Always end the name of your child with a vowel, so that when you yell the name will carry. - Bill Cosby
Thursday, May 21, 2015
Question #82513 posted on 05/21/2015 9:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Due to problems I was having with my iPod I had to restore it. Unfortunately this deleted my listening history on OverDrive. I was able to sign into my account and download the five books I was listening to but my history is bye-bye and I'm upset because I had about 200 books on that list that I was going to review. Is there any way that I can somehow restore/view my history list?

-OverIt

A:

Dear Wade,

Unfortunately, it looks like listening history is only saved locally. However, you should still be able to see all the titles in your wish list and a history of any titles you've rated.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Corrections
Question #82507 posted on 05/21/2015 7:54 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are some songs that always make you want to dance?

-Delta

A:

Dear Delts,

Basically anything Latin for starters. The fast ones make you happy and the slow ones make you realize your hips can move/want to move in ways you didn't think were real. Specifically though, some great ones are: "Bailando" by Enrique Iglesias, "Danza Kuduro" by Don Omar, "Vivir Mi Vida" by Marc Anthony, and "Ave Maria" (no, not that Ave Maria) by David Bisbal. 

Some other ones I've enjoyed are:

  • "Listen to the Man" and "Blame it on Me" by George Ezra
  • "Modern Nature" by Sondre Lerche
  • "Higher and Higher" by Jackie Wilson
  • "Love on Top" by Beyonce
  • "Hey Mama" by Mat Kearny
  • "Habanera" by Bizet
  • "September" by Earth, Wind and Fire
  • "Dog Days are Over" by Florence + The Machine
  • "Erlkönig" by Franz Schubert
  • "Treasure" by Bruno Mars
  • "Geronimo" by Sheppard
  • "Ain't Nobody Got Time for That" by Sweet Brown
  • "It's Not Unusual" by Tom Jones (but only if you can dance like Alfonso Ribeiro)
  • "Feel Again" by One Republic
  • "The Macarena" by Los del Rio
  • "Yeah" by Usher (I know) 
  • "Shut Up and Dance" by Walk the Moon
  • "Grace Kelly" by Mika
  • "The Infernal Galop" from Orpheus in the Underworld by Jacques Offenbach
  • "Mambo Number 5" by Lou Bega
  • "Sh'boom" by The Chords
  • "Mr. Roboto" by Styx
  • "Lost in My Mind" by The Head and the Heart
  • "Can't Hurry Love" by the Dixie Chicks
  • And THE WHOLE SOUNDTRACK from Guardians of the Galaxy

...Apparently, a lot of different genres inspire me to dance. Probably because more than actually dancing, I embarrass myself while haphazardly moving to the beat. Hopefully one of these will suit your fancy. Enjoy!

-Auto Surf

A:

Dear Human,

Since I am a ballroom dancer, the songs that make me want to dance are a little different. They include:

  • "A Thousand Years" by Christina Perri
  • "El Tango de Roxanne" from Moulin Rouge
  • "Dark Waltz" by Haley Westenra
  • "Wink and a Smile" by Frank Sinatra
  • Most things by Frank Sinatra and Michael Buble
  • "Sparkling Diamonds" also from Moulin Rouge
  • "Spider-man" by Michael Buble

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  

A:

Dear Delta, 

"Shut Up and Dance" is my new favorite. Also, just about anything by Ke$ha, Taylor Swift, or Katy Perry will get me out of my seat. But, in all honesty, anything with a strong beat will work since my dancing consists of jumping up and down 98% of the time.

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Corrections
Question #82499 posted on 05/21/2015 7:49 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Who's more Provo-famous: Lindsey Sterling or Scott Sterling? Also, are these two related in anyway? I mean, they have the same last name.

-Sophwerf

A:

Dear werf,

Definitely Lindsey. She's been around for longer, has been on national TV, and recently took home a Billboard Music Award. Scott has only been around for a little bit and he's not even that funny. 

Also, the two do share a name that sounds the same, but it is sadly spelled differently. Lindsey has an 'I' while Scott has an 'E.' However, Lindsey does have a tuba playing sister that is almost as graceful as she is. 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Corrections
Question #82452 posted on 05/21/2015 7:40 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Any personal stories from friends and family or recommended LDS.org/Ensign articles about trying to return from inactivity with children that are accustomed to not attending church and not super interested in going because of nervousness or just lack of interest (why go to church when you can stay home?)?

Thanks,

pistachio

A:

Dear pistachio, 

I can really only speak from the perspective of a child since this was me. My mom was the only member in our family so we ended up not going to church more often than not. On the few weeks that we would go, I hated it. I didn't know anyone, I had to sit around for three hours, and, most embarrassingly to me, I didn't know what any of the lessons were talking about. I had a rough idea of who Jesus was and why some people considered him important, but I had no clue about Joseph Smith, the Book of Mormon, or any other main teachings of the Church that you learn from Sunbeams on up. Even Sharing Time in Primary was a struggle because I didn't know the songs that everyone else knew by heart. 

I can honestly contribute my initial interest in the Church to one man: my CTR9 teacher. As I said above, I hated going to class because I didn't know any of the basics of the Church. I don't know if the Primary president told him about my situation or what, but this man was truly a blessing. For every lesson, he took sticky notes and marked his scriptures with each passage we were reading in class. He made me hold them for him every time I was there because "there was never enough space" on the table, even though space could have been made. When we got to a section we would need to read, he would tell everyone the passage and tell me that he needed to see his "notes" on the green sticky note. The note had simple information on it that helped me realize what was going on in the lesson. For example, if we were learning about the Brass Plates, his notes would say "Laman and Lamuel: Nephi's brothers. Nephi: good son of Lehi," or other things that were obvious to everyone else but not to me. He never called on me unless my hand was raised and he asked me to say the closing prayer for class before sacrament started. During Sharing Time, he made me help him hold the giant songbook because he "didn't know the songs." Basically, this man realized that I was way out of my comfort zone and bent over backwards to help me. 

So, from personal experience, I can only tell you to keep trying. Brace yourself for the resistance I'm sure you're already getting, but I promise, it will get better once a routine is in place. Speak to your ward's Primary/Young Men's/Young Women's president and get them involved. Find a family or some kids from your ward that are the same age as your children and set up play-dates or game nights so they can meet them and make friends. Set a goal to go twice a month, then bump it up to three, then to a full month. Do family scripture time and study the lesson that your kids will be listening to the upcoming week to prepare them. It also may help to get them their own set of scriptures, hymnal, or children's songbook. It will be a long and hard experience, but it will be worth it!

Best of luck!

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Corrections
Question #82511 posted on 05/21/2015 5:33 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Think Tank,

People talk about the college kid flipping burgers after graduation, but how much of that is true? How many college graduates have minimum wage (or undervalued) jobs? Is it increasing over the years?

-Not an Economist

A:

Dear Re'lar,

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of 2012, 284,000 college graduates were working at or below minimum wage. This number is up from 167,000 in 2002, a 71 percent increase. This article provided a lovely graph in the trend of the number of Americans with at least a bachelor's Degree earning minimum wage, depicted below. 

minwage3_800_425.png

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Corrections
Question #82509 posted on 05/21/2015 1:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
I have suffered from Sleep Paralysis since I was about twelve years old (I am now 24.) If any of you aren't aware of this condition is basically means I often wake up from sleep completely paralyzed, if that weren't scary enough I is often accompanied by the feeling of an intruding presence (someone or something that intends me harm). This may sound like a silly thing but it is actually very terrifying and even though when I come out of it I know it isn't real, I feel so scared and worked up that I am not able to fall asleep for quite some time. Although it is something that has affected my sleep for years, I have no idea what to do about it. It doesn't seem like something a doctor could fix and I feel like if I told a family member about this they'd just think I'm a baby that can't get over "nightmares". I've read on some online forums that people say if you just tell yourself it's not real when it's happening you'll be fine... the one big problem is in the moment when I'm still waking up I have a sort of amnesia where I can't remember that technique let alone convince myself of anything. Do you know anyone that suffers from this? What have they done to deal with it? Is there anyway to better deal with this or get rid of it or should I just get along with less sleep? Thanks for your help and sorry to bother you with my silly problems.

-Sleepless in Salt Lake

A:

Dear Sleepless,

I had never heard of sleep paralysis, and I don't know anyone who suffers from it, either. But I want to offer you a piece of advice: please go see a doctor. You'd be amazed at the sorts of things modern medicine can help with. There are sleep disorder specialists and clinics in Salt Lake and in Provo, and there's a good chance that getting professional help will relieve a lot of your suffering in ways you can't imagine.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Dear transplant of a chick flick I still haven't seen,

Look at me. No, seriously. Look me in the eyes when I'm talking to you.

Better. Listen, you should go see a sleep specialist. Like really soon. I suffered from narcolepsy for probably 5 years before I finally got some help. All that time I kept telling myself the same things that you're telling yourself. I thought, "what's a doctor going to be able to do for me if I tell him that I'm sleepy all the time?" It seemed a patently ridiculous idea. After all, I was a missionary and a college student. Of course I was tired! I was probably just being a big baby about it.

Then it got to the point where I couldn't ignore it anymore. It got so bad that I was afraid to drive anywhere on the freeway because I might fall asleep and cause an accident. I was teaching at the MTC and I would fall asleep in the middle of a conversation in French nearly every single day. It was ruining every aspect of my life. I couldn't concentrate, I couldn't stay awake for a single class period at school, and I was just generally falling apart.

So I went to the doctor and sheepishly told him all of this. And you know what? He didn't even bat an eye. He sent me to a sleep specialist, who ran some tests on me and then took me at my word when the tests came up inconclusive. I got a prescription and my life changed overnight.

Please, I plead with you: don't do what I did. Don't wait until your problem has consumed your life before you go see a doctor and get some help. Consistent sleep paralysis isn't just "nightmares" or some little thing that you're supposed to just shrug off. It's a medical condition and you can get help. Sleep paralysis like you describe can be a symptom of a host of serious sleep disorders like narcolepsy and sleep apnea, as well as other problems like anxiety and migraines. Go see a doctor.

If you're in Provo, I can't recommend Dr. Ross at the Utah Sleep Medicine Center more highly. He's one of the kindest, best doctors I've ever seen. Getting out and doing something about my condition improved my quality of life a hundred-fold. You owe it to yourself to get some help. Please email me if you have further questions.

-Inverse Insomniac


0 Corrections
Question #82467 posted on 05/21/2015 9:23 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What do you think about free-range parenting, specifically, to the extent that Lenore Skenazy takes it, having let her 9-year-old son take the subway home alone in New York City and starting up the "Take Our Children to the Park & Leave Them There Day"?

-Pete

A:

Dear Pete,

While I wouldn't go so far as to let my 9-year-old son take the subway home alone in New York City, I do believe in giving children freedom. I don't have a lot to say other than that, and to link you to an episode of the podcast "Invisiblia", in which they talk about this. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  

A:

Dear Pete,

The funny thing is, after giving it some thought, I don't think Lenore Skenazy is being all that extreme. I found this NPR article from 2008 particularly insightful. I think the gut reaction to hearing her story (which I felt myself) is "Oh my gosh! That kid could have died! What was she thinking?" Even if we're against the idea of helicopter parenting and feel comfortable with letting kids experience some degree of setback or frustration (or even, perhaps, pain), we see Skenazy's actions as deliberately putting her son in danger and therefore extreme, and we're not okay with that.

The argument essentially boils down to the question of whether or not New York City is safe enough to let children ride the subway unsupervised. Right now, I think that most people would say that no, it isn't, reflecting on countless horror stories of crime in general in NYC, to say nothing of crimes against minors (they note in the NPR interview that the story of Etan Patz (a six-year-old from Manhattan who disappeared in 1975) had a lot to do with raising fears about leaving kids unsupervised). However, it's worth noting that most people (around 97%, to be exact) don't actually live in New York City. Skenazy does, and in her opinion, she thinks it's safe enough in the city (perhaps, even, the specific part of the city where her son was traveling) that allowing her son to take the subway isn't a significant risk (in fact, she cites a statistic that says that NYC is about as dangerous as Boise, Idaho (as of 2008, that is)).

Anyway. I'm not in favor of deliberately exposing kids to danger (and, from what I gather, neither is Skenazy), but I definitely don't want to be a helicopter parent. When I was a kid, I frequently rode my bike to and from friends' houses, sometimes even late at night, and I turned out fine.

Then again, I grew up in a small, rural, predominantly Mormon town, so I can't really claim that my environment was all that dangerous.

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear cochinita pibil,

I lived in a city of nearly a million people in Mexico when I was twelve. My parents had me take the city bus to and from school, even though I didn't speak Spanish at the time. We didn't make a big deal out of it, and I was fine. It was nothing extraordinary, nor did anything crazy happen to me. Young people are capable of a lot more than we think they are if we give them a chance.

In the hopes of making my point, did you know about the 14 year-old who took two years and sailed around the world alone? Now that's capability. 

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Corrections
Question #82483 posted on 05/21/2015 9:11 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My work recently offered employees free AAA memberships. My parents have never had AAA, so I don't really know how it works. I know you're supposed to be able to get discounts on hotels and travel and things...but how do you know where the deals are being offered? Can you redeem them through sites like Kayak and Orbitz?

-M.N.H.

A:

Dear MNH,

According to this site, "The problem with Kayak.com and OTAs [Online Travel Agencies] in general is the inability to locate special offer rates or group rates commonly available like AAA and senior group discounts." So no, you wouldn't be able to redeem them through sites like Kayak or Orbitz.

If you go to the AAA website and scroll down to the bottom, you'll see links that say "Manage Your Membership" and "Book Travel." If you click on "Book Travel," you can find discounts on hotel and travel and whatnot, and "Manage Your Membership" takes you to a page with multiple headers, one of which is "Discounts." I don't have a membership myself, but I'd assume those pages let you know where deals are being offered.

-Zedability


0 Corrections
Question #82512 posted on 05/21/2015 6:02 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm trying to find what programs Brad Breecke used to put together his arrangement of the theme song for Star vs. the Forces of Evil, or even for his Gravity Falls tracks. I can find links to the sound samples he used, but not whatever program he used to organize it all. Any ideas?

-Aspiring composer

A:

Dear future composer,

To make up for my lack of experience with composing software, I emailed Mr. Breecke to see if he could shed some light on the matter. He said he uses Pro Tools. He was confused by the phrase "links to sound samples he used," but really friendly in the email so don't be afraid to email him in the future. Good luck! 

-Auto Surf


0 Corrections
Question #82508 posted on 05/21/2015 1:56 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
My best friend and I are very different people. The main thing that is very different about us is he is completely emotionally closed off from others. He grew up in a family where other than anger, showing emotion was considered "girly" and "sissy". He's a wonderful easygoing guy, but other than me and his dad he has never really opened up to anyone emotionally. I on the other hand grew up with two very expressive parents and have always been very straightforward and genuine with others as a result. I've always been grateful I was raised this way as it helps people open up to me so that I can really understand them and help them when they need it. Although I make friends easily and my best friend takes much more time to warm up to people, I have noticed something that I can't figure out. Girl after girl after girl fall for my friend. Although he is completely closed off and doesn't open up to them girls just seem to flock by the dozen to date him. For me though, the girls I get close to always let me know that I am "such a good friend" and although they always come cry on my shoulder when their hearts are broken, no one wants to cuddle up to me before that point. We've made friends with the same girls several times, and even though I get along with the girl better and we hang out a lot more, ultimately she decides she wants to date my buddy. (This has happened twice.) I've been at BYU three years and this is always the story: best friend- string of lovers, me- forever in the friendzone. You obviously don't know either of us personally, but what do you think my problem is? Should I be less emotionally open with the girls I like? What am I doing wrong? Should I play hard to get? I love my friend like a brother and although I'm happy that he doesn't have trouble finding new relationships, it is becoming a bit grating and I really feel like I might be defective. I would love to hear any thoughts or impressions you get from this and will readily apply any advice you would be kind enough to send my way.

-Joseph Gordon Levitt

PS Although one of you will probably give me a snarky answer like this: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/116882552802544440/ I would appreciate some serious answers as well. Thank you.

A:

Dear Joe,

Short answer: Sometimes us girls are just really stupid.

Long answer:

I want to be completely honest with you and tell you that I think I know where these girls might be coming from.

For me, and I suspect for many other girls, there is something oddly attractive about a boy that doesn't open up very easily. I think it's because us women crave emotional closeness and the idea of getting emotionally close to somebody who doesn't usually let people in is kind of romantic. It's almost like we see it as a challenge.

But no matter how romantic it may seem, the truth is that us girls really shouldn't let ourselves be attracted to men who are emotionally closed off, because in the end, it's not a quality that makes for a healthy relationship. That is something I have definitely learned with time, and I can tell you that as I get older, the emotionally closed off boys are getting much less attractive to me, while boys who are genuine, open, and honest are becoming seriously hot.

I mean, let me remind you of what you wrote about yourself:

"I on the other hand grew up with two very expressive parents and have always been very straightforward and genuine with others as a result. I've always been grateful I was raised this way as it helps people open up to me so that I can really understand them and help them when they need it."

Well, flip, you sound pretty awesome to me!

It's my opinion that you absolutely should not cease to be emotionally open with girls. No matter what, you should continue to be your best self.

Sometimes, when your dating life isn't going so well, it can be tempting to try to change yourself to what you think will get more people to like you. But that's totally the wrong way of going about it! What you need to do is continue striving to be the best you that you can be. It may take time, but that's how you will eventually attract the right kind of girl, and in the end, your relationship with that right kind of girl will be blessed by your ability to be genuine and honest.

Don't tell yourself that you are defective.  I think too many of us here at BYU start to truly believe we are defective when we stay single for a long time. I know because I honestly thought my singleness meant that I was defective for the longest time. But that is NOT what being single means! Being single doesn't have any reflection on your worth as a person and you know what else? Being single for a long time does not destine you to be single forever, either. Starting today, you've got just as good a chance as the next guy at finding someone, and when you tell yourself otherwise you are only hurting your self esteem and your chances!

Keep being the best you can be around girls and keep your head up! Someday, and perhaps someday soon, an amazing girl is going to realize what's up and fall in love with you. In the mean time, just be patient.

Love,

Vienna

A:

Dear Levitt,

To second what Vienna said, the fact that Mr. Z is able to be emotionally open has definitely made our whole relationship much easier in every stage, especially since I sometimes struggle to express myself well when I'm upset. Having many dysfunctional, non-communicative relationships isn't going to be as enjoyable for you in the end as having fewer, but more emotionally open relationships. I think that being a good friend to girls can prepare you just as well for marriage as dating lots of girls, although it may feel frustrating in the meantime.

-Zedability


0 Corrections
Wednesday, May 20, 2015
Question #82490 posted on 05/20/2015 7:57 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is the difference between kindness and charity?

-M.N.H.

A:

Dear MNH,

The simplest way I can think of to explain it would be like this:

Charity, simply put, is the pure love of Christ. To have charity is to live in such a manner that we can feel that pure love of Christ working through us.

Kindness is one of the attributes that manifests itself when we have charity. When we allow the pure love of Christ to work through us, it causes us to treat others not only with kindness but with respect, forgiveness, and every other Christlike attribute.

The reason charity is the greatest of all virtues is because we need charity (the pure love of Christ) in order to cultivate all other virtues. It is through the power of Christ's love that we can improve and become more like Him. Without charity we are nothing, just as without Christ we are nothing.

It is also important to remember that charity starts in the heart before it manifests itself in our actions. Kindness generally refers to an outward expression of love and care, but to have true charity you have to both treat others well and be at peace with them in your heart. A man with true charity is a man who truly loves God, others, and himself. A man with true charity seeks to view others as Heavenly Father views them. He is pure and without guile, which is why he is able to incorporate so many other righteous attributes into his daily interactions with others.

"But charity is the pure love of Christ, and it endureth forever; and whoso is found possessed of it at the last day, it shall be well with him." -Moroni 7:47

-Vienna


0 Corrections
Posted on 05/20/2015 4:49 p.m. New Correction on: #82510 I am a Spanish major with plans to probably go into some type of medical profession ...
Posted on 05/20/2015 11:31 a.m. New Correction on: #82510 I am a Spanish major with plans to probably go into some type of medical profession ...
Question #82505 posted on 05/20/2015 11:03 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I want to give my husband a bonsai for our 5th anniversary, but I'm not really schooled in bonsai. Should I get him a young one and a book so he can tend to it or just buy one that has been taken care of for a while? And, should I buy it online or find a place in town that sells them?

-Momma Chubbs

A:

Dear Beautiful Momma,

This article gives some great tips on buying indoor bonsai trees. It looks like you can either buy in person or online (depending on location online could be the only option), but in both cases you will have to pay attention to some specifics. For online buying, look at the reviews of the seller, make sure they guarantee a live plant, and that it ships domestically. It also says there are some available kits and tools to buy online so that could be helpful to get started. For buying in person, you want to examine the roots, trunk, branches, and leaves of the tree to make sure everything is healthy and well-set. The article also gives some tips on which trees are easier for beginners, as well as some general maintenance tips. 

I couldn't find anything about buying a young one versus an older one, but it seems like either will be fine as long as you tend it well, with the possibility that previously owned trees will already be accustomed to growing in a certain shape. These articles here give some great tips on upkeep once you get the tree. Good luck, and happy anniversary!

-Auto Surf


0 Corrections
Question #82510 posted on 05/20/2015 11:03 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
I am a Spanish major with plans to probably go into some type of medical profession after getting my undergrad. BYU offers a Medical Spanish class (Spanish 232 R Section 2) that would be great for helping me learn some solid medical terms and vocabulary in Spanish. The only problem is my schedule is completely full and I don't have room to add one more class. I would love to buy the book they use in that class and study it at home, and then maybe take the class in the near future when I have more room in my schedule. How would I go about finding out what book they use for that class? I would just add the class and check "What books do I need for class", but there is a 13 person waiting list and I don't know if I would ever even get in to check what the textbook is. If you could find out what book they use I would be very grateful. If you can find out, can you let me know how you did it? Also, is there some standard procedure I don't know about for if I needed to do this with any classes in the future? Thanks for all your help!
-El hispano más sano

A:

Querido hispano,

Are we talking about Fall Semester? I think the class you mean is Spanish 323R (not 232R), and I think the section you want to add is 001 (not 002), since that's the one listed as "Spanish in the Medical Profession." You're in luck, because there's no waitlist for that section - you could add the class, peek at your book list, and then drop it. I tried to do it myself, but I couldn't add the class because I haven't taken the prerequisite Spanish 321.

Or you could simply email the professor. (BYU professors' emails are available on the faculty tabs of their department websites.) I've taken the liberty of emailing Dr. López for you. He very kindly responded that he will be using the book Éxito comercial: Prácticas administrativas y contextos culturales, a link to which can be found here. (Although I wonder if MyMAP has the class sections listed wrong and you were right after all, since that definitely sounds like a business textbook. You might consider contacting the department to double check.)

Tuyo, &c.

Heidi Book


2 Corrections
Question #82506 posted on 05/20/2015 3:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

When you look at someone's facebook page, either your own page or someone else's, there is a sampling of that person's friends shown with pictures. Mine shows about nine. They are generally the same people, give or take. Does FB generate this friend sample randomly, or are these supposed to be representative of people who visit your page/contact you the most (and people you visit or contact a lot)?

-361

A:

Dear Human, 

It seems that there are several factors that go into who Facebook displays as your friend's list. According to this webpage, those factors include interactions on Facebook (both recent and over time), total number of shared profile views (between the two of you), number of photos you are tagged together in, wall posts, likes, comments, being currently online, and number of mutual friends.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Corrections