Kissing is just cuddling with your lips. -Krishna

While we appreciate factual corrections, consider posting on the Board Comment Board, brought to the readers by popular request.

Posted on 03/25/2017 11:52 a.m. New Correction on: #89214 What did they call the movie "Whiskey Tango Foxtrot" when they released it in other languages? ...
Posted on 03/25/2017 11:52 a.m. New Correction on: #89214 What did they call the movie "Whiskey Tango Foxtrot" when they released it in other languages? ...
Posted on 03/25/2017 8:12 a.m. New Correction on: #89204 Is there any place on campus that recycles magazines I could use for a project? I'm ...
Question #89204 posted on 03/25/2017 5:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is there any place on campus that recycles magazines I could use for a project? I'm wanting to do one of those cut stuff out of magazines collages, but don't have very many supplies myself. If not on campus, are there other places I could pick up old magazines for free?

-Crafty

A:

Dear Shifty,

If your ward is anything like mine, then a copy of the Ensign is delivered to every apartment once a month. I'd suggest going around and asking people for their old editions. Additionally, you could also try finding people taking Econ 110 or something similar that requires them to take out a subscription to the Wall Street Journal (yeah, I know this isn't a magazine, but I thought you still might be interested). 

If any readers have more suggestions, feel free to leave a correction.

~Anathema


1 Correction
Question #89213 posted on 03/25/2017 5:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So there is a specific seat in a study area within a building (whose identity I will protect) that I covet; it is my favourite and no other compares in my opinion and I do most of my studying on campus there.

Unfortunately, other people are discovering the awesomeness of this seat (the horror!!). Because I arrive early I usually get it, but when I go to the bathroom someone frequently has taken it over by my return (I'm gone a tops of 10 minutes). I don't want to leave my things there in the event they get stolen, or more likely, get turned in to the lost and found by an overzealous good Samaritan. I've tried leaving trash (eg crumpled but clean--I have some morals, however few--napkins) there to deter people, but this has proven ineffective, and I feel bad they had to clean up my trash. So I need a better solution.

What would deter you most? How can I retain my prize seat?

I was kinda thinking fake vomit...which of these would pass your litmus test?
this, this, or this? (1,2, or 3?)

-The Revenge of the Sith

A:

Dear Vengeful,

Please don't leave fake vomit (or real vomit, for that matter) on a seat just to keep it from being taken. If you're worried about your stuff being stolen, I'd suggest leaving something you don't care as much about, like an old jacket on the back of the seat. I think this would be an effective enough deterrent, and it wouldn't matter much if someone made off with your jacket (which I think is unlikely).

~Anathema


0 Corrections
Question #89214 posted on 03/25/2017 5:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What did they call the movie "Whiskey Tango Foxtrot" when they released it in other languages?

-The Old Bookshop

A:

Dear Bookish,

I wasn't able to find the translation for Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, but you might have fun looking at the search results for other movie titles as found in other languages (I didn't link to any specific pages because some titles had swears in them).

~Anathema


2 Corrections
Question #89193 posted on 03/25/2017 5:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've seen my super conservative friends on Facebook post articles involving Milo Yannapolis' statements and activities, and news media will report on him. I never heard about him until I came back to the US in 2015. He seems like nothing more than a troll by throowing out super conservative claims. What led to his rise to fame? What do you think of him?

Ovaltine

A:

Dear Elliptical,

Considering I wasn't able to find anything for a 'Milo Yannapolis,' I'm going to assume you were actually referring to 'Milo Yiannopoulos.' According to Wikipedia, he's British, and originally wanted to be a theater critic. However, in 2009, he became interested in technology journalism. Since then, he's branched out to multiple kinds of media. Based on this information, I'd say his relatively recent prominence in media is due to the fact he became more involved in the media just a few years prior. 

I'd never heard of Milo Yiannopoulos until researching this question, so my opinion on him isn't exactly informed. However, just from briefly perusing articles on him, it seems like he makes broad conservative statements without sufficient evidence to support them. So while that makes him not so different from lots of people on the internet, it doesn't make me think well of him. I haven't read enough of his comments to gather particular passion against him, though (of course, my lack of interest in him might have a lot to do with the fact I'm very tired right now, and so the only thing I'm feeling passionate about is sleep).

~Anathema


0 Corrections
Question #89216 posted on 03/25/2017 2:36 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Follow up question for Board Question #89177

When Zed and Anathema mentioned desiring perfectly clear skin, are we talking free of pimples/warts/funny-dots/etc clear skin?
...or are we talking look!-everyone-can-see-my-organs! clear skin?

Cuz both would be pretty awesome :)


-The Anatomist

PS: for the record (*ahem* stenographer that means you), the outer layer of the integument actually is see through--there's even a protective layer of skin covering your eye! that's also why tattoos are visible, despite being below the surface

A:

Dear Anatomical,

Oh, I was most definitely referring to my skin actually being translucent. I want everyone to be able to see the actual bones of my face, muscles and tendons of my limbs, blood flowing through my veins, etc. Never mind the fact that I have an extremely weak stomach and have actually fainted at the sight of blood before, and so may or may not get lightheaded every time I look at myself; I'm sure I'll get over it.

~Anathema


0 Corrections
Question #89215 posted on 03/25/2017 1:54 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

During your time at BYU, what was your favorite midterm?

-Hopefully not an oxymoron

A:

Dear Oxymoronic,

My time at BYU is still ongoing, but my favorite midterm thus far has been for my Eternal Families class that I'm actually taking this semester. I liked it because it was super easy; all 60-90 questions (I can't remember how many there were) took me a grand total of 12 minutes to answer, and I easily got 100%. T'was wonderful. (Now if I could only carry over that same ease to some of my super hard math classes...)

~Anathema

A:

Dear Ox,

I took a physics midterm where the theme for every question was musical instruments. It was great.

-Kirito

A:

Dear friend,

Eastern Religions. You know why? Because there was no midterm. Best midterm I ever took was the nonexistent one because you can't disappoint your parents with an imaginary F.

-Van Goff

A:

Dear Oxymoronic,

The one where we just had to write an essay in class on something that the professor had explicitly prepared us for, and where the professor brought donuts to give us once we finished writing.

-Alta


0 Corrections
Posted on 03/25/2017 12:10 a.m. New Correction on: #89176 Dear 0b01100100 Hour Board, I heard there used to be an "EE" dance where the (majority ...
Friday, March 24, 2017
Question #89186 posted on 03/24/2017 11:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm really struggling with the doctrine (lack thereof) of Heavenly Mother. I feel like most of us were fed a line somewhat like this growing up
"HM is too precious to talk about"
"HF respects her too much and doesn't want people talking bad about her so we don't really talk about her"
"We'll know more in heaven"

Ok 1--if she's "too sacred" to talk about openly, why don't we discuss her AT ALL in the temple? The LDS scholarly article put out about this is just soooo vague and unhelpful, in my opinion. It makes me start thinking thoughts like, "well, this just proves the church was created by men because of course men in the 1800's wouldn't consider adding HM in equal importance, or having any sort of religious devotion to her". I feel like we can't get answers anywhere because it's all speculation. Why doesn't the church publish more information about her, or why isn't more revealed to the Prophet?
Does anyone else have strong feelings about this? I feel like all I'm told is to pray and figure things out for myself, but that's not cutting it right now.

A:

Dear you,

The other writers have done a great job of providing perspectives and resources on Heavenly Mother. I just wanted to say that when you asked this question, I had to stop and check that I hadn't asked it and forgotten about it, that's how much I related to it.

I know some people who have had sacred, personal experiences with Heavenly Mother. I know other people who care deeply about studying her and value the doctrine that we have a Heavenly Mother deeply.

I still have a lot of answers I want on a personal level, and I also wish that the Church would do more to bring Heavenly Mother into our normal discourse. However, I can tell you that the Spirit has testified to me that this scripture applies to Heavenly Mother:

Draw near unto me and I will draw near unto you; seek me diligently and ye shall find me; ask, and ye shall receive; knock, and it shall be opened unto you.

Whatsoever ye ask the Father in my name it shall be given unto you, that is expedient for you

D&C 88:63-64

-Zedability

A:

Dear Reader,

Originally, I was going to compile some sources on our Heavenly Mother, but Frère has done an awesome job of that below me. So instead, I'm just going to leave you with some of my thoughts on the matter.

As Frère says, a lot of the titles we give to Heavenly Father also extend to Heavenly Mother. She is a co-creator, co-planner of the Plan of Salvation, and has an active role in mortality. Now I'd like to combine some knowledge about marriage with our Heavenly Parents. We learn in Mark 10:8 that a husband and wife should be "one flesh," indicating that our eternal destiny is to become one unified whole with our spouse. It's reasonable to assume our Heavenly Parents have already attained this state; in other words, they can be referred to as one unit. Here it is interesting to note that word "Elohim" is actually plural. To me, all of this implies that when the scriptures refer to Elohim, and even God, it is not just a reference to Heavenly Father, but also a reference to Heavenly Mother.

Along this line, I've started mentally substituting "Heavenly Mother" when the title "God" is used, and it has made such a difference to me. It's made me realize better my relationship with Her in addition to Heavenly Father. I haven't just limited this substitution to scripture either, but have made it even in the temple and prayers. One of the most spiritual temple trips I've ever had was one where I interpreted the term "Elohim" to equally refer to Heavenly Mother. 

While this practice isn't concrete doctrine, it feels right to me, and has strengthened my testimony in my Heavenly Parents and in my own divine destiny.

~Anathema

A:

Dear 'Nymless,

Is there a problem that a Dr. Mackay lecture can't solve? I submit that there is not. I took Dr. Mackay's Foundations of the Restoration class last semester, and there was an entire lecture devoted to Heavenly Mother.

Let me tell you, it was the best.

So, without further ado, here is an abbreviated list of points from that lecture, which I hope will help you out some:

  • First: the concept you're describing (where we don't discuss Heavenly Mother because She is too sacred) is called "The Holy Hush," and it is kind of problematic. For one thing, it's just kind of untrue: a former BYU professor, Dr. David L. Paulsen, led a team of researchers to look into just how often Heavenly Mother has been referenced in the writings and speeches of Church leaders, and they found over 600 different citations throughout the course of Church history. They assembled their findings in this article (which, now that I read it, appears to be what Dr. Mackay based his entire lecture on, so if you want your info straight from the source and without paraphrasing, I suggest you go there. If you can't access the article for some reason, email me and I'll send you a copy).

    So the "Holy Hush" is problematic firstly because Church leaders actually have been talking about her over the years. For the second reason, consider this: if talking about Heavenly Mother is taboo because of how sacred She is, then why is it okay for us to still talk about Heavenly Father, even respectfully? Is He somehow "less holy" or "less sacred" than She is? By implication, are all men inherently "less holy" or "less sacred" than all women? Supposing so about earthly men and women is wrong, and extending that to our Heavenly Parents is downright blasphemous. In general, it seems like maybe a well-intentioned idea on the surface, but the "Holy Hush" does not really stand up against reasonable arguments.

    (If this is true, why was there a hush in the first place? Well, it could have to do with the fact that there was a significant movement of women in the early 90's that started praying to Heavenly Mother and that was very critical of the First Presidency. Since Heavenly Mother was so central to that movement, it became hard to mention Her without also mentioning them, so people may have started to shy away from the topic.)

  • As far as official Church statements go, we have these:

    -In 1845, Eliza R. Snow composed the Hymn "O My Father," which contains the following lyrics: "In the heav'ns are parents single? No, the thought makes reason stare; Truth is reason—truth eternal Tells me I've a mother there" and "When I leave this frail existence—When I lay this mortal by—Father, mother, may I meet you In your royal courts on high?" There is nothing ambiguous about the wording here: they hymn clearly states that we have a Heavenly Mother. Just out of curiosity, I looked up the lyrics to this hymn in Spanish, French, German, and Portuguese, and the reference to Heavenly Mother is preserved in every edition. 

    -In 1909, the First Presidency published an article in the Improvement Era entitled "The Origin of Man," in which we find the following quotation: "All men and women are in the similitude of the universal Father and Mother and are literally the sons and daughters of Deity."

    -In 1991, President Hinckley said this: "Logic and reason would certainly suggest that if we have a Father in Heaven, we have a Mother in Heaven. That doctrine rests well with me."

    -Finally, in 1995, we received the Family Proclamation, which states that each human being is a beloved spirit son or daughter of heavenly parents.

    (There is also, of course, the Gospel Topics essay on Heavenly Mother.)

    (It's possible that there are other official statements listed in Dr. Paulsen's article, but these are the only ones from the lecture.)

  • Now, from the 600+ references found by Dr. Paulsen, what do we know about Her?
  1. She is a Heavenly Parent. Susa Young Gates, in the Young Woman's Journal, said that She was "the greater molder" of spirits such as Abraham in the pre-existence (distinguished as such because She nurtured them).

  2. She is a Heavenly Wife. Spencer W. Kimball said that God "made women in the image of his wife partner." B.H. Roberts sent out a challenge to Christianity in general to present a "conception of the nobility of woman and of motherhood and of wifehood—placing her side by side with the Divine Father."

  3. She is a Divine Person, meaning she advanced from womanhood to Godhood. Orson F. Whitney said that there was a time "when that being whom we now worship—that our eternal Father and Mother were once man and woman in mortality." She went through mortality and learned and grew and struggled like the rest of us. Said John A. Widstoe, "The glorious vision of life hereafter...is given radiant warmth by the thought that...[we have] a mother who possesses the attributes of Godhood." 

  4. She is a Co-Creator with the Father. Eliza R. Snow and Edward Tullidge said that "eternal Mother is the partner with the Father in the creation of the Worlds," and Brigham Young said that Her "eternal daughters" will "be prepared to frame earths like unto ours and to people them in the same manner as we have been brought forth by our heavenly parents."

  5. She is a Co-framer of the Plan of Salvation. M. Russell Ballard taught that the Plan of Salvation was designed "by Heavenly Parents who love us." Elder Milton R. Hunter said that "Our Heavenly Parents have through aeons of time...applied in Their lives an untold number of...everlasting laws. As They learned these verities and how to operate them, these laws thereby became subject unto Elohim." (Which, if I'm understanding correctly, goes back to point #3: She and Heavenly Father learned these eternal laws in both their mortal and eternal lives and then used them to shape the Plan of Salvation.)

    Lastly, we have my favorite point,

  6. She is An Involved Parent in our Mortality. Said Harold B. Lee, "Sometimes we think the whole job is up to us, forgetful that there are loved ones beyond our sight who are thinking about us and our children. We forget that we have a Heavenly Father and a Heavenly Mother who are even more concerned, probably, than our earthly father and mother, and that influences from beyond are constantly working to try to help us when we do all we can."

    Said Sister Chieko Okazaki, "when our rising love and joyful gratitude meet the shower of mercy and love from the Savior and from our heavenly parents, in that contact is the pure radiance and the brilliant light of glory."

Now, may I offer a couple of personal thoughts on the subject?

Firstly, I cannot tell you how happy I felt when I walked out of this lecture. I had an enduring feeling of goodness and truthfulness, like someone was saying "Yes, this is good. This is right." That feeling stuck with me as I went throughout the rest of my day.

Second, like I said, I love the point about Heavenly Mother being an involved parent in our mortality. When I first heard it, I started thinking about all of the things she might possibly be doing. Of course, all of what I was thinking falls squarely in the realm of folk doctrine (FOLK DOCTRINE WITH FRÈRE RUBIK *rushed banjo music*), but they're still nice to ponder:

-I first thought of my mission president and his wife, each of them up to their ears in things to do to help the mission run smoothly and to make sure the missionaries were alright. I specifically thought about how my president would block out large chunks of time just to read and respond to the weekly emails we sent him; in this context, it kind of reminded me of prayer. And, just like my president's wife would always handle the mission business while he was working on emails, I imagine that Heavenly Mother takes care of certain things while Heavenly Father is busy taking care of others.

(Yes, the concept of being busy kind of breaks down when we talk about eternity/immortality because you never run out of time in which to do things (not to mention the idea that God Himself is out of and therefore unaffected by time), but RELAX GUYS IT'S JUST A METAPHOR JUST SIT BACK AND ENJOY THE NICE THOUGHTS YEESH.)

-Going back to the quote about Abraham, have you thought about just how much the spirits outside of mortality outnumber the ones here on earth? We're talking every person who has ever died combined with all the people yet to be born. Now, one could argue about whether spirits in the spirit world are in contact with Heavenly Parents or not, but even if you count them out, it's a whole lot of people, guys. Could it be that all of these disembodied spirit children are Heavenly Mother's responsibility, while Heavenly Father takes major responsibility for all of us? It very well may be.

-Thinking on my earthly parents, I consider all of the different-but-equally-important responsibilities that they each took on in running our household. More than that, though, I think about them talking late at night, whether it be while lying in bed or sitting at the kitchen table. They talk about my siblings and I and how to best help us. They talk about how their days went and what was challenging for them. They talk about how much they love and support each other. I like to imagine our Heavenly Parents doing the same.

---

I hope I've been able to help with all of this. In the end, you could still argue that we don't know very much at all about Heavenly Mother. When I think about why that is, I come back to what Nephi said in 1 Nephi 11:17, except flipped: I don't know the meaning of all things, but I know that God loves His children, and everything that He does, has done, and will do is driven by that love.

-Frère Rubik


0 Corrections
Question #89209 posted on 03/24/2017 11:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have any of you taken the red pill?
https://www.amazon.com/Red-Pill-Blu-ray-Documentary-Cast/dp/B01LTI0BKA
I highly recommend it!

-Manly

A:

Dear "Manly,"

No, and I don't believe I will, thanks. I feel pretty confident that my rights as a man are not being infringed upon.

-Frère Rubik.

A:

Dear Self-Proclaimed,

I don't believe in taking in poison in any way, shape, or form into my life, so that will be a resounding no.

~Anathema

A:

Dear person,

Eyeroll.

-Sheebs

A:

Dear Toxic Masculinity,

Having just seen Beauty and the Beast over the weekend, the more I read about red pill, the more I'm reminded of a certain character who also blamed a woman for his own actions when she didn't want to be objectified by him (hint: roughly the size of a barge). 
 
Things didn't work out so great for him, romantically or personally. I suggest if you want to have a loving relationship with another person someday, you stay away from this ideology. It's full of angry, spiteful people and, as Anathema said, is poisonous thinking. 
 
Whoever you are, I'm not saying you're a bad person. I don't know why you're attracted to this belief system. Maybe you're hurt. Maybe you're lonely. I don't know you. But stay far away from this. It's not going to bring you happiness. From reading through what you've sent us, it's given me a sick feeling in my stomach believing that people out there can be that hateful. Ideologies based on contempt for other humans are never okay.
 
-Van Goff
A:

Dear reader,

No. Why are we having these gender wars? Can't we all just get along?

-Sunday Night Banter


0 Corrections
Question #89176 posted on 03/24/2017 11:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 0b01100100 Hour Board,

I heard there used to be an "EE" dance where the (majority male) electrical engineering students and (majority female) elementary education students were invited.

Was this a regular thing? Are there any events like this nowadays for us EEs?

-Forever EElone

A:

Dear Punny,

Searching through the events listed for the engineering department and the elementary education department for BYU, I wasn't able to find any mention of such an EE dance. However, if any readers know better, feel free to leave a correction. 

As a response to your 'nym, I'd like to point out that even without the dance, you can still go out and meet people outside of your major. Go to some the general events on campus, and I'm sure you'll find people outside of whichever EE you belong to.

~Anathema


1 Correction
Question #89205 posted on 03/24/2017 2:36 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So there's this guy that I really like and I'm kind of getting mixed signals from him? We hang out practically everyday and we text and talk. He even does the playfully pushing thing that guys do and other things that I would say are flirtatious. My only problem is that he is very, very extroverted. He loves to go on dates, but hasn't asked me out. He keeps asking me about other girls... Am I in the friend zone?

-Hopelessly Devoted

A:

Dear reader,

Our advice regarding these types of situations is usually to either 1) talk to him about it or 2) ask him out on a date. We aren't psychic, but we do hope the best for you and your dating adventures!

-Sunday Night Banter

A:

Dearly Devoted,

I would say just ask him out. One date isn't a commitment and it would be an easy way to see if he's interested. If he asks you on a followup date then you know.

-Spectre


0 Corrections
Question #89203 posted on 03/24/2017 8:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Hugh Mungus wot?

-harassment!

A:

Dear you,

You're killing me smalls!

-Sunday Night Banter


0 Corrections
Question #89201 posted on 03/24/2017 8 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am taking a bus from Miami to Salt Lake City tonight. It's gonna be 70+ hours of self-inflicted, unnecessary and complicated travel. But enough about that.

Who are some of the people I might meet on this adverse adventure? And what are some of the terrible ways me and my bus might perish?

--Ardilla Feroz, in transit

A:

Dear Ardilla,

You can wave in my general direction as you pass Orlando!

Love,

Luciana

A:

Dear Kaibab,

Terrible Fatal Potentialities of Bus Travel

  • The bus plays just one Justin Bieber song over and over again. The bad lyrics combined with a prepubescent voice pound into your head with the relentless force of endless repetition, driving out everything else from your brain, including your sanity. Eventually some remaining neurons manage to rally together and take the only escape left: death.
  • Unbeknownst to the rest of the bus passengers, there is actually a serial killer on board. He's just your average Joe trying to make his way up in the serial killer world, and gain even just a little bit of the notoriety enjoyed by some the greats (you know, the Zodiac Killer, Ted Bundy, Jack the Ripper, even the Teacup Killer). As such, he really has no choice but to gruesomely murder every single person on the bus, otherwise the world will never know his name.
  • The evil pigeon minions from Board Question #79487 finally catch up to you, and wreak mortal havoc with the Sole Cleaver and copious amounts of pigeon guano. 'Tis a tragic, and above all, messy death.
  • In a horrible turn of events, your bus somehow ends up trapped in the Testing Center. You are consigned to spend the rest of your existence taking tests, seeing grades die, and languishing in utter misery.
  • Your bus crashes with a train, a plane loaded with explosives, and a meteor. 
  • Somehow your bus slips out of the current time stream, and you arrive to Salt Lake 100 years in the future. All your friends, family, and everything you hold dear have passed away, and you are left completely alone to try to make your way through an unforgiving world where all value is placed in sitting at airless, sunless desks.

Enjoy pondering the myriad possibilities for total destruction!

~Anathema


0 Corrections
Question #89200 posted on 03/24/2017 7:24 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

If interplanetary travel were as safe as commercial airline travel and the lodging on Mars, including spacesuit hiking excursions, were equally safe, but it took nine months to get there, you had to stay three months, and then it took nine months to get back, or in other words, the trip was a 21-month commitment (see this) but money wasn't an issue, would you do it?

-Elon

A:

Dear person,

In a heartbeat. That sounds an amazing experience. The 9 months each way doesn't bother me so much because I could read books or work on projects remotely. Also, think of the cool other space travelers to make friends with! Martian hikes sound like they would get boring fast as they would all essentially be lifeless desert but there would be other cool things to do there, like sports with less gravity and space ship bumper cars and eat weird space food! Sign me up.

-Sheebs

A:

Dear Elon,

While a trip to Mars sounds awesome, I feel like the main reason I'd actually go would just to be able to say I had. It would be beautiful and amazing, and so much fun to actually hike on Mars, but at the end of the day, there are lots of amazing sights to see on Earth. If money wasn't an issue, I'd probably use that money to go on a tour of Europe, spend time in Jerusalem, venture to the depths of the ocean in a submarine, go on a Caribbean cruise, and basically just see the world. Additionally, doing this wouldn't have the cost of being cooped up in a spaceship for 18 months, where I'd probably go stir-crazy.

~Anathema 

A:

Dear Mr. Musk,

You've removed the only reasons to not go to Mars; what other answer do you expect? Of course I'd go, even if it is just so I can say I went.

-The Entomophagist

A:

Dear Elon Musk,

I haven't even been to Iceland yet, and I'd rather go there than to Mars.

-Kirito

A:

Dear Musky,

To quote Elton John, "Mars ain't the kind of place to raise your kids. In fact, it's cold as [heck]."

Even if space travel were as safe as air travel, I'm not sure I'd take the risk. All my studies of Mars have instilled me with a very strong desire to live and die here on Earth.

-Frère Wet Blanket

A:

Dear you: 

Safe? Even with all kinds of safety measures, I doubt "safe" is really how a trip to Mars could be described. 

But dying on Mars>dying an ignominious death on Earth, so that is interesting. 

I don't think I'll ever make it to Mars, though. But Antarctica? I could hang with that.

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz, from Monmouth, Illinois

A:

Dear Elon,

Mars? Nah. I'm not a big fan of potatoes.

-Van Goff


0 Corrections
Question #89202 posted on 03/24/2017 2:24 a.m.
Q:

Students of the CURRENT-YEAR,

"If you knew I was a class being offered this spring semester about Israeli film, would you be interested in taking me?"

~HEB 341R (sheepishly)

PS. I searched Google for homedir because I forgot the name for a tilde.
PSS. By CURRENT-YEAR I mean year of the currents.

A:

Dear spring,

I'm going to be focusing on making money during spring semester, so I'll have to pass. Sorry HEB 341R (sheepishly).

-Sunday Night Banter

A:

Dear Class,

Considering I'm already signed up for 3 or 4 classes, will be involved in research, and may or may not be organizing a new club (which I won't specify for anonymity's sake), that's going to be a no...sorry. It does sound very interesting, though, and will definitely be added to my list of classes that I think about wistfully as I continue to plug through my torrent of math classes!

~Anathema


0 Corrections
Thursday, March 23, 2017
Question #89199 posted on 03/23/2017 8:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

A question. But first, a brief situation. There is a girl that I kinda like, but don't know super well. I've asked her on a couple of dates, and the dates themselves seem to have gone fairly well, but in between those dates I get zero communication from her, unless I reach out a couple of times (usually phone calls), and even then that's about it. So, lately I've been thinking about it and I feel that she's probably not interested in me, but doesn't know how to say it without offending me.

An event more recently: I had a date idea that I thought would be kinda fun, but would involve contacting the person in charge of the organization for more details. I asked said young lady on a date for this weekend to potentially do that service opportunity, and at the end of our conversation she said something to the effect of how she would look at her schedule if I give the organization a call and figure out the details. Well, I have no issues doing that, and was going to anyways. This all happened, however, about two days before I came to my conclusion about her not wanting to offend me, but not really being interested.

So, actual question now: What should I do about the date? I've already asked her, with the promise to follow up again. I don't feel it would be right to do this date, but don't know if I should just follow through with this that I've committed to (at least my part of the follow up), then leave it alone; or if I should carefully drop it by saying something to the effect of how it might not work for me? Some advice, opinions, or corrections to my potentially false thinking patterns would be much appreciated.


Thanks,
-Confused

A:

Dear Confuzzled,

I'm in a similar situation to you, except I'm the girl. There's a guy who has asked me on a couple of dates, and those dates have all been pretty fun. However, we haven't really had any communication between the dates. I attribute the lack of communication to the fact we don't have any classes together and aren't in the same ward, thus don't interact unless there's some kind of planned event, or we randomly run into each other on campus (which is rare). Partly because the dates have been spaced so far apart, I wouldn't say I'm interested in him, but I wouldn't say I'm disinterested either (frankly, I don't think I know him well enough to form a definitive opinion). I don't see a need to tell him I'm not interested, because I wouldn't mind going on more dates, but I also don't feel a need for increased communication; I'm ambivalent. 

Since this girl hasn't really indicated one way or another her interest towards you, I wouldn't try and guess what it is. Maybe she's interested, maybe she's not, maybe she's ambivalent like me. Considering the only thing you know for sure is your interest in her, act in accordance with that. If it makes you uncomfortable, then don't ask her on more dates in the future, but I would at least follow up on the date you already have semi-asked her on, because she asked for more details. I think it's better to comply with what people have actually said/revealed about their preferences instead of speculation.

Good luck!

~Anathema

A:

Dear Confused,

My usual approach to situations like these would be to do as you're thinking and take the absence of signs of interests as a sign of disinterest. However, there are a couple of major differences between your situation and the ones I'm usually in. One is that you don't know her very well; I hate getting to know people on dates, so I tend to ask out girls that I already know or spend time around. The other is that she already tentatively said yes to a third date; even when I was much more persistent about repeated dates, I don't think I ever went on three dates with the same girl. Those two differences are enough to make me agree with Anathema: you should at least follow though with the activity you already invited her to. What's the worst that could happen?

-The Entomophagist


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