A perfect summer day is when the sun is shining, the breeze is blowing, the birds are singing, and the lawn mower is broken. - James Dent
Question #80018 posted on 11/23/2014 7:14 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've noticed that parents nowadays try to make sure their youngsters grow up knowing their alphabet, animals, and a slurry of other things, but what did parents teach them back when no one was educated at all?

-Colors and numbers?

A:

Dear maybe,

It seems likely parents taught their kids whatever was practical in the circumstances. Academic knowledge these days is very practical if your child is going to enter the American academic system. Consider how kids are raised outside the USA—Kids tend goats in Nepal and other countries, children in Papua New Guinea become proficient with large knives and machetes probably before most Stateside kids can even draw them.

Back in the day, it would make sense that kids (in a Western farm context) would have been taught basics that suited their agricultural lifestyle—milking cows, churning butter, weeding garden plots, watching livestock, underwater arc welding, washing vegetables, and other basics. What we teach our children when they are young to some extent anticipates our cultural needs and addresses our fears. This is why we're now preparing kids in America to be ready for the Big Candy Crush. The younger generation is our only viable hope in surviving this apocalyptic event which was long ago foretold by the sage toddler Jenny—age 3—of Emmett, Idaho. 

Be ready, 

--Ardilla Fearmonger


0 Comments
Question #80015 posted on 11/23/2014 3:14 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm a touch person...I really need to be hugged at least once a day, or I start to become really cranky and withdrawn and mopey and sad and lonely and apathetic.

I'm not married. I just moved about an hour from my core group of friends, and my one roommate has specifically stated multiple times that she is not a hugger, so I should not expect any hugs from her. I usually take a long time to get comfortable enough with friends to ask for hugs from them (my parents are not huggers, so I learned from a very early age that it isn't okay to hug people who might not want to be hugged, especially if the hug is "for you" and not out of consideration for the other persons needs), and my ward collectively has been very uninviting and standoffish (almost every individual I try to talk to makes it very clear friendly conversations isn't welcome), which further complicates the idea that I could just get hugs from new friends.

I don't have visiting teachers I can ask to give me hugs whenever they see me because my roommate is my visiting teacher (an honest mistake, I'm sure...?), and her companion (from as far as she can tell) is inactive.

How much will my home teachers think I'm just hitting on them if I tell them I'd really appreciate hugs whenever they can spare one when they ask what they can do for me?

-shriveled little soul

P.S. Any other suggestions of solutions are welcome, too

A:

Dear Wade,

I would think that if you just went in for the hug for both of your home teachers as they were leaving they probably wouldn't think it was flirtatious. That's what I would do if I were in your shoes. I also think you could benefit from talking to your roommate about this, since she is your visiting teacher. If you don't feel comfortable doing that you could talk to your Relief Society president who I'm sure would be willing to help and give you hugs.

Maybe you want to move into my sister's YSA ward because she says her Relief Society is super-huggy. She personally advocates for the fist-bump as the universal standard of greeting.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #80013 posted on 11/23/2014 1:14 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Could you please explain the term "meta" in a way I can actually understand?

-The Exquisite

A:

Dear Wade,

It means self-referencing. Metadata is data about data. A TV show can be meta, for example, when the events in the show reflect events occurring in the production of the show.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear not me,

I really don't think any definition can explain it better than this tattoo.

meta tattoo.jpg

(Source)

>Meta Knight

A:

Dear Rel'ar,

This comic is really useless for this answer, but I wanted to include it anyways.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Saturday, November 22, 2014
Question #79998 posted on 11/22/2014 11:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How can someone who is self-conscious about their appearance/abilities and not good at sports relax and participate fully in a friendly game?

Thanks,
jillgill

A:

Dear illill,

Play with people that don't care. Seriously. I hate playing sports because people always yell at me for sucking.

But last year I was on an Ultimate Frisbee team and all the guys were super supportive and helped me get better, instead of getting mad at me for not being great. I've never felt so comfortable playing sports. Find a group of people that won't be too competitive and it should be fine. Intramurals are good for that.

-Inverse Insomniac

A:

Dear gillyweed,

I've always hated basketball and other sports because I felt the pressure to do well far exceeded my abilities to do so. It didn't help when I learned some of the people on my blasted church ball team played basketball... in their spare time... for fun. Therefore they were good at it, and good at not being fun to play with if you have awkward reaction times and poor shooting skills.

My suggestion? Choose a sport/activity where everyone else is as bad at it as you are. Perhaps the beginning-level BYU student activity class of your choice. That's my plan, anyways.

See you in badminton,

--Ardilla Feroz 

A:

Dear jillgill,

I'm really bad at sports and dancing. I'm also really self-aware when I'm bad at things. For a while, this made things pretty difficult.

However, I started to notice that there are three types of people who are bad at something. The first type holds back from doing their best, acts stiff and awkward, and nobody quite knows how to react when the person make a mistake because they don't want to make that person feel bad. The second person tries their best without acting awkward about it. People respect the second person, unless people are jerks, and you don't need to care about the jerks. The third type of person tries their best and even hams up their attempts a bit. They have a sense of humor when they do something dumb. They're not good, and they know it, but they're just here to have a good time. Those people are fun to play with and make the game a lot more bearable for all the mediocre players who are tired of being pushed super hard by the two super competitive people on opposing teams.

The first type of person is the only one you don't really want to be. The second and third types are both good options depending on your personality and how willing you are to deliberately look silly. It's a bit of an adjustment transitioning from #1 to #2 or #3, but it's well worth it.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80008 posted on 11/22/2014 6:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

If the interwebz went down for an extended period (lets say a month), are stores even capable of exchanging cash for food/gas/merchandise without a functional internet? Does it make any sense to have a cash reserve on hand?

-Cash Me

A:

Dear Wade,

Yes. Companies most definitely can exchange cash for goods without a functioning Internet. Although, if the Internet went down that would be the least of your worries. As far as a cash reserve, it's generally good to have a small sum of money stored in case your wallet is stolen. Really, though, in my opinion it's a lot better to use cash as much as possible for a variety of reasons.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #80002 posted on 11/22/2014 4:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is your opinion on matching vs. complementary relationships?

I have a very shy personality. I am not a fearful person, but I get easily flustered when called upon publicly.
I see some relationships where two people are very similar -as though their shared characteristics allow them to understand and support each other. I must say, I am frequently attracted to people who are also shy. I believe shy people often observe things others do not and are able to understand each other in a very specific way. I am often misunderstood as being stuck-up and aloof and think it would be very comforting to have a partner who understands me.
Alternatively, I see a lot of relationships where the people involved have different strengths and weaknesses. A shy person gives stillness and groundedess to the relationship, while a naturally outgoing person gives brightness and light-heartnedness. However, I think these are the hardest relationships to get into because someone who has what you lack needs to be willing to see past your weaknesses and cherish your differences without trying to change you.

What do you think? Is one type more common than the other? Is one more 'advisable' than the other? I have been feeling strongly prompted to date more lately, but I'm conflicted about what kinds of people and situations to pursue. It's been a couple of years since my last relationship ended and I feel kind of lost.

-Quiet one

A:

Dear Bashful,

Like Ardilla, I have never actually been in a relationship, which of course gives me the right to parade around as if I'm the dating guru. Drawing on my deep well of inexperience, I think that complementary is super important but that there does need to be a balance. For example: I'm hopelessly asocial, so it's important for me that my partner is more social than I am - you know, willing to go out and do things or take the initiative to plan stuff. At the same time, I don't think he can be the sort of extrovert who wants to be doing social things all the time, partly because he would drain my energy and good will too fast, and partly because I would be boring for him. 

I agree with what Zedability says below. Give it a shot. See how it turns out. What's to lose?

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Dear quiet one, 

As I have never been in a relationship, it is quite simple for me to offer unbiased, objective, and accurate advice.  

While I feel contrasting traits can add balance to a relationship, you need to have core values and desires to align at the center if it's going to endure. This seems to correspond decently with the people whom I am most interested in dating. Also, it would seem "love of cheese" is among my core values. 

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Dear Quiet one,

In my experience, compatibility is a really big plus in a relationship. M and I are very similar in a lot of ways, and that's an aspect of our relationship that we really enjoy. However, we do have differences as well, as every couple does. I think the key for us is that our differences either don't matter (he doesn't like mustard; I think he's crazy, but since it's a condiment that's typically added individually it doesn't really make a difference) or they complement each other. For example, I am terrible at talking about my feelings. He is very good at talking about feelings, and I'm glad he's my opposite in that regard because it's much better for my emotional health.

Ultimately, I think it's difficult to tell on paper if differences are going to be complementary or cause conflict. For instance, if it drove M crazy that he has to drag all my feelings out of me, that difference wouldn't be the positive thing it is for us.

So basically, you just need to try to date people and see what works for you in practice. The good news is, serious non-constructive personality differences will become apparent reasonably quickly. Smaller non-constructive differences take longer to manifest, but that means you have time to develop a relationship with a person and decide if it's something you want to work on overcoming together or if it means you want to date someone else.

Once again, it boils down to the common theme of my dating advice: try it, see what happens, and don't feel like it's a sunk cost if you decide it's not for you.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80006 posted on 11/22/2014 2:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Kid Insomniac is due on Friday (the 21st). What are your baby name suggestions?

-Inverse Insomniac
PS - It's a boy!

A:

Dear Inverse Insomniac,

My dad, who we'll call Dave,* has a long-standing offer in our family to pay $1000 to anyone who will name their baby "Funkmaster Dave." I'm sure the offer still stands.

-Zedability

*His name is not Dave.

A:

Dear Wade,

How many times do I have to suggest Chewbacca Dirtbike before someone uses it?

Mo will also be acceptable.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear E'lir Baby Namer,

  • Sebastian
  • Joren
  • Carlyle—then you could call him Lyle for short!
  • Maximillian
  • Bartholomew
  • Sherlock
  • Sylvester
  • Winston
  • Ian
  • Eoin
  • Kian
  • Liam
  • Kurtis—with a "K." The "K" is important
  • Gianni
  • Lewis

I won't be too offended if you don't pick any of these. My siblings all tell me how sorry they feel for my future children because of the names I want to give them.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger

A:

Dear Inverse Insomniac,

I've always liked the names Justin and Stuart. Gavin is a recent favorite.

You might also consider avoiding some of this year's most common names. Not that they're bad names, I'm just encouraging conscientiousness.

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Comments
Question #80005 posted on 11/22/2014 2:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear Meta Knight,

Have you seen this xkcd?

-Zedability

A:

Dear asker of this question,

I enjoy most acronyms, except for xenophobic, kite-flying comics drawn by Randall Munroe.

meta2.png

>Meta Knight

PS - The green portion also doesn't relate to your question. That was just a bonus.


0 Comments
Question #80004 posted on 11/22/2014 1:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My fiance needs a new ipod and I was going to get her one for Christmas. But I'm not sure if I should just get the ipod for listening to music or if I should spring for the ipad or ipad mini. She likes to play the games I have on my ipod, so I think she would enjoy the gaming function of the larger ipad, but she also needs a music storage device so that she can play music for working out (and she likes to listen to music at work, too). Does anyone have both and can offer me a comparison for usefulness/fun-factors?

-Mr. Smee

A:

Dear Mr. Smee,

As far as working out goes, I think it would be inconvenient to lug around an iPad or iPad mini while at the gym. I think that's a definite plus for the iPod. For me, it would outweight the gaming benefits of a larger screen, but I've never been much of a gamer.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80003 posted on 11/22/2014 12:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm waiting in a hospital room for my scheduled 2 hour surgery under which I'll be under anesthesia. Some directions were I can't wear my contacts or wear makeup. I kind of understand the not wearing contacts but why can't I wear makeup?

-Lame Name

A:

Dear Name Lame,

According to this website, face makeup can prevent doctors from assessing your true skin color, which can serve as an indicator of how well your body is handling the surgery. Makeups or creams could also prevent tape from sticking to your face or body if they needed to apply tape.

Another site adds that without a blink reflex, small particles from eye makeup can get into your eyes and damage them.

As a fun fact from the first site, nail polish is also prohibited due to the fact that it can interfere with oxygen probes or noticing if your fingernails turn blue.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #79984 posted on 11/22/2014 7:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear Inverse Insomniac,

Apparently the Insomniac Family's Pumpkin Chili is so good that it causes all who eat it to rapturously sing its praises. Will you share the recipe so that all may partake?

-Delectable

A:

Dear able to be delected,

Ah, it is so good to have a pilgrim come seeking enlightenment at the fount of chili knowledge. You have come to the right place, my child. This chili is genuinely very very good.

I'm happy to share, granted that you give me the credit and royalties if you start a food truck that serves this chili. The thing you have to understand about my chili is that I never make it the same way twice. I just sort of put in whatever takes my fancy at the time. I will attempt to reproduce the recipe for the aforementioned heavenly pumpkin chili, but bear in mind I might be missing things. Also, many of the amounts will be according to your discretion.

Behold the deliciousness:

Insomniac Family Pumpkin Chili

Ingredients:

  • 1 large can of pumpkin stuff
  • 1 medium butternut squash
  • 1 medium yellow onion
  • 1-2 clove garlic
  • 2(ish) Italian sausages
  • 1 can of beans (I used kidney beans because Madam hates the rest, but you could conceivably use whatever ones you want)
  • 1 can of stewed tomatoes
  • 1 can of diced tomatoes
  • 2-3 medium potatoes
  • About 2 cubes of chicken bullion
  • A fair amount of cinnamon
  • A bit of nutmeg
  • The barest dash of vanilla (Mexican if you can get it)
  • Cumin, cumin, cumin (or taco seasoning if you don't have any cumin)
    • If you don't have cumin, you should really get some.
  • Enough butter
  • A bit of sage, if you're brave
  • (Optional) Lawry's Seasoned Salt
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Whatever other seasonings fit your fancy and go along with the autumn feel.

Steps:

  1. Prepare vegetables
    1. Shell and cube the squash (the easiest way is to use a paring knife to peel the rind off. Trust me.)
    2. Cube the potatoes
    3. Dice the onion and garlic. Try not to cry. Fail miserably.
  2. Start potatoes boiling in the biggest pot you have and add chicken bullion cubes. Don't use too much water, but don't use too little either.
  3. In large skillet, melt butter. Add cubes of squash. Sauté for 5ish minutes, then add onions and garlic. Sauté until all your roommates are jealous.
  4. Cut sausages into bite-size pieces. In another skillet, melt a bit more butter and cook sausages until they won't give you food poisoning.
  5. By this time, your potatoes should be soft. Add all the canned items to the pot. Do not add the cans.
  6. Add the sautéd items. Mourn their delicious smell.
  7. Use the rest of the ingredients according to your own conscience. You'll probably need more cumin and cinnamon than you think. If it doesn't taste enough like chili, you need more cumin. If it doesn't taste autumnal enough, add more cinnamon, nutmeg, and/or vanilla.
  8. Simmer on low heat for a long time. Seriously, the longer the better. Stir occasionally.
  9. Enjoy with cheese, sour cream, and Fritos
  10. Sing my praises publicly

As a bonus, here are some of my other autumn/cold weather favorites:

Inverse Insomniac's Incredible Squash Soup

Ingredients:

  • 1 medium butternut squash
  • 1 medium yellow onion
  • 6 cups chicken stock
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • Nutmeg
  • Salt and pepper

Steps:

  1. Prepare veggies
    1. Shell and cube the squash (see above)
    2. Dice the onion
  2. In large pot, melt butter and sauté onions.
  3. Add chicken stock and squash.
  4. Bring to a boil and simmer until squash is soft
  5. Use slotted spoon to put squash and onion into blender or food processor. Add a bit of broth.
  6. Blend until smooth.
  7. If too thick, add more broth and blend until desired consistency is reached.
  8. Add nutmeg and salt and pepper, blend some more.
  9. Eat. Enjoy. Repeat.

"I Stole This From Jamba Juice" Pumpkin Shakes

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup vanilla ice cream
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin stuff
  • Some milk
  • Brown sugar
  • Cinnamon
  • Nutmeg
  • Bit of vanilla

Steps:

  1. Put ingredients in blender.
  2. Blend.
  3. Taste, adjust, blend some more.
  4. (Optional) Top with whipped cream and cinnamon
  5. Drink.

Mom Insomniac's Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies

Ingredients:

  • 1 box of spice cake mix
  • 1 can of pumpkin stuff
  • Chocolate chips

Steps:

  1. Mix
  2. Bake according to box directions
  3. Eat

You're quite welcome.

-Inverse Insomniac


0 Comments
Question #79999 posted on 11/22/2014 7:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why do I avoid doing things that I know will help me feel better when I'm down? (example: I was feeling down and should have done homework/my scripture study/prayed to feel of worth but I just really want this one boy to text me so that I feel like I matter to him even though that won't happen and isn't what I really need.)
Why don't I do homework when I know the material is things I wish I knew more about?
Why don't I practice even though I want to be talented?
Why does nothing motivate me and why am I so lazy?
How do I fix myself?

Thanks,
Mademoiselle Laziness, waiting on a text she won't get from a boy she spent time with this afternoon

A:

Ma chère mademoiselle,

Perhaps zis boy is also waiting for ze text zat is never coming, no?

-L'insomniaque-inverse

A:

Dear Mademoiselle,

Regarding the procrastination of unpleasant things: I think there's a cycle of avoidance and guilt that's easy to fall into. I often postpone things I don't want to do because they're undesirable and I choose a more enjoyable activity so I can ignore my inconvenient reality. I feel guiltier the longer I postpone things, resulting in me diving deeper into my distractions for long periods of time so I don't have to think about the mess I've made for myself. When and if I ever get around to doing the undesirable tasks, I invariably discover they're usually not as bad as I made them out to be.

Oddly, the things that help me to break the cycle most are going to bed on time—even if I'm not done with my Things—eating regularly, and exercising regularly. This helps ground me a bit and I'm happier and more productive as a result.

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Chère Mlle,

I know exactly what you mean. And so does Allie Brosh, author of Hyperbole and a Half* (image source):

motivation game.png

motivation game 2.png

motivation game 3.png

motivation game 4.png

 motivation game 5.png

motivation game 6.png

motivation game 7.png

The way I deal with this is by manipulating my procrastination. If I want to procrastinate doing homework, it means I have to clean my room. If I want to procrastinate cleaning my room, it means I have to do the dishes. If I want to procrastinate doing the dishes, it means I have to practice an instrument. Eventually, I find something I'm actually willing to do. I start with that, and work my way back up the procrastination chain. I get to trick myself into thinking I'm procrastinating, but doing useful things gradually builds my motivation until I'm prepared to do less appealing tasks.

-Zedability

*Just FYI for anyone who hasn't seen it, her blog does contain some language


0 Comments
Question #79975 posted on 11/22/2014 7:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is your favorite song that is a total mind screw?

-Actual Cannibal Shia LaBeouf

A:

Dear needs new music,

The most nonsensical song I enjoy is probably "Birdhouse in your Soul" by They Might Be Giants, which confuses people all over the place.

"I'm your only friend
I'm not your only friend
But I'm a little glowing friend
But really I'm not actually your friend
But I am."

It does have some clever moments—

"There's a picture opposite me
Of my primitive ancestry
Which stood on rocky shores and kept the beaches shipwreck free
Though I respect that a lot
I'd be fired if that were my job
After killing Jason off and countless screaming Argonauts."

—but quickly reverts back into

"Blue canary in the outlet by the light switch
Who watches over you
Make a little birdhouse in your soul"

There you go. Now, if you'll excuse me, I've got a birdhouse to go build. 

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Dear cannibananabal,

Without a doubt, my pick is Bon Iver's entire self-titled album. The lyrics (set to some of the richest, most beautiful instrumental work I have ever heard) are so thoroughly abstract and random that I can't imagine they actually mean anything, but they are so poetic that I can't imagine they are meaningless.

Three of my favorite songs from the album: "Perth" (lyrics), "Calgary" (lyrics), and "Beth/Rest" (lyrics).

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #80001 posted on 11/22/2014 2:08 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

A while ago I left a comment on one of the questions here on the 100 hour board which was rejected. I don't really care that it was rejected. I get that you all get to write here and that the rest of us can go find our own corners of the internet to type to our hearts content, but I found the reason for the rejection very odd: "Reason: please sign comments"

Why on earth does that matter? I'm logged in to the system to comment, so if you really wanted to track me down, you could, regardless of how I sign it. But to everyone else, the comment is anonymous and any signature I put at the end is a random collection of words that has no real identifying value. In your mind, is this a valid reason for rejecting a comment?

-Pharilun the gravish Shimjup

A:

Dear Wade,

As a Board we've been discussing the policy on comments. Some writers (like M.O.D.A.Q.) are very vocally against comments so in my mind anything is a valid reason to reject a comment. The reason we have a strict policy on comments is because it makes it easier to get through the approval process for submitted comments. The editors have enough on their plates without having to scrutinize every submission. Granted, the Board has historically not been 100% consistent in the application of this policy.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #80000 posted on 11/22/2014 1:50 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

80,000! Time to celebrate. What is your favorite question ever asked of the Board?

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear M.O.D.A.Q.

My favorite question is this one.

>Meta Knight

A:

Dear M.O.D.A.Q.,

This one.

-Zedability

A:

Dear M.O.D.A.Q.,

You asked for my favorite singular question, but I am going to include a couple because I'm an entitled American.

For calculation genius: How much popcorn would fit in the Marriott Center?

For it's educational value: What is the true origin of gummy bears?

For sheer reading pleasure: Majors deathmatch. 'Nuff said.

I suppose, though, that my favorite question is probably my go-to question whenever I'm introducing someone to the Board. I present to you HFAC's legendary encounter with the Fishwasher.

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Comments
Question #79997 posted on 11/22/2014 12:14 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am not video-making savvy, so I need your help! I am trying to make a video on Windows Live Movie Maker, since that came for free on my computer. This video is comprised of pictures that go along with the song, so I want to time the pictures to appear at the exact moment the event in the picture is named in the song. Is there an easy way to do this in Movie Maker, or should I use a different program (preferably a free one)?

For clarification's sake, let's pretend the song is "Do Re Mi" from The Sound of Music. Let's say I have a picture of a doe I want to appear when they say "Do, a deer, a female deer" and then I have a picture of the sun to appear when they say "Re, a drop of golden sun," and then I have a picture of myself to appear when they say, "Mi, a name I call myself," and so on.

Is there a way to insert the pictures at the moment I want them in the song? Right now the only way I've been able to do it is to time how long I want the first picture to appear and adjust the duration accordingly, then time how long I want the second picture to appear and adjust the duration accordingly, over and over again. The biggest problem with that is that even once I've timed the pictures perfectly, if I try to just go to a picture in the middle somewhere and start from there, the song just starts up at the last place I paused it, or somewhere random, not the part that should be so perfectly timed with the music. The only way to do this is to start the song over from the very beginning and play through to the slide I'm timing, change the duration, and then start over again so I can time the next one. It's getting really old because this song has a lot of pictures to go with it! Any help you can give me would be really appreciated.

~Mrs. Fitzherbert

A:

Dear Mrs. Fitzherbert,

I'm not very familiar with Windows Live Movie Maker. What sounds like the best solution to your issue is to combine the picture clips into one larger clip as you edit, making it more difficult for the sound to get out of sync. If that doesn't help, try looking at a more general Movie Maker support page.

Are you at or near BYU? The Multimedia lab on the 4th floor of the library has computers that are free to be used by students. These have programs like Final Cut Pro 7 and the program I'd recommend most to you, Adobe Premiere. The lab assistants are happy to help you figure out what you need to know to make your video. Not a student? Try the open Mac lab on the 2nd floor of the HFAC. You can use those computers as well, and most anyone working on stuff in there will be able to give you a few pointers.

Adobe Premiere's pretty easy to figure out, and it has the precision to give you the results that you want.

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Comments
Friday, November 21, 2014
Question #79996 posted on 11/21/2014 11:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So I am dying to minor in English, but I was wondering- how hard is Eng 251? As in, how time-consuming is it? I'm planning on taking a really hard class for my major at the same time but I don't want to kill myself with the workload. Thanks!

-Because RMP is Being Useless in These Matters of Utmost Importance

A:

Dear don't trust RMP,

I would imagine that it depends a lot on which teacher you take it from, but I didn't find it any more time-consuming than other 200-level, 3-credit-hour English classes. I took it from Dan Muhlestein and really enjoyed it. There is a lot of reading, so it will also depend on how fast of a reader you are, how good you are at skimming, or how capable you are of passing a class without actually reading anything.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book


0 Comments
Question #79995 posted on 11/21/2014 10:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

A student made a bingo board while attending Br. Brau's Finance class that has been passed around. Do you know what all the items on the board were? I know some... "Said 'dude' or 'bro'", "Talked about weightlifting", or "bagged on accounting majors".

Thanks!

-Bobby

A:

Dear Roberto,

It doesn't look like this Board knows anything about that board, so here's a consolation prize of testimony bingo.

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Comments
Question #79993 posted on 11/21/2014 10:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why is the movie called The Texas Chainsaw Massacre when it's loosely based on a sick dude named Ed Gein, who's from Wisconsin? (Look up Ed Gein's Wikipedia page and then crime scene images on Google and you'll be scarred for life...) Yes, I know in real life that Ed Gein never killed anyone with a chainsaw but that it was added to the movie to be scarier. But what does it being in Texas have anything to do with anything? Why is it so important that it's even in the title? I'm talking about the original movie--that's the only one I've seen--and I didn't see any significance to it taking place in Texas.

--Mystery is Me--

A:

Dear Eduardo Lipfish,

According to this The Texas Chainsaw Massacre FAQ page, the movie was inspired by Ed but not actually based on him or his story, so they could film it wherever and call it whatever they wanted as it was, like all films, a work of fiction. Supposedly the director "Tobe Hooper told a story of how when shopping in a mall in Austin [Texas] he got tired of all the crowds. He looked up and saw a chainsaw in the hardware department and thought to himself, 'Now that's a quick way of getting out of this crowd.'"

Also, if it was called The Wisconsin Chainsaw Massacre, no one would watch it. Turn that into The Wisconsin Cheesewheel Massacre, though, and you will have created another dumb series that will play just fine with all the other HBO trash.

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Comments
Question #79992 posted on 11/21/2014 9:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am almost always cold. My ideal temperature is around 85 F. I found Board Question #72310, but with the addition of the LSB to campus, I figured I'd ask the question again. Where is the warmest place to be or study on campus?

-Human Popsicle

A:

Dear sasparilla-flavored,

Since I'm wearing two coats and still shivering in the LSB computer lab I'm going to hazard a guess that the warmest place is definitely not here. If you go to the third and fourth floors of the LSB (as they are strangely numbered), there are also beautiful, well-lit study areas that are warmed by the sun and feel like a hug. A HUG OF SUFFOCATING ACADEMIC SUPPRESSIONexcuse me, I meant to say a hug from the sun. There's also some prime nap real estate in there.

Coincidentally, there's south-facing window areas on the third and fourth floors of the JKB by the elevators that are also sunny and toasty. They are also great for napping and spiting people who wish to study there.

The JFSB Education in Zion exhibit might be nice. 

The atrium in the Brimhall Buildingor the window-lit study areas in the stairwellsare usually pretty nice.

Sensing a theme here? Higher areas in buildings and areas with south facing windows are the cat's meow.

Now, there is one superlatively warm and humid place on campus, but I'm not really willing to post it here because just like my best nap place, I realized it suits my selfish purposes if it remains obscure and virtually unknown. Email me at ardilla(dot)feroz(at)theboard(dot)byu(edu) and I'll grudgingly part with this secret.

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Dear ENGL 316 laptop friend,

I'm usually relatively indifferent to temperature, but I've found the Hinckley Alumni building to be well-heated and quite comfortable. Also there are parts of the RB that can be pretty warm in the winter thanks to the heated pool and (probably) all of the human exertion that goes on in there.

See you in class on Monday.

-Inverse Insomniac

PS - For what it's worth, I didn't think you looked particularly tired the other day. But then I'm probably just unobservant.


0 Comments
Question #79989 posted on 11/21/2014 8:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

While watching "All Quiet on the Western Front" (in the HBLL auditorium for part of the WWI 100 year anniversary exhibit) last week I started to wonder how/why the book/movie title was chosen. It seems a bit of a contradiction.

Thanks!

-Old

A:

Dear Old,

I haven't seen the movie, but when you read the book it is pretty clear where the title comes from.  The last two paragraphs of the book read,

He fell in October 1918, on a day that was so quiet and still on the whole front, that the army report confined itself to the single sentence: All quiet on the Western Front.

He had fallen forward and lay on the earth as though sleeping.  Turning him over one saw that he could not have suffered long; his face had an expression of calm, as though almost glad the end had come.

-Curious Physics Minor


0 Comments
Question #79988 posted on 11/21/2014 7:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So we landed on a comet. How did we do this? How did we spin a probe around our solar system several times, gaining gravity boosts along the way, to precisely land on a rock in the middle of space? I'm interested in a summary of the mathematics.

Sincerely,
Space 4evah

A:

Dear Wade,

The basic principles date back to Johannes Kepler who developed laws of planetary motion. Based on this information Newton was able to form his law of gravitation. If you want to read up on the details of it you can read the articles on this page under "Mechanics" and "Orbits." With an understanding of those principles scientists programmed models and were able to use computers to calculate the trajectory of the probe.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Posted on 11/21/2014 6:17 p.m. New Comment on: #79971 I'm planning a tentative trip to Washington D.C. for next Spring. I've never been before and ...
Question #79987 posted on 11/21/2014 5:14 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why don't we fly around in blimps anymore? Why did airplanes take over the as the main way of air travel?

Does the Hindenburg play any part in this equation? If it does, what would air travel be like if the Hindenburg hadn't happened?

-Have you seen pics of the interior of the Hindenburg? It was SO spacious.

A:

Dear yep,

I think this comic actually sums it up rather nicely.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Wade,

Blimps are just glorified billboards.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear no, but now I'm going to look,

From what I understand, the Hindenburg was part of it, but really, yayfulness is right. They're just s'dang slow. Blimps have declined in popularity for the same reason that ocean liners and passenger railroads have. Why take two days to get to the East Coast in great comfort and relaxation when you can get there in four hours with your legs squashed in front of you and a tiny packet of pretzels?

-Inverse Insomniac, who thinks it's a pity.


0 Comments
Question #79986 posted on 11/21/2014 5:14 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I would like to take the text messages that my wife and I sent to each other when we were dating and have it bound in a book as a gift. What is the best way to do this?

I noticed that there is a website that does with with android based phones but we both have iPhones and a fair amount of her text messages won't make sense without emoticons or the photos she send.

Thx

- :)

A:

Dear :),

There's a software called iMazing that allows you to download iMessages. You can save them in PDF format, complete with images, emoticons, and even timestamps. According to this review, "You can get a free 15 day trial of iMazing at the company’s website right now, for Mac or PC. Once your trial ends, you can pay an introductory special price of $15 for one user, $50 for up  to five users, or even $90 for up to 10 users." So if you can get it done in less than 15 days, this part might even be free!

There are a lot of ways to make PDFs into books. I'm a fan of Blurb.

-Zedability


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Question #79985 posted on 11/21/2014 4:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Like many people, my personal email address is basically my name. There is someone who lives in Georgia who has the same name as I do. She must have an email address very similar to mine, as well, because I frequently receive email for her- often important things, like notifying her that health insurance is going to expire, or a digital copy of some sort of contract when she was selling a house. With less unimportant things, like her university alumni newsletter, I just removed myself from the listserv. Important things, I've always replied to the sender and explained I wasn't that person. I never hear back from those people, so I'm guessing they just straighten it out and move on with things. I worry that she's not getting her email, though, and it's a bit annoying that this keeps happening. (It has happened maybe twice a year, for the past couple years) What is the appropriate way to handle this situation? I don't like reading people's private mail, but I don't know if it's mine until I read it. Should I try to get in touch with this person? How would I do that, given that I don't know her real email address, only that it's somewhat similar to mine?

Thanks,
Someone with an apparently common name

A:

Dear James,

Relevant. I've never had this happen in my email before but my Twitter handle is just my last name so I frequently get mistaken tweets and have also received a few emails from Twitter telling me that I tried to reset my password even though I never did.

If you'd like to get in contact with them then your best bet is to either try to find them on Facebook or see if a phone number is included in one of the emails you receive. If you're not willing to snoop a little you're not going to be likely to find the person's real email.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear you,

My name is uncommon. I'm the only person in the US with my name. However, my phone number is very similar to someone with a similar name so I frequently get phone calls and messages for this guy (yes, my name is close to that of an older man). I was really annoyed at first, but some of the messages I got were about his health and he was getting pretty sick and I knew they were important, so I figured out what his actual number was and made sure to pass the messages along to him after the original callers refused to answer my calls or rectify the wrong number issue. At first, he was really confused as to why a young female was passing the info along, but then he became really grateful and in some of the calls we would get to chatting and discussing life and how the other was doing. He was this really sweet, older gentleman who lived fairly close to where my parents lived and when he found out I was coming home at Christmas he invited me over for a dinner with his wife and daughters.

So I went, and really enjoyed meeting him and he was like the grandfather I never had for a little while before he passed away a few months later. His wife called me a little later and thanked me for ensuring that the right messages got to him. Because of his failing health he wouldn't always manage to give the right number to health care providers or friends and family and while friends and family were easily redirected by me, health care providers and recorded messages weren't as easily redirected and needed to be passed on and if I had just ignored all the calls and voicemails, he might have missed very important messages. Moral of this random story is that while I was really annoyed at first, I realized it didn't take that much time or effort to just pass the information along and it actually worked out really nicely.

I think if you can figure out what her e-mail is, it might be helpful for you to just forward it to her. You could try e-mailing some similar e-mail addresses and seeing if there is a response (mention clues that would make it abundantly clear to the correct person that it is them) or getting in contact with her university and asking for an alumni list and find her name (since it's similar to yours it shouldn't be too hard to find) and then going from there. If it's only twice a year, that's not too bad and I think it would be thoughtful of you to just send it on.

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #79983 posted on 11/21/2014 2:38 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Another relationship question.

We're really good friends, but our lifestyles are so different. I put myself through school with 3 jobs and working my tail off for a competitive scholarship. I am very careful with my finances. I love exercise, dancing, the outdoors, culture, music, and vegetables. Some people get blessed with opportunities. I get blessed with mountains to climb. Without going into detail, I related greatly to Concorde's recent story on her life situations. Things have never come easily for me and I don't honestly expect that to change.

For reasons I don't understand, one of my close friends wants to date me. And I don't want to hurt him, but I'm worried that our differences are huge. He was happy with B/Cs in college and didn't work while in college. He has a job to support his interest, but is not as financially restrained as me. Foodwise he likes anything that isn't a vegetable. And although he has started to make exercise a part of his life, it's definitely not a passion like it is for me. He is extremely extroverted, and while I love service, I have an introverted streak a mile wide. I am not used to attention.

We have some core values--especially service and caring for other people, along with some international interest. And I appreciate that he is gentle and kind, which are not things I have had a lot of in my life.

But am I being selfish for thinking we are too different? Letting him into my life would mean letting go of a lot of things I love because I would have to do them on my own. He wouldn't ever understand the passionate love of the outdoors or wild nature or all those things that mean so much to me.

Have any of you ever dated someone the opposite of you? How do you deal with the stress of having super different interests? Will I have to let go of things that mean alot to me?

(Sorry if this doesn't make sense. But I guess if it did, I wouldn't be writing in the first place.(

-A shallow person trying not to be shallow

A:

Dear aren't we all,

Despite being hyper-aware of every mention of my SO now, I can't help but feel that it's applicable here, especially since you relate to me a lot and I am a very different person from my SO.

I am very extroverted, love junk food, work extremely hard in school while still being relatively undisciplined in other areas and am not always the most politically conservative person. I am not as careful as I should be with my finances. I have strong opinions and I was inactive in the church for several years. My SO, on the other hand, is the most disciplined person I know in every regard but school, is extremely frugal (I pay for most things when we go out), has never questioned the church and is very conservative politically. He is more reserved, is in way better shape than I am and has had a great family life and hasn't had a tenth of the trials I have had. We're just very, very different people, but our core values are the same, and really I think that's what matters the most. 

Like you, I have not had a lot of gentleness or kindness in my life, and one reason I stuck with my SO during the first few weeks when I was freaking out about our differences and the newness of the relationship was that he was so gentle and kind with me. When it came down to it, we had some major differences, but he was a really good guy and I knew that if we wanted to make it work, we could because the core things that I looked for in a guy were all there.

With that being said, I don't think it's selfish (or even shallow) of you in the slightest to consider your differences and take those into consideration. You need to take care of yourself, first. However, I don't think that letting him into your life would necessarily mean letting go of the things that you love. If he really cares for you, and you for him, you'll both want the other to be happy and to do the things that the other enjoys. If you end up dating him and care for him in that way, you'll probably find you want to do things with him that you dislike just because it means spending more time with him and vice versa. And even if he doesn't do all of the things you love with you, you can still absolutely do them by yourself. Being in a relationship with someone doesn't mean giving up the parts that make up you. Alone time or time with friends is perfectly acceptable from time to time, even when in a serious relationship.

My SO hates the newer Les Miserables movie and I absolutely love it. He set up a special date where he watched it with me just because it meant spending more time with me and he knew that it would make me happy. I remember I was really surprised that he would do that for me and I'm still getting used to the idea that I rank so highly in his life. Like you, probably, I have never ranked highly on anyone else's list of things to care about and I'm used to fending for myself. Being in a relationship has surprised me in what he is willing to do for and with me. Similarly, I think he might surprise you, even if you think he doesn't have a love of the outdoors or of nature, as to what he's willing to do for you and with you.

I guess the bottom line is that if you want a reason to not date someone, you'll always find it. Always. You can always find a way to talk yourself out of something, but the question is why you're trying to do that. Are you afraid of the possibilities? Genuinely concerned that he won't treat you well or care for you? I don't think it's the latter because he sounds like a decent guy and as a decent guy, he's never going to ask you to give up the things that mean the most to you and make you who you are. If he likes you and the things that make you who you are, he's not going to have a problem with your love of exercise or vegetables.

And as for the stress of having super different interests, I don't think that they have to be all that stressful. In fact, I think it's kind of fun to be so different because it exposes you to a different viewpoint and set of tastes and opinions. If you're both similar, sure, it's fun that you can do lots of things together, but being different is just as rewarding. While being very extroverted, I hate dancing. Absolutely loathe it. I can do slow dances, but anything beyond that I freak out, get super self-conscious and immediately look for the nearest corner to hide in. It actually induces stress in me because I'm so terrified to look stupid. My SO is a ridiculous dancer and loves to dance. He's awful at it, but he's 100% okay with looking goofy and I thought that was going to be a huge issue, knowing how much he loves it, and how much I refuse to do it. We went to a ball recently and I was surprised (and so relieved) to discover how cool he was about it. He never once pressured me or made me feel uncomfortable. Instead, he went and hid with me in the corner, which was really sweet of him. And in return I danced as many slow songs with him as possible and made sure he knew that I was okay with him going to dance to some of the faster songs.

So like I said, it's a give and a take, but it's not even necessarily taking as much as it is giving. I'd give this guy a chance and give him an opportunity to show how willing he is to compromise with you and be introduced to the things you love. He doesn't have to love doing what you love, but you shouldn't have to give anything up, either.

-Concorde

A:

Dear you,

Disclaimer: If you have watched a chick flick today and already reached your quota of sappy, please do not read this answer.

Like Concorde, I have some significant differences from my boyfriend. 

Me: Semi-extroverted hyper law student who enjoys reading books; listening to pop, musicals and country; writing for fun; hiking.

Him: Introverted, grounded engineer who enjoys mountain-biking, instrumental music, airsoft, occasional game of Battle Tanks with roommates.  

Does this create any potential difficulties? Sure. If I want someone to discuss the most recent novel I read, I should probably join a book club or talk to another friend rather than making him read it (particularly given my leanings for cheesy regency stories that even a very reader guy probably wouldn't care about). If he wants to go mountain biking, he knows he can probably convince me to come but he might have a better time with one of his friends who's actually good at it, at least some of the time. Occasionally my social needs expand beyond him and I need to run around and be crazy with large groups. Occasionally he needs to have some time alone.

Do I have to let go of things that matter to me? Not necessarily. Maybe I have to let go of the idea that I need to do all of the things I like with my boyfriend, but I don't have to stop doing them. On Saturday mornings, he can go out and mountain bike while I catch up on a good book. He can get his alone time while I grab lunch with my roommates or a friend.

Our relationship has been workable for us because the things we have in common are much more important than the ways in which we differ. We care about each other enough that we're willing to sacrifice to make each other happy (we made a trade earlier this semester where he read a book I liked and when he finished I went mountain biking with him). More importantly, I've started to see that happiness in a relationship, while it might be aided by having obvious common interests, is founded much more on being with someone who helps you feel safe, cherished, and supported and who will help you live up to who you can be. Because we share commitment to things of great and central (Gospel) importance, the relative priorities we put on hobbies isn't that important, particularly if we're willing to be flexible and make sacrifices to spend time together and focus on enjoying each other even if one of us doesn't absolutely love the thing we're doing.

In conclusion, I guess I'd say this: some people probably just aren't very compatible. If you hate everything he likes and he hates everything you like, that's going to be really difficult. However, I'd encourage looking for similarities within the differences (even though he bikes and I hike, we both appreciate nature; even though he listens to different music, we both enjoy singing and playing instruments). Finally, and most importantly, learn whether you're aligned on the things that are the most important. Hobbies and interests can develop, refine, or change over time: what should remain constant is a commitment to each other and to God. If you have that, you can develop the charity to appreciate each other regardless (or even because) of differences.

~Anne, Certainly 

A:

Dear you,

If you're genuinely not interested in dating him, that's okay regardless of what your reasons are for not wanting to. If you're interested in him, or aren't sure if you're interested in him, then I think the advice of my fellow writers is excellent. Just remember that starting to date doesn't mean you're committing to someone else forever. You could always try to date him casually, taking it slow and communicating with him about your concerns. Like Concorde and Anne, you might find that these differences aren't as big of a deal as you initially thought. Or, you could find that these differences legitimately bother you, and that's okay too.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Posted on 11/21/2014 1:50 p.m. New Comment on: #79954 This year my family is not doing a traditional Thanksgiving dinner, and I'm kind of bummed. ...
Question #79982 posted on 11/21/2014 12:38 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Before my husband and I were sealed, I remember sitting in an office going over some paperwork. At some point, I was asked what I was going to change my name to after I was married. They wrote it down and I confirmed that it was correct. I assumed this was for church records, but my name on the RS and Sunday School rolls in my new ward do not reflect what I wrote down and confirmed with the worker at the temple.

Example:

Maiden Name: Jane Mary Smith
Married (and legally changed) Name: Jane Smith Brown
Church roll name: Jane Mary Brown

I've gone to the clerks office and requested that it be changed, but months later my name is still "Jane Mary Brown" on the class rolls AND on the tithing settlement paper I just got. I even put "Jane Smith Brown" on all of my tithing slips.

If my ward clerk can't get it together, do I need to have it changed in Salt Lake or something?

Is it such a crime that I like my maiden last name more than my old middle name?

-confusing middle name

A:

Dear confusing (who is probably also confused at this point),

While I don't have a definitive answer for you I can tell you a few things I've noticed and tell you the good news bad news of the situation.

When yay and I got married I worked for the Church, so I knew exactly how my name was displayed on everything Church related (because I looked at it every day). And my name was magically changed to First Middle Married without me having any say in the matter, it's just what happens to make sure their records are kept accurate.

The bad news is, I honestly don't think there is anything you can do to get this changed, regardless of what your legal name is. I talked to a handful of sisters while at my job who asked me why their name was associated with their husband's last name, despite their legal name being their maiden name.

The good news is, while you can't 'legally' get the Church to change your name, you can go into your LDS Account and change your display name on all lds.org related sites. I changed mine pretty much immediately to display as Middle Maiden Married because I've gone by my middle name my entire life but that is the only place where those changes have been effective.

The other bad news is that I don't think it matters if you take your request higher than your local ward clerk. I spoke to a sister who had a negative reaction to me just asking if her last name was what was displayed on my screen. She told me that she had written multiple letters to Salt Lake (presumably to the records department) asking them to change her name and they all went unanswered.

I wish I had better answers for you. You can always try contacting the records department. It is notoriously hard to find actual addresses and phone numbers for any specific department in the Church Office Building so your best bet is to just call the Church Operator (I believe the number is 801-240-2100; if that doesn't work call Church Distribution at 801-240-3500, and just ask to be transferred to the Church Operator, it happened to me all the time) and ask to speak to the membership and or records office. They might give you a run around because they typically only help bishoprics and ward clerks, but it’s a place to start and they hopefully direct you to someone who can give you a better answer than I did.

Good luck!

-yayfulgirl c/o yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #79977 posted on 11/21/2014 9:50 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Who is you're favorite musician and what are your favorite songs by them?

-Looking for new music

A:

Dear Level Up,

I don't have just one favorite musician, just like I don't have one favorite food (fine, it's probably ice cream).
That being said, here are some great songs from interesting musicians I'd recommend. I don't know if you'll like them, but that's up for you to decide.

Pop Stuff 
"#thatPOWER" — will.i.am
"Magic" — Coldplay 
"Rather Be" — Clean Bandit 
"Sunshine" — Matisyahu 
"Live Like A Warrior" — Matisyahu 
"Elevation" — U2
"Fine By Me" — Andy Grammer 
"Forever" — Andy Grammer 
"Classic" — MKTO 
"Superheroes" — The Script 

Alternative pop/rock stuff 
"We Are Done" — The Madden Brothers
"Stolen Dance" — Milky Chance
"Riptide" — Vance Joy
"Dust Clears" — Clean Bandit 
"Trojans" — Atlas Genius
"Left Hand Free" — alt-J
"Crystalised" — The Xx
"Gold on the Ceiling" — the Black Keys 
"Called out in the Dark" — Snow Patrol 
"Tokyo" — Imagine Dragons 
"Blue-Eyed Universe" — Fictionist  

Latino Stuff
"La Camisa Negra" — Juanes 
"La Tortura" — Shakira
"Ojos Asi" — Shakira
"Bien o Mal" — Julieta Venegas 

Bonus Points
"Be Gentle With Me"— The Boy Least Likely to
"Wala ala Balo" — Amr Diab
"Jai Ho" — A.R. Rahman
"Aaj Ki Raat" — A.R. Rahman
"Super Girl" — Super Junior M 

That should hold you over pretty well. If you get through all that, feel free to ask for more suggestions—I'm always more than happy to blather away about music I like but to which I can't force other people to listen.

--Ardilla Fluteroz

P.S. If you are disappointed in my selections, the archives have your back. 

A:

Dear Looking,

I just discovered The Icarus Account and I am in love. "Favorite Girl" and "3000" are two of my favorites so far.

-Zedability

A:

Dear TARDIS,

Here are my current favorite artists, since I don't want to pick (with favorite song in parentheses):

  • Ed Prosek ("Elena")
  • Bear's Den ("The Love We Stole")
  • Coasts ("A Rush of Blood")
  • Ben Rector ("Let the Good Times Roll")
  • The Mowgli's ("San Francisco")
  • Little Mix ("Salute" or "Little Me - Unplugged")
  • Sheppard ("Geronimo")
  • Hurts ("Sunday")
  • Greg Laswell ("Comes and Goes")
  • Foxes ("Holding onto Heaven")
  • Imagine Dragons ("Warriors")
  • Piano Guys ("Home")
  • Owl City ("Shooting Star")
  • Elle Michelle ("Sleepy Heart")
  • Emily Hearn ("Not Walkin' Away")
  • Gabrielle Aplin ("November Rain")
  • Regina Spektor ("The Call")
  • Barenaked Ladies ("Odds Are" or "Another Heartbreak")
  • Tyler Ward ("If I'm Being Honest")

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #79967 posted on 11/21/2014 9:50 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Springville and Spanish Fork seem to be building up quite a bit. Is there a Target in their plans sometime in the near future? (I'm getting tired of the closest one being in Orem)

-Saxamaphoto

A:

Dear Saxamaphoto,

I haven't been able to find any evidence that Target will be expanding in southern Utah County anytime soon, but that doesn't necessarily mean that it won't happen.

-yayfulness


0 Comments