Resolve to keep happy, and your joy and you shall form an invincible host against difficulties. - Helen Keller

While we appreciate factual corrections, consider posting on the Board Comment Board, brought to the readers by popular request.

Love is in the air: it's the season finale of the Board Bachelorette! The Final Challenge has been issued, and final submissions are due by 11:59 PM on Friday, July 29th. Be sure to vote for your favorite contestants, then stay tuned for the explosive, suspenseful, action-packed finale, in which The Bachelorette announces which reader has stolen her heart and we revolt and stage a coup against the editors when their puppet contestant swoops in at the last minute and wins through clearly fradulent means!

(Prepare for the Final Challenge by binge-reading the previous episodes of the Board Bachelorette! The first, second, third, and fourth, and fifth challenges have all been completed; their results can be found here, here, here, here, and here, respectively.)

Question #87464 posted on 07/28/2016 3:08 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Disney is planning to replace Tower of Terror with a Guardians of the Galaxy attraction. This is a terrible idea. What address should I send my email protesting the planned change to?

Thanks,
please Disney, just no

A:

Dear Protestor,

You're certainly not alone in your opposition, and it took only a quick Google search to find a petition with thousands of signatures.

If you want to contact them directly, there's a form you can fill out here, but I don't imagine one individual complaint will make a significant difference.

I, however, feel no significant opposition to the venture, nor do I believe the move is outside of Disney's mold, like the petition suggests. As a disclaimer I don't appreciate the ride mechanics of the Tower of Terror, so discount my opinion if you will, but Disney deserves a defender.

Let's start with this quote from Walt Disney, establishing what Disneyland is all about:

The idea for Disneyland came about when my daughters were very young and Saturday was always Daddy’s day with the two daughters. So we’d start out and try to go someplace, you know, different things, and I’d take them to the merry-go-round and I took them different places and as I’d sit while they rode the merry-go-round and did all these things- sit on a bench, you know, eating peanuts- I felt that there should be something built where the parents and the children could have fun together. So that’s how Disneyland started. Well, it took many years… it was a period of maybe fifteen years developing. I started with many ideas, threw them away, started all over again. And eventually it evolved into what you see today at Disneyland. But it all started from a daddy with two daughters wondering where he could take them where he could have a little fun with them, too.

The premise of Disneyland is the creation of a place that appeals to people of all ages, and a place where families can enjoy themselves together.

You could argue that current management has deviated from that ideal if you want to, but that's neither here nor there. The fact remains that Disney's commercial power is in their near-universal appeal. A Disney vacation doesn't appeal to only children--there's something for everyone.

Of course, not every attraction will hold that universal appeal. There are roller coasters that might not be especially appealing to small children, and there are attractions that are geared more toward small children. Nevertheless, within every land and area there's something that everyone can enjoy.

The Tower of Terror is a beloved attraction for many, to be sure. But let's be real, The Twilight Zone doesn't hold universal appeal. I'm willing to bet that the majority of people under the age of twenty have never seen an episode and have no nostalgia about the show.

Therefore, it makes sense for Disney to transform it into an attraction that holds greater appeal, and one that can be appreciated both for ride mechanics and theming. Yes, plenty of people will be sad about the change, but many more people will be interested in a Guardians of the Galaxy attraction.

Of course, the theming of California Adventure itself is an entirely separate argument, and in my view a more persuasive one. Disney recently spent a lot of money refurbishing the main street of the park to better fit the 1920s California theme. The Twilight Zone does fit that vision better than Guardians of the Galaxy, but at least it doesn't deviate from the idea of Hollywood.

All in all, while many people seem to be disappointed by the decision, it doesn't seem like such a "terrible idea" to me. I'm much more concerned about the addition of Star Wars Land in Disneyland park, because I'm suspicious of anything that seems to violate Walt's vision, and this has the potential to be disastrous (in my personal view. Probably not financially or anything).

Love,

Luciana


0 Corrections
Wednesday, July 27, 2016
Question #87463 posted on 07/27/2016 11:14 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Does this just happen to me? On multiple occasions I've met a nice girl, and on the abstract paper of my mind, it seems like everything should work out great. It seems like we're a perfect match. She's attractive. Sometimes she even shows interest in me! But for whatever reason, something just doesn't... click. And I want to like her because it makes so much sense, and maybe I convince myself that I kind of do... but in the end, it just feels like something's missing. Like I'm looking for something, but my conscious self just can't quite identify it.

So, what is that one thing?

-Me

A:

Dear you,

From my limited dating experience and discussions with male friends about dating, I don't think you're the only one who's experienced this. In fact, my friends have expressed great frustration with girls for this very reason.

From conversations about this very topic, I've come to the conclusion that some people rely on instinct more than others. You don't always know what you're looking for until you find it. Perhaps that's why One Direction couldn't articulate the concept more eloquently--they're looking for something specific, but they still aren't sure what it is.

Sometimes dating is instinctual. You don't have to love someone just because they're perfect for you on paper. I was once dating a guy who my friends declared was essentially the same person as me. I like myself, so the relationship could have made sense, but I just didn't feel any spark. You can't always convince yourself to like someone. Love doesn't make any sense, so maybe we should stop expecting it to.

Love,

Luciana


0 Corrections
Posted on 07/27/2016 10:27 p.m. New Correction on: #87447 I'll be in good old Rexburg for the summer and I'm a bit at a loss ...
Question #87444 posted on 07/27/2016 7:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear The Board,

What are your thoughts on signing while driving? I was driving behind a guy on the freeway the other day and noticed he was making a lot of gestures to a child sitting in the passenger seat. Once I pulled up behind them at the off-ramp I got a closer look and realized he was probably speaking sign language. Frankly, I didn't know what to make of it. On the one hand I was already irked because he'd been driving slow in the left lane on the freeway. Also, driving at any speed while signing with your hands just seems dangerous to me. On the other hand, I know driving with a child in the car is no picnic, and not talking to them might not be an option if they're upset. I assumed the driver wasn't deaf, because drivers need to be able to hear horns honking and that sort of thing, but am I mistaken about that? Can deaf people get drivers' licenses?

-Nellie Bly

A:

Dear Nellie,

Signing while driving is completely okay. In this case, and in many, it was probably his only method of communication, either because he's Deaf or because his child is. How would you feel if you weren't allowed to talk while driving? To Deaf people that's how they "speak." Because that is the language that they use, deaf people have gotten pretty proficient at signing while doing other things (holding babies/items/etc., walking/running, biking, etc.). From this forum, a lot of the people claim that they only have very shallow and necessary conversations while driving, and even then, they try not to take their eyes off the road. In terms of actually signing (not receiving sign), they may sign with one hand. It's also not that hard to drive with your knees. it's probably easier on the freeway than anything because you have cruise control and a fairly straight road. Not saying it's the safest practice, but it's doable.

Of course a deaf person can have a driver's license. And they're probably safer drivers than the rest of us! I mean, good grief, think of all the sounds in your car that distract you while driving. The radio, children and other noisy passengers, talking on a cell phone, cell phone alerts, and the list goes on and on. A deaf driver concentrates all of his focus on one sense, and when he keeps his eyes on the road, his ride is probably the safest it could be since it's free from aural distractions. Here is an article from a Deaf person's perspective.

-Adelaide


0 Corrections
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is the name of the actress in the Love's Baby Soft commercial?

--Sexier than this commercial deserves

A:

Dear Ew,

What an odd commercial.

Okay, I Googled the crud out of this question, to no avail.

I asked my parents and many people who were actually around when the commercial originally aired to see if they recognized her at all.

Nothing.

I contacted Love's from every social media source I could use (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, etc).

No one would get back to me.

I'm sorry, but I cannot find the answer anywhere.  It seems like this girl fell off the face of the earth after the commercial (and that might be best, considering how creepy and ill-received it was).

If anybody knows, please enlighten us.

-April Ludgate, who is disappointed in her researching skills.


0 Corrections
Question #87460 posted on 07/27/2016 12:10 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Does Trump's choice of Mike Pence or Clinton's choice of Tim Kaine as VP have any effect on how you plan to vote?

-no but curious

A:

Dear No Way,

#feelthejohnson

That's all I have to say.

-April Ludgate

A:

Dear NbC,

All I have really heard about Tim Kaine is that he's a pretty swell fella; I haven't really looked into his policies at all. That alone does not make me any more likely to vote for Hillary, though it also does not make the possibility less likely. It has a neutral effect overall.

I was never ever going to vote for Trump, no matter who he picked as VP. And I still need to read up more on this Johnson person to see if he is more than just a terrible hashtag.

-Frère Rubik


0 Corrections
Question #87447 posted on 07/27/2016 12:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'll be in good old Rexburg for the summer and I'm a bit at a loss as to what I should do with my spare time. I'm not taking classes and I'm not working, so I have a lot of time on my hands! It looks like they used to have live music at Smith park every Thursday night -- do they still do that? What other things are there to do in the summer time? Preferably free or dirt cheap.

Two thumbs up,
Summer

A:

Dear Summer,

You should find something worthwhile to do instead of just whiling away the time. It might be too late to take classes, but I think you should get a job. It's always better to have more experience and a more consistent employment history. Plus, then you could do things that aren't necessarily dirt cheap.

According to the Rexburg official website, there still are concerts every Thursday night.

Love,

Luciana


1 Correction
Question #87438 posted on 07/27/2016 12:07 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I and some theater friends want to (in a year or so) put together a community play. However, we're almost all women, and we'd like to change The Music Man's characters' names to have more female characters.

It's still under copyright, and needs a license to perform it. Who in the world do we contact to get permission to change pronouns/names in the play? Even the most theatery of us all have no idea.

-Harriet Hill

A:

Dear Harriet,

The copyright for The Music Man looks to be currently held by Music Theatre International. You'll have to create an account on their website, but from there it should be easy to communicate with them about your ideas. From that link you can request a perusal or a license. 

Love,

Luciana


0 Corrections
Question #87414 posted on 07/27/2016 12:07 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is your favorite place that you've ever traveled to?

-Scintillation

A:

Dear Sid,

Ecuador or Florida Keys are pretty high on my list. I also really liked Disneyland, though I didn't really like Anaheim. I love St. George because my family is there. I haven't traveled anywhere more exciting than that though. Sorry.

-Adelaide

A:

Dear you,

If I discount Disney parks, then probably Maine. A large portion of my extended family used to live there, so my cousins and I would fly out for a few weeks in the summertime. I have many fond memories of flying kites near Port Elizabeth, sledding down big hills, and spending time with family. My grandparents had property with several acres, which the children had free run of it. It was pretty and picturesque and I miss it.

Love,

Luciana

A:

Dear Shiny,

One time, I flew over Iceland coming back from Europe. It's hard to describe why, but ever since that day I've wanted so badly to go back and visit for real. There's something about that landscape and its northern isolation that really speaks to me.

-Kirito

A:

Dear Scent,

Tokyo, but it is also the only place I've ever traveled outside of the US. 

But check out these pictures showing just how awesome Tokyo is:

2016-07-22 15.41.22.jpg

A bunny cafe.  Much like the Puppies For Rent business, but with bunnies (other cafes offer owls, cats, and hedgehogs).

FB_IMG_1469223920529.jpg

Wonderful English t-shirts available in the crazy Harajuku college district.

 2016-07-22 15.52.04.jpg

Andy and I at Daibutsu (the Giant Buddha) in the coastal town of Kamakura.

 2016-07-22 15.55.38.jpg

 And adorable animal donuts, for sale about a block away from Daibutsu.

Japan has some of the coolest combinations of history and technology, silly and insightful tourist attractions, and all-around fun.

It's seriously amazing there.  I've made two trips and I wish I could make another trip in the near future.

-April Ludgate

A:

Dear scented earwax candle (ew... but that's probably for sale somewhere in the internet), 

There are a lot of cool places and many places outrank others for some cool thing they have going on. Some things I enjoy are good food, tropical forests, scuba-friendly oceans, mountains, jungles, caves, and ancient ruins, preferably Mayan. 

Glacier National Park has great mountains, and backcountry Hawaii scores extremely high for jungle mountain adventure and pretty decently on food and scuba stuff. Peru has great mountains, ruins, food, and jungle (though I haven't visited the Peruvian Amazon... yet). The Holy Land ranks high for food, history, and culture but sort of failed on the plants thing.

If I had to pick just one place, though, I'd have to go with Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula. Yucatecan food is phenomenal, the ice cream (paletas)  the tropical fruit is outstanding, and there are caves and cenotes (water-filled sinkholes) in abundance. As for ruins, Maya ruins abound throughout the region; I love them. There are interesting cultural influences from the Spanish Conquest and the area's Maya roots reflected in current culture—food and religion, especially. Scuba diving is great on the eastern Yucatán, though I haven't actually been. 

One thing the northern Yucatán doesn't really have are sweet tropical forests. Technically, it's subtropical, so things are pretty scrubby in the limestone soil. There also are no mountains. If I am permitted to extend the region a couple of hours' travel to the south, though, we end up getting the lush forests and mountains of Campeche, Quintana Roo, and Chiapas. Especially Chiapas. Also, Guatemala and Honduras are nearby, and if you've ever had the chance to visit Tikal in Guatemala or the Bay Islands of Honduras... I hope you'll agree they are incredibly beautiful.

Ultimately, my decision to go with the Yucatán is a sentimental one. I lived there when I was twelve and largely credit it to shaping the beginnings of my current worldview and wanderlust. You can read about that in Board Question #82578, if you're so inclined.

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Dear person,

The USA. 

-Sheebs, the terrible Canadian

A:

Dear Sparkle,

I went to Corvallis, OR a few months ago for some school stuff. It was my first time in the Pacific northwest, and it loved it. Back home, things are pretty green, but Oregon takes it to a whole new level. I think one of the biggest differences was the temperate (as opposed to subtropical) climate. Also, the food in Portland was really good.

I've been to a few places outside the U.S. as well. While South and Central America and the Caribbean are all well and good, I'm going to have to pick Switzerland as my favorite travel destination. I would have probably chosen Italy if my family had taken me with them, rather than going while I was in the MTC, but I'm not bitter. It's not like I've wanted to go there pretty much my entire life. It's fine.

-The Entomophagist

A:

Dear Sin 'Till Ate Shun,

This is a hard question. 

If we're talking cities/urban areas, I'll probably go with Washington D.C. I don't know what it is about that place, but I just love it. It just feels different.

The other thing that's coming to mind right now isn't exactly a place that I've ever traveled to, but rather one that I've traveled through many times: Glenwood Canyon in Colorado. You have all of these cool-looking rocky cliffs with the Colorado river running through them, and in the summer everything's really lush and green. We drive through there whenever we go to Grand Lake or Denver, and every time I love it.

(Though I do love Glenwood Canyon, this answer may have been influenced by the fact that The Lone Musketeer's placeholder, which is directly underneath mine, is basically just her saying "COLORADO" 47 times in a row. Yes, I counted.)

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear Scurvy,

COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO COLORADO.

I'm just a li'l obsessed. I'm gonna go listen to some John Denver now. 

Cheers,

The Lone Musketeer

A:

Dear S,

At the risk of being cliché, I'm going to say Hawaii. Specifically, Kapalua and Ka'anapali, Maui. I'm a beach bum at heart.

-TEN

A:

Dear Scentsy,

I had a hard time picking just one place, so the following are places I've been that I found notable for one reason or other.

Coolest urban place: New York City. Aside from the myriad of songs written about it that you can sing endlessly while there, it's so filled with cool things to do. And even if you don't want to do something super touristy you can still wander around and have a blast.

Most exotic location: The Andes. I lived in their foothills for half of my mission, and I even got to have a picnic on one of the peaks, with giant condors flying overhead, and it was a surreal experience. The Andes are so huge (I thought the Rockies were tiny when I got home from my mission) and craggy and awe-inspiring, and I love them.

Prettiest place: Glaciers National Park. It's filled with stunning vistas and icy blue glacial lakes and sweeping mountains, and if you like nature it is the place for you.

Most random place: Lethbridge, Canada. Going there is like someone from Canada coming to visit Provo. Like, Provo has fun things to do if you live here, but it's not really a hot destination for world travelers. That's the vibe I got from Lethbridge. All the locals we met were so confused that we chose to go there on vacation, and mostly we just went to a lot of historic forts nearby while we were there. But I was excited about it because it was my second time going out of the U.S.

-Alta

A:

Dear you,

As far as outside the U.S., it would have to be Bergen, Norway in the summer or Salzburg, Austria just a few days before Christmas. Both were incredibly magical and spectacular and I don't have enough adjectives to describe how great they both were and I want to go back so bad.

In the U.S.: I love Disneyland and Walt Disney World (especially EPCOT and Animal Kingdom and heck, all of the kingdoms) but apart from Disney, I loved going to Dollywood in Tennessee and Mammoth Caves in Kentucky. That was a whole lot of adventure packed into those two states, and I completely enjoyed myself.

-Squirrel


0 Corrections
Question #87406 posted on 07/27/2016 12:07 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I came across some cleaning advice that said "Mix baking soda with TBS of fabric softener and spread on mattress every one or two months. Leave on an hour and vacuum off. Kills dust mites and freshens the mattress."

Why/how does baking soda kill dust mites? Also, wouldn't this not kill germs so what's the point?

Thanks,
cleaning lady

A:

Dear Cleaning Lady,

From my Google research, I learned that some people have dust mite allergies, so a natural means of killing them can be quite beneficial even if it doesn't kill germs. 

However, this site explained that the baking soda itself doesn't kill the dust mites. The baking soda is used to eliminate odors, and the vacuuming is what actually kills them.

Love,

Luciana


0 Corrections
Question #87352 posted on 07/27/2016 12:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why are strong cheeses and chocolates (both of which I love and crave) common triggers for migraines? What about its substances induce monster headaches? That's a cruel joke! Wait... do they trigger them? Or do they just make it worst if you already have one? Should I avoid them to prevent migraines? Any migraine suffers that love these foods? Words of comfort?

-Ironic Chef

A:

Dear you,

A simple Google search reveals to me that a substance called Tyramine which is found naturally in some foods - particularly aged or fermented ones such as strong cheeses - triggers migraines. Chocolate also contains this substance.

If you don't have a history of migraines, you probably have nothing to worry about with eating these things. If you do have a history of migraines but these foods haven't ever caused you problems, you probably have nothing to worry about with eating them. If they do start to cause you problems, consult your doctor about how to deal with it.

~Dr. Occam

A:

Dear you,

Everyone who suffers from migraines has their own unique triggers, although some are more common than others. Excedrin actually has a very helpful page on how to track your own migraines and identify triggers. Like Dr. Occam said, unless you notice that these foods are triggering migraines for you in particular, there's no point in avoiding them.

-Zedability

A:

Dear Sweet Irony,

I have a stinky cheese story for you.

I love buying and tasting new cheeses. When I lived in Old Heritage, I'd go to the Creamery every week and get a cheese I hadn't tried. A reward of sorts for getting through another 7 days of school. One week, I got a hold of some Romano cheese. I had never researched it but if you are a cheese connoisseur, you can guess how this is going to go down. 

For those of you who do not know, Romano cheese (or at least the creamery's) smells exactly like an old gym sock. With a bit more bite, though. I got quite a surprise when I opened it back at home. Whew, that stuff was STRONG! A stench of biblical proportions. But you can't just waste such an expensive commodity. I stupidly supposed that the stink could be "cooked out". So I took some crackers, laid them out on a cookie sheet and layered the rancid Romano with some spinach and tomato. Just to shake it up, you know. Preheated the oven to 400 degrees and popped those suckers in.

Within a matter of minutes, the entire apartment smelled like a foot fungus sauna. It wafted into every corner and sunk into every absorbent surface. And was absolutely disgusting. I wished at that moment that I was prepared for a zombie apocalypse and had a gas mask. I need to sort out my priorities, here. Breathing through my mouth, I frantically ran around throwing windows open.

This is how permeable the stench was. My best friend came up from studying in the lobby one floor down. She pleasantly noted, "Oh, that was what I was smelling downstairs." Another roommate, having been told this story a couple months after the fact, meekly mentioned that she'd thought our apartment had smelled like feet for a while. But when you live with a dancer, you learn not to ask questions related to foot odor. It's kind of a sensitive topic.

Months later, my best friend gave me a pasta box mix with a cheese sauce that she didn't want. I excitedly cooked it up, and tucked in for a deliciously free meal. As the first bite reached my lips, I bolted up. It couldn't be! Sure enough, after rummaging the box out of the garbage, I saw that one of the main ingredients was...the dreaded Romano cheese. The meal was thrown out with no regret. 

Romano is disgusting. That is all.

Cheers,

The Lone Musketeer


0 Corrections
Posted on 07/27/2016 9:17 a.m. New Correction on: #87457 Dear Zedability & Sheebs & those with Canadian kinsmen, friends, foes, etc., I asked a Canadian ...
Question #87441 posted on 07/27/2016 9:08 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I don't wear lipstick. Not because I have anything against it, I just never grown up in an environment where the women in my life wear lipstick. I think I may have tried it once and it looked so bizarre on me (I felt like a clown), that I never pursued it again. Does lipstick grow on the user (or onlookers)? Is it common for it to take a bit of time to get used to the lipstick effect? (Both for the girls to get used to its appearance and the guys to appreciate it)?

On what occasions do you wear lipstick? Does the occasion constitute what shade of lipstick you should use? What makes it seem appropriate for the occasion and not so strikingly unnatural? How do I pull it off?

-Vogue Villain

P.S. Major props to Andy Ludgate in Board Question #87217! What a trooper to take one for the team! Thanks April for thinking of broaching the idea with your hubby. You guys won my heart!

A:

Dear Vogue,

I like lipstick and I wear my fair share, mostly on Sundays, so I guess I'm qualified to answer this question.

Does lipstick grow on the user (or onlookers)? Is it common for it to take a bit of time to get used to the lipstick effect?

It took me a while before I didn't feel incredibly awkward every time I wore lipstick, but that had a lot less to do with the lipstick itself and more to do with my own confidence levels. I was just self conscious because it was new and I wasn't sure if it looked good or not, but once I got over my own awkwardness I loved it. So I guess how long it takes you to get used to it depends on your own confidence levels. Honestly, though, I think other people are much more accepting of how it looks than we think. If you never wear lipstick and then suddenly you start wearing hot pink lipstick every day, people might be a little surprised at first, but they would probably become accustomed pretty fast. 

On what occasions do you wear lipstick?

Personally, I usually only wear lipstick on Sundays to church, like I said. Part of that is because it's a fancy-ish occasion, so I don't feel overdressed, and part of it is because wearing lipstick more often than that is a hassle. It smears all over my cup when I try to drink water, I have to awkwardly keep my lips out of the way when I eat food, and it interferes with kissing my boyfriend. Nobody wants to kiss someone who will leave pink smears on their mouth. 

All hassle aside, though, sometimes I wear lipstick just because I feel like it. It adds an extra punch to pretty much any outfit, and sometimes it's nice to look and feel great. 

If this question was supposed to be about the general "you," instead of me personally, you should wear lipstick any time you feel like it.

Does the occasion constitute what shade of lipstick you should use? What makes it seem appropriate for the occasion and not so strikingly unnatural? 

More than the occasion, I feel like your own skin tone and outfit determine which shade of lipstick you should use. Personally, I wear mostly bright red, magenta, and pale pinks, because anything else looks weird with my skin tone. If you feel unnatural or odd wearing a certain shade of lipstick, don't swear off lipstick completely, just try a different color. If you feel confident and beautiful, you'll look good in any situation. Seriously, people won't judge you any more than you judge yourself. 

How do I pull it off?

Make sure it matches or compliments your outfit in some way. That might seem obvious, but I've seen people whose lipstick clashes with their clothing, and it's not a super wonderful look. I'm not saying you only can wear colors that perfectly match your clothes, because sometimes a bright pop of color really brings your whole outfit together, just use common sense. If you wonder if a shade of lipstick works with what you're wearing, you can always snap a picture to a friend and beg their advice. I do this to my sister all the time, because she's usually more objective than I am.

Balance your lipstick with your eye makeup. Everyone online says you can't do a bold lip with a bold eye, but I personally think it's a good idea. That way your lips don't overpower your whole face, and overall you just look sultry.

But more important than anything else is your confidence. If it feels like all I've said in this answer is that if you're confident you'll look great, that's because that's pretty much all I've said. Seriously, don't be afraid to try new things and give yourself time to get used to them. You'll look fabulous, don't worry about it.

-Alta

A:

Dear W, 

P.S.- The name is Andy Dwyer.

More people should watch Parks and Rec.

-April Ludgate


0 Corrections
Tuesday, July 26, 2016
Question #87440 posted on 07/26/2016 10:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Did you know that a group of kangaroos are called a "mob"? And a group of squid are called a "squad"? And a group of cats are called a "clowder" (what the heck)? And my two personal favorites: A group of ravens are called a "murder", and a group of sea otters are called a "raft"? Way awesome!

So who decides on what a group of animals should be called? I want to be on that committee!!! (Why are kangaroos called a "mob"? and why are ravens called a "murder"... seems a little prejudice.)

What are your favorites? Or what other names are the most interesting/ironic/funny group names?

-Raccoon Bandit and Mumbo Jumnbo

A:

Dear Raccoon Jumbo,

It looks like most of the collective nouns we use for animals come from the Book of Saint Albans, written in 1486 as a gentleman's guide. It's commonly accepted that Juliana Berners is the one who compiled the list, and she probably learned most of the terms through her deep passion for hunting. Going back further than that, there's no evidence of who came up with the terms.

My personal favorite animal group names are a flamboyance of flamingos, an ostentation of peacocks, and a bloat of hippos. If you want any others, check out the list on Wikipedia

-Alta


0 Corrections
Question #87456 posted on 07/26/2016 10:31 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do we know what percentage of LDS members who have received their patriarchal blessing are a part of the Tribe of Judah? What is it? If it tells them they are literally from the tribe (not adopted in it), does that mean that they indeed have Jewish ancestry somewhere along the way?

-Gospel Goodie

A:

Dear G2,

So fun fact, Jews are not all from the tribe of Judah.  I know right? GASP!! But yeah, modern-day Jewish people actually come from a blend of any of the 12 tribes.  The reason we (particularly in the church) think of Jews as being all from the tribe of Judah is because of a misinterpretation. Here's a bit of history for you. 

When the tribes of Israel divided into two Kingdoms, these were called Israel and Judah. While many members of the tribe of Judah lived in the Kingdom of Judah, there were also some that lived in the Kingdom of Israel. In the same way, there were members of the other 11 tribes living in both Kingdoms. In the end of the 8th century B.C., the Assyrians came and attacked the northern kingdom (Israel) and generally thrashed them. About the year 732 B.C., the Assyrians did a mass deportation of the northern part of the northern kingdom in the areas we know as Galilee and Gilead. Those Israelites who were able to escape this deportation fled south into the part of the northern kingdom that we know as Samaria, and into the southern kingdom (Judah). 11 years later, the Assyrians decided they weren't happy with how things were going in the Israelite lands and so they did another mass deportation, this time scattering those Israelites living in the area of Samaria. Again, any Israelites who were able to escape the Assyrians fled south, this time to Judah. Note that to this point the Kingdom of Judah has been left alone. This is because the king of Judah was basically cooperating with the Assyrians while the Israelite king refused to do so.

So now we have the Kingdom of Israel totally scattered, and many Israelite refugees from all different tribes taking shelter in Judah. However, in about 701 B.C. the king of Judah basically ticked off the Assyrians and they started marching through Judah, taking captives and deporting them all around. Right as they were about to finish their conquest of the southern kingdom, however, they were stopped thanks to a miracle of the Lord, and the city of Jerusalem and the surrounding area were spared, leaving roughly 20,000 Israelites representing all the different tribes to one degree or another. Modern Jews trace their lineage back to these 20,000 who remained in Jerusalem after the Assyrian conquest. Due to the mix of tribes represented among those 20,000 as well as the fact that, with their population reduced that drastically, keeping the overall House of Israel alive became more important than marrying within one's own tribe, Jews today accurately claim to descend from all the tribes of Israel, not just the Tribe of Judah.

Why do I tell you this when it doesn't really answer your question? Well, because often in the Church we tend to misunderstand how that lineage works. The thing is, we forget that there were members of all 12 tribes among both the "Lost Tribes" that were scattered during the various Assyrian deportations and the 20,000 Jews who remained at Jerusalem. Basically, because of the way genetics work as civilizations spread, almost anyone today can find some Jewish ancestry if they go back far enough in their family trees. This is why, as True to the Faith puts it, "Because each of us has many bloodlines running in us, two members of the same family may be declared as being of different tribes in Israel." The lineage declared in your PB is likely based on the bloodline that is most dominant in you as well as the particular calling you have individually within the House of Israel, such as Ephramites' role in the Gathering of Israel. (NOTE: That last sentence is speculation on my part. I feel like I heard or read it somewhere, but I can't figure out where so for now take it as The Gospel According to Dr. Occam).

So in a nutshell, all this goes to say that, no, we don't know what percentage of members of the church are of the Tribe of Judah, but whatever it may be, those people would not necessarily have to have ancestors who were Jews in the modern sense of the word. It doesn't really matter though, because as I explained, pretty much everyone has Jewish ancestors somewhere in their family tree, and as such would have the potential to be from any tribe of Israel.

~Dr. Occam


0 Corrections
Question #87457 posted on 07/26/2016 10:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear Zedability & Sheebs & those with Canadian kinsmen, friends, foes, etc.,

I asked a Canadian the other day if they have Prairie Dogs in the Canadian Prairies (Saskatchewan). The response, was "Oh, yeah. We have dogs everywhere." I have to admit, I wanted to laugh (actually, I think I did with no remorse) at the ridiculous answer -- I couldn't believe someone could be THAT stupid. I've never met anyone who thought prairie dogs were actually dogs. That was a first. (I know, I know... I'm mean... and we're all stupid in one way or another). I went on to explain that they weren't actually dogs, but rodents and continued to explain their behavior and what they look liked. And he interrupted me, and said, "You mean, ground squirrels?" I said, "Well, sorta, but those are different animals technically." I showed them a picture of Prairie Dogs, and he said, "In Canada, we call those Ground Squirrels." I responded, "Um.... but those are different. I can see how they are easily confused, but they aren't the same." But he adamantly said in Canada, no one knows about an animal called a 'prairie dog' because they are called a 'ground squirrel.'" I again, showed him a picture of a Prairie Dog Colony, and he said, "Yup, those are ground squirrels." During this quickly heated discussion, I research and showed him that both prairie dogs and ground squirrels are in Canada -- they are separate entities -- not one and the same. He shot back, "Well, no Canadian calls them 'prairie dogs.' That's absurd." Both he and I went our separate ways, huffing and puffing.

Yes, I got into a fight over prairie dogs... and I'm ashamed/proud of it.

Is what he saying true? Do you call "prairie dogs" "ground squirrels" instead? Because I know Canada has both rodents -- which are two different types of rodents. I know they are extremely similar, but does no one in Canada know what a true Prairie Dog is (I mean, do you guys just know them as "ground squirrels" and the term "prairie dog" is just something truly unheard of)? Or is that one Canadian just not the brightest crayon in the box? (He also believed mice lived on Mars... and got super mad at me when I "burst his bubble" that he was looking at a photo-shopped image -- his "mouse" was a giant Martian boulder). I think Zedability and Sheebs would be a better representation on what Canadians actually call their wildlife. Please shed light on this confusing situation.

-Candid non-Canadian

P.S. But to his credit, prairie dogs and ground squirrels are very, very similar. Is there a website that compares them side by side? Or even just an image of them side by side, highlighting their differences?
P.P.S. Please don't judge me too much.

A:

Dear you,

Everyone I know in Alberta called them gophers. Occasionally, I heard people call them prairie dogs. I have never, ever heard them called ground squirrels. This website compares gophers and prairie dogs, which makes me think that gopher is another term for ground squirrel, maybe? But then this website compares gophers and ground squirrels, and so does this one!

Basically I don't know what to believe anymore, but I'm going to keep referring to all of them as gophers, because it's the most phonetically pleasing to say.

-Zedability


1 Correction
Question #87452 posted on 07/26/2016 6:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

The Trib just posted an article about the man accused of being the BYU Groper having his record expunged. I made the mistake of reading the comments section, and several people said that according to LinkedIn he currently works for BYU in the honor code office. That seems...off to me. Is that true, or are commenters misinformed or just trying to upset people?

(I am aware that his participation in a diversion program should not be seen as an admission of guilt.)

-Curious Cat

A:

Dear you,

I was only able to find one profile that seemed to fit this man's description, and it doesn't say anything about the Honor Code Office, although he has been involved in some unrelated BYU clubs and activities.

-Zedability


0 Corrections
Question #87454 posted on 07/26/2016 6:41 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

As children, did you believe that babies really came from storks? Did you believe babies were created in some other absurd way?

-Diaper Sniper

A:

Dear you,

When I was younger, I knew that babies grew "in Mommy's tummy." When I got old enough to start asking questions, my parents said something to the effect that a couple would pray and ask Heavenly Father to let a baby grow in Mommy's tummy. This satisfied my curiosity until my mom gave me the sex talk when I was eight.

-Zedability

A:

Dear sasparilla sasquatch,

I was pretty well aware of the fertilization process between sperm and embryo even as a young child, thanks to nurses for parents and some documentaries we had lying around the house. I was less well-informed that sex was the mechanism to initiate said process and was somewhat traumatized when I learned this in the fifth grade.

I hope to be pretty candid with my hypothetical future kids about everything, just treating it respectfully and whatnot. Besides, we all know babies come from herons.

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Corrections
Question #87455 posted on 07/26/2016 6:41 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What do you guys think of the Washington Hypothesis & Lincoln Hypothesis? Book or video of lecturer? Worth checking out?

-Gospel Goodie

A:

Dear Gospel Goodie,

I haven't read those books, and neither have any of the other writers, if 96 hours without a response is any indication. However, I did read some online reviews that say that the books are highly speculative and that any evidence supporting those hypotheses is circumstantial at best. Here's an example of one such review.

Personally, I don't feel inclined to read either of them.

-The Entomophagist


0 Corrections
Posted on 07/26/2016 5:31 p.m. New Correction on: #87449 Is it possible to not live in BYU approved housing? I would preferably like to live ...
Posted on 07/26/2016 2:39 p.m. New Correction on: #87449 Is it possible to not live in BYU approved housing? I would preferably like to live ...