"I like fiery passion, actually." - Olympus
Question #80831 posted on 01/30/2015 12:14 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Would you or would you not recommend the following books to someone with the comfort level of the reader who asked question #80282? If not, please include your reasoning.

Neil Gaiman's the Sandman (the comics)
Stiches: a memoir (graphic novel)
Stardust - Neil Gaiman (graphic novel)

Thanks,
pudding

A:

Dear Wade,

I would. The Sandman has (some, not a lot of) nudity as well as (again some, not a lot of) sexual themes. Stitches has some things that can be pretty disturbing but not really anything sexual. And Stardust? I wouldn't not recommend that to anyone. It's been a while since I've read it but from what I remember that book is super appropriate.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #80832 posted on 01/30/2015 12:14 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

When is margarine preferable to butter? All my searches are coming up with cases where butter is better, but nothing on when butter might be worse. Does margarine have any advantages besides price?

-Blue Bonnet

A:

Dear Bonnet,

Price aside, butter is always preferable to margarine. Butter is slightly better for you (it is saturated fat, while margarine is trans fat), and it tastes far better. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  

A:

Dear Miss Bonnet,

The difference between margarine and butter is that margarine consists of hydrogenated vegetable oil rather than dairy fat. Vegetable oil has hydrogen added to it to make it solid at room temperature and is sold as margarine. As TSG mentioned, butter is definitively better for you than margarine. The major advantage that margarine has (aside from price) is that it tends to be much softer than butter and melts more readily. For that reason it is popular as a spread and in baking. Have you ever tried spreading butter that you just got out of the fridge? Impossible!

Don't use margarine if you can help it.

-Inverse Insomniac 


0 Comments
Question #80833 posted on 01/30/2015 12:14 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm wondering if my troubles with focusing on homework/work are normal or otherwise. Every time I sit down to get something done, I end up surfing the web. It's incredibly frustrating. I feel like I'm not reaching my full academic potential here. I don't know if I'm expecting too much of myself, if I just have no willpower, or burnout from 3.5 years of college (1.5 to go!), or an attention deficit disorder. I've never seemed to have problems before, but then again - my high school and GE classes really weren't that hard for me. I've never felt the need to actually focus and get things done like I do now.

How do I know if I'm normal, if I have legitimate ADD, an addiction to web surfing/social media, or something else?

Who can I talk to? A counselor, a doctor, a "facebook addict anonymous" support group? I'm getting desperate...


-Should be studying

A:

Dear Great Intelligence,

Yeah, that's normal. I attempted to use self-control, but after spending entirely too many hours on websites I genuinely didn't need to be on (I'm looking at you, Buzzfeed), I finally went back to using StayFocusd. Another thing I would recommend looking into using is the Church's addiction recovery program. Mother M. went through it by herself for an addiction to sugar, so it's not like you're misusing by not using it for "serious sins."

Best of luck!

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Me,

Like Tally said, you are definitely not the only one with this struggle! She has some great advice, and I think I am going to start using StayFocusd myself!

If your ability to concentrate while you are supposed to be studying is the only ADD-like symptom you have noticed in your life, I think it is pretty safe to say that you probably do not have ADD.

Still, I commend you for wanting to overcome the time-wasting habit of surfing the internet, and I know that I need to do the same.  It has actually been one of my goals lately.

I have a very hard time focusing sometimes, and living in the 21st century has done nothing to help me. Here are some of the things that I have been trying to do in order to spend my time more wisely (and particularly to avoid wasting time on the internet):

1. Be accountable.  I have realized that sometimes I just do not have the willpower to work on something I don't want to do when I am supposed to do it.  I can tell myself, "Okay, self, I am not going to visit any other websites until this is done."  I can even promise myself rewards for when I am finished with my homework.  I have tried to incentivize myself in every way possible, but sometimes, I just need somebody else's help. For instance, if I tell myself that I am not going to eat my delicious leftover cake from the Cheesecake Factory until I am done with an assignment, I am going to end up eating it anyway. But if I ask my roommate to not allow me to eat it until my homework is done, I can pretty much guarantee that I am going to do my homework, and quickly. 

2. Tithe your time.  A friend of mine gave me this idea and it is genius.  Just to make it a little easier, I do a little more than 10% and I say that for every hour I waste on the internet, I have to do 10 minutes of scripture reading. Though I am not always good at following these rules (take the last few days, for example), when I have done this it has worked pretty well.  It helps me to not spend so much time on the internet and it helps me to read my scriptures.  Double points.  Again, this is easier to do if you are accountable to somebody so that you don't break your own rules.

3. Know the websites that end up sucking up a lot of your time and avoid them. For instance, I can check my email and be off in a minute. Youtube is another story.  I click on one video, then another, then another... and so on.  So if I have something really important to do, it helps to simply not allow myself to visit Youtube.  During study breaks, I will check my e-mail or read something on LDS.org instead, because I know that those sites won't turn my "study break" into an hour long internet splurge.  The best thing to do is honestly to not even allow your study breaks to include the internet.  If you can, get up and walk around for a moment or grab a light snack instead.

4. Think, "Will I really be glad that I read/watched this?"  Sometimes I keep clicking link after link just out of dull curiosity.  I mean, do I really care about the 24 unbelievable things Justin Bieber has said, or what would happen if Ron Swanson quotes were motivational posters?  I think I care in the moment that I click on it, but then I usually end up thinking to myself, "Well, self, that's another five minutes of your life you just wasted." When I am trying to focus it helps to ask myself if what I am about to click on will actually help my life in any way or if it will just mildly entertain me for a couple of minutes.  If I remind myself that I am not likely to gain anything from watching/reading something that pops up on my news feed, it makes it easier to close the page and do something more productive.

5. Understand why you are procrastinating.  I used to think that procrastination was just a result of really not wanting to do something. Often it is, but there are always other things at play.  One thing I realized is that part of my procrastination comes from my fear of failure.  If I never start something, I will never fail at it, right?  Wrong.  I know this advice is given all the time, but positive thinking really can help.  Envisioning your goals really can help.  Sometimes it is hard to motivate myself because I think, "Well this is just one assignment, so it won't really influence me in the long-term." I feel more motivated when I remember that every short term goal is part of a long term goal and remind myself of what those long-term goals are.

I also think that it definitely couldn't hurt to use the free counseling center that the Board writers always mention.  One of the goals of the counseling center is to help students achieve their academic best, which includes being able to overcome procrastination and stress, so if you are looking for help, I would start there.  Good luck!

Love,

Vienna


0 Comments
Thursday, January 29, 2015
Question #80823 posted on 01/29/2015 11:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

In the wake of the Disneyland measles outbreak, many of my friends are sharing pro-vaccination (or anti-anti-vaccination) articles. While I appreciate the sentiment, I'm afraid they're falling on deaf ears. Pro-vaxers praise the articles and share them with their friends, while anti-vaxers continue to think of themselves as the stalwart defenders of their children against the evils of "big pharm". And in the end no one really changes their views. So is there a way to convince anti-vaxers (or anyone with strongly held beliefs) that they are making a bad choice that impacts more than them and their family?

-sue donim

A:

Dear Wade,

If I were a parent and sent my child to school with a loaded Glock, I should be sent to jail and my child placed in more responsible hands. If I were a parent and held my child's birthday party on a freeway, I should be sent to jail and my child placed in more responsible hands. If I were a parent and refused to vaccinate my child for diseases that were almost completely eliminated based on falsified information that those vaccines caused autism, I should be sent to jail and my child placed in more responsible hands.

That's what I think should be done, at least.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear donim,

No, I don't think there is any way to make them change their minds. The best I think we can do is encourage those whose children we know personally; otherwise it just sounds like a bunch of strangers trying to tell you what is right for your child. If all that has been said is not enough, I don't see any way they'll be convinced. I think the only thing we can do now is teach the younger generation before they get in the same mindset that their parents were. I know very few people my age that are strongly anti-vaccination, so hopefully our children will be fine, but that's small consolation for the kids that are getting sick today. I'm surprised that some ladies from my home ward are against them, considering the Church's own official immunizations initiative. If science doesn't convince them, maybe religion will; the First Presidency said way back in 1978 that they "urge members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to protect their own children through immunization." I wonder if another similar statement will be made soon.

-Owlet

A:

Dear sue,

In my experience, it has been incredibly hard to reason with those who do not support vaccinating their children. It's hard arguing this issue because it has implications for their child's body. Some anti-vaccination supporters say that the side effects aren't worth the vaccination. Others don't vaccinate because the diseases are uncommon in the United States. There's also no guarantee that your child will not contract whatever the virus the vaccine prepares your body for. 

Well guess what? They're right! Vaccines do have side effects. For instance, roughly 16% of those who receive the MMR vaccine experience a fever after vaccination. Measles are relatively uncommon in the United States. From 2001-2010, there were only two years with just over 100 measles cases reported. And this isn't the first year that the flu vaccine doesn't match the strain of the flu virus floating around.

HOWEVER, when you catch whatever virus you're not vaccinated against, your symptoms will more than likely be infinitely worse than vaccine side effects. That low grade vaccine fever looks pretty good compared to 101°+ measles fever you will get. Some viruses are uncommon, but THEY STILL EXIST. Remember those low annual case numbers for measles? In 2014, there were 644 cases! Additionally, most of the people who contracted measles were unvaccinated. While the CDC doesn't disclose their numbers, they do say that "most of these people got measles...after being exposed to someone who got measles while in another country." It literally becomes a global issue when a disease travels thousands of miles and continues to spread and infect people.

I'm not even going to justify those who claim vaccines cause autism because they do not. I'm also not even going to touch those who argue that the government/big corporations are out for your money because the WHO, UNICEF, and countless other groups have put vaccinations as a priority. 

So basically, it's hard to argue with people who are anti-vaccinations. Doctors and other health officials have been encouraging vaccinations for years but here we are, still spreading diseases that are completely preventable. If showing the anti-vaccination supporters my ranty post still doesn't change their hearts, show them this news article about how a baby who is too young for the vaccine may catch the measles (and experience all the symptoms that can be fatal to small children) because some parents decided not to vaccinate their child.

End of rant,

-Ms.O'Malley

Sources:

CDC-Measles Fact Sheet for Parents

CDC MMR Vaccine Side-Effects

CDC Measles Cases and Outbreaks

CDC FAQ About Measles in the US


0 Comments
Question #80828 posted on 01/29/2015 10:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So just now I remembered a question that I had maybe eight or so years ago, but didn't ask at the time. I can't remember all of the details, so I will do my best.

A number of years ago, on the BYU Physics homepage, there was a little news article thing about students in a research group who either participated in some sort of running event or went white-water rafting (I am pretty sure it was some sort of run and the white-water rafting was a different little news story). It referred to one of the students as a "laser jock," as the student worked with lasers and the picture was from said sporting event. So my question is, is there any sort of connection to THE Laser Jock? Did Laser Jock pull his alias from that little blurb on the physics homepage? Was that him, or did he just think it was cool and adopted it? Or was it just a complete and utter coincidence? Since I am a little fuzzy on the date, it is hard to know if the article was even from before Laser Jock started writing. (I realize I should've asked this before Laser Jock retired. If you don't have the answer or can't get a hold of him or whatever, it's cool. Thanks)

-physics grad

A:

Dear Wade,

I can neither confirm nor deny this information (partly because I was unable to find the article in question). It should be noted that on one of Dr. Bergeson's class websites (from 2011) he uses the term "laser jocks" and that "laser jock" is definitely a more far-reaching term than even just BYU's campus. Also, since I now currently work with the same research adviser as Laser Jock formerly did, I would add that saying "the student worked with lasers" would apply to just about anyone in our research group.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #80826 posted on 01/29/2015 9:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

If Steve Urkel was really that annoying then why didn't the Winslows ever lock their doors?

-Shanimal, who finds it amusing that Carl the cop wasn't all that concerned about his family's safety

A:

Dear Shanimal,

Steve Urkel is one persistent character. I'm sure even if the Winslow's kept their door locked 24/7, he would find a way in. He is smart enough to make copies of their house key or find an unlocked window to crawl through. Instead of having to rescue him after every attempted trespass (because he would be the one to get stuck and hurt himself), they just leave their door open.

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #80827 posted on 01/29/2015 8:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Who is this little girl I've seen in a couple of pictures with Kim?

http://m.zimbio.com/photos/Kim+Kardashian/Kim+Kourtney+Kardashian+Take+Kids+Museum/cufNTtxXmGl

-Famous Fanny

A:

Dear Wade,

That is Sophia Pippen, daughter of former NBA star Scottie Pippen and Larsa Pippen (formerly of The Real Housewives of Miami). Larsa and Kim are reportedly good friends.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #80824 posted on 01/29/2015 6:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How many old accounts on the board are still active? By old accounts I mean accounts that are created at least five years ago.

-Curiosity

A:

Dear you,

At least one. Six years old and counting.

In all seriousness, though, the writers probably can't really answer this; I don't know of any way to check this without having the editors creep on individual accounts, which they obviously can't do just for curiosity. 

~Anne, Certainly

A:

Dear Curiosity,

My answer to Board Question #74831 contains a histogram of account age that you will find interesting.  That question is from 2013, but from that histogram it would suggest there are now probably 500-600 active accounts older than 5 years.

-Curious Physics Minor


0 Comments
Question #80821 posted on 01/29/2015 4:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm always hearing about how attractive women are who have self confidence. But how true is this to guys with no to low confidence? Are guys who are lacking confidence likely to be attracted to women with confidence, or to someone who's probably at the same level as them? To me, it seems that girls with confidence would be a big intimidation to guys who don't have as much.

-Granola girl

A:

Dear Mickey,

Have you ever seen Hitch? No? Well, the main character Albert has absolutely no confidence. The main storyline is the fact that he's really into a girl with a lot of confidence, and he doesn't know how to get her. Of course they're an intimidation!

I've also seen this play out in real life with my roommate Bambi—who has relatively high confidence—who's got a boy with fairly low confidence attempting to go for her. (Hint: it's not working out.) One reason why I think this may happen is because they may feel like they have nothing else to lose, and being able to get someone who's so clearly a catch would boost their own confidence. Then again, the mystery of guys' minds is incredibly deep and I may be completely off base.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #80815 posted on 01/29/2015 2:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why is my room so cold? My roommate and I share an apartment (duh) and the living room and her room are basically the same temperature but my room feels about 10 degrees colder (she's even attested to that). Why is it? Can I do something to change that? Should I keep my door closed or something?

-Chilly

A:

Dear Dream Lord,

You should first check your vent to make sure it's open. It's also a good idea to check to make sure that if you have a window in your room that it's not letting out the warm air. If it is, placing a blanket around the problem spots can alleviate the problem temporarily. Keeping your door closed can also help to keep heat in.

If none of these suggestions work, try talking to your complex's maintenance and see what they can do to help.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear you,

Door closing might actually be hurting you if everywhere else feels warmer. If the vent system in your room is faulty, allowing greater circulation with the rest of your apartment may actually help you. Figuring out whether there is hot air entering your room from some internal source (e.g. vent) that's then escaping or whether the air is supposed to be getting into your room through general air flow may help you figure out where to direct your heat-capture efforts.

~Anne, Certainly


0 Comments
Question #80774 posted on 01/29/2015 2:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is it true that it's a Misdemeanor in Michigan to curse God? Why was this law put in placed? Why here out of everywhere else? What do the liberals say about it? When is the last time someone was convicted?

-Liquid Paper

A:

Dear you,

As I am not a lawyer and have no interest in being perceived to give legal advice (which I cannot do and am not doing), I will link you to the part of the Michigan Penal Code (which, I note, may not offer up-to-date information on state laws) to which you appear to refer. 

I'm not sure when (if ever) anyone has been convicted under this law and also refrain from speculating on legislative intent in creating such a law.

~Anne, Certainly


0 Comments
Question #80822 posted on 01/29/2015 1:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is it really better to have loved and lost than to never have loved at all?

-Dallen Johns: The Ultimate DJ

A:

Dear DJ,

Directly from the Canterville Ghost --

"You fear the thrill that seized your heart when you did kiss that boy. Love it is! And not to be denied, and it can bring you joy untold. But never to have loved, and sadder yet to have loved and let it slip away, is never to have loved at all. And love, and come what sorrow may, it cannot countervail the bliss that one sweet minute gives you in his sight."

I don't think this applies to every situation, but Patrick Stewart says those lines in the movie, and who can complain about that?!

-Squirrel

A:

Dear DJ,

I was thinking about this before your question even came in because I actually read In Memoriam A.H.H. this week, which, for those of you who don't know, is the original source of the famous line quoted above. The poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson wrote it as a eulogy for Arthur Hallam, his dearest friend who died suddenly of a cerebral hemorrhage when Tennyson was 24. Here's my tuppence, for anyone who cares:

Being human is about finding joy. Joy comes from loving human relationships. Of course, you incur a lot of risk when you venture to love someone with every part of you there is to offer - and sometimes, it doesn't work like you planned. You're left empty and broken inside. But the emptiness and the brokenness can be healed, and your journey into the depths of human emotions can leave you a more tender, empathetic, and compassionate person. You know what it's like to love, and what experience can be more truly God-like? 

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book


0 Comments
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I love etymology! I think the process of semantic change is absolutely fascinating. Like the word 'belfry'; it used to be 'berfry' but it changed to 'belfrey' because they have bells in them. Cool, right? What's your favorite word etymology in English?

-La fille américaine

A:

Dear La fille,

My favorite word etymology in English is the etymology of the word compatibility. We talk about compatibility a lot in our culture, particularly when it comes to romantic relationships, and everyone seems to have different ideas of what it really means to be compatible with someone. Generally when we talk about compatibility we talk about similar goals, sense of humor, some ethereal "chemistry," etc. The roots of the word, however, suggest something much different. It has the same roots as compassion: com- "together" + pati- "to suffer" + -ability "to be able to."

Think about that for a minute. I think it's a pretty powerful concept. 

-Divya 

A:

Dear Li'l American,

Edit. You'd think that the verb "edit" came first, and from that followed the noun "editor," meaning "one who edits," right? Wrong. "Editor" was the original word, deriving from the Latin, and we backformed the verb from the noun. There were "editors," but there was no such thing as "editing."

Glad we corrected that oversight.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book.

A:

Dear Phil,

Probably "savvy," because I guessed its etymology, and then found out I was right! It's from the Spanish verb "sabe," the usted form of "saber," meaning "to know." Savvy?

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear small American girl,

My favorite is the word "soon," which in Old English meant "immediately." I like to think that the meaning changed over time because parents kept telling their kids "We'll go to the park soon," which the kids (of course) took to mean "in a little while, but definitely not now because I'm busy. I'm just telling you we'll go soon to get you off my back."

-Inverse Insomniac


0 Comments
Posted on 01/29/2015 9:23 a.m. New Comment on: #80817 I am on a binge for downloading church music and trying to build up my Sunday ...
Question #80806 posted on 01/29/2015 8:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I was quietly studying in my apartment today, in a spot in the living room where people can't see me but all my roommates know I study there. My roommate came in talking to a guy in the ward. I knew they wouldn't notice me unless I said something, but didn't want to interrupt them. After a while they were still talking, and I didn't want to startle them by popping out.

Then they started talking about me. Not really bad things, but bad misconceptions. One thing they talked about is something that I do which costs more money, even though I am obviously skimping everywhere else. I do it for health reasons that are very valid, while many people see it as making no difference and just a waste of money.

I told one person in my ward my reasons, and he believed me. I'm afraid my roommate (who I have lived with for a year) won't though. We don't talk much, and when I try to talk about personal things I get the vibe she doesn't believe me. Which hurts.

So my question is, do I explain my reasons to this roommate? How? Especially how to do it without to much pain when she refuses to believe, or at least acts like it. Or, do I say nothing and let her and her friend keep thinking poorly about me in that case, possibly telling others their view?

Assuming they have been talking to others in the ward (no idea), or it would be easier to tell the ward, would there be any good way to do that? It's about an eating choice I make, that some people say has no effect.


-Miss. Frazzled, who knows communication is necessary and would like to clear up the understanding (and knows there are probably more) but is seriously scared to talk to this roommate because it's like trying to hug a porcupine.

A:

Dear Miss Frazzled,

Porcupines are hard to deal with. I should know; I am one, on occasion. Let's see if I can frame my answer in a way that will be helpful to you.

1: People will always have opinions where they have no business opining. The truth is, there is such a vast spread of ways to live your life that any one person's ideas are bound to conflict with another's. The choices that you make are based on your best understanding of the situation, and the choices others make are based on theirs. The trouble comes when we get up in arms about someone else's way of doing things because we assume that ours is automatically better. You've probably already discovered that no matter what you do or believe, someone will call you crazy for doing or believing it. 

I get angry when I see people sticking their fingers where they don't belong - when they presume to have opinions about someone else's personal choices that don't affect them - but it's a hypocritical anger, because I do it too.

"I can't believe they named their baby Zebra!"
"Yet another person on a gluten-free diet - doesn't he know that's just a fad?"
"Why on earth would she dye her hair that color?"

Kudos to those who have mastered the impulse to judge. A few of you have, and you are among the most Christlike people I know. But really - MOST OF US FALL INTO THIS TRAP. And not just occasionally, either. ALL THE TIME.

2: We can't always change those opinions. You may have all kinds of reasons for eating the way you do and all kinds of evidence that it's important, and they may have reasons that you shouldn't and evidence that it's not. You won't change many minds by arguing about it.

3: Given 1 and 2, we have to learn to live with and love people with different opinions. Unfortunately, life is bound to be pretty miserable if we only associate with those who approve of all of our actions and beliefs. Therefore, we have to accept that people will judge, and we have to find a way to not let it bother us. 

4: Yes, you actually can achieve 3. Letting go of what other people think about us is truly an epic battle. I'm not saying you should totally disregard others' feelings or intentionally flout social norms to make a statement. But it is so important to be able to shrug at censure when you have done the research and the soul searching required to make a personal decision.

4.1: Make your position clear to others. To directly answer your question, you can start by explaining your reasoning to those around you, including your porcupine roommate. Don't make a ward announcement or anything, but explain it to your friends and to people you associate with regularly. It's a topic that frequently comes up in the routine course of conversation, especially if they witness some of your eating choices.

This does not entail arguing, mind you, but simply letting them know why you do what you do. Then you can be sure that you've given it your best shot - if they don't believe you or accept your explanations, the problem is on them. Acknowledge their doubts and let them know you're okay with their differences in opinion: "I know you think it's silly, and you have a good point that _________. I've thought about it a lot, though, and the reason I still choose this course of action is _______. But I'm not offended that you don't agree with me."

4.2: Seek for integrity and consistency in your actions. By integrity, I don't so much mean "doing what's right even if no one is watching," but rather being sure enough that what you're doing is right that you're willing to move forward regardless of criticism. It means prayerfully and thoughtfully considering all of your options before deciding on a course of action. It means researching and giving due attention to all sides of the argument. In some cases, the right answer isn't obvious even AFTER you've done all the research - but you should still learn all you can about the subject so that you know you can justify your decision (especially to yourself) when others cast doubt on it. Knowing that you've done your best to come to the correct conclusion will give you confidence to defy the consensus.

4.3: Be a good person. Even if you make eating choices that people think are dumb or lack scientific validation, it won't actually matter if they enjoy being around you. Be aware of the needs of others, look for opportunities to serve, show real interest in people, and be thoughtful, humble, and optimistic. People will want to be around you just for being you, and while they might still think you're silly for your diet choices, they will hold you in high regard for the things that really matter. 

Example 1: One of my cousins gave his first child a name I don't approve of. I still shake my head when I think about it - but I don't think less of him. It's just a quirky part of his personality. 

Example 2: Another of my cousins is on a diet that I don't approve of. I won't be adopting it myself, but she is my best friend and one of the most incredible people I know. It doesn't really matter to me that she's making weird eating choices.

4.4: Develop a strong relationship with your Heavenly Father. This goes along with 4.2. If you know you're acting according to the best information and inspiration you have, you know that God is satisfied with what you're doing. You can always act in confidence when you know that he loves you and is on your side.

5: Keep in mind that everyone has different ideas about what constitutes healthy eating, and that just because your roommate and this ward member judge you for your choices doesn't mean that everyone else does, too. Even if gossip has somehow spread, most people don't care. They won't even give it a second thought. 

6: Don't stress about it! (I know, easier said than done, right?) Life will go on regardless of what happens here or what anyone thinks about you. Keep up the things that you're doing right and strive to be a better person, and when you look back on this time of your life, you'll remember that more than anything else.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

7: Just a quick P.S. It's also probably a good idea to head off situations like this before they happen by always making sure the people in your living room know you're there. I have a roommate who sometimes cuddles up under a blanket by the couch, and it doesn't look like a person - she usually stretches or yawns or something when people come in so that they're aware she's there and don't do anything... incriminating.


0 Comments
Question #80819 posted on 01/29/2015 2:20 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Without reading the rest of this question, what do you think of the design of this ring?

Have you looked at it? Ok. I like the ring but I just found out that it's based on a symbol for the Trinity. Do you think most people would recognize that, or would they just think it's a cool design?

-Morning Glory

A:

Dear Morning Glory,

My first thought when I saw the ring wasn't that it looked like a Trinity symbol, but that it looked Celtic. A lot of Celtic art and design is based on the Trinity, because Ireland is very Catholic, but I think there's a subtle difference. The ring doesn't have to mean the Trinity to you if you don't want it to. I'd honestly just expect more questions about if you have Celtic heritage. That's just my two cents.

At the end of the day, if you really like the ring, just get it and enjoy it.

-Zedability

A:

Dear Morning Glory,

Fun fact: In Spanish, the LDS word for "godhead" is trinidad, meaning, you guessed it, "trinity." I think we like to use a different word in the Church because we like to emphasize the fact that We Are So Different (and we really are different in some very important nuances), but we still do believe in the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost. Personally, I don't see anything wrong with that ring at all.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #80818 posted on 01/29/2015 2:08 a.m.
Q:

Dear Vienna,

(A belated) Welcome! Would you like to introduce yourself?

-The Inquisitor

A:

Dear Inquisitor,

  • I am 21 years old. I have lived in 6 different states and moved something like 15 times. As a result, I am pretty used to change, and it is actually things staying the same that scares the heck out of me.
  • Ever since my parents gave me a copy of Room for Squares when I was 12, I have been obsessed with music. My favorite way to calm down is to play/sing Jack Johnson songs on my guitar and my favorite way to express myself is to write music. I’ve also played violin for a really long time, and every now and again I still get it out of its case to play myself some Praeludium and Allegro.
  • My favorite thing about life is the opportunity we have to improve ourselves. I think it is such a miracle that we can invent ourselves and be whoever we want to be. For that reason, I am always trying to develop new skills and learn new things. I am happiest when I feel like I am growing and making a difference for good in the world.
  • As a kid, I was always painfully shy around people I didn’t know well. Then when I was 17, I decided I didn’t want to be shy anymore. For the past four years I’ve been applying a “fake it till you make it” strategy in my social life. It’s actually worked pretty well and I am a lot less shy now than I used to be. My mission also contributed significantly to this growth, by increasing my love for humanity about 10-fold. These days I sincerely enjoy getting to know new people, and I have come to realize that just about anything can be fun if it is done in good company.
  • Despite all of that, I often still get flustered in big groups of people or around attractive members of the opposite sex. I always prefer small get-togethers to big parties. That’s partly because I usually fade into the background in big groups. Sometimes I actually enjoy being a wallflower, but other times it bothers me.
  • There have been times when I have thought that maybe I am just different than everybody else.  Then, one day, I realized that everybody else is as weird and insecure as I am.  Since then, it has become a lot easier to have the confidence to be myself.
  • I love nature and being outside.
  • I decided to apply to be a board writer when Anne, Certainly wrote a super awesome response to a question I asked.  I thought—I want to do that, too!
  • If there hadn't already been a writer named "Serendipity," that would have been my pen name.
  • I speak Spanish and Mexican food is the best food in the world.
  • The only TV shows I watch are comedy shows, my favorite being Community, which I quote pretty much all the time. My favorite movie is Remember the Titans and for Christmas I got a TC Williams sweatshirt that says “Bertier” on the back. Even though I’ve seen it 100 times I still cry every time when Julius says “strong side!"
  • I am better at expressing my love through service than I am at vocalizing how I feel about people. I love doing thoughtful things for people.
  • If there was a word to mean the opposite of loneliness, that would be my favorite emotion. More than anything, I hate feeling lonely. I have also made it my personal goal in life to try to help others not to feel lonely.
  • I have more book smarts than I do street smarts, which has always bugged me. I tend to do ridiculous, forgetful, and even plain stupid things at times. But it does get me some good stories, and I have learned that it is pretty fun to laugh at yourself.
  • I have the worst sense of direction of anybody I know.
  • I’ve been told that my personality is a mix between Monica and Phoebe from Friends. I've also been told that I am half Hermione and half Luna Lovegood. Make of that what you will.
  • When I was growing up, people always told me I looked like I belonged in an old painting. I never knew whether to take it as an insult or a compliment.  I still don't.
  • My favorite drink is Fufu Berry Jones Soda.
  • The internet tells me I have ADHD, which is probably true. 
  • My favorite quote is "Joy in all its glory can only be obtained through unselfishness."
  • I love life—even the sad parts, because let’s face it, life wouldn’t be as beautiful without them.
  • I love the gospel. My relationship with God is the only thing that has gotten me through some of the hard times in my life. Well, that and laughter. I have a strong testimony that God is involved in each of our lives. I have a lot of weaknesses, way more than I could list here, but I know that God loves me and that He knows I am trying to improve.

Love,

Vienna


0 Comments
Question #80817 posted on 01/29/2015 1:20 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am on a binge for downloading church music and trying to build up my Sunday music library. I recall on my mission listening to an album that was dedicated to Joseph Smith. It was motly centered on music but was not just music. There was a narrator reading about Joseph Smith and his life. Does anyone know which album I am talking about? I have tried googling but have come up with nothing. Can you help?

Thanks in advance!

-Lexman

A:

Dear Lexman,

I'm pretty sure the album you're looking for is Joseph: A Nashville Tribute to the Prophet.

For the most part, I like the album. However, there's one line from one of the songs that has always really bugged me: "Many men are lying under six feet of ground fired from the smoking gun of modern-day Sam." This implies either that many men are lying under six feet of ground after having been fired from Porter Rockwell's gun, or that many men are lying under six feet of ground because six feet of ground was fired from his gun. Either way, that sounds like a pretty unusual gun and I'd love to get my hands on it.

-yayfulness


1 Comment
Question #80812 posted on 01/29/2015 12:20 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I just made a PayPal account. I teach clarinet lessons and thought it would be cool to have the option for the parents to pay online vs. in person. I have a website and got a "button" so they can pay through paypal on my website. I know services like ProPay charge a fee for every transaction. Does PayPal do that? If so, I'd rather not offer this service to my students. I can't find anywhere that answers this question. Sorry if it's a simple one but I appreciate it!

-teacher

A:

Dear Wade,

You might want to check out this help article. PayPal charges "2.9% plus $0.30 USD of the amount you receive" for receiving money for goods or services.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
Question #80816 posted on 01/28/2015 7:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

We need to buy an alto saxophone because my husband is studying it at college. It's going to be about $3,000. We are young and married with a little baby so something that expensive isn't in the budget. We can rent one through the school, but that's not ideal. We were thinking about a student loan to pay for it. Is that possible since it's for his major? I don't know anything about student loans. Or, do you know any other ways we can get this paid for? Like, special things for very low income families? We are on welfare (FAFSA, WIC, Food Stamps), so that gives you an idea of how much money we bring in.

-saving $.... ?

A:

Dear Saving,

I talked to Yog in Neverland, since she's probably the most music-expert-y person I know. She said that the reason that BYU and many other schools allow music majors to rent instruments for free or very low prices is that it is really, really difficult for students to come up with the money to buy their own instrument. It's really the best way to go.

There aren't any special programs that we're aware of that help people pay for music instruments. I suppose it's possible that you could apply for a student loan and use the money towards that (I don't think they specifically track where you're putting all of your money), but I'd also be careful about going into debt when you're already on a low income. I'm sorry to say it, but it sounds like renting is your best option right now. Perhaps your husband could talk to his professors and see if they know of any better alternatives, since they'd probably have the most expertise about it.

Sorry we couldn't come up with anything more helpful!

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80782 posted on 01/28/2015 6:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How sinful/bad is it (yeah, I know that might be vague and subjective) if someone unendowed looks up the temple ceremony online and reads through it? What would be your response if an unendowed LDS friend of yours told you that they had done that?

-Rhode

A:

Dear Island,

You're right that it's subjective, but I would feel uncomfortable looking up the ceremony even as an endowed member. We're asked not to discuss it outside of the temple itself, including in private settings with other endowed people. This indicates to me that it's less about secrecy and more about sacredness: if all that mattered was keeping a secret from the unendowed, then we'd be allowed to talk to others about it outside the temple, right?

So it's not that you would be getting in on a secret so much as you would be defiling something solemn and hallowed by not affording it the reverence you should. God intended sacred things for sacred places, and taking them out of the context they were intended for violates all of my spiritual sensibilities.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book


0 Comments
Posted on 01/28/2015 12:36 p.m. New Comment on: #80809 My prof kept talking about about monographs... in the library. Is this like a book or ...
Question #80808 posted on 01/28/2015 9:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What's your favorite Jack Handey quote. (Don't know who that is? Look 'em up, they're great!)

-A pirate with fond memories

A:

Dear pirated muzak,

"As you make your way through this hectic world of ours, set aside a few minutes each day. At the end of the year, you'll have a couple of days saved up."

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Dear real treasure,

“If you saw two guys named Hambone and Flippy, which one would you think liked dolphins most? I'd say Flippy, wouldn't you? You'd be wrong though. It's Hambone.”

This quote provided the inspiration for nicknaming my brother Hambone. It's stuck for the better part of ten years.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Dear pirate,

"To me, clowns aren't funny. In fact, they're kind of scary. I've wondered where this started and I think it goes back to the time I went to the circus, and a clown killed my dad."

Also, "Children need encouragement. If a kid gets an answer right, tell him it was a lucky guess. That way he develops a good, lucky feeling."

It worked with me,

-El-ahrairah


0 Comments
Question #80811 posted on 01/28/2015 8:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is Haleakala still on Haleakahiatus this semester or have I somehow missed his recent responses?

Thanks,
come back.... (if you want to and/or when you're ready and it won't be a burden/stress/etc. Or just enjoy the rest of your life and take care).

A:

Dear come back,

Haleakalā cannot be reached at this time. Please try again later. Thank you for your patronage!

(♫ Believe it or not, we can't pick up the phone./

Please leave a message after the tone/

Where could he be? )

-The Board Answering Machine v2

**beep**


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