I don't really trust a sane person. -Lyle Alzado

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Question #90544 posted on 10/23/2017 2:56 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Where exactly do web developers hang out at BYU? Looking to start a company.

-Optimistic seeker

A:

Dear Optithon,

They are all in the Talmage. Along with other people starting their own technology companies. 

Particularly if you walk around the CS side of the building, you're sure to find web-developers and more galore.

~Anathema

A:

Dear Webbed,

You might find a few in the Tanner building as well since people generally want a mix of technical knowledge with business know how. But if you are serious about creating a startup, take CS 405 - Creating Software Ventures. I took it my last semester and the class is amazing for startups. The teachers are Craig Earnshaw and Sid Krommenhoek, Venture Capitalists and one is an Angel Investor. Look them up and you'll see a bunch of stuff about them. It's great because Craig is a no-nonsense, straightforward, brutal feedback kind of guy while Sid is the eternal optimist who always makes you feel like you can go just a little longer when you start doubting yourself. Basically the whole class consists of: 

  1. Make a company.
  2. Get another person in your class to join your company.
  3. Prepare a minimum viable product (MVP).
  4. Pitch your company to the teachers.

The teachers understand that most companies made in that class won't become real companies but there are a few who have, for example, Podium started in this class only a few years ago and just spent $10,000,000 on a new building and added 400 jobs to their company. They also have a bunch of guest speakers who are startup founders and tell about their success so you can get some networking done in class. One guy already had a good start on his startup before the class started and then won a Startup competition while in the class.

For more help, check out the Clubs section of this page. If you want to connect with the professors before next semester you can email them. Brother Earnshaw would take any of his students out to lunch who wanted to talk to him and get more feedback about their idea. If you want to connect to them through me, send me an email and I can give you their info and my name for a better networking connection.

Good luck!

-Spectre


0 Corrections
Sunday, October 22, 2017
Question #90543 posted on 10/22/2017 8:14 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is the seating capacity of the large conference center on the BYUI campus? Is it as large as the conference center in Salt Lake City?

-Ricks College alum

A:

Dear Ricky,

The seating capacity of the BYU-I Center auditorium is 15,000 people. The conference center in Salt Lake City has a seating capacity of 21,000 people. The BYU-I Center has 6,000 less seats, which gives it 71% of the seating capacity of the conference center in Salt Lake City. Although it isnt as large as the conference center, the layout of the auditorium is nearly identical, except it doesn't have a 2nd level like the one in Salt Lake City does.

Peace,

Tipperary


0 Corrections
Question #90537 posted on 10/22/2017 4:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have a dating dilemma. I've gone out with a girl four times now. I would like to date her more. But she is REALLY busy with school, work, and homework and doesn't have time to date anybody. I've gotten to know her friend a little bit, and she seems pretty cool. Should I take the friend out? Or would that doom things with girl #1?HELP ME 100 Hour Board! You're my only hope!

NormansNotFunny

A:

Dear Hermitian,

If you want my advice, I'd say to take the friend out. As a general rule, it's a bad idea to put your dating life on hold for a single individual with whom you have no idea of how things will end up. Who knows? Perhaps you'll like the friend even more than the original girl. Or perhaps you won't. There's really no way to tell in advance.

If the girl told you that she's too busy to date right now, that implies that she won't shun you forevermore for dating other girls who actually have time to date. After all, you guys aren't in a relationship, so you're both free to date other people. 

Of course these are just the thoughts of an internet stranger who isn't so awesome at this whole dating thing herself.

~Anathema

A:

Dear you,

Occasionally, someone will be busy by accident, and will plan on not being busy as soon as possible. But I've found that busy people usually stay busy. If she doesn't have the time you feel like you would need in a relationship, that's not likely to change. If you're still interested in her, that's fine, but I don't think you should let her stop you from asking out someone else you're interested in.

-Kirito

A:

Dear Dilemma,

Dating a busy person is the worst, especially at the beginning of a relationship. It requires so much trust and patience, because when you can't spent much time together it's easy to wonder if feelings have changed. Yossarian is pretty much constantly busy, and that's definitely had a serious toll on us. If you aren't already dating the girl, I would avoid getting tangled up in that mess, unless you truly see a long-term future with her.

That being said, if she's too busy to date you, it's not fair of her to expect you not to date other people. However, it seems to me like the best solution to this problem is to ask if going out with her friend would bother her. Explain that you've enjoyed dating her, and wouldn't mind continuing, but that you don't want to intrude on her limited spare time. Be open and honest about your feelings. See how she feels about the idea before you proceed, if you don't want to jeopardize the hypothetical relationship.

Love,

Luciana


0 Corrections
Question #90439 posted on 10/22/2017 4:26 p.m.
Q:

What is the general breakout of majors within the writer-ship of the Board? Which one has the greatest representation? The least?

Thanks!

JQS

A:

Dear Jose Q. Smith,

I took a poll of the Board writers, and have detailed my findings below. Not all the writers responded, so this doesn't represent all of us absolutely accurately, but I did what I could.

Board Writer Majors:

  • Political science (2)
  • Physics (2)
  • Teaching social science (2)
  • Civil engineering
  • Mechanical engineering
  • Applied math
  • Biochemistry
  • English
  • Environmental science
  • Experience design and management
  • Food science
  • History
  • Microbiology
  • Sociology
  • Computer science

We also have writers who either have or are working towards graduate degrees in law, food science, and physics. 

I initially thought there was absolutely no consensus whatsoever among us and our majors, so I was surprised to find that there are three majors that have/had at least two Board writers (I'm pretty sure that one of the people with an undergrad degree in physics is also the one pursuing a Master's in it, which is why I didn't double count them, and I believe it's the same situation with the food science undergrad/graduate degree, so I didn't double count that one, either).

In the interest of being thorough, I also checked which college each major was in, to see if that would break us up into groups more neatly. 

Board Writer Colleges

  • Family, Home, and Social Sciences (6)
  • College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (5)
  • Life Sciences (2)
  • College of Engineering and Technology (2)
  • Humanities
  • Business School
  • Nutrition, Dietetics, and Food Science
As you can see, looking at us by college really did help group us more, and people in the FHSS college have the clear plurality, with the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences close behind.

Hopefully that was somehow interesting/informative to you. What I found interesting about this is how dang smart Board writers are! I was very impressed by the range of majors, and I love all the different perspectives we get from them.

-Alta


0 Corrections
Question #90541 posted on 10/22/2017 3:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is there a name for the feeling if nostalgia for a time period you never experienced? Like that wistfulness you get after reading a book or watching a movie set in an earlier decade/century? Or am I the only one who gets that?

Thanks!
Dorothy

A:

Dear Toto,

Sure is! According to The Dictionary Of Obscure Sorrows, this nostalgia for a time period you never experienced is called "anemoia." While I'm no authority on what's normal for people to feel, I can say that you're not alone. There's a piece of me that really longs to have experienced times I never will. I think a lot of people experience that. It's a bittersweet feeling, though ultimately we've got to be content with the time we were given. We remember the positive things about past eras but forget that they had just as much good and bad as the present day.

-Van Goff


0 Corrections
Question #90516 posted on 10/22/2017 12:38 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board Snail Lovers,

Will you just read this article, listen to the love ballad and the eulogy, and confirm for me it's the best thing the internet has come up with this year?

-Jeremy

A:

Dear Jeremy,

That is quite the touching story. It may well be one of the coolest things that the internet has come up with this year.

As touching as it was, I don't think that it is the greatest love ballad the internet has ever made, nor the greatest snail video.

How can there be any love ballad greater than "The Zombie Song" by Stephanie Maeby?

Jeremy may be the hottest new star in internet snaildom, but he is no match for these two videos by Vihart (#2 is even a song!)

Sorry, Jeremy, you may not be the greatest of all time, but you will always hold a place in our hearts.

Peace,

Tipperary


0 Corrections
Question #90534 posted on 10/22/2017 9:31 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm looking for examples of something that represents simple materials with a powerful impact. One that I've come up with is flint. While flint is a great example, I'm looking for an something that is a little less rustic and a little more refined. I'm looking to find an example that evokes a mindful, purposeful, refined, simple feel to it.

I can't for the life of me think of anything other than flint! Can you help me out?

-My Name Here

A:

Dear MNH,

Water is essential for life and has amazing chemical properties that makes it useful in so many different  situations. Oil is used to make plastic, gasoline, and a slew of other petroleum products. Carbon can be in the form of graphite, or coal, or diamonds, and it has many other more refined forms. Carbon is part of basically everything. Silicon is essential in electronics. Salt is a seasoning, a perseving agent, is also essential for most forms of life, and can be used to conduct electricity if dissolved in water. 

These are just a few ideas. Hope this helps!

Peace!

Tipperary

A:

Dear you,

The pen.

-Kirito


0 Corrections