"Now I'm not only a Mormon cliché; I'm also a puppy." - Claudio
Question #89935 posted on 06/19/2017 10:03 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

When was a time you made a bad decision, or perhaps were careless, that ended up costing you a lot financially?

I am just pretty bummed right now because my bro and I decided to splurge on a day's car rental on a trip but didn't notice the gas station attendant putting gasoline into our diesel engine, and now we get to pay the cost of repairs.

The damage is done, I won't be financially ruined, but it feels to be a meaningless burden.

Looking less for "perspective," more for stinking stories of commiseration

--Ardilla Feroz, who discovered fuel hose color-coding is not standardized internationally, and also wouldn't mind hearing from readers

A:

Dear Ardilla,

If I remember correctly, the same thing happened to my uncle and his family when they were traveling in Europe. I think it was my uncle, and not an attendant who filled with up the car, though.

If you take the economic view of finance, and so include opportunity costs, I have the perfect commiseration story... because I'm still paying for a mistake made some years ago.

So there's this really great scholarship called the Regents Scholarship. A large part of what makes it awesome is that you automatically get it as long as you meet certain GPA and ACT requirements, and have taken some specified classes. It's open every year for high school seniors to apply, and then proceeds to give money to its students for several semesters afterwards. 

My brother actually got this scholarship, and it helped him quite a bit, so my mom had me sign up for all the correct classes to ensure I would qualify my senior year of high school. 

One fine Sunday afternoon towards the middle-endish of the school year, I was walking with my parents up a canyon (the mouth of which was directly above my house), and they started asking me if I had applied for this scholarship yet. I somewhat irately responded that no I hadn't, but they should stop nagging me. Nevertheless, they kept telling me I should really get on that, so once we got home, I immediately checked online for the application. 

To my horror, I discovered it had closed a few days previously. I was pretty shell-shocked at first, incredulous that I had really just let thousands of dollars slip through my fingertips due to being too careless/lazy to merely perform a simple Google search to find out its deadline. After the shock eventually wore off, I was just miserable, realizing that my entire college career would then be significantly harder financially than I had initially thought (banking on having this scholarship to help me).

True to form, if I hadn't missed that deadline, I would currently be in a better financial situation than I am, thanks to how long the payments last from the scholarship.

~Anathema

A:

Dear Ardilla,

I'm honestly still too embarrassed to tell the story, but you know that seminary video about justice and mercy? Where the kid thinks he's smart so he does what he wants and maybe ignores some quiet wisdoms and then ends up in chains? Let's just say I understand that movie a lot better now. 

Take care,

-Auto Surf

A:

Dear Ardilla,

Once I decided to go to college.

Keep it real,
Sherpa Dave

posted on 06/19/2017 7:09 p.m.
I auditioned for All-State choir as a freshman in high school, and to my amazement I got in. I then proceeded to not practice or learn any of the music (I convinced myself I would learn the music swiftly and completely upon joining rehearsal and "hearing how my part fit in with the other sections"). Turns out there's another set of 'auditions' on the very first day, and I failed miserably. I was the first person in the history of All-State choir in my state to not be prepared with my learned music. They told me I had 30 minutes to go study the music and come back to re-audition, but no dice. They really had no idea what to do with me, but eventually they realized they had to kick me out. I've been out of high school almost a decade and thinking about it still makes me cringe.
posted on 06/19/2017 11:10 p.m.
I needed to get my brake pads replaced. I knew I needed to get them replaced, because they were squeaking. I continued to not replace them for an extended period of time, to the point that they pretty much *stopped* squeaking, they were so worn out. I told myself I would do this when summer break arrived. Then my husband borrowed my car because I had parked behind him in our narrow driveway. His commute has much heavier traffic than mine, and he had to slam on the brakes due to a sudden slowdown ahead of him and completely melted the two front rotors because there were no brake pads left. Repairs cost 2-3x what they would have if I'd actually gotten the brake pads replaced when they started squeaking.