"The 13th article of faith: a recipe for dating success. The ladies seek after these things *kisses biceps *" -Foreman
Question #79112 posted on 09/16/2014 3:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear Owlet and El-ahrairah,

Are you guys dating each other?

-Marlsven

A:

Dear Marlsven,

Gurrrrrlllll you cray-cray. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #79135 posted on 09/16/2014 1:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is Board Question #37225 of September 15th 1998 the first question EVER asked and answered by the 100 Hour Board? If so, then why is it not labeled Board Question #1 (which actually happens to be in 2003)? Why do older questions have higher numbers?

<3/Me

A:

Dear You,

That was probably the very first question ever posted to the 100 Hour Board website. As you can read on our history page, the first questions asked to the Board were in 1995 when it was an actual board in the Wilkinson Center.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Question #79077 posted on 09/16/2014 1:24 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I need the recipe for the mini-loaves with honey butter from Sugar n Spice. Haven't found it anywhere. Would it be possible for you to find it for me? A large BYU-loving family reunion thanks you in advance!

-#cravingBYUbreadinVirginia

A:

Dear Amy,

Could this be what you're looking for?

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #79122 posted on 09/16/2014 12:48 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why am I seeing lots of the energy drink, Monster's, capital M as a sticker on lots of vehicles? Are they showing how much they like the drink or does the M symbolize something I don't know about?

-Leonard Peregrine

A:

Dear Slitheen,

It looks like they're just really easy to get a hold of, and so there's a lot more people who enjoy Monster that have the ability to put the sticker on their cars.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #79059 posted on 09/16/2014 12:48 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I love my real leather cell phone case for my Galaxy Note 2. However, the plastic shell has broken in several places and isn't very securely holding my phone anymore (plus it looks bad). Is there anywhere I can buy a plastic shell to glue inside my current leather case? The case itself wasn't extremely expensive, but I don't see any more of them on eBay.

-Didn't Kill the Cow Myself

A:

Dear Doctor,

Something like this could work, though it seems like they're temporarily sold out. Just Googling "plastic case for Galaxy Note 2" brings up a fair amount of results for something you can replace it with.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #79105 posted on 09/16/2014 12:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I work for the post office. Consequently, I see a LOT of mail on a daily basis (in the thousands). So, recently, Victoria's Secret has been sending out coupons to all of their members (or subscribers, or something like that, I don't really know. All I know is I'm seeing a lot of their stuff). On the front piece of the mail is the picture of a woman's face, and I think it's in the top left-hand corner that tells the receiver that they have a coupon for a free item. The items I've seen for free so far are: a thong, a panty, and a hip hugger. The mail piece looks identical, except for the free coupon inside. My question is: does Victoria's Secret randomly select which free item their customers will receive, or do they go by how much each customer usually spends? Like, if someone tends to spend over $50, will they be the one to receive a coupon for a panty (if that is the most expensive of the items)? Or do customers of certain regions receive the same free item (like everyone in Utah County will get a hip hugger)?

-Fly Like an Eagle

A:

Dear Amy,

Based on some forums I browsed, it seems to be completely random.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #79070 posted on 09/16/2014 12:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

This is going to sound racist maybe, and I really don't mean it that way. Also, it's a bit of a generalization, but here goes...

Over my years at BYU I've had several sets of Latina roommates. Some of them are sisters, some are just friends and some didn't even know each other before moving in. These girls always speak in Spanish around the apartment and over the years I've noticed that by the end of the year together they are always at each others throats. Compared to my non-Latina roommates, they are more dramatic, messier and fight a lot more with each other. At least once a week there is an ear-shattering screaming fight, and one of them always stomps out of the apartment and slams the door. This has been repeated in several different complexes with about a dozen different girls.

I have seen American and non-Latina girls fight before in a similar manner, but it feels like the Latina's do it WAY more than other ethnicities. I also lived in South America for several years and noticed that the women are quicker to anger than they were in Europe (where I also lived) or in the US.

Why might this be? Is it just a cultural thing or are they all naturally hot-blooded? Also why are they so messy? My mom reminded me that when we lived in South America we had a maid and it was VERY common for most families who could afford maids to have one, and she said that it's likely that these girls are used to having a maid and used to not having to do any cleaning themselves and that's why are so messy. What do you think?

-Please stop slamming the door

A:

Dear Reader,

Simply put, different people react to things in different ways.

Although I don't normally slam the door or scream at people, I'm much less concerned about conflict then my current set of roommates and many others I've interacted with here at BYU. I'm known among people who know me well as "telling it like it is," or "not holding back." To me, my behavior is normal. If anything, I find the tendency we sometimes have within Provo culture to hold back, or to "silently fester" about things that are bothering us rather than discussing them as more unhealthy than loud arguing. (Not that either is acceptable.) This is one of the things I love about the Board. We can respectfully disagree here. Sometimes in Provo culture I feel like we think the definitions of "contention" and "conflict" are the same. They are not. Conflict will always occur when different groups of humans interact with each other. We don't deal with it by ignoring it. The trick is to prevent conflict from becoming contentious.

I'm not saying your roommates are right to behave this way, but you might want to take a closer look at how they might see it: for them, this is how you resolve conflict. This is the way you deal with it.

I don't want to reveal too much about myself, but I'm willing to say that I feel my family is, culturally, much more.... "honest" than others are. I'm so glad. It's become a fundamental part of who I am, and I'm grateful for that element of my personality. Are hispanics more prone to favor the "honest" side of the spectrum? Maybe. Terms like "hispanic" and "latina" cover lots of countries and cultures. I'm not sure anyone can really speak from experience for all of them.

Have some compassion for your roommates. Chances are, there are some things about Utah culture that they find unsettling and unhealthy. They're probably right about some of them, too. I've always loved the following quote:

Where … national traditions or customs conflict with the teachings of God, set them aside. Where traditions and customs are in harmony with His teachings, they should be cherished” (Removing Barriers to Happiness,” Ensign, May 1998, 87)

Every culture has aspects of its heritage that are beautiful and assist in individual efforts to live the gospel of Jesus Christ. However, each culture also has aspects that are not in harmony with the teachings of the gospel of Jesus Christ. Surely each of us, acknowledging that we have our own "cultural demons," can be patient as we all - together - work in harmony to live the gospel of Jesus Christ.

- Haleakalā


0 Comments
Question #79091 posted on 09/16/2014 12:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Techies,

I apologize for my less that clear question, and have since modified it (because I'm desperate to have an answer). In Board Question #79005, the "E drive" I was referring to was indeed an external hardrive that you plug in through a USB port. I am using a new PC with the newest Windows.

Is there a way to get it so that every time I plug in my external hardrive it just saves the latest versions of my drafts, adds my new pics and photos? Or do I have to really go into each file and save it all again to my external hard drive? I just want it to back up everything systematically and automatically? I don't want to have to consciously think about which files I've worked on and transfer it over (I'm afraid I'll miss something). And I'm worried I'll then have like 50 versions of the same paper (but at different draft periods). I just want the most updated version of it. Does this make sense?

-Fossilized Typewriter

P.S. If you can't asnwer the above question because you don't have enough details, maybe you can answer this one: As mentioned, I have a PC and the latest version of MICROSOFT (hate it). So when you turn on your computer, there's all these apps all over the place. Anyway. One of the Apps I use is: Netflix. However, the Netflix is all completely black. I can't see the menu. I just see categories like: "drama" or "top pics" but I can't see the movie/show in the boxes? I just see contours of boxes? I don't want to select each box to find the show I want... that would take forever! How do I get to see what I'm selecting on the menu again?

A:

Dear Fossilized Typewriter,

There's nothing like this built into the operating system, if that's what you're asking. You might have seen someone using the Time Machine feature built into Mac computers, and maybe that's what you're thinking of. Unfortunately, your operating system was made by Microsoft, an entirely different company.

The only thing I can recommend is that you put everything you want to back up in the same folder. Every time you want to back up your files, you can delete the folder from your hard drive and copy the new folder over again. This is very inefficient, (you would have to keep all the files you want to back in the same folder, and the computer will back up everything every time) but you could make it work.

There are many third-party pieces of software that assist you in backing up your computer in various ways. Perhaps one of them has the feature set you are looking for. Try Googling "back up my computer" and see what you come up with.

As for the Netflix problem you're having, I really can't figure out what's going on without seeing the computer. As I've said before, I strongly recommend you try to find someone that can help you with those kind of problems in person.

Good luck!

- Haleakalā


0 Comments
Question #79124 posted on 09/16/2014 12:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

PLEASE HELP ME!! I read an article/talk either from the BYU website or LDS website. It was about dating and courtship. They gave a tip that if you really want to know if you are in "love" or strongly like someone (to the point where you want to get married) but you aren't sure if those are true feelings or you are just physically attracted to them (this includes hugging, kissing, cuddling..etc). They suggested that you should go about two weeks without physical contact and see if you still like being with each other. Then after the two weeks you know that you really do like them. I need help finding this article/talk. I have been searching for hours and can't find it. No I can look at my Browser history because I don't have access to it anymore because it was a public computer. PLEASE HELP ME!!

-struggling to find

A:

Dear Cinnamon,

You're probably looking for this New Era article by John Bytheway: "What Do Kisses Mean?"

-Marguerite St. Just


0 Comments
Question #79096 posted on 09/16/2014 noon
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am so conflicted when it comes to the issue of gay rights and homosexuality in general. I have many gay friends who I love and respect. A few of them are getting married in the near future. I want to be able to congratulate them and be happy for them, but I hold back because of my LDS beliefs. It hurts, I guess. I don't want to betray my beliefs, but I don't want my friends to feel I am not happy for them or that I am judging them. How do I respond in these situations?

On a related note, I feel like I can say all I want that the church does not hate or condemn homosexual people, but in the end, it really doesn't seem there is a place for them in our religion. I understand the reasons, I guess - marriage between a man and a woman is essential to exaltation- and that is just what God has decreed... But it is still so sad to me. I hate having to say, "Well, yes, you can be a member of my church, but you have to either marry someone you're not attracted to, or remain celibate all your life... um, but it will all be worth it in the end!" It makes me want to cry that my friends will never know the joy of the gospel and the love of Christ through really no fault of their own... It doesn't seem fair to me. Am I missing something here? I really want to know. How do I explain these things to my gay and lesbian friends? Thank you so much in advance for your help, I know these are very difficult questions.

-Pippin

A:

Dear you,

I have many gay friends who I love and respect. A few of them are getting married in the near future. I want to be able to... be happy for them, but I hold back because of my LDS beliefs....I don't want my friends to feel I am not happy for them or that I am judging them. How do I respond in these situations?

I wanted to bring up this portion of your question mostly to say that I'm not really going to address it. How to respond to specific individual situations isn't something I feel particularly qualified to instruct you on. I'd urge you to pray for guidance and let the Spirit fill your mouth as you open it; he can do a much better job than I could.

It really doesn't seem there is a place for them in our religion...

I can see how someone would arrive at this conclusion, but to me it indicates an improper view of the Church. The expression that the Church should serve not as a museum for saints but as a hospital for sinners brings us closer to the true point: not because those naturally inclined to homsoexuality are inherently more sinful than the rest of us but because the reason we ALL need our religion is because of our imperfection. There is a place in our religion for anyone who can be better than he is (which is all of us) or for anyone who has successfully completely emulated the Savior (none of us yet). There are blessings of the Gospel that may have to wait: eternal companions, children, etc. However, there are likewise many heterosexual members waiting on the Lord in these situations as well. The Church is not a social club for perfect nuclear families. It is an organization founded on and sustained by a message of truth that applies to every single human being who has (or will) ever lived.

I hate having to say, "Well, yes, you can be a member of my church, but you have to either marry someone you're not attracted to, or remain celibate all your life... um, but it will all be worth it in the end!"

You say that end phrase like it's a consolation. That end phrase is the entire point. Yes, some of us start our eternal families earlier or in different circumstances than others. However, our earth lives are "but a moment" in our eternal destinies. Remaining faithful to the laws of God "all your life," is certainly a sacrifice, but it is one that is asked universally of the Saints. 

Joseph Smith taught that "a religion that does not require the sacrifice of all things never has the power sufficient to produce the faith necessary unto life and salvation." This sacrifice will require different things of different people, but it will be required of everyone. There is no church member who can escape the requirement of sacrifice of all things. This means that any of us must be willing to suffer anything according to the will of God, and for this sacrifice we will receive "life and salvation." 

It makes me want to cry that my friends will never know the joy of the gospel and the love of Christ through really no fault of their own...

If this were true, it would certainly be something worthy of sincere sorrow. However, your friends can absolutely know the joy of the Gospel and the love of Christ. These things are held out to all men and women. The good news of Christ's redemption of mankind is freely available to all of God's children. He does not send any of us away. It needs to be made clear here that being susceptible to a particular temptation or being inclined to a particular sin does not somehow except us from God's love. God knows we are all going to be tempted and at times give in to that temptation. This is why he sent Christ to provide an infinite Atonement so that what matters is not the failures in our past but way in which we direct our hearts: toward him and a future of obedience and true repentance and sanctification.

It doesn't seem fair to me.

I think that one of the things that really does make this hard is that humans have a longing for "fairness" but an inadequate perspective to understand what fairness is. God is perfectly just, but He also has a perfect and infinite perspective, while our views are all too often limited to that which we can currently perceive or conceive of. Is it "fair" for me to give one of my children one cookie and another child two cookies and to give a third child only vegetables? Perhaps your initial instinct is that this is not fair. What if I told you that one of my children is two (only needs one cookie) one is ten and just came home from a soccer game (is hungrier) and the third is diabetic (and can't have the sugar right now)? God is aware of what we need: not just right at this moment, but to be perfected eternally. God's goal is not to make my earth life contain the same type or number of trials as someone else's. It is to allow and help me to face those things which I need in order for me to be who He (and I) needs me to be. These trials will differ from Concealocanth's or Tally M.'s or Maven's or yours. However, we can trust in the knowledge that if we all endure our trials and come unto Christ the end result will be glorious for all of us: eternal life with God.

Am I missing something here? ...How do I explain these things to my gay and lesbian friends? 

Explain with love. As I said earlier, pray for the guidance of the Spirit and speak as you are prompted. Remember that you cannot force knowledge or acceptance of truth on anyone. Agency is powerful and allows us all the choice to accept or deny the truths of the Gospel. Speak truthfully and in the charity of God, neither judging those you have no authority to judge, nor excusing those whose actions you cannot give absolution for. These things (judgment and forgiveness of sin) are for God. All we can do is explain that we love others, that we seek to emulate God in this, that we know God loves them, and that we can testify to particular truths that He has revealed to us.

It is a sign of your tenderheartedness that you hurt for others. Empathy is a critical quality in becoming Christlike, because it allows us to mourn with those that mourn and comfort those who need comforting. Recognize pain. Comfort those who struggle. Know, though, that struggling is asked of all of us because it is what we need to be refined and perfected. Finally, remember that the Lord does not give commandments to any of us without making it possible for us to keep them and that if we endure well our times of trial, we will be exalted on high

Love,

~Anne, Certainly


0 Comments
Question #79079 posted on 09/16/2014 11:54 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have any of you used hola unblocker? http://hola-unblocker.en.softonic.com/ I am a US citizen that is barely across the border that pays for netflix services? And I use to have no problem using hola unblocker on my last computer, but since my new computer --- hola has been sporadic? It works only sometimes and only for a few minutes at a time. Any tips on hola unblocker? IS there a way to lock it into my system so it wors right all the time?

-Fossilized Typewriter

A:

Dear Fossilized Typewriter,

Unfortunately, using the Hola extension is a violation of the Netflix terms of service. The 100 Hour Board can't help you do that. Last time we did a picture of a puppy, so this time we'll do a picture of a panda.

pandas_1.jpg

     (source)

Good luck with your new computer!

- Haleakalā


0 Comments
Question #79020 posted on 09/16/2014 11:12 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why don't I move when I'm asleep to a more comfortable position? When I was a kid I was all over the bed. When I'm trying to go to sleep, I move almost constantly. Now after I fall asleep, I'm usually in the last position I can remember being in (if I remember that at all). Is there anything I can do to prevent waking up with a sore arm (or whatever) in the morning from sleeping on it wrong the whole night?

-Sleeping Beauty

A:

Dear Little Briar Rose,

I haven't found anything on why, but if you want to wake up without sleeping on your arm I suggest finding a comfortable position and restfully meditating to fall asleep so that you can fall asleep in that position. Also, use pillows to help you find a comfortable position.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #79129 posted on 09/16/2014 11:06 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board female members who are married,

As a woman, I'm curious as to how helpful the pre-marital classes at BYU are, as well as thoughts from your own experiences of "meeting with the bishop" frequently in the months between your engagement and marriage. Are those classes really just sex ed 101 for all the people whose parents never really brought them up correctly? For that matter, why is the class for women 3 hours long and the guys' one is only 2 hours long?

While I myself am a currently unmarried virgin, I'm by not the kind of person whose first kiss happens at the altar... whoops, I've kissed my fair share of guys and made out with a few of them, I'm such a slut by Mormon standards [/sarcasm]. Additionally, I'm fortunate enough to have feminist-minded and sex-positive friends and resources (Laci Green's youtube channel comes to mind) who have filled whatever gaps my parents left behind in my understanding of female anatomy and common sexual misconceptions women often have to deal with (e.g. "it hurts the first time," "don't plan on getting an orgasm," etc.). What all this boils down to is that I consider myself about as well educated on sex as I'll ever be without actually doing it.

What I'm fundamentally asking is, is there some "Mormon sex secret" that only gets shared in BYU premarital classes, parental sit-down talks, and bishop meetings, or is it pretty much just the fact that so many LDS women are cultured to not embrace their own sexuality? Again, this is all coming from someone who hasn't had sex, but I more or less understand "how it works" and it's not like it's some great mystery you can't find in a SFW, educational format online. I don't see why you would need to discuss your sex life with anyone who's not your spouse-to-be/actual spouse (unless you are seeing a therapist or doctor).

-ms. c

A:

Dear ms. c,

I didn't take the BYU Health Center pre-marital class (see MSJ's answer below for more on that), but I can comment on the meetings with the bishop. Clearly, the information given will vary from bishop to bishop, but for me it had nothing to do with sex. It was all temple preparation and general marriage advice from an LDS perspective. Also, every meeting (except for recommend interviews) was conducted with both Mr. Maven and me together. I would have been quite uncomfortable if he'd started giving us advice on sexual intimacy, at least if I didn't ask about it (and I didn't and never would).

There's no secret. And you're right, you can get educational information on the mechanics of sex elsewhere, but all too often young LDS people are completely unprepared because they've never been told and they're too worried or scared to attempt to get the information on their own. You're lucky people close to you were open with you, because so many members of the Church are not. For example, my parents were never very forthcoming about sex. We didn't talk about it, and it felt weird to ask them about it. Consequently, I learned on my own, thankfully from reputable sources.

I think it's a good thing that these people can take a class to learn what they didn't learn from their parents or elsewhere in a safe environment where they feel that the information will be treated respectfully. It's not like they're discussing their sex life with anyone (since most members haven't had sexual experiences prior to marriage), they're just trying to be prepared for a new experience.

--Maven

A:

Dear Cinnamon,

My friend gave me all her notes from the BYU pre-marital class here. You can judge its helpfulness from that, I hope.

-Marguerite St. Just


0 Comments
Question #79133 posted on 09/16/2014 11:06 a.m.
Q:

Dear football fans of the 100 Hour Board,

I'm as stoked about the next person about BYU's football season so far (we just beat Houston tonight). I think we're generally playing well and I'm excited to see how far we'll go and how much we've improved.

However. The big damper on our successes this season will be how relatively easy and light our schedule is. I mean, it's not really an achievement for a program like BYU to beat someone like Savannah State. And all the commentators mention that during the games. So my question is, why?

Why did we decide to take such a cake schedule, knowing that even if we won, it would kind of be a 'whoop-de-doo'? Was it because we couldn't get better teams to fit us in? Or (worse) was it a calculated morale-booster where all the fans get excited about watching us whoop up on lesser teams, making us look better than we are?

Don't get me wrong. I think we're doing well and I'll always be a big Cougar fan. I'd just like to see us play the likes of Alabama or Auburn someday instead of the Idaho States of the NCAA.

-Coug-girl

A:

Dear Cosma,

When it comes right down to it, it's about the money. That's why we switched to being independent - ESPN said they would give us more money to do that. It's hard to schedule games against conference teams. Being in a conference, they are required to play all the other teams in their conference and that leaves few spots for non-conference games. Each school then tries to fill the remaining spots with a balance of teams that they think they can win against but will still be impressive to beat. As an independent team we have to convince people to play us - and that usually means monetarily, though sometimes it's "We'll go there if you come here." It's particularly hard to convince teams to come play at BYU because of the altitude difference and losing to a good BYU team on the road doesn't help their image. This complicates things since we are required to play at least five home games so we take what we can get.

Really these schools aren't competing so much athletically as they are financially.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #79126 posted on 09/16/2014 9:36 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

For those of you old enough to really remember, where were you on 9/11/01?

Sorry if this is in the archives...I looked I promise.

-Constructor

A:

Dear you,

I distinctly remember being woken a little earlier than usual, and being rushed to the living room to watch the towers fall. I remembered feeling empty, and not knowing how to react. Everyone got to school late, and the lunch chatter was quite subdued that day. 

-Squirrel

A:

Dear Constructor,

I remember being awoken from my bed, far earlier than was really necessary, by my mother. My parents and all my siblings were gathered in the family room, where the TV blared the events of the morning. I am sure we said a prayer together as a family before my brothers went off to school, and Dad went off to work (my sisters and I were homeschooled at the time, so we stayed there).  I was only eight—a precocious eight year old, mind you, but an eight year old nonetheless—and while I recognized the horror the situation called for, probably the worst part of the tragedy in my mind was the lack of anything on TV besides the news.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 

A:

Dear Constructor,

I was getting ready for school. For some reason, my mom had the T.V. on in her room and saw the announcement about the first plane crash. My siblings and I came up and watched what we could of it before we had to go to school. We kept watching announcements about it in school, too. I remember writing in my journal something like, "The most important thing in my lifetime so far happened today."

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear Constructor,

I was on a 6th grade biology field trip. Nobody told us anything while we were on the field trip, and the first indication that I got that something was wrong was near the end of the day in art class when the TV was on in the background. I remembered having seen reports of the bombings of the US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, and at first I assumed this was something similar. It wasn't until I saw footage of the towers collapsing that I realized this was something much, much bigger.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #79047 posted on 09/16/2014 9:36 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I hear all the time that as a white male I'm privileged. When I ask for hard numbers on that, I hear that it's like asking for hard numbers on gravity--It's just so obvious that you're a moron for asking for it.

I guess I'm a moron because I still like to see numbers (something of the scientist in me). I've tried looking for numbers on this, but all the numbers I've seen seem incomplete, i.e. compare men and women without taking into account different choices that men and women culturally make. I.e., how many hours a day do full-time exempt women work vs full-time exempt men? Are there any good numbers that reduce the confounding that happens because men and women decide different priorities?

-White Male

A:

Dear White Male,

Reasons why whites are privileged:

  • Blacks tend to be arrested more often than whites [1][2][3][4]
  • There is a salary gap between whites and minorities [5][6][7]
  • Racism still exists in America, and whites are typically favored [8][9]
  • Poverty is more wide-spread among minorities than whites [10][11][12]
  • Whites tend to be more educated [13][14][15]
  • Whites tend to have longer life expectancies than blacks, though eclipsed by Asian Americans and Latinos [16]

Reasons why men are privileged:

  • The gender pay gap favors men (and yes, some may be explained by women leaving and reentering the workforce, but source 17 discusses this more in depth) [17][18][19]
  • Men have a "power" position in society and American culture [20]
  • Some view the fact that men have the priesthood in the Church as an example of male privilege. I don't want to have this discussion here, but I think it is important to say that some people see this as an example of inequality.

Obviously there are more examples that I could give, but this should be enough to show you that simply being born as a white male in America sets you apart from 99% of the world. You are privileged in many regards.

As for the numbers seeming incomplete, this is difficult to address. Clearly, race does not explain all the variation in salaries, health, education, crime, etc. I think what those claiming inequality are actually asserting is that if you were born as (for example) an average black woman, it would be much harder for you to reach the specific goals that you might currently have than if you were born a black male. In fact, you likely would not even have the same goals, since many of your desires are culturally defined and deemed "possible" from what you have seen around you. Of course there are reasons that may explain why blacks are more likely to be arrested: you could claim that a higher percentage of blacks than whites grow up in poverty, leading to a greater likelihood of a life of crime, which is often passed to their kids and causes a cycle. But that doesn't change the fact that blacks are more likely to be arrested, which is inherently sad and wrong.

The salary difference between men and women is a little different, as you mentioned. It is absolutely true that the average woman works fewer hours than the average man. There is also evidence to suggest that women leaving the workforce and reentering (possibly due to having children or caring for them) explains some fluctuation in the wage difference. And some is explained by the fact that women tend to be less flexible with hours and overtime than men (generally due to children and family), as explained in the New York Times article cited as source 17. However, even accounting for this, it seems that women are paid somewhat less.

There can be a lot of debate over how privileged you are after controlling for various variables. But, the fact remains that the average white man fares much better than the average minority woman in America in terms of salary, education, poverty, crime statistics, and racism.

-Ozymandias


0 Comments
Question #79131 posted on 09/16/2014 9:30 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Bored,

About how frequently does the "I'm Board!" function repeat questions (non-sequentially)?

-The Inquisitor

A:

Dear Wade,

According to Board Question #67591, the "I'm Board!" function randomly selects a number between 1 and the current number of questions and tests to see if the question is "valid" (i.e. published). If the question isn't, it repeats until up to ten times after which you will be directed to Board Question #12345.

Currently there are about 80,000 submitted questions. I have no idea how many are valid so let's just say it's about 90%. Then, for convenience, we'll round down and say there are 70,000 valid questions. This means that there is less than a one in a million chance of selecting an invalid question ten times in a row. We can effectively ignore that feature, which is nice because it complicates things. 

Now, for a graph! This is generated by 1-P(all the questions are the same), again, ignoring the possibility that we are being redirected to the cop-out question.

Let's get more questions that let me make graphs

After 312 clicks, you have an over 50% chance of a repeat. After 802 clicks, you have an over 99% chance of having a repeat. At 70,001 clicks you are guaranteed to have a repeat.

To illustrate that the odds of a repeat coming from the cop-out are negligible, let's say we've clicked 70,000 times. There is a 63% chance that we've clicked and rolled 12345. There is only a 0.007% chance that we've had 10 invalid questions in a row on any one of the clicks. Somewhere between 10,000,000 and 100,000,000 clicks we get a 1% chance of being forced to 12345.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #79084 posted on 09/16/2014 9:30 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do you think the bachelor would ever do a season with homosexuals? I would suspect not, but with the way Hollywood is going.........

Also, does Chris Harrison just show up for the rose ceremonies or does he stay with them the entire time even when they are traveling all over the world or on some exotic island? Or does he just fly out for rose ceremonies

Jeanette Lenz

A:

Dear Lenz,

In an interview earlier this year, Chris Harrison actually stated that there'll probably never be a gay bachelor. He said that the show works so well that it need not vary its "straight-folks-seeking-love" model. There is also the potential of driving away viewers by promoting such a controversial position. That being said, I could imagine there being a show unto itself that is a spin-off/copy-cat of The Bachelor with gay men.

As for the other part of your question, I am pretty sure all of the seasons spent in exotic locales are in fact Chris Harrison's way of getting a paid vacation. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Question #78977 posted on 09/16/2014 7:12 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I got back from my mission less than a year ago and I've been dating this one girl ever since I got back. I keep thinking about whether we should break up or not, and it's a hard decision. So I'm asking for your help on several aspects of the relationship.

For one thing, I have very very little experience with dating different girls because I have never had a girlfriend before, and although I did go on dates with lots of different girls before my mission, it was a very different situation--as in, marriage was NOT anywhere near the horizon. In fact, I made great effort to avoid even getting into a serious relationship. Anyways, after my mission, I only went on a date with 1 other girl, since there weren't very many LDS girls in the area, and then I soon moved to Provo and started dating the one I'm currently with.

I always imagined it would go like this: I would get back from my mission and date lots of different girls with whom it just didn't feel "right" for whatever reason, and then finally after so much searching, I would meet someone who is perfect and every way, and we would date for a while and then realize we're perfect for each other and get married and everything would be perfect. However, when I started dating this girl, everything seemed somewhat perfect for quite a while, and still seems good but not perfect, but since I have so little experience, I can't help but think about how if I were to be single again and then date around more, I would find a better match for me. But then I don't know that for sure and I don't want to spoil the good relationship I've got if there's not a better one in my future.

So:
1) Are these concerns valid? Should I break up with her solely so that I can date other people and have more experience and make a more informed choice after a year or two, even if it means getting back together with her, the original girlfriend, because she was the best choice for me all along? I guess I'm just really pained by the idea of marriage being "permanent," and pained by the expectation that I will continue to doubt my decision, thinking what if I had done things differently and there could be a better woman out there for me???? (I'm a math major, which I chose because there's only ONE right answer to each problem. Obviously I struggle with subjective, debatable questions.)

Another thing is that I feel dumb that my feelings for her are really back-and-forth, in that sometimes when I think of her and how we're dating, I'm really happy with being close to her, and other times, I'm like "why haven't we broken up already." It's just weird for me that I can be so in love with her for a day or something and then so NOT after that for a day or two and then on again and off again. I feel like after this long of dating, I'm a little more often in the "off again" stage, but I attribute that to the fact that we're kind of out of the "honeymoon" stage (for lack of a better descriptor), as we've been dating so long that the initial excitement has kind of worn off and I'm realizing she's not perfect.

So on this point I'm confused about:
2) Is this normal after several months of dating something? Or does it mean we should break up? (Of course nobody's perfect ... not the answer I'm looking for)
3) If I date someone else should I expect the same thing -- a few months of crazy intense infatuation at the beginning and then we're more just like friends?
4) If "yes" to #3, does that mean I'll have to date several different girls, for a LONG time each, before I find out which one I would like to marry?

Another thing is that she likes me at least a little bit more than I like her, which for some reason is a turnoff, but
5) should that matter?

I suffer from depression and I want to make a good decision that comes from me rather than coming from the depression, which is hard because my depression makes it so that when I think of breaking up with her, I anticipate a huge emotional emptiness, which of course makes breaking up with her seem extremely undesirable. So:

6) Do you think I should wait to get married until I feel more in control of my depression? It's fairly mild, after all, as in, I had a therapist for a year or so but he never put me on medication for it.

Thanks for your perspective! Of course you can't tell me for SURE what to do because you don't know my situation completely, but what I'm looking for is some guidelines like "IF this, THEN you're golden, but IF something else, THEN break up."

Love,
Brazilian

A:

Dear bazillion,

I have a ton of thoughts about this, and no idea how to express all of them. Let me just start out by saying that you're asking good questions. These are questions that everyone in a relationship needs to ask themselves sooner or later. And you acknowledge the basic problem with these questions: there is no best answer. There are good answers, and there are bad answers, but figuring out which answer is best or worst is essentially impossible. Or, to put it in Randall Munroe's words:

useless.jpg

(Source: XKCD)

So, where do I start?

Now, in your question, you say that obviously we can't tell you whether you should or should not break up... but you ask for us to say "if this, then yes; if this, then no." That is, unfortunately, pretty much the same thing. We can't tell you what you should or should not do. In fact, I'd be rather horrified if you took my advice as anything more than just that--outside advice, a second opinion. Saying "if X, then the right decision is to break up with her" is kind of like saying "if your opponent moves king's pawn forward as their first move in a game of chess, then you should do this and you're guaranteed victory." Chess is complex enough that finding a mathematical solution is beyond the capacity of even the most advanced computers. And relationships are infinitely more complex than chess. All we can do is give general advice and hope that you can figure out how to apply it properly. That said, here's my advice.

I think the first thing you need to know is that this happens in every relationship sooner or later. You're not going to feel an intense attraction to your significant other all of the time, or even most of the time. And that is okay. Ideally, rather than disappearing and leaving a void, it will be replaced by things like trust, investment, and concern for each other's well-being. These are the foundations for a stable long-term relationship.

You're also going to run into problems in any relationship. Unless you and your significant other are perfect, which you admit you are not, then you are inevitably going to hurt each other and make each other upset. Obviously, too much of that is a warning sign that your relationship isn't healthy, but the occasional difficulty is just evidence that you're human.

My next piece of advice is something you probably already know, but I'm going to say it anyway because it is so important. I prefer to give it in the context of an analogy. A relationship is like food. When you are making food, there are two things that determine what you make. One is the starting ingredients. The other is the way you cook them. It is true that some ingredients are inherently better than others (for instance, a freshly picked tomato is inherently better than a rotten tomato). It is also true that some ingredients are better for some things than for other things (for instance, a strawberry is better than a tomato if you want to make a cake, and a tomato is better than a strawberry if you want to make a soup). However, the starting ingredients are just half the story (and after spending far more time than necessary watching Chopped, I would argue they're less than half the story--but disregard that for the purposes of the analogy). The other half comes from how you cook them. The same is true in relationships. While it's important to recognize that some people just aren't very compatible with each other, once you do get two people together, the biggest issue isn't whether they have the best starting ingredients, so to speak, it is whether they have good or bad cooking technique. Like I said, you probably already know this, but it bears repeating.

You have to remember, too, that there are two contributors to every relationship. What does this mean? Unfortunately, one thing it means is that you're going to have some of the same problems in every relationship you have. I can guarantee you that you are at the root of at least one problem in your relationship (unless you're not human, in which case the NSA and I have quite a few questions we'd like to ask you). I don't want to go too far into things that are too personal here, but suffice it to say that I recently realized that one of the biggest sources of unhappiness in my relationship with my wife is actually rooted in a basic way that I interact with others, and it has always been a part of my relationships and would be a challenge to me no matter who I had married. Barring an ego of fantastic proportions, I'm certain you'll have a similar epiphany about something sooner or later.

Another implication, which I'm sure you've already thought of, is that in order to date someone else, you have to find someone else who's willing to date you. If you find the perfect girl and she's totally uninterested in you, then despite her impossible level of perfection, you're still better off trying to date someone else. In addition, suppose you do break up with your girlfriend and then find that you can't find anyone else as good for you as her. You have no guarantee that she'll still be around when you decide to go back to her, and you have no guarantee that she'd take you back. She might be married by then, or she might have moved on, or she might not be willing to invest in you a second time if you broke things off the first time. None of these things are guarantees. They are all simply possibilities.

Regarding being the person who cares more, all I have to say is that someone will always care more. Who cares more might even change from day to day. There's not really anything to be done about that.

Regarding depression, all I can tell you is that depression is best viewed as a chronic illness rather than acute. It might go away, it might get better, and it might get worse. It will probably do all three at different times. It's very hard to make any sort of prediction about the future. My personal opinion is that, unless you're at an unusual extreme, you have to work with whatever you've got right now.

So should you break up with your girlfriend or should you stick with her? I honestly don't have a clue. I hope that what I've told you can get you closer to a decision, but the burden's on you to figure that one out. All in all, the impression I'm getting is that you've put quite a bit of thought into this, but at the end of the day you have serious commitment issues. That's natural and understandable, especially in an LDS paradigm where marriage is an eternal decision. However, if you ever want to get to the point where you can marry someone, you'll have to get past it sooner or later.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #79075 posted on 09/16/2014 7:12 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Would someone better versed in things medical explain to me why there isn't really a birth control pill for men? Something that would slow or halt the production of sperm, or just neutralize them while the guy is on it?

-kat

A:

Dear does that make you krazy,

Really short answer: Science is trying but medicine is hard.

Somewhat short answer: A variety of male birth control options (other than the two currently available--condoms and vasectomy) have been proposed or researched. However, so far, either they aren't reliably effective, they are too likely to cause permanent infertility, they have too many side effects, or they can't get sufficient funding to be developed.

Much longer answer: This is a very interesting subject that I've been vaguely interested in for quite a while, so thanks for the excuse to finally research it!

There are quite a few varieties of male-oriented contraceptives in development. Wikipedia directed me to two web sites with fairly comprehensive overviews of the topic, Male Contraceptives (last updated in 2011) and the Male Contraception Information Project. It is from these sites that I draw all of the information in this answer.

One of the most promising male contraceptives in the works is Vasalgel, based on a polymer called RISUG studied in India. The gel is injected into the vas deferens and remains there for ten years, blocking most sperm and destroying the cell walls of those that do pass. It has essentially no side effects, and primate studies indicate that it should be reversible (an additional injection is required). It is in advanced clinical trials in India, and a US group is seeking funding for FDA trials here.

Another option that looks like it could move forward soon is known as the "dry orgasm pill." This is actually based on a high blood pressure medication that had unintended contraceptive side effects, and current research is focused on isolating the contraceptive aspects while avoiding side effects on blood pressure. The pill acts by blocking the contraction of certain smooth muscles in the vas deferens while leaving others uninhibited, which causes it to clamp shut. The result is that while orgasm still occurs, ejaculation is prevented. The pill could be taken two to three hours before intercourse, or for long-term effects a rod could be implanted in the man's body. The drug still needs funding for research and testing, and this is made more difficult because pharmaceutical companies believe that many men would object to a contraceptive that leads to semen-free sex.

Research has been done on several heat- or ultrasound-based varieties of male contraception. Either an ultrasound is applied to the testes, or the man wears a special sort of underwear that pushes them back up into the body. Although these have proven effective at contraception, they are unfortunately not as reversible as once thought, meaning that they are more likely to become a non-surgical alternative to vasectomy rather than a male equivalent of the Pill.

Scientists in Indonesia are working to finish testing on a pill derived from the plant Justicia gendarussa, which could lead to a male contraceptive being available for widespread use within several years. However, in order to get approved for use in the United States, it would likely have to go through the FDA's full study process from start to finish, meaning that it could take ten years or longer for anything to come on the market here.

The drug nifedipine, while not intended as a contraceptive, does have contraceptive side effects. It is intended for use as a high blood pressure medication, and studies have not been done on its use by healthy individuals. Because the drug's patent has expired, pharmaceutical companies have no incentive to go through the lengthy process of experiments and trials to repurpose a drug that can then be replicated by anyone else--without the protection of a patent, they cannot possibly make a profit.

Several male hormonal contraceptives have been researched. They have a variety of delivery methods, and are as safe as female hormonal contraceptives (although side effects do exist). Reversal takes four to six months, since the process of spermatogenesis has to restart from scratch. The biggest problem with male hormonal contraceptives comes in the form of a mystery: for reasons unknown, they have no effect on 5% to 20% of the population (depending on the exact variety being tested). While several correlations have been found (including, interestingly enough, being effective on most Asian men but fewer Caucasian men), nothing conclusive has been discovered so far.

Some time ago, researchers discovered the contraceptive effects of a compound produced by cotton plants--men in China who ate foods cooked in unrefined cottonseed oil had unusually high rates of infertility. The compound is a very effective contraceptive... so effective that over 20% of the time its effects are irreversible. Since it is too likely to cause permanent contraception, it can't be used as a temporary contraceptive; since it is not likely enough to cause permanent contraception, it can't be used as a permanent contraceptive. Thus, despite its initial promise, all research has been abandoned.

Columbia University is conducting research into a drug that inhibits vitamin A receptors in the testes (once again, discovered as an unintended side effect of another medication). Although initial leads are promising, further testing is required to determine whether the drug has any serious negative side effects, particularly on vitamin A receptors elsewhere in the body.

Scientists are in the very earliest stages of researching a contraceptive that would trigger an immune response to sperm, causing the body to kill off its own reproductive cells. Work is still being done on finding the right part of the sperm cell to target. One trial in monkeys led to effective contraception in seven out of nine in the study, and five of the seven were able to recover their fertility. Because of the difficulty in working with immune responses and the extreme variability between individuals even of the same species, this is still very much a long shot.

While this is not a comprehensive overview of every possibility, I think it's safe to say that if a male contraceptive comes on the market in the US in the next decade or so, it will probably be one of these. The various drugs and treatments I've mentioned also provide a good overview of the difficulties in developing a contraceptive, ranging from unknown side effects to insufficient effectiveness to irreversibility to a simple lack of funding. I hope that one or more of these does advance and receive approval for widespread use in the near future, but as with many areas of medicine, the future for now remains unknown.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #79134 posted on 09/16/2014 3:12 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board Writers Who Brush Their Teeth:

I'd like to find a toothpaste that make my mouth feel fresh and doesn't leave a bad aftertaste. My current one makes my mouth feel yucky by the time I crawl into bed - and that's not long at all - maybe 5 minutes.

Any suggestions from Board Writers before I go buy one of everything?

-Misses Mentadent

A:

Dear you,

I've never had this problem, as every kind of toothpaste that I try leaves my mouth tasting fresh and delicious. My favorites are the toothpastes with mouthwash inside them (they have a stronger and longer lasting taste than regular toothpaste). One suggestion would be to try using mouthwash after you brush, which might leave a better taste in your mouth without requiring testing many different toothpastes first.

-Ozymandias


0 Comments
Question #79132 posted on 09/16/2014 2:42 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is the reason behind BYU's policy of not accepting applications for second bachelors' degrees?

-Spleen

A:

Dear Spleen,

While BYU provides no official statement on this that I could find, I expect they don't offer second undergraduate degrees because BYU tuition is heavily subsidized by tithing, as are many of BYU's facilities and resources. The university probably deems those tithing funds more useful to go to those without a degree. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Question #79130 posted on 09/16/2014 1:30 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I had a dream last night in which I had a big ol crush on a dude and we eventually became really good friends...if you catch my drift. In real life the dude is a coworker. I dont know the guys name and havent spoken to him before. What should my dreams takeaway message be?

-Quiero enseñar...

A:

Dear quisiera,

Every couple weeks, I dream that I'm married to a man.

Judge for yourself.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #79098 posted on 09/16/2014 12:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board Writers,

Some single people will say they feel unfulfilled or incomplete without a romantic relationship. Is this feeling a thinking error and cognitive distortion created by individuals?
Or is there an universality to it?... meaning that a good romantic partnership will be make any person feel more whole

-:)

A:

Dear Emoticon,

Personally, I do not feel unfulfilled or incomplete without a romantic relationship in my life. However, there is every possibility that the overabundance of homework before me is to blame for such things.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 

A:

Dear 3a29,

I have never had a romantic relationship and my feelings would add evidence to the universality theory.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #79052 posted on 09/16/2014 12:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is there an equivalent of perfect pitch for the visual spectrum, specifically in recognizing colors?

-Rainbow Dash

A:

Dear Rainbow,

There is a Radiolab podcast all about this that you may find interesting. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Question #79114 posted on 09/16/2014 12:36 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Hi! So I am trying hard to get in shape right now. And by trying pretty hard I mean that half of the trying involves motivating myself! Anyway, I work the typical hours between around 8am to 5/6 pm. I am super horrible at getting up early, especially because my neighbors are loud and I can hear them in my apartment and that usually keeps me up late at night. So that leaves me the evening hours to exercise! This is fine. Right now. I can eat dinner when I get home from work and still have enough daylight outside to go for a jog later on. But that won't always be the case! As fall approaches ever more quickly, I know my hours of evening light are coming to an end! I live in a place that I think is probably pretty safe but I haven't really lived here long enough to know. I also don't have access to a gym. So what are my options when, come late fall/winter, it's already dark outside when I get home from work?

-slow and steady

A:

Dear you,

Don't forget the 80s! Workout videos, while they can be cheesy, can also be a good way to get your exercise in, particularly when you can't leave home. I have Jillian Michaels' 30 Day Shred, but check out Amazon/the internet and see what looks good to you. If you watch it on your computer, you can have Netflix open on half the screen and follow Jillian on the other half. Party hard.

You can also find ideas for at home workouts on the Googles. Fortunately, you're not the first person to deal with problems like this and there are plenty of ways to exercise without being at a gym. When it comes to motivating yourself, I'd encourage you to set reasonable goals (e.g. I'm going to work out 3 times a week) and make them specific and scheduled (e.g. M at 5:30, Th at 6:30 and F at 7:00). Getting yourself an accountability/workout buddy to whom you report whether or not you succeeded in your weekly goal may also help you.

Good luck!

~Anne, Certainly (Exercise gives you endorphins! Endorphins make you happy!)


0 Comments
Question #79127 posted on 09/16/2014 12:36 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do you like or dislike Christopher Columbus?

-I read he was bad to the natives

A:

Dear Doctor,

Yes.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Native,

Personally, I have never met the man. I am waiting to reserve all judgements until I do.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 

A:

Dear Wade,

Whenever I want to have an opinion on something I always first make sure that it is in line with The Oatmeal.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #79095 posted on 09/16/2014 12:36 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have a testimony that the gospel is true and that Jesus Christ is my Savior. I know God exists and that the Book of Mormon is the word of God. I have had numerous faith-building experiences and have felt the Spirit on many occasions. That being said, I am struggling with many questions and anxiety-causing feelings of uncertainty.

Many of my questions surround issues such as gay rights, women and the priesthood, and the fallibility of church leaders. I want to do my homework on these things, find answers, pray and fast, and be at peace. I go through periods where I push my questions aside because I have a hard time feeling the Spirit when I focus on them. Other times, I feel prompted to face these questions head on and clearly define for myself why I believe what I believe in effort to become stronger. But the process scares and confuses me.

How do I go about finding the answers to my questions without jeopardizing my testimony? I'm tired of that nagging feeling of doubt and confusion that interferes with my ability to enjoy the gospel fully. But at the same time I'm afraid that maybe if I do start attacking these questions that I will find too many reasons to NOT believe. I'm afraid maybe it is Satan prompting me to question everything in order to lead me away from the church.

I also want to be sure that I include the Lord in this, but then again, I'm afraid the answer I will get is "Just have faith in this matter" or "Just follow the prophet." I want to be able to have the kind of faith that says "it just is what it is," but I'm the kind of person that desperately needs logic and reasoning behind what I believe and how I live my life.

Please, I need some help. What is the best way to go about finding the answers to my questions?

-Timid Seeker

A:

Dear Dorium,

I didn't give the whole story in Board Question #78715, so I hope the additional details will help you.

When I was doing the research for Board Question #76752, regarding women and the priesthood, I wanted to make sure I understood the various positions of those involved. Not only did I study the position that those against female ordination had, but I also studied the positions of those who were for it.

The balance between seeing both sides of the story can be difficult, however, as often times, anti-Mormon literature is incredibly distorted (as I ran into quite often at work). A really helpful resource I've found is the FAIR wiki, which explains the problem, and then offers evidence for or against the statement. It's decently well-researched, providing a number of resources to back up its claims. The Gospel Topics section of LDS.org has also improved, providing citation-rich essays on a variety of subjects, including same-sex marriage.

Through all of this, I think it's important to make sure that you have the Spirit with you, so that you can better be able to discern the truth regarding your topic of study.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear you,

I want to add to Tally's list of possible resources another fantastic one: BYU Professors, particularly if you're a student here. I've taken questions from the Board to BYU professors, and that's a great thing to be able to do. These are wise and learned people who are able to look at the Gospel through a historical and factual as well as a spiritual lens. Yes, there may be situations where it's appropriate to "take something on faith," but odds are there's also been quality research and discussion of the issue done by the academics of the Church. Resources like Google Scholar or the HBLL librarians and library catalog can direct you to some of these resources and allow you to gain knowledge. Often this knowledge is incomplete or imperfect, but it can be enlightening and increase your perspective.

~Anne, Certainly (who points out that if you ever have specific issues you're looking for this type of source on, the Board can also help refer you to specific subject librarians at BYU or to specific books or articles that may address your issue. We're here to help!) 


0 Comments
Question #79120 posted on 09/16/2014 12:30 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have regrets of things I did/didn't do in high school and college (not sin-related things because that's a whole different topic) or I sometimes get down about things that I wish would have worked out differently, but didn't for reasons outside my control. I don't dwell on these things often, but when I do it's usually triggered by something something random and I tend to get depressed about it for a few days. How do I put stuff like this in the past and move on?

-Qwerty Lee

A:

Dear Qwerty, 

For a long time (which is still continuing as you read this) I have experienced this exact same thing. My high school was downright awful and for the most part, I tucked my head down and chugged along and prayed that I would make it through the coming weeks. I was beyond desperate to get out of there and the city that I lived in that I ended up with a ton of regrets about the place that I come from. And those regrets kind of haunt me. 

For the most part, it's just a matter of letting time pass and keeping your head forward. To help myself cope with these regrets and the negative emotions that accompany them I usually just remind myself that I am not currently repeating those same mistakes. I resolve that I will do something different in the coming days to remind myself that I have learned from those regrets, or those instances where things worked out poorly outside of my control. 

It's hard- it really is, and I empathize with you. Just don't get too down on yourself. Know that you have grown and learned and don't forget that the past is the past. You can't turn your back on it (sorry, Simba), but you can't do anything to change it either. No use in crying over spilled milk and all of those other platitudes, right? Don't let your past overshadow your future. If it was out of your control, it was out of your control and you would not be the person you are today if those things had not happened. Embrace who it made you and love yourself. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #79026 posted on 09/16/2014 12:24 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Guys throughout history have had long hair (yes, yes, we know), but generally speaking... women tended to have the longer hair. How did long hair become categorized as "Feminine?" We can say it's because it's "beautiful" and women are beautiful, but that opens up a whole can of worms... beauty is in the eye of the beholder yadda, yadda. But in the wild, the male species tends to have the elaborate "stunning" features. So why do we deck women all out in order to get attention? Even in ancient times, women were into the jewelry and long hair in all societies. Is this ingrained in us or something? Why the jump from plain (female features) in the other female animals to elaborate features in female humans?

Why do you girls have long hair? Why is it "feminine."

-Vogue Villain

A:

Dear Vogue,

Why do I have long hair? It is because I have the round face of a baboon and long hair is my sad attempt to remedy that. Also it swishes in the wind and if I turn my head really fast, sometimes I can hit people in the face with it.

Long hair is a tertiary sexual characteristic and is often seen as feminine because it's seen as a sign of physical and sexual health- hair is dry and brittle and doesn't grow very fast if you're unhealthy, so long glossy locks send the right signals about mating to men, so it's seen as desirable, and thus, feminine. Socially, we associate long hair with females and that makes it feminine as well. Men didn't start cutting their hair shorter until about the mid 19th century when it came into fashion and the trend has continued since then. Most of the ways we perceive the length of hair is just the result of social conditioning now. 

As for your last question, I've been doing a lot of reading on why sexual dimorphism is different in humans than it is with animals and mostly, scientists aren't sure beyond the biggest factor, which is that we are human. As humans, we are different from animals because we develop symbolism and culture and that culture then influences the way we think, act and behave. Females are still probably the choosier gender, because we can only mate with one man at a time, while a man can mate with many women, but at the same time, we don't have a breeding season. Without going off on tangential ruminations, basically the answer is that we don't really know besides the fact that we have culture and culture has influenced which gender is the flashier one at different points in time. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #79094 posted on 09/16/2014 12:24 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I feel like the big message today is to be a dreamer. Dreaming big is important! See today's quote on the Board: "Be open to your dreams, people. Embrace that distant shore. Because our mortal journey is over all too soon." -Chris Stevens. There are a lot of similar quotes, talks, devotionals, seminars, etc. that tell us to dream, and go out and fulfill those dreams! The person that wants to open their own restaurant, or visit every fancy museum in Europe, or meet so-and-so famous celebrity, build a device that helps feed starving children, quit med school and become a sidewalk chalk artist, you name it. I want to dream, to have a passion, to do things that sound amazing to me.

Here's the problem: what am I allowed to sacrifice to go and fulfill my dreams? Time with my kids or wife? Money? Grades or even a degree? Taking a risk like spending lots of money to become an incredible home chef so I can be on Master Chef (something that in theory sounds rewarding and fun) seems so impractical and risky to my practical and risk-averse self. I don't want to be stuck doing the least risky things in life, but I also don't want to lose things that are important all in the name of a "dream". Do I only get to dream of things that have no possible repercussions of failing (or even succeeding) in obtaining my dream?
Help?

Slug

A:

Dear Slug, 

You pretty much just voiced everything that was going on in my mind, with a few differences. I'm not married and I have nothing that is really anchoring me to anything. The world is open to me and any choices that I want to make. However, my parents keep cautioning me about following my dreams. They don't want to shut me down, but they want me to have back up plans. My biggest dream is working as a foreign service officer overseas, but there are some significant risks to that. The biggest, according to my bishop and parents is that I will follow that dream and not get married as a result, or that I will put my career first over having a family. The second is that as a young, single female in a potentially dangerous foreign country, I might end up in serious trouble. I keep getting pushed toward a more traditional route: investment banking in Salt Lake and maybe an MBA. 

I keep getting told to follow my dreams and do what makes me happy, but in the same breath I'm told to have equally viable backup plans and work towards all of them equally. It's confusing and frustrating because one person obviously doesn't have the time or energy required to work towards three potential plans. So what does one sacrifice? What does one give up? 

I think it's a very tricky balance between being "selfish" in a way, as well as remembering others and appropriately measuring risk involved. You don't need to be a door mat for everyone else and give up everything that's important to you, but I think if you have a family, they come first. As David O. McKay said, "No other success can compensate for failure in the home." Finding a way that you can chase your dreams and passions without compromising your family is crucial, and it'll be different for everyone based on their passion and dreams and on the circumstances of their families. To find this balance, you have to analyse the risk involved in following your dream or passion. 

With great risk comes great reward, but in that same vein, with great risk can come catastrophic loss. When the stakes are high, a careful analysis of what can be gained, what can be lost, and what is required for success should be made with the help of the Lord. In the end, there can be no blanket statement of what should or should not be attempted. Bill Gates gave up a degree and money at the beginning to follow his passion and became wildly successful. But he is not the norm and we never hear about the hundreds of thousands who have foregone degrees and a steady salary to chase a passion or dream that did not pan out. An important thing to remember is that your dream does not need to be accomplished in the shortest amount of time possible. Consistently taking small steps toward your passion is probably one of the better ways to help mitigate risk. 

For example, instead of dropping out of school and moving your family across the country to attend an expensive culinary school at the drop of the hat, you could start by taking community culinary classes with your spouse in the evenings, or having cooking evenings with your children to help develop necessary skills. The former course of action involves severe risks, but the latter two options are still moving towards your passion without sacrificing more than is needed. It may not be dramatic and if, in the future, you end up on Master Chef it won't exactly make a great story for reality TV, but it makes a fantastic story for reality. Taking smaller risks in an effort to realize your dreams while still remembering your loved ones and the truly important things in life is a much more poignant story to me, because it shows a certain selflessness that a lot of people who realize a hugely impressive dream are lacking. That's not to say that everyone who chases their passion and attains it is selfish, but often times the important things get shoved to the side and the reward is hollow, compared to how it might have tasted if you brought others along. 

-Concorde

A:

Dear you,

Just a brief thought, which I hope doesn't trivialize your question: I think the most important thing is to have as our ultimate "dream" the goal of building God's kingdom. It may sound trite, but if we focus on becoming the people God wants us to be, our priorities will remain aligned towards the best dream we could have, which will give us the most joy we can attain, and we'll be guided in this course as to what things we should take risks on and expend effort on.

~Anne, Certainly


0 Comments
Question #79100 posted on 09/16/2014 12:24 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Can you explain for me how college football is working these days, specifically, what does BYU have to do get to a "major" bowl? Which ones are "major"? What does BYU have to win to be national champions again? What is College Football Playoff that I have seen commercials for? Is that for everyone? What if you win that? But we can't because we're not "in"? If there are so many different conferences (I've heard of the Big 5 power conferences), and there can be winners of each, who is really the winner? I know BYU is independent, so how do we become winners of something? I know we are trying to get into the Big 12, is that mostly because we will play better teams and get many more millions of dollars for doing so? I'm a student and a big fan, but don't know much about the political workings of it all.

-Because my husband doesn't follow sports

A:

Dear Wade,

The major bowl games traditionally have been the Rose Bowl, Orange Bowl, Fiesta Bowl, Sugar Bowl, and the BCS National Championship. Now there is no BCS and we have the college football playoff. The "major" bowl games now will be the Rose Bowl, Orange Bowl, Fiesta Bowl, Sugar Bowl, Cotton Bowl, and the Peach Bowl. Two of these each year will be the semifinals for the playoff bracket and the teams will be the top four ranked teams. The bowls not part of the playoff bracket each year are contracted with the different conferences. It's really confusing (a carry-over from the BCS, I'm sure) so I'll just link you to here to read about it. In order for BYU to reach one of these bowl games they need to be selected by the playoff selection committee. BYU getting in the Big 12 is not likely (in my opinion) but if we were it would mean guaranteed better schedules and more media coverage, revenue, etc.

BYU has agreements to play in "minor" bowls (provided they win at least six games) in the event that they do not make it to one of the College Football bowl games.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Monday, September 15, 2014
Question #79067 posted on 09/15/2014 8:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'll be turning 25 in a few weeks and have decided to step up my skin care game. What are some splurge-worthy cleansers, creams, etc.?

-Birthday Beauty Queen

A:

Dear BBQ (haha!),

My favorite cleanser line is Paula's Choice. Her whole line is clinically proven to be non-irritating, and it isn't tested on animals (if that's something you're looking for). She has something for every skin type and concern. I also really like the Paula's Choice website because she has a list of other brands of makeup and facial products that don't contain harsh chemicals and other irritants. It's shocking how many mainstream skincare lines contain ingredients that are actually irritants and can be harsh on your skin, especially if you have sensitive skin. If you ever wonder about the quality of a specific product in that regard, you can look it up on the website and see how it's rated. 

Also, I can't say enough good things about my recent decision to purchase one of these. I think I got it at Target for $15. It's like a Clarisonic, only way, way cheaper. Sure, it's not as fancy, but it's certainly done the job for me. I've noticed that my skin has been a lot clearer, smoother, and just generally healthier looking since I started using it every morning. 

-Divya


0 Comments
Question #79106 posted on 09/15/2014 8:12 p.m.
Q:

Dearest 100 Hour Board,

I love the song I Wish by Skee-Lo. However, I'm only a teensy weensy bit unsure of one thing. Why does he wish he had a bat??

I wish I was little bit taller
I wish I was a baller
I wish I had a girl who looked good
I would call her
I wish I had a rabbit in a hat with a bat
And a six four Impala

Would you figure out the riddle for me? And if you can't, can you create a creative or witty reason why he wants a bat? Here's lookin' at you, Concorde, and anyone else who has a lot of imagination.

Your boardie,
Scarlet Flamingo

PS: I think it's HILARIOUS that whoever submitted the lyrics for Rude by Magic! on AZLyrics' website thinks that the song is actually saying:

I hate to do this, you leave no choice
Can't live without her
Love me or hate me we will be boys (instead of poised, hahaha)
Standing at that altar

Who submits these made up lyrics, anyways? Teenagers?

A:

Dear Sasha Eduardo,

At some point I remember reading a statement that bat was a reference to the alcohol Bacardi which uses a bat (as in blind as a) for its logo. In retrospect I doubt that was the original intent. Likely Skee-Lo just put in words that rhymed. If not, then clearly he wants a bat (as in right off the) with which to beat anyone who calls him a one-hit wonder.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #79115 posted on 09/15/2014 7 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Board Question #78979 got me wondering: what are some good ways to respond to guys catcalling at you?

-I'm not sure ignoring them will help

A:

Dear me neither, 

I figured that researching this question was probably a good idea, considering my recent experiences, including being "dogcalled" (seriously, a car full of guys barked at me as they drove by). 

The first Google result was this Business Insider article and for good reason. I think all of the tips are great, and I actually learned quite a bit. In the past, when I feel uncomfortable or harassed, my go-to reaction is to actually call someone. When I was harassed by the guys in the Jeep who got out to chase me, I wanted to call someone, but when I hit the power button and glanced down, I saw the white spinning your-battery-is-dead-and-I'm-turning-off wheel and I panicked. I still could have totally faked a phone call though, if I had had my wits about me. 

I've also definitely sworn at harassers and for a while, I thought that it was a good strategy because I thought it made me appear tough and unafraid. The article corroborated my experiences though, because swearing never actually scared anyone off. It just escalated situations. Making eye contact and being assertive, on the other hand, really does work. When I'm out walking by myself I try to keep my head up, and watch everything around me. Too often I see people walking with their eyes to the ground, and their hands in their pockets, or their arms folded (which is really a weird look, but I see BYU girls constantly walking around with their arms folded for some reason). That kind of body language makes harassers think you're an easy target and your own body positioning can help to create feelings of confidence if you carry yourself in a certain way. Walk with shoulders back, head up and eyes forward and with your arms at your side. Resist the impulse to tuck them into your pockets or to fold your arms. 

When I was harassed that night, I was unable to project any sort of bravery or confidence. I dropped my eyes, tucked my arms to my side and backed up. Things might have gone a little differently if I had appeared more confident and assertive. I think this specific article is also really great because it discusses what to do if you witness someone else being harassed. Too often we stand by as things unfold, and we hesitate. Make a commitment to get involved. I caught sight of a couple sitting on their stoop in the background, watching me get harassed by these guys. I know they heard what was said because they got up, hovered on their stoop with looks of concern and then did absolutely nothing to help me.

When I was younger my dad I were entering a grocery store when we witnessed a store employee gathering grocery carts get harassed and chased around the parking lot by some losers who were safe in their car. Several other people hovered at the edges of the scene, unsure of whether or not they wanted to involve themselves. It was dark outside and instead of potentially putting himself or his daughter in danger, my dad simply pulled out his phone, waved it around and shouted that he was calling the police. The car of harassers drove off and we were able to then go and help the store employee. 

So thanks for your question-- it's really important to know how to respond to catcalling, if at all. But in the end, I just really wish we emphasized more how absolutely inappropriate it is to catcall anyone, in any way, shape or form. It's not a compliment and it's not funny, and it goes for both genders. I've seen just as many cars of females shout things at men walking by as I have with the roles reversed. How hard is it to just leave other people alone?

-Concorde 


0 Comments
Question #79123 posted on 09/15/2014 4:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

This is a curious question, not a judgmental one: If you were sealed in the temple to your husband, and then you guys get a divorce (whether or not a cancellation of the sealing was involved), does that mean it's okay to stop wearing your garments?

I ask only because I've seen this happen like...three or four times with different women I've known. (And in case you're wondering how I know what underwear they are or are not wearing, it's because I see them wearing clothes that a garment would obviously not work with - sleeveless dresses, tank tops, etc.)

I was under the impression that the wearing of the garment was tied to your status as an endowed member, not a married one. Or is this incorrect?


-kdawg

A:

Dear kdawg,

You are correct. Wearing garments is associated with the endowment, not the sealing. Endowed members in good standing are expected to continue wearing garments regardless of their marital status.

That said, as I'm sure you already recognize, decisions regarding garments are personal, between the endowed member and the Lord. Our job is to love, not judge. It sounds like that's your goal, and I appreciate it.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #79116 posted on 09/15/2014 4 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm taking an institute class at another university right now and I know that I can end up transferring the credit to byu. How does that work though? My institute instructor mentioned that he just had to mark something on the computer... but will byu be notified then that I am in the class? Will the credit transfer automatically at the end of the semester? Or will I have to get it transferred myself by going through some process? Anyway, what is that process like? Thank you so much for your help! You guys are awesome!

-first time institute goer

A:

Dear Paprika,

Your instructor marks in WISE (the student management system for Seminaries & Institutes) that you are taking the class for BYU credit, and whether you earned the credit or not. The institute secretary can then, at your request, print out a BYU transcript from WISE which she then mails to BYU.

So it's fairly automatic, but not so automatic that you don't have to ask them to do it.

I hope that helps.

-Marguerite St. Just


0 Comments
Question #79118 posted on 09/15/2014 4 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm re-asking Board Question #78843 to those who have never answered this question yet (I'm thinking: Owlet, MODAQ, El, Halek, Entropy, Ginger, and others who I haven't listed).

-Marlsven

A:

Dear Wade,

I can't remember a time when I didn't know about the Board. My older sister was at BYU when it was a physical board and she introduced our family to it.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Marlsven,

I started reading it freshman year. I think I googled some questions I had about BYU and the Board popped up enough times that I became interested. I didn't read it consistently; I mostly just read the most popular questions. The only writer I could probably name was Katya. When I got off my mission, I started reading it more and became familiar with the writers of the time. Becoming a writer was a lofty, far-off goal that I dreamed of. However, as I felt more and more close the Board, I felt more comfortable with the idea of applying. I struck when I felt the time was right, and here I am—a humble student among masters.

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear Marlsven, 

There isn't much to tell. I was tottering along during my freshman year when my upper-classman roommate showed it too me. I read it for a while, got bored, and stopped reading it. I think I re-discovered it again my sophomore year, and then again from one of my co-workers just last year. 

Sorry my encounters with the board aren't all that harrowing. I used to read it sometimes, and now I write for it all the time. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 

A:

Dear Marlsven,

You know, it's one of those things that doesn't have a beginning. I honestly don't remember; it's like it's always been there. (For that matter, no one actually knows when the Board started, according to our "History" pages.) It was sometime during the summer after my freshman year, I believe. My roommate and I argue about which of us was the first to find it and recommend it to the other. I do remember, though, that I used it solely through the archives, and I didn't realize it was an ongoing service. For a while I wasn't even sure the "writers" were real--it seemed too good, like a big prank or legendary relic or something. I just spent hours and hours clicking "I'm Board!" before realizing I could, and should, apply. I didn't even know who the current writers were--in my mind, Duchess and Optimistic. and Yellow and Eirene all coexisted at the same time, and I've simply joined the ranks beside them. I guess that's why I reference the archives so often; it just feels like we're still all writing together, even though I've never met them.

-Owlet


0 Comments
Question #79042 posted on 09/15/2014 3:36 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I recently listened to the talk "The Atonement Covers All Pain", by Elder Kent F. Richards. I really liked the physical/medical aspect that he talked about in regards to the atonement. Are there any other talks or devotionals I could read that focus on physical/medical topics?

-Thanks!

A:

Dear you,

You may be interested in:

Readers, we also welcome your contributions of specific talks or devotionals (with links if possible) that cover this subject.

~Anne, Certainly


0 Comments
Question #79078 posted on 09/15/2014 12:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Three weeks ago I had a friend enter the MTC. Just today she announced her engagement on Facebook. I realize that the decision to go on a mission and/or get married is completely personal, but I don't understand the thought processes of sisters who decide to go on missions when there is a man ready to marry them at home. Especially when they come back within a few weeks or months to get married to him.

I understand personal revelation of the sister and her potential spouse is a huge factor in these cases but I find it strange that it happens so often. Do any of you know someone who has done this and would be willing to talk about their experience? Or speculate on why someone would come home to get married? (I would ask my friend but we're just friends on Facebook. I haven't talked to her since high school.)

-Not married or a missionary

A:

Dear,

I often reference the Ensign article "Young Women and the Mission Decision" for questions regarding potential sister missionaries. It contains accounts from several sisters who describe how they made the decision to serve, or not to serve, a mission. One of those stories is of a woman who postponed her mission in order to consider her boyfriend's proposal, and she ended up marrying him. I think that reading her side of the story helps us to understand that experience.

That being said, I do find your friend's situation strange; I don't usually hear about people going all the way to the MTC and then coming back for marriage. I have a cousin that did something similar, and at first it was difficult not to judge him for that. However, they married in the temple, and I'm perfectly content to now cheer them on.

Some speculation: Receiving personal revelation can be really hard, especially when you think you know what you want. Sometimes the only way to be sure is to go ahead with one path, realize it's not right, and then choose the other path. Perhaps that is similar to what is going on with these sisters. Additionally, it's not simply a decision "to go on missions when there is a man ready to marry them at home." That kind of rubs me the wrong way, like I'm only going on a mission because I couldn't get married. Just because there's a guy ready to marry me back home doesn't mean I should drop all plans to go on a mission; maybe I'm not ready to marry him. Going on a mission is a huge dream for many sisters, and at that point in one's life it can seem more important than marriage. Mission papers can take up to a year to complete, but how many Mormons do you know who dated for a year before getting engaged? When you've put that much preparation into something, it's difficult to step back and take a long, hard look at your opportunities and priorities. I think there's a lot of sunk-cost fallacy that can go into it as well. Plus, there's definitely girls that fear they'll feel inferior if they don't go on missions--you only have to go as far as the archives to find that out.

Wow, that turned into something of a rant. I haven't gone all the way to the MTC, but this question has some bits that relate to a really confusing part of my life right now. Suffice it to say that there are a lot of factors that go into a decision like that, and I appreciate you not judging those of us that don't get it all figured out on the first try.

-Owlet


0 Comments
Question #78930 posted on 09/15/2014 12:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is a typical day like for President Monson?

-M

A:

Dear Ginger,

From what I understand, a typical day for President Monson would be filled with various meetings of the First Presidency and with various committees and boards of directors. Once a week the First Presidency and Twelve meet in the Temple to review matters which must be discussed and decided upon by all of them. I understand he also spends time in his office handling correspondence and other matters which need his attention.

-Marguerite St. Just


0 Comments
Question #79086 posted on 09/15/2014 10:54 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Does rubbing hydrogen peroxide on my face work as an effective acne treatment?

What did people use in the ancient days?

-bump in the night

A:

Dear bump,

After looking at several semi-reputable sites and some not-so-reputable sites, what I'm getting is that hydrogen peroxide might work to clear up acne, but it might not. Although it may kill the acne bacteria and/or dry out the pimples, it may also cause premature aging, scarring (since it can kill new cells), and bleaching of the skin or hair. Benzoyl peroxide is a much safer choice.

If you decide to try it, use a Q-tip to apply 3% hydrogen peroxide (nothing stronger–it can burn the skin!) directly to the pimples and whiteheads rather than rubbing it all over your face. You may want to use a moisturizer directly after to prevent excessive skin drying.

For your second question, people used sulfur to treat acne before the onset of modern medicine. Check out Wikipedia and this article for more information.

--Maven


0 Comments
Question #79092 posted on 09/15/2014 10:54 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are your guilty pleasure songs?

-I Like Taylor Swift

A:

Dear T Swift, 

I'm actually a really big Selena Gomez fan. Her album Kiss & Tell came out right before fall term of my sophomore year in high school when I had my first overly emotional high school heartbreak and I'm like 98% sure all I did was mope around and listen to that album on repeat. My iTunes library informs me that I listened to all of the songs on that album a combined 5,634 times. When I do the math, it becomes apparent that I spent rather a lot of time being dramatically upset about a guy whose last name I can't even remember how to spell. We're talking like twelve days straight that I spent on a guy that I never even held hands with! Ah well, I still haven't really learned my lesson yet, and I still love that CD. 

Also I still definitely listen to and enjoy the Jonas Brothers. I also have NSYNC, Backstreet Boys and Britney Spears CD's circa 2001 floating around my car, although at this point, people think I have them because I'm retro and ironic and hipster and all that. I'm willing to let them believe that, although the reality is that I like to crank the volume up and go driving just because I honestly like listening to those CD's.

-Concorde

A:

Dear Lady Cassandra,

"See You Again" by Miley Cyrus is one of the few songs to which I can truly cut loose.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear T Swift, 

I can guarantee you that just about any song you consider a guilty pleasure I listen to with no shame. I'm talking  about Aaron Carter, Glee, and Hannah Montana here. 

I also have a surprising number of different versions of the Hokey Pokey and the Chicken Dance that I occasionally put on and bust a move to. 

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear Taylor Swift,

"Super Bass" by Nicki Minaj hits the top of my guilty pleasure songs, as does "I Wanna Have Your Babies" by Natasha Bedingfield. I know I'm weird.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  

A:

Dear Taylor Swift,

"The Ballad of Bilbo Baggins" by Leonard Nimoy. Maybe it's just because it's Leonard Nimoy, but I think he's got a good voice for folk songs, but my parents think I'm crazy.

-Squirrel

A:

Dear no comment,

"Love Shack," by the B-52's, with honorable mention going to "Rock Lobster."

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #79063 posted on 09/15/2014 10:54 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

One of my teachers challenged us to learn the name of everyone in the class. I'd like to practice at home. Is there an easier way than Facebook to find pictures of everyone in my class? I have all the names from LearningSuite.

-Book Lover

A:

Dear you,

When I was a TA, I would get a picture roll from my boss. It would have everyone's name and school ID photo on it. The only problem I had was that quite a few of them had changed their hairstyles and it made it really difficult to identify them. However, by talking to just about everyone every class session and using their names, I always was able to have the section memorized by the 3rd week of class. 

While I personally would just Facebook stalk everyone, you may be able to get a roll from your professor. There's no hurt in asking!

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #79103 posted on 09/15/2014 8:30 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Parades make me cry. Not in a sad way, though. Every time I watch a parade, I get this overwhelming feeling in my heart, a good feeling mostly but I can't even explain it...I'm not a super sentimental person & don't cry easily, but attending a parade always makes me well up with emotion. I have felt the same way when I see a graduation processional. So it might have something to do with large groups of people gathered for a single purpose, maybe...involving marching...okay, I don't really know. Going to church doesn't make me cry, and most other things don't. So, can you think of any explanation for this? Is it weird? I can take it, just tell me if I am weird. It has happened consistently enough that I truly wonder what is going on.

-Sitting Watching Walking

A:

Dear Feeling,

I don't know if it's weird (since I don't know how weird I am), but that happens to me, too. Not necessarily with parades, but with different events that appeal to my nostalgia. Different movie scenes, the sacrament, farewells, and various other activities appeal to my sentiments of justice, sorrow, pride, anticipation, gratitude, and love, resulting in tears. Not very often, mind you, but it does happen. Usually I recognize that the strength of the emotion I'm feeling is uncommon, and maybe even a result of calculated effects, but I'm not ashamed of it. I think our feelings are very similar—you feel a pride, a goodness, as a result of the united formality of and meaning behind parades and processionals. They symbolize hard work, progress, and everything good, and their inspirational music especially helps convey that significance to your heart. That mix of symbolic visual and auditory rhythm isn't something you experience everyday, and your mind translates those signals well. I think it's a positive thing.

-El-ahrairah


0 Comments
Posted on 09/15/2014 7:23 a.m. New Comment on: #79089 How many religion credits do you actually need to take at BYU? I seem to be ...
Posted on 09/15/2014 7:22 a.m. New Comment on: #79107 Ok sorry if this is a stupid question but I'm new to BYU so I don't ...
Question #79117 posted on 09/15/2014 7 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Hey, have you ever been in the tunnel beneath the HFAC?

-One True Answer

A:

Dear Doctor,

I went once at midnight. I found shoelaces.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear One,

YES ACTUALLY THIS ONE TIME THIS GUY WHO WORKED SECURITY TOOK ME DOWN THERE AND IT WAS KIND OF LIKE A HALF DATE, I DON'T REALLY KNOW, BUT IT'S THAT ROTC GUY I TOLD YOU ABOUT? YEAH, ANYWAY, SO NO ONE WAS THERE BUT US AND THEN IT WAS REALLY DAR---

Oh. 

Wait...

-Concorde

A:

Dear True,

No. I never went that far north. The tunnels around the basement of the HFAC are a different story, however.

-El-ahrairah


0 Comments
Sunday, September 14, 2014
Question #79097 posted on 09/14/2014 11:36 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Are there BYU approved student housing that are private apartments? As in, not just a private room but entire apartment for one person. If not, is living by yourself not even possible as a BYU student?

-Like my space

A:

Dear spaaaaace,

Unfortunately, I couldn't find any private apartments here or here. If any readers have heard of any, maybe they'll let us know. This person had the idea of renting a whole apartment, but that's not very feasible. There's ways to live with nearby family, but that's not really "alone." Sorry, it seems the answer to your question is negative.

-El-ahrairah


0 Comments
Question #79068 posted on 09/14/2014 11:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm working on making a jar with ideas for service/doing things for other people written on slips of paper. The idea is to have more ideas for when I am too tired to think of what to do, but I want to take a minute or two to show someone I care about them. What Ideas would you put in?

Zwerg Zwei

A:

Dear Zwerg Zwei,

As another writer suggested, think of ways to use your talents to do nice things. Here's a list to get you started. Some of them may not appeal to you, but hopefully they'll inspire you to think of your own:

Make them a pop-up card.
Make them origami.
Send them an email with a cool link or a personalized trading card or meme.
Make their bed. If they're of the opposite sex and you're at BYU, pay their roommate to make their bed.
Make them brownies/cookies/cookie dough/fudge/tacos.
Write them a poem.
Write them a nice note.
Write them an anonymous nice note.
Write them an anonymous nice note, and pretend to be a cute guy/girl.
Call them.
Text them.
Buy them a candy bar.
Find out what kind of writing stick they use. Buy the appropriate pencil/ink replacement/lead size.
Call them and sing a song.
Buy them a book or toy from D.I.
Offer to take them shopping, running, to the gym, out to lunch, or on a hike.
Tell them a funny joke, or a not-so-funny joke.
Cut out a comic strip from the newspaper and put it on their desk.
Make them a scavenger hunt.

-El-ahrairah


0 Comments
Question #79089 posted on 09/14/2014 9:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How many religion credits do you actually need to take at BYU? I seem to be getting conflicting messages--Some places seem to say 8, others 16! Which is right?

-Looking to clear up some space

A:

Dear Looking,

Undergraduate students at BYU must complete 16 hours of religion credits, broken down this way:

religion_requirements_converted.jpg

If you want to learn more about religion requirements, try looking at this page from the religious education department.

Good luck!

- Haleakalā


1 Comment
Question #79111 posted on 09/14/2014 9:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
I love patrick sterwart.

Has he made people more money as Capt. Picard or Professor X?

PropM

A:

Dear Jean-Luc,

Probably Professor X. Although the X-Men movies had a much higher budget than The Next Generation movies, they also grossed significantly more in box office. It's hard to determine how much money was made from the TV series and merchandise from either franchise and how much is directly attributed Patrick Stewart, but based on how much money Days of Future Past made I still think Professor X would beat out Captain Picard.

That being said, Procter & Gamble is valued at over $139 billion so maybe he made people the most money from being the model for Mr. Clean*.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

*I know that Patrick Stewart is not actually Mr. Clean.


0 Comments
Question #79113 posted on 09/14/2014 7 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Who was the most recent member of the Quorum of the Twelve to be a convert? Who was the most recent member of the Quorum of the Twelve to join the Church as an adult? President Uchtdorf doesn't count for either of these because he was baptized at 8.

-Harriet Uchtdorf

A:

Dear Silence,

I also answered a similar question in Board Question #75260.

But, to answer your specific questions:

Howard W. Hunter was the most recent member to be a convert (technically), since he was baptized at age 12.

And, to find someone who joined the Church as an adult (at age eighteen counts, right?) we have to go all the way back to Charles W. Penrose who was baptized in 1850.

Fun fact: Richard L. Evans was the last Apostle to have facial hair while serving as an Apostle.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #79093 posted on 09/14/2014 5:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Can you tell me when the recycle bins like those that were found in the hallways of the WIDB will be in the new LSB? I need to recycle my papers without getting too much exercise!

Thanks,
Geronimo

A:

Dear Geronimo,

Having just personally gone through the process to get recycling bins at another fairly new building on campus, probably a while. The recycling facilities themselves are super fast and super friendly-- they give you the options and you order what you want and they just drop them off and bam, you're done. The slow part is probably going to be the committee behind the new LSB. They will likely want to meet to discuss how many bins they want, and where they'll go and what kind of bins they want. With everything else that comes with administrating a brand new building, I wouldn't be surprised if getting recycling bins falls lower on their list of things to do. I called campus info and was passed along an impressively long phone chain, and eventually I was told that there would most likely be bins by Christmas. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #79107 posted on 09/14/2014 5:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Ok sorry if this is a stupid question but I'm new to BYU so I don't really know the ropes. How does the whole TA thing work? What's the etiquette with befriending them? Is that like trying to be friends with a professor? Does it come off as sucking up or just wanting a good grade from them? I wouldn't have assumed that but I tried to make small talk with my Microbiology TA yesterday and she totally acted like I was trying to suck up or something. (I totally wasn't.) I just asked her how to pronounce her name and if she was from Utah, it's not like I was asking to be best friends or something.
So TA's- treat them like friends or is it more of a business-type relationship? And for my own knowledge, do they all get paid equally? And is it a requirement to graduate for any majors to TA?
Ok I'm done now.

-Meee

A:

Dear meeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee,

So... if Concealocanth is my TA this semester, does that mean we have to officially suspend our friendship until January?

Dear Concealocanth,

Please do not report us to the TA Police.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear M.O.D.A.Q.Q.Q.,

When I was a freshman taking American Heritage I knew that two of my quiz scores would be dropped. On the last quiz of the semester, since I knew it wouldn't count, I didn't write any answers and instead wrote a note asking my TA out on a date. She never responded. I've since worked as a TA for a really long time and realize how weird that probably was for her since she still had to grade my last paper. In my own TA training, my department specifically emphasized that "You cannot date someone whose grade you can influence." After the semester's over, though, have at it, I guess.

TAs have the weird experience of balancing being professional and friendly. I tended to be pretty good friends with my students but I was also a really lax TA. You still need to remember that that person can change your grade and is doing this because they're getting paid so it's not like you guys are going to hang out on the weekends and get mani-pedis. If your TA is being super cold and distant all the time, in my opinion she's not doing a very good job. One of the key aspects of being a TA is being approachable.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Meee,

Having TA'ed in the Political Science department for two years now, I would say that there will always be stuck-up TA's who think that in their infinite wisdom, they are better than the students. I started TA'ing when I was 18 though, so I was terrified enough by the prospect of having all of my students be older than me that I wasn't so cocky. I liked small talk and getting to know students, but for the most part, I kept it pretty business-related. I had one female student invite me out a few times during the semester and I turned her down each time because it was just kind of weird to me. I don't really want to hang out with you and then go home and grade your paper. That's weird. I worked with some TA's who were nothing but business and others who were very friendly with their students. Just mirror the behavior of your TA and you can avoid awkward situations. 

As for the wage, it depends on the department. When I started I made 9.25 an hour, and by the time I quit (four semesters and an independent study course later), I was making 10.50 an hour. It obviously wasn't bad money (my two other jobs paid just over minimum wage until I got recent raises), but the stress of TA'ing a very large intro class and dealing with angry students and a difficult boss was not worth it in the end and I decided to switch to being a research assistant and working in a new office on campus instead. 

-Concorde

A:

Dear Meee,

As for your last question, to my knowledge it's not a requirement for any major to be a TA in order to graduate. It would have to be a fairly small major in order to provide that opportunity to every student.

Technical and science TA's are generally known to get paid higher than other TA's, and often the longer you've been a TA the more likely you are to get a raise. See also Board Question #65233 for more perspectives on wage ranges for TA's.

-Owlet


1 Comment
Question #79108 posted on 09/14/2014 5:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Did you forget about the question I asked 12 days ago? It was about whether I should break up with my current girlfriend or not, and it's kind of an urgent question so that's why I'm so anxious that it hasn't been answered and it's already been over 250 hours.

Love,
Brazilian

A:

Dear Brazilian,

I'm so sorry you've been waiting so long! Rest assured, other writers are hard at working answering your question. When it comes to asking the Board for advice on these types of things, you'll want to keep a couple of things in mind. First, while we'd like to think are advice is worthwhile as a second opinion, it is not intended to be final or definitive. I think most writers would shudder at the idea that readers accepted our advice as law. We aren't nearly as close to the situation as you are, no matter how much detail you give us in your question. Don't rely too heavily on our advice.

Second, never ask the Board a time-sensitive question unless you're prepared to act without an answer. For a variety of reasons, questions sometimes go over-hours. We're a bad place to ask for help with time-sensitive issues.

I wish you the best of luck with your situation. Your question will post as soon as the writers involved are finished.

- Haleakalā


0 Comments
Question #79054 posted on 09/14/2014 5:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What with the Frozen costume craze and various cons going on, such as Comic Con in Salt Lake, I've been seeing Frozen costumes everywhere. My question is, how do people find fabrics with the patterns they need on it? For instance, Anna's winter dress has distinctive rosemaling on the bodice and skirt. My assumption would be that it was embroidered or painted on. But how do people do that? The one that seems more difficult is Anna's coronation gown because it has multiple panels in the skirt of the same pattern. Surely that can't be hand-done because it would take forever and be nearly impossible to look so perfectly uniform! So do people just manufacture this fabric for people to buy, or is there some special secret that I just don't know about?

-Amateur costume-maker

A:

Dear costume-maker,

When I went to Comic Con I paid particularly close attention to the Frozen costumes. I came to the conclusion that it is 1/4 magic and 3/4 a variety of different techniques. One cosplayer told me that she had added the detail to the "Let it Go" styled blue dress by hand, mostly through gluing and tiny stitches. In other instances, the effects were painted or sewn on and in another, the cosplayer told me that she had actually bought several of the children's costumes and torn them apart to create her dress. 

Most of it was over my head, since my sewing and design skills start and end with sewing on buttons, but from what I gathered, it's just a lot of talent and hours and hours of work combined with creativity and searching for the right types of fabric and appliques. Some of them really do "take forever" on their costumes! 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #79057 posted on 09/14/2014 5:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is it rude and/or ridiculous to not want to date someone (with some level of seriousness) based on their individual earning potential--or your and his combined earning potential--or is it being honest and realistic about your socioeconomic expectations?

-M.N.H.

A:

Dear M.N.H, 

I think if you're looking for a free ride, then it's a bad idea and kind of shallow, especially if it's the only thing you're considering. My parents used to tell me to marry rich and only date guys with high earning potentials, but given my complete lack of allure with men, I realized that even if I did only date someone with high earning potential, that it doesn't guarantee me any measure of economic prosperity. In the end, I realized that I could only count on myself and I decided that I would date guys regardless of earning potentials. As long as they were passionate and ambitious in regards to whatever they wanted to do, that was enough for me. I am skilled, intelligent and hard working enough that I have a pretty high earning potential on my own and because of that, my potential dating pool is not as limited as it might be. 

At the same time, I think it's perfectly fine to look for someone who works as hard as you do, and wants a similar standard of living and is willing to work together with you to achieve that standard. I know it's seemingly commonplace for many Mormon women to completely disregard guys who aren't pre-med, or pre-law or business majors. In a way, our culture kind of encourages women to look for men with high earning potentials, since many women expect to stay home and not contribute to the income. They will have to rely on their husband to be able to support them and their children, and it becomes a relevant concern. In those cases, I can understand the desire to want to date someone who can take care of you in the future, but money isn't everything and if it's the single most important factor in the dating game, then I hesitate to condone it. 

-Concorde

A:

Dear M.N.H,

I've thought about this and my opinion has slightly changed. I think it's alright to consider it a major factor in whether you want to marry someone, but I don't think it's fair to make it an instant disqualification to date someone. I'm assuming here that you are a woman, since men (especially in Mormon culture) generally don't worry about their wife's earning potential.

I think there are some women who seek or require a high standard of living in order to be happy. I've heard such women referred to as "high maintenance" and I don't really think that's fair, but I think it's true that there are women who care a lot more about money than others. If you're that type of woman who really wouldn't be happy to live on a meager income, then obviously you should really think about it before you marry yourself into such a situation. If it's important to you, then it's important to you and you need to act on it! But your opinions could change, especially if you have similar, compatible visions of the future. You might end up realizing you don't need a huge income to follow your dreams with your future husband.

I have a few reasons why I suggest not instantly disqualifying someone from your dating pool because of their "earning potential". First, as I described above, you might realize after dating that you're very compatible and that your dreams of money aren't as important to you as finding a great man to be married to. Second, how do you know based on a few dates what someone's earning potential is? I hear talk all the time about pre-med, business, and law guys... can we stop this train of thought in the Mormon world? There are plenty of very successful and rich men with science, engineering, communications, math, music, English, and even art degrees... I know them. And there are plenty of mediocre business graduates here, not to mention that half of all doctors say that if they did it over again, they wouldn't go into medicine. This leads directly to the third reason, that personality, sense of hard-work, and diligence are much better indicators of future success than major or prior internships. And that is something you're unlikely to really understand unless you date someone first.

Anyway, yes it's important... no, it's not everything and it could be rude to reject someone just because you don't think their earning potential is high enough.

-Ozymandias


0 Comments
Question #79074 posted on 09/14/2014 5:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I need a place on campus to make Skype calls for work. My main stipulations are that 1) It has to have access to a good internet connection and 2) it has to be relatively private (slightly confidential material will be discussed, and I have to avoid any place where the background noise gives away the fact that I'm on a college campus). It would also be helpful if I had some sort of desk or table to put my laptop on, but that's not my top priority.

Do you know of any places like that?

-Maker of Tests

A:

Dear Tests, 

I originally wanted to suggest using a study room in the library, but Tally informed me that those are technically not supposed to be used for personal use and that if you wanted to play it safe, you could use the sound booth in the library. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #79083 posted on 09/14/2014 5:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is it instinct for ppl to close their eyes when they kiss? Or are their cultural elements involved? Have you or the person you were kissing had their eyes open? How to react?

-big mouth

A:

Dear mouth,

I haven't been able to find a plethora of research regarding the instinct to close one's eyes while kissing. This article notes that there are a lot of biochemical reactions that occur when kissing, stating that "A good romantic kiss quickens our pulse and dilates our pupils, which is probably part of the reason so many of us close our eyes." Many also speculate that shutting off your visual senses helps you to better focus on the sensation of touch, taste, and smell; one of the proposed hypotheses for why we kiss is that we have a great many nerve endings in our lips and tongue, and the act also helps us exchange pheromones. However, it's possible for it to be largely cultural as well; the article I just linked to also mentions that some cultures haven't developed the tradition of kissing, so it may be a learned phenomenon.

As far as personal anecdotes go, you can read some of our opinions in Board Question #28744 and Board Question #72977. Personally, I agree with the notion that people look most attractive at a distance where their features seem proportional. Yes, I've had my eyes open while kissing; it wasn't that bad, but for me it turns it into more of a silly or fun kiss than a romantic one. Both kinds of kisses can be good, depending on the situation. How to react? Uh...kiss back? I'm not really sure what you're asking in your last question. If you care enough about the person, it's probably not that big a deal. If it's weirding you out that they're looking at you, well, what were you doing with your own eyes open in the first place? Again, open communication can be a great help in this area.

-Owlet

P.S. My favorite find when researching this question is Yellow's answer to Board Question #42118. So much yes.


0 Comments