By elimination, dishonesty is the second-best policy. -George Carlin
Question #862 posted on 10/08/2003 1:35 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Did Joseph Smith (or anyone else) really say that Del Parson's "Christ in Red Robe" was the closest painting made to the actual likeness of Christ? My roommates insist that it's the truth but I thought that was just another Mormon rumor.

- Skeptic

A: Dear Skeptic,

I have heard the same thing. A mission companion told me something along those lines too. But I too am skeptic too since Del Parson is alive and with us today. So I'm pretty sure that Joseph Smith didn't tell him that.

As far as anyone else saying it, I would be fairly suprised because while I was on my mission that picture of the Savior was replaced in the copies of the Book of Mormon we gave out with a different one.

- Mighty Quinn
Question #875 posted on 10/08/2003 1:34 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
Suppose one is trying to get from say, point A to point B. Between point A and point B there is an infinite number of points. If this is the case, how is it that anyone can get anywhere.

- Lost in the middle

A: Dear Lost,

Well, most people try something like walking or riding a bike. I'd suggest driving if it is a long distance.

Because every point we start from and travel to are "point a's and point b's", and we seem to manage to travel between them just fine. For example, I just walked to a bench and back. This distance too has an infinite number of points in it, and it caused me very little stress or angst.

- Mighty Quinn
Question #895 posted on 10/08/2003 1:34 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Okay, so there's this poem that I really like, and for the most part I understand it. However, there's this part that kinda leaves me hanging. Maybe you can help. The poem is called "Poetry" and it's by Marianne Moore. The part that confuses me starts at about the middle when she starts mentioning "the bat holding on upside down" and continues on until "business documents and school-books." Now, I know that "all these phenomena are important" because they demonstrate things "we do not admire because we cannot understand" them. My question is this: WHY mention these things? What makes them so special? What, really, is so great about "a wild horse taking a roll"? Any insights you have will I'm sure be quite helpful because I myself cannot fully admire this poem I have already started to love until I can get a better understanding of it.

- Utterly Confused Poetry Lover

A: Dear Utterly Confused,
I believe you understand this poem better than you think. Your confusion illustrates the meaning of this section of the poem perfectly. We cannot fully admire that which we do not understand, and we often don't understand poetry because we have placed too much meaning on things in the past. They aren't there to be part of some "high-sounding interpretation" - they are there because they're useful to show things people don't understand. You may not understand a statistician, another may not admire a baseball fan. Yet another may admire bats in search for food, but not admire a wild horse taking a roll. There IS no special significance in the items selected, there are merely there to illustrate a point.

- The Poet
Question #884 posted on 10/08/2003 1:34 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

The extent of your research seems to have fallen off as of late. Sadly, as the oft used-by-the-100-hour-board-writers adage goes, you get what you pay for. These are freebies, but I should charge for them.

Benvolio, the berries are of the Pyracantha genus, which has too many species for me to worry about. It is a relative of the rose, hence the thorns and its common name of "firethorn". The berries are not poisonous, though that did not stop a babysitter of mine from feeding ipecac syrup to me after eating some when I was 3. Still, they are unpalatable and there is marginally better food to be had in the Cannon Center.

Rufus, I sure hope mama isn't a pilot...I wouldn't like her landing atop my car! Mama may know why alligators are ornery, but a quick check of the archives would show the real reason behind the painted airplanes on the sides of freeways. They are a devilishly ingenious way to catch speeders by aircraft. Instead of relying on some sort of radar gun (which is difficult in the air, prone to error and detectable by the offender) the pilot can gauge the car speed by the time it takes the car to pass between checkpoints. This is the favored method to catch speeders in Nevada's desolation. A pilot doesn't need a sign to know when a freeway is straight. Go tell mama.

- Mickey Finn

A: Dear Mickey Finn,
Alas, you too have noticed that our research seems to have falled off of late. That's because we had over 50 questions to answer in 100 hours, and we tried to honor you question and get an answer back to you as soon as we could. Sorry about the quality then, but we're back on track and doing better. And no, my mom isn't a pilot, and I never call her mama, so I'd appreciate it if you wouldn't either... And if it ever comes up again, I will tell her.

- Rufus

P.S. While we are grateful for the answers to the questions, it's really hard for us to remain nice to everyone when people seem not as nice to us. We work hard, both with our normal lives, and with the board. And we do appreciate our readers and respect you as well. Thanks. We appreciate it.
A: Dear Mickey Finn,
While we do say you get what you pay for, the truth of the matter is that sometimes people aren't going to exactly agree with the details of what we write, or lack thereof. But you know what? That's the fun of the board. Consider us a mix of the National Geographic, The National Inquirer, and editorials in the Daily Universe. We aren't as strict as the CIA nor as in-depth as a library research assistant. If you ever want a serious in-depth answer, we recommend heading into the library for a few days. We'll give you an answer, but please don't bitterly reply. Read the board light-heartedly; a merry heart maketh good like a medicine, and when the merry heart starts to be degraded, well, it just isn't fun anymore.
- Duchess
Question #888 posted on 10/08/2003 1:34 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I was on this until I left on my mission in 2002. How do I get back?

-Ex-etymological Euripides

A: Dear EE,
Just apply as anyone else would. If the editor recognizes you, you might even be able to skip the whole "interview" process.

- Rufus
Question #879 posted on 10/08/2003 1:34 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
How does the staffing of the 100 hour board work? How many people are on it and how do you know who answers what?
- (Just wondering)

A: Dear just wondering,
How the 100 Hour Board works:
When you are a member of the 100 Hour Board, you are given a login and password, as are told the secret location of the login page. (which I'm sure could be figured out by an astute visitor, which is why they have login names and passwords) When you log in, you see the questions that have been assigned to you by the editor (or that you have claimed from the inbox). Since all the writers log in, the system recognizes and records who answered the question. Besides, we usually use the same pseudonym every time, although sometimes it's different. You can also see what questions have been claimed by others, and answer them as well, if you wish (this is good for group questions). There's also a messaging page, so we can send messages one to another, and a place to view the server stats, and...

(sorry, getting a little off topic - you see, I just redesigned the whole system, and it's one of my favorite subjects)

We currently have 18 writers (including one just added today!), 1 webmaster, and 1 editor in chief. The webmaster and editor also answer questions.

- The Webmaster
Question #878 posted on 10/08/2003 1:34 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
I'd like to join the writing staff of the 100 hour board. Could you give me some info on how to do it?
- (Curious)

A: Dear Curious,
To join the writing staff of the 100 Hour Board, submit a question with your email address and your desire to apply. We'll send you a few questions we have in the inbox, and you get to answer them for us, and if we like the reponses, you'll be made a member of the 100 Hour Board. Oh, and we'll remove the question so your email address isn't spread across cyberspace.

- Rufus
Question #682 posted on 10/08/2003 1:34 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What original films did Jimmy Stewart give to BYU? And why did he do this? How did he become the one to star in "Mr. Krueger's Christmas?"

- Film Buff Hopeful

A: Dear Film Buff Hopeful,
"Mr. Kreuger's Christmas" was cowritten, produced and directed by Micheal McLean. (The other writers were J. Scott Iverson and Allan Henderson) If you've ever heard his song "You Must Believe There Are Miracles", you've heard the following lines:

"I was barely a man, dealing with the demands
Of a job, three kids, and a pretty wife.
When I got kinda bold, and dreamed a tale could be told
With the star of "It's a Wonderful Life" (Jimmy Stewart)
So I got up the courage, and I asked him if he
Would make a movie with me for the holidays
And from his reply, I soon understood why
The underdog always dreams; there's a way"
<chorus>

So, for "Mr Kreuger's Christmas", Michael McLean asked him to, and he said yes.

As for what films he donated to BYU, I have found references to him donating his personal copies of "The Glenn Miller Story" and "It's a Wonderful Life" to the BYU Special Collections Motion Picture Archive. Along with those he donated many personal papers, scripts, etc.

- Rufus
Question #642 posted on 10/08/2003 1:34 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What was the song performed in last Tuesday's devotional by the ballet dancers? I thought it was so cool!

- Dancin' Fool

A: Dear Dancin' Fool,
Unfortunately, the September 30th devotional won't be available for review for several weeks. We'll try to remember to watch for it, but if you don't see anything by, say, early to mid-November, please remind us, and we'll look into it.

- Rufus
A: Dear Dancin' Fool,
The song was Vanessa Mae's "Storm" Track 4 Bach Street Prelude.
- Duchess
Question #868 posted on 10/08/2003 1:34 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I was buying a new toothbrush a few days ago and noticed that all the toothbrushes have numbered head sizes. There are size 30's for little kids and 50's and 60's for normal adults, and 80's for people like me that have gaping, cavernous maws. How are these sizes determined?

- Big Mouth

A: Dear Big Mouth,

I believe it is determined by bristle size.

- Crest Kid
A: Dear Oversized Oracular Orifice:

The numbering system is actually not systematic. It's just a representation of bristle stiffness and head size. Apparently Oral-B started the trend, and other toothbrush manufacturers just picked it up. It just happens to appear systematic so that store owners can group similar types of toothbrushes together.

-- Misaneroth
Question #874 posted on 10/08/2003 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
Very Important Question! ok the golden seal on top of the organ in the conference center what does it look like and what is it for? because when i was there for the pioneer thingy we went and asked the people that do the cameras afterwards and they had no idea and so i was wondering if you could help me out!
- GoLdEn SeAl

A: Dear GoLdEn SeAl,

As a part of the overall aesthetics of the organ's facade, there is a golden seal at the top center. There is no particular pattern thereon, it is a convex circular seal meant purely for decorative, aesthetic purpose. Interestingly enough, it was textured using one of those circular snow sleds. You know, the kind you used to crash on cause they'd randomly turn around while you're going down the hill? Good times... and I've got the scars to prove it.

::: Latro :::
Question #864 posted on 10/08/2003 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My scholarship includes full tuition, plus a $5000 yearly stipend. My question is, should I pay tithing on any or all of that amount? The stipend is taxable income, and it seems like I ought to be paying the church if I'm paying the government. But, what do you think? Thanks for your advice.

P.S. I know I could ask my bishop, but I just moved into the ward, and I haven't met him yet.

BYU grad

A: Dear BYU Grad,

Guess what- even if you talked to the prophet about it he wouldn't touch it with 40 foot pole. That decision is between you and the Lord. My parents had a similar question about money they received as a gift from my grandfather, who is not a member, so they were going back and forth on whether or not to pay cause technically that money hadn't been tithed (certainly not by rampa-rampa) so what to do? Guess what the stake prez said when they asked? "I'm not touching that one. That's between you and the Lord." Ok, I'm beating a dead horse. I'm not going to tell you one way or the other, but cheers for considering it at all...

::: Latro :::
Question #859 posted on 10/08/2003 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
What is the BYU quarter back's (number 8) full name and where is he from?

- A True Zoobie

A: Dear True Zoobie,

Here's his stats:
#8 Matt Berry 6'6" 227 lbs QB Soph. from Redmond, WA / Eastlake HS
Here's hoping he heals up, even though Beck's doin' alright. But for goodness' sake, John, slide!!!

::: Latro :::
Question #648 posted on 10/08/2003 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I always hear of BYU's Ballroom Dance Team winning national collegiate competitions. What colleges are typically runner ups? Or who is the next best ball room dance college?

- Footloose

A: Dear Footloose (my grandma was in that movie),

Here's the deal on ballroom competition. BYU's team is actually unique in that we present a unified front, and teams that represent the school. In most cases, couples compete for themselves individually, sometimes with backing organizations (such as colleges), sometimes without. More often it's the latter, so it's hard to say which school would be "second best." UVSC has a team, BYU-I does as well, various colleges throughout the country have teams, but nothing like BYU.

::: Latro :::