My kisses are sort of limited to...well, female human things. -Claudio

Check out Episode 9 of the Podcast to hear discussions about Church leader rumors and dating by Haleakala, Maven, and Tally M!

Question #78446 posted on 07/24/2014 4 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

When some of the English-speaking authors I follow reveal their cover designs for various countries, the Japanese ones are always in manga style. Is there any particular reason for this, or is manga art really that popular over there?

-Sokka's Boomerang

A:

Dear Sokka's Boomerang,

According to my friend who served his mission in Japan, almost all artwork over there is in the manga style. It is wildly popular in the culture, and everyone draws in that same style. Other styles of art in Japan are rare. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Wednesday, July 23, 2014
Question #78443 posted on 07/23/2014 6:24 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is favorite podcast intro/outro music?

-The Boardcast's is hereby disqualified as an answer

A:

Dear TARDIS,

I personally enjoy Welcome to Nightvale's intro/outro music; it fits well with the podcast.

Also, if you ever have any questions, comments, concerns, or complaints regarding the Boardcast, don't hesitate to e-mail me!

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #78441 posted on 07/23/2014 4:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

In reference to Board Question #77837, may I make a request? If possible, would you kindly present me with a list of all the questions CATS (both 'nyms) has answered? Maybe in chronological order as well? I know I can search the 'nyms, but there's rather an abundance of discussion about the animal of the same name. The 100 Typing Monkeys were much easier to search...

-The Exquisite

A:

Dear The Exquisite,

The best I can do is link you to this search, in which I searched for "CATS" and "How are you" (the way CATS begins all of his answers) and ordered the questions from oldest to newest. I confess that if CATS didn't begin any of his answers with "How are you" then they won't show up in the list.

--Maven


0 Comments
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've noticed there have been many a writer with grammatical errors as their pet peeves. Have you seen this? What do you think?

Me

A:

Dear Professor John Smith,

I like it better than the original. I don't like the meaning/implications behind the original, so while I don't agree with absolutely everything mentioned in the song, I find it much more entertaining.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear M.O.D.A.Q.,

There are very few things I don't like more than the original. While I still prefer Strong Bad's reminder as far as its/it's is concerned, I thought this production was excellent. My favorites from the album are "Foil" and "Now That's What I Call Polka."

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Posted on 07/23/2014 1:48 p.m. New Comment on: #78437 I'm in Germany right now and I'm wondering: What kinds of things are better to buy ...
Posted on 07/23/2014 11:31 a.m. New Comment on: #78437 I'm in Germany right now and I'm wondering: What kinds of things are better to buy ...
Question #78437 posted on 07/23/2014 10:18 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm in Germany right now and I'm wondering: What kinds of things are better to buy here, compared to in the U.S.? I'm thinking of practical things, like kid's toys and school supplies/decorations.

-Future Teacher

A:

Dear twin, 

From my research, I've found out that most of the things you should buy in Germany and bring back to the States aren't practical for a classroom. You could throw down some serious cash on a fancy clock, stock up on Dr.Oetker's mixes, or buy as many Ritter-Sport that your suitcase can support but unless you're handing out pudding packets as part of your rewards system, I can't see them being beneficial for your future class. 

For your classroom, you may want to pick up some postcards or small picture books just to show a glimpse of Germany. I have a few German toys and only two have survived my childhood: a wooden, Grimms' Fairy Tales puzzle and (miraculously) a mechanical, flipping frog. They're not something I would necessarily put in a classroom, but they've lasted quite awhile and may be suitable for your future students. 

Enjoy your trip!

-Ms.O'Malley


2 Comments
Posted on 07/23/2014 10:12 a.m. New Comment on: #78434 I am scheduled to receive my endowments in a few short weeks, Aug. 9th to be ...
Question #78424 posted on 07/23/2014 10:12 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have a friend who feels that every little thing that ever happens to her is a miracle (and she uses that word). This bothers me (a lot, actually), because it seems like waiting to eat a bag of candy and then giving it as a birthday present, for example, isn't something that would have anything to do with divine intervention. This is probably a terrible example (ignore it, actually), but am I the one in the wrong? Is there really no such thing as a coincidence? To me, that feels like divine micromanaging and doesn't mesh with the wise deity and free will I believe in. And yet, these are faith-promoting experiences for her—how can she be wrong? How much do you think God chooses to influence the mundane details of our lives? Help, please!

-doubting thomas with song stuck in head

A:

Dear you,

To steal a line from Ela, as Einstein probably never said, "There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is."

You and your friend might be working from differing ideas of what constitutes a "miracle."

The bible dictionary defines a miracle as "an extraordinary event caused by the power of God." Applying that definition to every good thing that happens to us probably isn't reasonable: a lot of things happen either because God allows the vicissitudes of life or because of the choices we or others make. However, it is also important to remember that we are alive (surprise) which is of itself miraculous. We are alive because God lends us breath through his power even though we are unprofitable servants. That itself is a miracle, so I can understand seeing blessings on top of that miracle as semi-miraculous themselves.

Finally, I think God influences our daily lives in many ways without "performing miracles." Small and ordinary blessings come to us because of obedience to the commandments, because of the mercy of God, and because of the guidance of His Spirit in our lives and others. These are not necessarily miraculous healings or angelic ministrations, but they are nevertheless the constant reminders of God's love for us, which is of itself miraculous.

~Anne, Certainly


0 Comments
Question #78429 posted on 07/23/2014 10:12 a.m.
Q:

Dearest 100 Hour Board,

I was listening to the song She Hates Me off of Puddle of Mudd's "clean" album, Come Clean. So, technically, the songs have their explicit lyrics muted, like in this particular song--the F word isn't in the song anymore. Yay! So I was wondering why, if this album is no longer considered explicit, at the end of the song there's a little part where you can hear the band members talking and one of them says the F word. That F word isn't removed. Why not? Is it because he wasn't singing it, but saying it?

G'day,
Scarlet Flamingo

A:

Dear Sasha Eduardo,

While the FCC regulates broadcasts and the MPAA rates movies, the RIAA's Parental Advisory Label is more of a suggestion. There is no official rubric of what is explicit and what is clean but the PAL Notice is recommended for audio recordings that contain "strong language or depictions of violence, sex, or substance abuse to such an extent as to merit parental notification." In the end, it is up to the discretion of the artist and record label whether or not to use the PAL Notice. Since the specific instance of the f-word you mentioned is difficult to notice unless you're paying close attention (at least, in my opinion), I assume that the record label either deemed it not necessary to edit out in order to no longer warrant a PAL Notice or just simply missed it themselves as they were making the edited version. I'm sorry to say that I could not find any specifics on the production of this song that would confirm or refute my hypothesis.

On a related note, did you know that in the 1960s (before the PAL Notice was created) the FBI launched a two-year investigation in The Kingsmen's recording of "Louie, Louie" because they suspected that the lyrics, which they could not immediately understand, were obscene? The investigation even missed the drummer yelling in the background what was likely the f-word.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Posted on 07/23/2014 10:11 a.m. New Comment on: #78436 So...I kind of feel that the issue of same sex marriage will make it to the ...
Question #78436 posted on 07/23/2014 3:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So...I kind of feel that the issue of same sex marriage will make it to the Supreme Court, they'll follow precedents seeming to be set in the states and it will be legalized federally. Not saying I agree with the practice, I just think that's the most likely scenario. In that event, would who is allowed to perform marriages in states have to change (i.e. if a clergyman who had previously been listened/certified/whatever the states rules dictated refused to perform marriages for a same gendered couple on the basis of their own religious beliefs, could the state renounce their right to perform marriages)?

If it would change, this would mean temple sealers would no longer be able to perform LEGAL marriages (I assume they would still be able to perform sealings as a religious oridnance, but that it would no longer hold as a binding, legal marriage...is that even correct?). In such a scenario, the US would have to adopt new sealing rules like into some other countries, and members would probably need to start having civil ceremonies first, and then be sealed later. Obviously, the current 1 year waiting period would go away, to match more closely the policies in those countries where this would already be the case (could you list those countries for me?).

If US Mormons started doing that...what do you hunk the CULTURAL implications would be? The stigma of getting a civil marriage would have to go away...would the "Big Three" wedding turn into the "Big Four" wedding? Would people be sealed and then civilly married, or civilly married the sealed? How long sod the time gap between them be?

What so you think of this scenario? Likely? Unlikely? Do I just completely not understand marriage laws and practices in the US?

-~

A:

Dear ~,

I agree that the Supreme Court is likely to rule that marrying someone of the same gender is a right guaranteed by the US constitution when the issue goes before the bench next term. The breakdown will likely look like this: Justices Kagen, Sotomayor, Ginsburg, Breyer, and Kennedy in favor of the ruling, with Justices Alito, Thomas, Scalia, and Chief Justice Roberts against. The ruling will probably be very narrow. Justice Kennedy will likely author the majority opinion, and Scalia will write a scathing dissent, even if the other justices do as well.

Of course, if there's any doubt in how this case will go, it's in how Justice Kennedy will rule. He's notoriously quiet during oral arguments, which makes it hard to tell what he's thinking. He's a centrist on nearly all issues, with the notable exception of campaign finance.

As for your question, it really all depends on how "broadly" or "narrowly" the court rules when it makes its decision. When the Supreme Court makes a decision it doesn't just pick a side, it decides how much and to what extent its ruling applies. For example, if the Supreme Court ruled against some kind of campaign finance law in a constitutionality case, they would have to decide how broadly to rule. Does the ruling apply only to federal officers or all elected officials? That's a very simple example (they would almost certainly apply that decision to all elected officials), but you get the idea. When this issue comes up, if the Supreme Court rules using language that refers to gay marriage as a "civil right," or says that gay marriage must be treated equally by all institutions - not just the government - it is likely the Church would need to significantly restructure its operations in the United States.

That is highly unlikely to happen in this case. This Supreme Court has been very cautious and typically rules fairly narrowly. They've also recently shown a special concern over religious issues, as evidenced by their ruling in Hobby Lobby v. HHS. They ruled that RIFRA - the religious freedom restoration act - protected the rights of the CEO of Hobby Lobby not to pay for contraceptive coverage he had a moral objection to. RIFRA prevents the government from passing laws that require someone (such as a preacher preforming marriages) to violate their religious beliefs unless the government can prove that it has a "compelling interest" in passing the law, and that they've chosen the "least restrictive means" of doing so. If Congress tried to force preachers to preform the wedding ceremonies for same-sex marriages, I think they would have an extremely difficult - if not impossible - task in proving it had chosen the "least restrictive means" of allowing same sex couples to marry. After all, what's stopping gay couples from marrying at the local courthouse? They would reap all the same benefits - at least from a legal standpoint - that a traditional couple would.

That having been said, I don't think your hypothetical scenario is too far down the road. There has been a significant degradation of religious rights in favor of perceived "civil rights" over the past 5 years. In fact, Senate Democrats were so angry over the Supreme Court's decision to protect the religious rights of the CEO of Hobby Lobby instead of women's rights to birth control, they attempted to weaken RIFRA to allow the contraceptive mandate to continue. It was mostly a political gesture (they knew the Republican-controlled House would never pass the bill), but the sentiment was real. 

Although citizens who are affiliated with religious institutions haven't really been targeted yet, many businesses supplying wedding services have been. For example, a wedding photographer in New Mexico was sued by a gay couple after she refused to photograph the couple's commitment ceremony. The gay couple ultimately won. The Washington State Attorney General sued a florist for civil rights violations after she refused to provide flowers for a wedding. In a more recent case, a gay teacher at a private Catholic school was fired after announcing plans to marry his partner. The teacher is now suing the school for wrongful termination. 

In all of these cases, the person or institution involved said their actions were based on religious belief. These are just a handful of many such cases playing out across the country. 

So I don't think your hypothetical is out of the question. I think it's only a matter of time before it becomes more common for gay couples to sue religious institutions directly. Chances are, they would win. However, that's more likely to come a few years down the road. It's very, very unlikely that it would come as a result of the upcoming Supreme Court case.

- Haleakalā

Side note: For readers who are concerned (as I am) about this degradation of religious freedom, you may want to look at the Church's recent public campaign effort to support religious liberty. They've created a Facebook page, and published a series of articles on their newsroom website. You might also want to check out the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, one of my favorite legal organizations. They take no position on things like gay marriage and abortion, but support the religious liberty of those who oppose them. They do tons of litigation work, much of which is for religions that aren't Christian. Elder Oaks accepted an award from the organization last year, and the Church has sent apostles to give invocations/benedictions at Becket Fund events. Becket Fund lawyers have also participated in Church presentations on religious liberty.


1 Comment
Question #78435 posted on 07/23/2014 3:30 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm about to experience two things I've never experienced before: I will have a date for a friend's wedding AND I will be a bridesmaid. My date isn't in the wedding party...what's the proper etiquette for this scenario? I don't want to shirk my duties, but I don't want to leave my date feeling dateless as I'm running about...I'm attending the sealing and luncheon in the morning...do I just say "hey, meet me here later" and have my date show up to the reception awkwardly alone? My friend said "oh yeah! He's invited to all wedding festivities"...but certainly she didn't mean the sealing too?? Is it rude to ask? My date is super flexible and understanding, and he IS also friends with the bride and groom, and I'm sure he can entertain himself if I have bridesmaid duties and he'll know mutual friends that will be at the reception too...I just want everyone to have a good time!!

-Firsts


0 Comments
Question #78434 posted on 07/23/2014 2:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am scheduled to receive my endowments in a few short weeks, Aug. 9th to be exact. I'm just curious if you could tell me any Church History or important, historical events that may have occurred on Aug. 9th? Tell me anything you can about this date, especially in regards to church history or spiritual/inspired events that may have occurred on this dates in years previously.

Also, I am hearing impaired, and am concerned that I will not be able to hear the video. People have assured me that I can wear a hearing device or they can turn it up for me, but those have never helped in the past. Trust me, I know these things! I've spent my life not being able to hear. What has really helped me while watching films is subtitles/closed captioning for the hearing impaired. But my Bishop told me he has never seen subtitles on the video and doesn't think they have that. Can you confirm this for me? And if they don't have that be the case, why wouldn't they do that? It's seems a little discriminating to not be able to assist in that capacity when closed captioning on a video would really enhance my ability to comprehend what is unfolding before me. I can't hear... what's the harm in closed captions on the video when someone really needs it?

-Still Small Voice

A:

Dear Doctor,

The source for the following is the blog Today in Mormon History:

  • Neil L. Andersen was born in 1951
  • Chicago, Illinois temple is dedicated by President Hinckley in 1985

As for other historical events:

  • The Sistine Chapel was opened in 1483
  • Thoreau publishes "Walden" in 1854
  • Richard Nixon resigns in 1974
  • Nagasaki is hit with a nuclear bomb in 1945

More can be found on History Orb and Wikipedia.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear voice,

I know for a fact that the Provo temple does endowment sessions with subtitles. Usually subtitled (or foreign language) sessions are done on a special schedule; for instance, once a day, once a week, or once a month, depending on needs. (You can see the Provo temple's schedule here; I'm assuming the ASL session is the subtitled session, but I could very well be wrong.) Your best bet in a situation like this is to call the temple you'll be going through and ask if they have sessions with subtitles, or if they can make any special arrangements for you. Not knowing which temple it is, I can't do much more to help you. Best of luck!

-yayfulness


1 Comment
Question #78433 posted on 07/23/2014 2:36 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am quite keen on watching period pieces in my spare time, specifically aristocratic Europe in the 1600-1800's. It takes me back to a time where a certain propriety was upheld. I find these period pieces to be informative, interesting, but more importantly wholesome for my family and I.

As I'm watching these graceful prim and proper characters interact at their garden and dinner parties and so forth in which they discuss the morals, standards, reputation of their days, I can't help but notice their clothing. Many of these women's bosoms are busting at their neckline! ("Downton Abbey," even Kierra Knightly in "Pride & Prejudice" and "Pirates of the Carribean", but more recently and specifically the movie, "Belle"). While I know corsets were quite typical among the wealthy classes and that corsets do squeeze women to give them an "hour glass" shape, which inevitably makes certain female features pop, I can't help but wonder if these women's necklines were really that low or if this is something Hollywood has done?

It seems to me that these people who are so concerned about their reputation and about proper mannerisms and etiquette would not wear something so drastically immodest. I, as a woman watching the show, cannot help but stare at these womanly features the way their clothing so prominently shows off their cleavage (especially in "Belle"). And if I do say myself, I find myself a bit troubled. Perhaps my husband and children and I shouldn't be watching such seemingly wholesome shows!

Bottom-line: Is Hollywood sexing up fashion typical to aristocratic British women in the seventeenth to nineteenth century England? I do know the general fashion is typical, but were the necklines really, truly that low where cleavage was "boom-in-your-face!"? (Particularly in "Belle," mind you). Or is this Hollywood's artistic license to appeal to people today? Does it seem odd to anyone else that a class so concerned about their proper appearances would allow such revealing neck lines?!

-Vogue Villain

A:

Dear Queen Elizabeth I,

Believe it or not, there's actually a Wikipedia article that deals with this. Seventeenth to nineteenth century England was during the "age of acceptability" with showing cleavage. The article explains:

In Europe during the Middle Ages, when women wore shapeless clothing, art frequently portrayed women with one or more of their breasts exposed to signify fertility rather than sexuality.

Gowns that exposed a woman's neck and top of her chest were very common and non-controversial in Europe from at least the 11th century until the Victorian period in the 19th century. Ball or evening gowns especially featured low square décolletage designed to display and emphasize cleavage. The wearing of low-cut dresses that exposed breasts was considered more acceptable than it is today—with a woman's bared legs, ankles, or shoulders being considered to be more risqué than exposed breasts.

During the fashions of the period 1795–1820, many women wore dresses that bared the bosom and shoulders.

In fact, Downton Abbey takes place during the "age of reintroduction" that occurred after the "age of controversy." I'm not entirely sure when Pirates of the Caribbean, is supposed to have taken place, but it could've taken place between either the age of reintroduction or acceptability.

So, no, Hollywood isn't "sexing up fashion" but is actually dealing with it as it happened.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #78432 posted on 07/23/2014 12:54 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How do I cope with the fact that the person I consider to be my best friend doesn't consider me to be her best friend anymore? We were each other's best friend until recently and it stings to know we're not as close as we used to be. We're still friends, it's just more like "good friends" rather than "best friends."

-Missing her BFF

A:

Dear Rose,

The thing about friendships is that they come and go. There is only one person that I've been close friends with consistently for more than a couple of years, and that's the one girl I still stay in touch with from high school. There are others I've been really close to, but as we've both gotten busy and had our communication lapse, we've grown apart. It is hard when the distancing isn't simultaneous.

I'd still make the effort to be friends with her, but don't assume she'll always reciprocate. At the same time, look to other people that you can strengthen your relationships with, such as visiting teachees or roommates.

I know it's hard, as I've gone through my fair share of friendship break-ups. But you will eventually find new friends to connect with. If you need someone to talk to, you're welcome to e-mail me.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #78431 posted on 07/23/2014 12:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I recently read an article about the best and worst fast food chains. I disagreed with many rankings. What are your rankings of best and worst? Are there any that are superior in one particle item? For example, mcd's is nasty but their mcflurries are divine.

-Eat more chikin

A:
Dear filet of chicken,
  1. Whataburger
  2. Everything else
  3. Arby's

Anyone that thinks that In-N-Out is better than Whataburger clearly has not had Whataburger. Similarly, anyone that thinks that Chipotle is better than Freebirds clearly has not had Freebirds.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Chikin,

Wendy's pretzel bun burger is back. 

God really does answer prayers. 

That is all. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #78430 posted on 07/23/2014 12:42 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

As a former public health major and current SAHM I am intrigued by the show "doc mcstuffins". I love this show and I think I can see a difference in the way several children I know approach the doctor now. Does the medical world or public health world have any statements, opinions, or studies on the show?

-it's time for your check up!

A:

Dear check up, 

The medical world itself doesn't appear to have too many statements, opinions or studies on the show, because, well, it's a show for kids that doesn't actually get too much into the world of medical health. While the main character does do things like encourage hygiene practices and basic care for others and oneself, she doesn't do much else beyond encouraging independence and tackling problems (and I mean that in a nice way not in a "what do you mean you don't actually do anything?" kind of way). Actually, most of the commentary about the show deals with her race and with the fact that her parents don't conform to gender roles, and not actually the fact that she's restitching seams on her toys or changing batteries. Also, the fact that her patients are her toys (I know this because I watched like three hours worth of this show for research purposes and procrastination. Mostly procrastination.) doesn't really call for any statements, studies or opinions from the medical community. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Posted on 07/23/2014 12:01 a.m. New Comment on: #78420 I'm graduating in August and trying desperately to finish an Independent Study course in time. The ...
Tuesday, July 22, 2014
Question #78428 posted on 07/22/2014 9:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have any of you guys been to the biofeedback lab on campus? What exactly do they do there? What would an appointment be like? Was it helpful? Also, if I'm not currently taking any classes, but I am enrolled full time for fall (and I was in classes winter semester) can I still go there and the CCC for free? Thanks for your help!!!

-stressed out nutjob

A:

Dear,

I went there once. To start out, you fill out a form about your stressors, how you feel your stress affects your health, and what your goals are. You then meet with a counselor who goes over your form with you and then hooks up a heart rate/breathing monitor to your finger (just a little clip you may have seen in other medical settings). The kinds of exercises you do may depend on the counselor and which visit you're doing; since it was my first time, she talked to me about the monitor and what we would do. She asked me to think about all the things that were stressing me out, and we recorded my heart rate/breathing. Then we discussed some ways that I might approach the stress using calming breathing techniques and the like. She asked me to try that focused breathing and recorded it again, and we discussed the results and what goals I would make that week to handle my stress better. So a lot of it was sitting in a comfy chair and thinking.

Honestly, I didn't get much out of it; I felt like I was "bad at it," which kind of stressed me out. It was helpful in that it reminded me that my quality of life as far as how I deal with stress is not where I'd like it to be, but the breathing stuff didn't really do it for me. However, my visit was only once; I'm sure it's more helpful if you go regularly. I think you should try it and see if it's for you. And yep, you can still go there/the CCC for free.

See also Board Question #43968 to read a previous writer's experience with biofeedback.

-Owlet


0 Comments
Question #78398 posted on 07/22/2014 9:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Meet me 2 blocks down the street, near the small abandoned dry cleaners next to the hole-in-the-wall Mexican joint, and behind the dumpster that leads to a secret staircases... I have a question to ask. This question falls under Mormon taboo. But I don't think it should.... so let's meet in the middle of Times Square for all the world to see. I think we should be open and honest and upfront about the question I am about to ask.

Are there any statistical analysis of homosexual individuals that attend BYU, serve missions, or are active member of the church?

I know it's perfectly fine and common for those suffering from SSA to be faithful members of the church -- but has statistical analyses ever been conducted? If not, why not? If so, what are the results? Do we know how many are at BYU, on missions, or the church overall?

-Gayle

A:

Dear Gayle,

There isn't any such data specifically for the church. There are estimates that there are approximately 1800 gay students here at BYU. This number comes from national averages which estimate that 6-10% of people have homosexual feelings at some point in their lives. If we were to use these numbers, and do a little guesswork, of the missionaries out in the field now, between 4950 and 8300 of them have homosexual feelings of some sort or another. As for total members of the church, approximately 1,206,600 church members are gay. Personally, I know, or am acquainted with, several active members of the church who are fall into one of the LGBTQ categories, and at least four of them have served missions. 

I really don't know why such data hasn't been gathered, probably because no one has had a specific research question that requires it. I also expect it would be incredibly hard to gather such a census of data for the church, and that there would be a lot of lying or misrepresentation on such a survey. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Question #78411 posted on 07/22/2014 9:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My acoustic guitar is rather old (I got it used in 2008) and I noticed the other day that the frets are getting worn down badly enough that the two highest strings usually have a very buzzy sound and sometimes won't play the notes I want them to. Is there anything I can do about this (a way to replace or repair the frets, for instance), or do I need to just bite the bullet and get a new guitar?

-sloshy

A:

Dear Sloshy,

Just get the frets replaced. Any local guitar/music shop should be able to help you out. Just call around. It isn't really cheap (from my research it will cost you between $60 and $80), but it is generally cheaper than replacing your guitar.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Question #78425 posted on 07/22/2014 8 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have a baby girl who I love so much! I would like to have more children one day, but I worry that I won't love the next baby as much. I know that sounds silly because lots of people have more than one child and seem to love them all equally. Did anyone else feel this way and then have another baby and realized the worrying was for nothing?

-Proud Mama

A:

Dear Mama,

Momlet (hmm, that's weird; it sounds like omelet) offers the following:

The excitement and learning experience associated with your first child is a unique experience. I have found that the love I have developed for my first child ENHANCED my ability to love additional children, and so on. Also, in my experience, my oldest child, a girl, was like a little mother to her siblings, and I greatly admired her for this. All of my children have been very unique and I have found things I appreciate in all of them. Each of them holds their own special place in my heart. Final words: Some children are more difficult than others to form a bond with, because of our and/or their personality, but motherhood seems to drive us to overcome all challenges related to our children. The rewards are worth it!

I really don't think you'll have a problem loving future children. After the cuteness of the first baby wears off, it will be easy to love a younger, cuter child. (I'm not sure if I mean this is a joke or not.) I'm sure many people have felt this same way and realized the worrying was for nothing. Now is probably not the right time to be thinking that far ahead, though; you'll likely feel differently when more time has passed and you're in a position to be ready for another child.

-Owlet


0 Comments
Question #78422 posted on 07/22/2014 1:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I understand why cameras cannot be let into the courtroom (most the time) because it would be distracting, possibly be exploitive, and create a circus of sorts... I understand sketched drawings as an alternative. But why do we need sketched drawings of inside the courtroom in the first place? What purpose do they serve?

Why do we need to have it visually documented through an artistic medium? Why is it necessary? So others could see the reactions? But even then... it's subjective and from the perspective of the artist.

Is it jut for curiosity sake and because we can?

How does one prepare for a life in court room sketching? How much do they get paid a day? Do they get benefits?

-Why did the art dealer go broke? Because he ran out of Monet!!

A:

Dear Claude,

Although cameras are becoming more common and the demand for courtroom sketch art is decreasing, the need and profession still exist. You raise a good question: why do we need to have trials visually documented through an artistic medium at all? The Social Science Research Network claims that 65% of us are visual learners. To prove a point:

learning_styles.jpg

I bet at least 65% of those who read this answer will look at the graph above first. People are drawn to pictures. If you're writing a news article about a trial, you'll take whatever visual you can get. Are they imperfect? Yes. Are they subjective? Probably. But it's better than nothing.

 According to this website:

A formal education is not always necessary for a successful courtroom sketch art career, but it can be very helpful. Most individuals pursuing a courtroom sketch art career will often find that a degree from an accredited art school can help them hone their skills and gain experience.

When pursuing an education for a courtroom sketch art career, students should earn drawing degrees. Some courses that may come in useful for this type of career may include portrait drawing, caricature drawing, and life drawing. All of these types of drawing help artists capture the human form.

Additionally, courtroom sketch artists need to be able to sketch quickly, and should "be prepared to hear disturbing and shocking details of extremely heinous crimes." The average yearly income is $53,080, but most are paid on commission. In addition to selling their work to news outlets, many sell their art to judges and attorneys who want mementos of important trials. If you're interested, you should read this interview with a sketch artist.

-El-ahrairah


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