"Sweet son of spell check." -Rating Pending
Question #81391 posted on 03/05/2015 10:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I think there used to be a writer who was in law school. Are they still around? I've got some questions.

I'm really seriously considering law school, though admittedly not for another year or so. I graduated from BYU with a B.A. this past August, and will most likely be in Utah for the next few years. BYU and the U are my only options in this state, and while the U is easier to get into, BYU is far cheaper.

Questions:
1. My GPA from undergrad is less than stellar. I hate myself for it, but there's nothing I can do now. Would it be beneficial to go become a paralegal and get excellent grades that way first? What things would increase my chances of getting into a program?

2. Any other advice about going to law school in general?

-kebbo

A:

Dear you,

I'm in law school right now! I've got a couple of tips:

  • Be aware that going to a paralegal program will not alter the GPA the LSAC gives you based on transcript summarization.
  • I don't know if having paralegal experience would increase your chances - that probably depends on a ton of factors including what schools you're looking at, what the rest of your resume looks like, etc. Before you do this, I would:
  • Focus really, really hard on the LSAT. I think that there are probably a lot more candidates with high GPAs than there are with high LSAT scores. Schools want to admit students who will keep their admissions statistics the same or higher than they have been in the past. That means that if your GPA is lower than their median, you should shoot to have an LSAT that is as far above their median as possible. Then the school can balance out your high LSAT/low GPA with someone who struggled a bit more on the LSAT but has high undergraduate grades. The folks over on the Top Law Schools Forums have a specific term for high LSAT/low GPA candidates: splitters. Though you should take most of what you read on the internet with several grains (and perhaps an entire shaker) of salt, forums like TLS might have useful information about what schools are most friendly to candidates like you.
    • In order to succeed on the LSAT, start studying NOW, even if you don't plan on taking the LSAT until this October or December. Take a diagnostic test under timed conditions and see where you are and what sections you struggle with. Look at whether it makes sense for you to do a full course or to study targeted sections by yourself (for example, I decided not to take a full LSAT course: I struggled with one section of the test, but was fine on the others and didn't want to drop a lot of cash on a course that would include a bunch of stuff I didn't need). Do as many practice tests as possible: they're for sale online and doing timed tests (and reviewing what you missed or didn't understand) is one of the best ways you can study.
  • Think about your personal statement and your letters of recommendation. You don't want your personal statement to be an excuse letter, but find good things you can focus on other than your lower GPA. Talk to recommenders (at least one professor if possible, and then probably one boss). Make sure they have specific good things to say about you, especially about qualities that a low GPA might make people worry about.
  • Make sure you want to be a lawyer. Getting into law school is not an easy process and neither is being here. Make sure that this is really what you want because the road ahead is not entirely painless and you'll want to be able to remember that you have real, personally compelling reasons to be here.

This is just a couple of tips. If you'd like to talk to me by email and give me more details about your situation (what schools you're looking at, when you're planning on applying, what your undergraduate GPA is, what your diagnostic LSAT is, etc.) I may be able to give you more specific advice.

Good luck,

~Anne, Certainly


0 Comments
Question #81376 posted on 03/05/2015 10:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So is the reason why we don't have lemon scented perfume (at least popularized in the US) because we use lemon scented cleaning products? What scent do other countries use for their cleaning products? Does that same scent not hit it off in perfumes in that respective country? Do you catch what I'm saying here? What's the weirdest perfume smell you smelt lately?

-Vogue Villain

A:

Dear vaudevillian,

Insofar as I can tell, cleaning products smell more or less the same wherever you go since the same umbrella companies (Procter & Gamble, Unilever) have operations worldwide. I don't know about lemon-scented perfumes in the USA, while I agree they're not really common I also don't think they're as rare as you might think. I suddenly want to find lemon-scented perfume/cologne, it sounds like it would smell really nice. Hey, here's a thing. I feel like men's colognes/perfumes/who made these arbitrary distinctions have citrusier undertones more often than girls' perfumes do. I am not good at distinguishing perfume scents, but I think some scents out there are really weird. Original Old Spice is one of those things. Despite some nostalgic reasons for liking the smell, I think Victoria's Secret Lovespell is a weird scent.

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Dear you,

Like Ardilla said, lemon perfume may not be terribly common here, but it does exist. I have a fondness for lemon, so one of my perfumes is actually C.O. Bigelow's Lemon.

~Anne, Certainly


0 Comments
Question #81380 posted on 03/05/2015 10:20 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How do you create self-motivation that outweighs laziness and other demotivating factors?

Example 1: My boss is never mad at me when I'm late and getting up in the morning is not my specialty. Any internal/external motivation I have from not wanting to be judged by my co-workers or not wanting to be that kind of person is outweighed by not wanting to go to work (I don't like my job) and laziness and sometimes other factors.

Example 2: My mental health. I just don't want to make the effort required to have good mental health and sometimes I get little boosts of motivation because I get too far down, but they don't always last. With this there's also things like not even wanting to be happy with my appearance because I don't like the way I look and other things.

Example 3: Exercise takes effort, time, pain, and other things. And I don't think I'll like the way I'll look afterwards anyway so it's hard to want to do it if I figure I won't be attractive afterwards anyway.

Thanks!
word processor

A:

Dear Word Processor,

Welcome to one of the greatest plights of our generation.  Fun, isn't it?

I am really excited to answer your question, not because I am an expert on the subject, but because I have been there before and have found a lot of things that help me, personally, to get rid of that annoying thing called apathy.

As Sam Bracken says, "The desire to be different is where change begins." You simply cannot change without a strong desire to do so. The fact that you submitted this question shows that you do have at least a starting desire to be different.  Now you have to do all you can to help that desire grow.

So, start by taking an inventory of where you are. Are you busy right now? No? Good. Sit down and start with some introspection. Be completely honest with yourself about where you are now and about where you want to be.  What are the specific things blocking you from becoming your ideal self? What are the negative effects of choosing to go to work late, not exercise, not care for your mental health, etc. What would some of the benefits be if you started to change those things?

Now, if there is one thing necessary to self-motivation it is positivity. If you are constantly feeling down in the dumps, it is going to be practically impossible to motivate yourself.  For this reason, I would suggest attacking the problem of your mental health first.  If you are a BYU student, take advantage of the free counseling services. If you are not, seek counseling in some other setting. You may be experiencing some degree of depression, and if that is the case, you are going to need some outside help before you can begin to motivate yourself.

Apart from counseling, one of the best ways to become more positive, and thus more easily motivated, is to surround yourself with positive things. Read motivational books.  Start your day off with the teachings of the gospel. Before you leave in the morning, read your scriptures for 5 minutes or watch a 5 minute Mormon Message. This may seem difficult, but planning, accountability, and rewards, all of which I will discuss later, will help.

It's also important to remember that surrounding yourself with positive things is often accomplished through eliminating negative or even neutral things in your life. One of my goals right now is to not watch TV. And let me tell you, I think I discovered one of the secrets of the universe. Yes, I have slipped a couple times (I needed to watch the Parks and Recreation finale, obviously), but in general, cutting TV out has helped me immensely to feel more motivated to do more productive things. During the time I would have spent watching TV, I end up sitting there, realizing I now have nothing to do, and then suddenly thinking, "Well, I could write a letter to my cousin who is on a mission," or, "Well, I guess I could get started on my homework." Cut time-wasters, whatever they may be for you, out of your life.

L. Tom Perry said, "We all make daily entries in our books of life. Occasionally we take it from the shelf and examine the entries we are making. What kind of memories will flood your mind as you examine the pages of your personal entries?" Value your life and your time enough to cut out things that are wasting it.  I promise this will help you to feel more motivated across all aspects of your life.

The next essential in creating self-motivation is planning, and by that I mean specific planning. If I tell myself that I'm going to go to the gym tomorrow, the chances of it happening are maybe 20%. If, on the other hand, I write in my planner that from 7PM-8PM I am going to the gym, the chances it will happen improve to maybe 85%.

Buy yourself a planner that has specific lines for each hour of the day and plan each day before you go to bed. Don't just make a to-do list, put each thing that you have to do at a specific time during the day. I am glad that you have going to the gym on your list because honestly, once you do accomplish it, it will motivate you in many other aspects of your life, as well.

In fact, it has been a goal of mine lately to go to the gym three times a week and, wow, has it made a difference. Another thing that helps me is listening to motivating music at the gym, as I walk home from the gym, and even as I am doing daily chores like putting my laundry away. Turn down your Bon Iver just for a while, and make a playlist of motivating music.

Since I have already brought up goal setting, let's talk about it. My favorite method of goal setting is the spiritual-physical-mental-social method. Right now, on the wall right next to my bed I have a post-it note for one goal from each of these areas of life. Physical: Go to the gym 3X a week. Mental: NO TV. Spiritual: Read the scriptures for 15 minutes every day. Social: Talk to at least 3 new people every day.

Make goals and keep them where you can see them, otherwise you will likely forget about them. Don't make too many goals, make just enough that you have a road map for where you are going.

Still, goal setting on its own is not enough. In fact, goal setting can be a well-intentioned road to nowhere without the next step: accountability.

Never allow yourself to be the only person who knows about your goals. Tell as many people as possible about your goals, especially people whose opinion of you is important to you.  Tell friends, roommates, family, heck, even post it on Facebook as long as it isn't too personal.  Finally, tell the Lord. Then ask specific people to hold you accountable. One of my friends at work is currently holding me responsible for my spiritual and social goals, and it motivates me a lot to know that when I go to work the next day, she is going to be asking me how things are going.

In addition to these kind of social rewards from others, reward yourself! Next to each goal that you make, list a reward of something you are going to give yourself if you succeed. (Again, tell somebody else about it so that you can't cheat).  I've also found that one of the greatest rewards I can give myself is being able to record my successes in my journal.  Keeping a journal allows you to see how far you have come and gives you motivation to keep going.

Now, for anyone who is actually still reading, I've only got a couple of tips left.  First, just as positivity is important in creating self-motivation, keeping up your self-esteem is just as important. Stop comparing yourself to others and make a conscious effort to silence both the critics without and the critics within. Sam Bracken said, "Getting where you want to go begins with opening your eyes and seeing yourself differently. Our potential is almost unlimited, but we hinder ourselves when we allow critics to drag us down or let low self-esteem keep us mired in a pit."

Finally, stay energized. For the kajillionth time, I am putting in a plug for going to the gym, but that is not all. Make sure you get enough protein and take B-vitamins. Don't take naps during the day, and get enough sleep at night, without oversleeping.  If you are tired or unhealthy, it will only be that much harder to motivate yourself.

Okay, last but not least, when you really have a hard time getting yourself to do something, just start. Starting is always the hardest part.  Put away anything and everything that may be distracting you and just start.

I hope you know that I am not even close to perfect at living all the ideals that I just described, but I feel a lot more motivated, happy, and fulfilled when I do live them.  Be patient with yourself, know that you will make mistakes, but keep trying and remind yourself daily of the value of your life and of the time you have been given.

Love,

Vienna


0 Comments
Question #81367 posted on 03/05/2015 10:20 a.m.
Q:

What's your top 1-2 topics (in any way you want to logically class/organise the topics) that you are most insightful on, so we know what kind of questions would be productive in asking?
~~~
beautiful (n.), more, takes time. i ask questions i actually care about.

A:

Dear AMBW,

I am most proficient at science-based questions, cheesy relationship questions, and questions about Canada. I also really enjoy answering opinion questions on social issues, Church doctrine, or Church culture, but since some of these are more personal-belief based, the idea of "proficiency" varies from person to person. For instance, I often provide a lot of personal experiences or anecdotes because I feel like they provide the most valid basis or explanation for why I believe what I do. Some people find those helpful, whereas others may prefer something more objective or fact-based.

-Zedability

A:

Dear tiguilote,

I know/geek out more about tropical fruit than anyone else I've ever met. This probably just means I need to meet more people (so I can steal all their knowledge, obviously). I also like things that have to do with Latin America.

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Comments
Question #81388 posted on 03/05/2015 9:02 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

When do you think Michelle Duggar will get a new hairstyle?

-Famous Fanny

A:

Dear Famous Fanny,

Honestly, probably never. She got a makeover for her 46th birthday a few years ago which was mostly just a haircut and straightening her hair. She was a good sport about it, but you can tell from the video that she wasn't over the moon about it. She's kept it about the same length since her haircut, so I don't think that's likely to change. 

-Squirrel


0 Comments
Question #81390 posted on 03/05/2015 9:02 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do you know who the actor is that plays Christ in the Bible Videos on LDS.org? My own searches aren't turning up any results.

-Curious

A:

Dear Curious, 

It doesn't look like they've made that information publicly available (IMDB, how have you failed me!) but I am pretty sure it isn't actually Jesus.

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz 


0 Comments
Question #81381 posted on 03/05/2015 9:02 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Last night I held a particular girl's hand for the first time. It was great! I really like this girl, but I need some help. She has a rod in her back from a previous back surgery. So...she can't cuddle like other girls I've dated. For instance I tried to put my arm around her in the movie theatre to pull her closer to me and...well...it didn't work logistically. She just can't move her back much. Any ideas on techniques of cuddling with someone with a rod in their back? I know there are lots of people who have rods in their back so there's got to be some sort of work around, I'm just not sure what it is. I'm sure you'll invite me to talk to her and have an open conversation about it which is probably the most effective solution. It's just that sometimes talking about physical affection early in a relationship can be awkward...

-Striped Pony Rider

A:

Dear Zebraburger,

OK, imagine you're sitting side-by-side with this girl. Instead of having her lean to the side against you, angle your body towards her and have her lean straight back onto that nice spot formed by your shoulder, neck and chest instead of leaning sideways. Something like this always worked well for me when I cuddled with a friend who had a bad back.

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Comments
Wednesday, March 4, 2015
Question #81386 posted on 03/04/2015 8:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I don't like much about myself including not liking the way I look. I could put in tons of effort into being happy with my life despite the fact that I dislike a lot of things about it but I really don't want to. I don't want to put in tons of effort into being happy and ugly. Happy and broke. God could easily make me beautiful. It wouldn't take much effort on His part. And yet, I'm suppose to put in this gigantic effort to be happy despite knowing I will never look the way I want to. I don't want to make that effort. I don't want to spend time trying to be happy and ugly. I want to be beautiful. If I beautiful and not broke it'd be more worth the effort to try and be happy. But ugly, single, broke, unlikable and happy is not what I want to be. Thoughts?

Thanks,
crying

A:

Dear Crying,

I have had a lot of really gorgeous friends over the years. And let me tell you, one thing I have learned is that there are a lot of beautiful people in this world who are straight up miserable. I have also had a lot of friends who are pretty average looking. But many of them have been some of the happiest people I have ever met. Honestly, beauty does not equate to happiness.  It just doesn't. And neither do riches. Beautiful people aren't the only people who can or should be happy, despite what Hollywood might have taught you.

It might sound harsh, but you have to start by changing your current mentality.  You have to realize that being happy will change your life a lot more than being beautiful will.

You are not strange or different for wanting to be beautiful.  I think we all want that to some degree. But why? It is most likely because we each want to feel more loved, admired, and respected, and we think that beauty will get us that. Well, we are simply wrong.  Though it often feels like how loved we are is the most important thing in the world, it isn't.  It is how much we love others that matters, and beauty has nothing to do with that.

Sometimes we become so focused on our quest to obtain our personal desires that we forget where real happiness comes from.  I will say it again, true happiness does not depend on the love we receive, but on the love that we give.

We have each been given a set of tools in this life, and each set of tools is unique.  You have to do what you can with what you have and that is how you will reach happiness.  Find other ways to excel. Change your desires.  It may seem impossible at first, but with time it really is possible.

In addition, focus your attention on others. Sometimes, when we focus too much on trying to make ourselves happy, it has the opposite effect. 

Finally, realize that God wants you to be happy.  Realize that He is not trying to make you miserable. He sent you to the earth, knowing you would encounter specific trials which would allow you to grow. This may be one of your trials, but it doesn't mean that He loves you any less.  We all have trials and things we need to overcome. Know that because you are a child of God, there are many beautiful things about you, inherited from a Celestial Being, than are much deeper and much more important than anything physical.

Good luck with everything,

Love,

Vienna

A:

Dear friend,

I feel for you. I really do. I haven't been in your exact situation before, but I've faced challenges in my life that have been major barriers to my happiness. Some of them have been beyond my direct control (for instance, repeated periods of depression), but some have been the result of decisions and attitudes of my own choosing. So, with all the love I can give you and without pretending to know the answer myself, I am going to ask you a question.

Do you want to be happy?

Do you really want to be happy, more than anything else? Imagine for a moment that happiness and beauty were completely unrelated—if you had to choose between being happy and unattractive or being beautiful and unhappy, with no other alternatives, which would you choose?

In this life, it's really easy to set your sights so firmly on a Thing that you think will bring you happiness (beauty, money, a significant other) that you lose sight of happiness itself. Is the Thing somehow bad? Not at all! But you get so fixated on the Thing as a means to an end that the Thing becomes an end in and of itself. It doesn't matter how hard you work towards the Thing or even whether or not you get the Thing, you won't be able to be happy if your quest for the Thing is so huge that it blocks your entire view.

Is it ever okay to care about a Thing more than happiness? Of course! If people never cared about a Thing more than about their own happiness, every marriage would inevitably end in divorce. Marriages survive and thrive because both members of the couple care about a Thing (namely, their spouse's happiness) more than they care about their own happiness.*

And honestly, if you're worried that you are unlikeable, I think that's the first thing you should look at. I first got to know my wife during one of the hardest times I've had in my life so far, and the first thing that really impressed me about her while we were still corresponding by email was how much she cared about me and how much time and effort she was willing to invest in me, even though we had never met in person and I didn't know if we ever would. In other words, I cared about her precisely because she cared about me. If you only care about yourself, it's hard to get anyone else to care about you. If you're worried about being unlikeable, you can start by liking somebody else. Put someone else's happiness before your own.

Paradoxically enough, that can be one of the best ways to be happy.

With all my hopes for the best,

-yayfulness

*I should make it clear that this, like anything else, can be bad if it's taken to an extreme. If you are in a relationship, you have a responsibility to yourself as well as to your significant other. The key is to find a proper balance.


0 Comments
Question #81387 posted on 03/04/2015 7:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have you or anyone you know had success with herbal remedies for small chests? I really, really hate being small chested.

Thanks,
ugly

A:

Dear Ugly,

Being small chested is great! Coming from a small chested chick, I can do all sorts of things! I can lay on my stomach for long periods of time without it hurting. I can wear almost anything and it fits my bust correctly. I can wear lower cut things because I don't have as much cleavage showing. Running around/exercising doesn't hurt as much as it would if I had a larger bust. Zed also pointed out that you can cuddle without your entire torso being off limits (I had never realized this was an issue before, but it makes me even more grateful to be small chested). She also pointed out that most stores sell your bra size for less than $70 (I can waltz into any clothing store and waltz right out with my bra size because it's always there and always inexpensive). Her final point was that people don't make unfounded assumptions about your morals, which is unfortunately true. I never had to deal with any judgement or harassment. My chest was always only my business. My little sister, on the other hand, was 13 when she hit puberty and her bust size is easily five times as large as mine, and even at that young age she got harassed a lot and people assumed terrible things about her. 

So moral of the story is that being small chested isn't bad at all. Like your bust size! It will likely fluctuate throughout your life and any herbal remedy that claims to increase your size is likely garbage. If you're worried about what guys think, don't be. Many, many guys don't even understand bra sizing. Saying you're a 34C means nothing to them and your relationship with a guy or his physical attraction to you should NOT be centered on the sacks of fat and mammary glands attached to the front of your rib cage. In general, your self worth should not be tied to the sacks of fat and mammary glands attached to the front of your rib cage, either. 

-Concorde

A:

Dear Human,

I would be willing to trade with you.

Sincerely
The Well-Endowed Ginger 

A:

Dear perfectly fine,

I think it's also worth mentioning that the vast majority of herbal remedies are actually a scam. A recent investigation by New York's attorney general revealed that four out of five supplements tested in their investigation contain none of the ingredients advertised on the label. Contaminated supplements have been implicated in several deaths, including from a hepatitis outbreak.

Although it's quite possible for supplement-sellers to stumble across something legitimately useful more or less by accident, for the most part they make a profit out of selling the false illusion of hope and control.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #81384 posted on 03/04/2015 6:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I recently read A Marriage of the Heart by Kelly Long--what a waste of time! Anyways, the main guy in the book, who's Amish, mentions to his wife that women used to bathe in milk because it made their skin softer. True? Not true? When, where, all that good stuff, etc?

-Christmas Cactus

A:

Dear Holiday Desert,

The Internets claim that Cleopatra, Elizabeth I of England, and Elisabeth of Bavaria all bathed in milk and acclaimed the beautifying benefits of such a practice. The lactic acid and alpha hydroxy acid (whatever that is) that are in milk work together to dissolve the proteins that hold together dead skin cells. Milk baths also exfoliate the skin, and according to qualitative evidence, they calm and soothe the stressed college student and their irritated skin. 

You can learn how to mix your own milk bath here

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Question #81383 posted on 03/04/2015 5:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

A friend of mine has a family member who is a prominent diplomat. The other day, it occurred to me that if I was trying to play six degrees of separation to connect myself to the rest of the world, it would be a good idea to go through my friend and her diplomat relative, since he knows politicians and other diplomats from all over the world.

My question to you, then, is who is the most famous or well-connected person who is two degrees of separation away from you? (I.e., not someone you know directly, but someone with whom you have a mutual connection.)

- Katya

A:

Dear Katya,

One of my professors is a cousin of Dan Reynolds from Imagine Dragons. Yup.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Dear Katya,

I am two people away from Brandon Sanderson and President Obama. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger (who is therefore only three people away from Patrick Rothfuss!! Just in case you were wondering...)

A:

Dear Katya,

The only people I can name for certain are a couple diplomats/humanitarians, the former governor of South Dakota, and Elder Christofferson. I'm pretty sure there's someone more prominent who's two degrees of separation away from me via one of my professors, but that's just a guess.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Katya,

Taylor Swift and Tyra Banks.

-Vienna

A:

Dear Katya,

President Obama.

-Curious Physics Minor

A:

Dear Katya,

Katya and Donny Osmond.

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear Katya, 

President Obama for me as well. I know you said one, but there's also the Queen of England, the President of France, Mitt Romney, President Monson, former President George W. Bush... I think I can connect myself to almost anyone through two degrees, to be honest. I've been fortunate enough to meet a lot of key people, and those key people are all very connected. I'm not so connected myself. 

-Concorde

A:

Dear Katherine,

I don't really have any prominent peoples that are only two degrees away from me, but I do have a Bacon Number of 2! So that's something, I guess. One of my major life goals is to get in a film somehow with Kevin Bacon so I can reduce that down to 1.

degrees.gif

-Inverse Insomniac

PS - I was just reminded by another question that I have a super flaky 2-degree connection to Ryan Gosling. Woo hoo.

PPS - I finally learned enough GIMP to make my photoshopped bag not look stupid! Now that's something to celebrate.


0 Comments
Question #81369 posted on 03/04/2015 5:50 p.m.
Q:

What's one of your main interests, academic or not, that you know a lot about?
~~~
beautiful (n.), more, takes time. i ask questions i actually care about.


A:

Dear care bear,

Apart from what I covered in another answer, I do consider myself quite the expert on cat videos.

Sadly not-cat-owningly yours,

-yayfulness

A:

Dear you,

I'm not super great at identifying my own main interests, I guess. I can think of things I dabble in or have had significant experience with over time or during certain parts of my life (playing piano, reading young adult fiction, listening to country music, having semi-awkward DTRs, etc.) but it's difficult to point to a few specific areas and be like "that's my thing," you know? I just do stuff and like stuff.

~Anne, Certainly

A:

Dear Aphrodite,

I am interested in and know a lot about long-distance running, drawing (pencil, charcoal, pen and ink), Avatar: The Last Airbender, some YA fiction (particularly the big three: Harry Potter, Hunger Games, Percy Jackson), linguistics, American Sign Language, teaching, Photoshop, and Greek/Roman mythology. I've also been reading a lot about user experience design and visual/web design lately.

-Owlet

A:

Dear Reader,

I really enjoy following the U.S. Supreme Court! I love listening to the oral arguments and reading court briefs. Of course, I don't know as much as an actual lawyer, but I know a lot more than a lay person. On a related note, I'm super stoked to listen to the arguments in King v. Burwell this Wednesday.

Shameless Plug: Readers, feel free to ask SCOTUS questions, I love those!

- Haleakalā


0 Comments
Question #81362 posted on 03/04/2015 5:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How do you score on this color perception test?

-Strong Sad

A:

Dear elephant feet,

12, which I was really proud of until I read all the other writers' responses.

-yayfulness is not actually special

A:

Dear #whiteandgold#blueandblack,

Zero! I actually took that test a couple months ago after a debate about what color a bag that I own is. Of course, we decided the only way to solve the debate was to determine whose color perception was better. And I won.

-Vienna

A:

Dear Strongbad,

I got 16. I appeared to have the most trouble with blue and bluish-purple, which surprised me, since that was the one I felt the most confident on.

It's also 8 in the morning after a night of little sleep and I'm not wearing my glasses, so this result might be skewed. My result still compares well to my demographic, though.

-Zedability

A:

Dear Wade,

4. I have a slight problems with greens.

#blueandblack

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear you,

8. Slight problems with greens and red/oranges.

~Anne, Certainly

A:

Dear Iris,

26. Good thing I never applied to the graphic design program.

-Owlet

A:

Dear limozeen,

Woo hoo! 0, baby! I always thought I was good at color discrimination. Now I know that I'm right whenever Madam and I argue about whether something is blue or green. She got a 24.

-Inverse Insomniac

A:

Dear you,

My score was 18. I had trouble distinguishing between colors in the teal, aqua and violet areas. 

-Squirrel

A:

Dear friend,

A 42? What the heck?

Well, I may not have great color discrimination, but I do have the answer to life, the universe, and everything.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Dear Teen Girl Squad,

I got a 4. Apparently I have a hard time discriminating teals.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Question #81382 posted on 03/04/2015 4:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have you've seen the sandman? What does he look like? Who is he? What does he do? What is the origin of his existence? Who are his relatives?

--Kool Aid Man Smashing through a Brick Wall

P.S. Oh Yeaaaaaaaah

A:

Dear Kool,

Yes, I've seen the sandman, or rather, the sandrabbit. I've heard of the human misconception of him, but he is in fact a rabbit. When rabbits are asleep, he hops into their den as silent as a breeze. He has sand in his fur, and he shakes it off into the ears of the sleeping rabbits. But this is no ordinary sand, this is the sand from the hrair stars, which falls on him as he travels in the night. The hrair stars watch over the earth, and shed what they see on the sandrabbit, who then shares them with the others—very narn sights of zilflay, carrots, and even El-ahrairah himself. But sometimes Inlé, the moon, sheds some of his thoughts, and these get mixed with the stars'. This is what causes the rabbits to dream of elil and zorn with fright. The sandrabbit is a brother of El-ahrairah and is almost as old. Frithrah, Lord Sun, made him sandrabbit when the other rabbits did not have any desire to sleep—they just wanted to silflay all day. And that is how sandrabbit became sandrabbit.

-El-ahrairah


0 Comments
Question #81332 posted on 03/04/2015 4:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How did you know the church was true? What was the process and the steps you took and how do you keep your testimony intact and strong? What exposure did you have to material (not anti material, but just contrary material) that was opposite of church teachings or pointed out inconsistencies?

Would you say "I KNOW the church is true" or "I BELIEVE the church is true?"

-Curious

A:

Dear Curious,

I'm sorry for holding this question over hours. My answer won't be as thorough as I wanted it to be, but I wanted to add some thoughts because I think your question is so important.

I spent all of high school praying for a testimony without feeling like I received any sort of witness. When I decided to serve a mission, it wasn't out of a burning desire to share the gospel; it was partly because it felt like the right thing to do, and partly because I wanted to do something crazy and a mission sort of fit the bill. But I didn't really feel like I knew that the Book of Mormon was true or that Joseph Smith was a prophet. I wanted to believe, and that was all. It was during my teenage years that I first started to realize that there were contradictions, and since I was afraid of talking to my parents about anything, I turned instead to the internet. I think I encountered most anti-Mormon, anti-Christian, and anti-theist arguments during that time.

Of course, by intense study and constant repetition once I was in the field, I started to understand the core doctrines (especially the plan of salvation) better than ever before. That helped, because I started to see how the beauty of the consistencies outweighed the trouble of the inconsistencies. But I didn't arrive at any degree of conviction that the Church was true until, like Vienna says below, I lived it.

I had always more or less kept the commandments, but it wasn't until I gave my heart over to dedicated obedience that I actually understood why. You know how the scriptures say you can't receive a witness until after the trial of your faith? Well, sometimes we think "trials" means deaths or financial hardships or family problems. And yes, those things are definitely trials. But my trial of faith was not some external event that forced me to turn to God in a time of need. Instead, it was a very internal matter. God asked me to turn myself over to him even when I felt strong - that is, he asked me to be humble and obedient during times when I was solid, healthy, happy, and independent. It was easy for me to be humble when external circumstances forced me to my knees, but otherwise I suffered from a don't-nobody-be-tellin'-me-what-to-do attitude. He literally tested the extent of my faith. When I learned to be obedient even when I felt like I could do everything by myself, the conviction came. This is what the Bible Dictionary says on the subject of faith: "Miracles do not produce faith, but strong faith is developed by obedience to the gospel of Jesus Christ. In other words, faith comes by righteousness." 

Still, though, several years after I realized that I actually have a testimony, I wouldn't say that I "know" the Church is true. I cynically discount most other people, too, when they say over the pulpit that they know, and I hated it when teachers encouraged us to speak like that to our friends. (Am I the only one who got the lesson that we should say "I know the Church is true" rather than "I believe the Church is true"?) Frankly, I think that we do ourselves and others a disservice by not admitting room for doubt into our religious rhetoric. If we were more open about our struggles to receive an answer and come to an absolute knowledge of the truth, I think we would alienate a lot fewer people, especially those who despair of ever receiving the witness that the I-know-the-Church-is-true testimony bearers seem to have obtained or those investigators who are uncomfortable with the air of absolute certainty in the way we talk.

I'd say that most thinking, questioning, rational adults may never arrive at 100% certainty, even if they say over the pulpit that they do. It’s kind of crude to put a number on it, but I think that I’m maybe hovering around 85%. Does that mean that I lack faith? Probably, yes. But does God condemn me for not knowing? No. He grants 100% knowledge to the very small handful of people to whom He has shown himself or given other forms of proof. To the rest of us, those of us who have received no angelic visitation, we have to take things on at least a bit of faith. And if you ask me, that is more noble than absolute knowledge. What can be a greater show of humility than to say, “Heavenly Father, I have HUGE DOUBTS, and I can’t get them out of my head, but I’m going to go ahead with it anyway because I want to do my best in this life, and because I love you, okay?” Once we know for sure, faith is no longer required, and obedience becomes easy because we have caught a glimpse of the eternal rewards. That’s why the veil is so instrumental in the Plan of Salvation. 

Sometimes I still struggle to believe. But I've learned that doubts are a manifestation of a healthy and active mind, and that Heavenly Father doesn't intend for us to close our ears and eyes to all objections or questions. Rather, He wants us to take them in stride and weigh them against the strength of our faith. For this reason, I also believe that He is (as we should be) compassionate and forgiving towards those who leave the Church because their faith doesn't match up to the many assailing doubts they have. Some apparent contradictions have explanations that I won't understand or receive in this life, and that's where God is currently asking me to take Him on faith. That's why the battle never ends, and that's how we slowly refine ourselves toward the ultimate goal of perfection.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Dear Curious,

I described my process of coming to know the Church is true in Board Question #79961. I'll just add that in high school, I was exposed to pretty much every anti-Mormon/contrary argument that popularly exists. This was through a combination of reading way too many Internet comments on new sites (and trying to argue with people), and a friend who was really fond of bringing these issues up without really explaining what the possible resolutions were.

I think that in a way, being exposed to contrary material slowed down the process of receiving a specific answer to prayer about whether the Church was true. However, I still had a lot of other spiritual experiences along the way, more relating to my personal life than the truthfulness of the Church, that nonetheless showed me that the Church was bringing me closer to God and gradually built my testimony that it was true. I also gradually discovered answers to certain issues that seemed compatible with Church doctrine to me, and seeing that answers were there, and that oftentimes the concerns came from people distorting the truth, gave me confidence that there were answers to the other issues as well.

By the time of my mission, I was satisfied as to about 80% of the anti material I'd heard. The other 20% gradually got answered on my mission. I didn't really have to seek out answers; I just tended to stumble into them in the course of doing what I was supposed to be doing.

In the words of Ed Eyring, the great thing about the Church is we don't have believe anything that isn't true. I have always really loved that idea, and so throughout my life, even though I didn't know what the truth was or what it meant for the Church, I always trusted that there was a truth and that everything would make sense eventually, one way or the other.

If you're wondering about any contrary materials, I'd encourage you to research them through FAIR, the Journal of Mormon History, the Neal A. Maxwell Institute, the LDS Topics page, or similar sources. I think some people are more comfortable not having answers yet than others, and these are decent places to get answers. In order for these answers to truly build your testimony, however, they need to be accompanied with sincere scripture study and prayer, and regular Church and temple attendance. Nobody can know of spiritual truths without spiritual manifestations; without an accompanying witness from the Spirit that the Book of Mormon is true and Joseph Smith is a prophet, research only results in an intellectual conversion, which can be more easily challenged by false arguments from the opposing side. When you have your own answer from God, no argument can tell you that didn't happen. When you regularly renew your answers from God, you always have a strong, recent testimony to help you see things clearly.

I really noticed on my mission that when I was really having good personal studies in the Book of Mormon, everything seemed so clear to me. The answers to all the common contrary material seemed so obvious and I wondered how anyone could not think it was true. When my personal study slacked off, it was like my mind was clouded and things seemed confusing again, because the Spirit couldn't enlighten me as well. There are moments where I've KNOWN the Church was true and moments where I've only believed. However, after receiving a knowledge, in the moments of mere belief, I can trust that that knowledge is still accurate. Right now, I know it's true.

If you ever have questions about contrary material or would like to ask for advice or clarification about any of this, you're more than welcome to email me at zedability(at)theboard(dot)byu(dot)edu. I can't promise I'll be able to help, but I can promise that I can listen and not judge whatever you're wondering about.

TL;DR Version: I'm quite confident that I've been exposed to about 80 to 90% of the anti-Mormon or contrary material that's been put forth, and I can confidently promise you that answers to these questions exist, and that it is still possible to gain a testimony and know the Church is true after hearing about them. (I also know, from talking to other people, that I'm not the only one who feels this way. If you're wondering if you can, don't give up! It IS possible.)

-Zedability

A:

Dear Curious,

I gained my testimony of the gospel in three distinct ways.

First, through living it. In my mind, living the gospel consists of abiding by the commandments, keeping my covenants, striving to strengthen my relationship with God, and using the Atonement daily. Living the gospel is the testimony builder that functions on a daily basis in my life. I may not know or understand everything, but I do know that living the gospel makes me happy, and that means a lot to me. Living the gospel fulfills me, enriches me, give me joy, makes me a better person, and above anything else, it's what keeps my testimony alive.

The second way I gained my testimony was through studying the Book of Mormon.  Basing my testimony in the Book of Mormon is what protects me from the voices of the world— the voices of doubt and confusion. I have always been a naturally curious person. When I was a teenager, I read quite a bit of anti-Mormon literature on the internet.

Now, let me clear.  I absolutely do NOT recommend reading anti-Mormon literature.  Especially if you are struggling with your testimony, that is not the way to go. I mean, think of all the slander and lies that celebrities like Justin Bieber have to deal with.  Well, Justin Bieber is just a teen heart-throb. Joseph Smith restored the true Gospel of Jesus Christ.  Of course Satan is going to fill the internet with everything he possibly can to get you to doubt the character of church leaders such as Joseph Smith. Reading what the anti's have to say will only cause you unnecessary pain and put you farther back than you currently are.

That being said, I will also let you know that for me, personally, none of the anti-Mormon literature I ever read impacted me too much. That's because my testimony has always been centered around the Book of Mormon.  When I was 16, my parents locked me in the basement with a copy of the Book of Mormon (I was going through a stage), and that is when I truly started to gain a testimony of that book. That testimony has since grown into one of the strongest convictions and beliefs that I have. I don't care what you have heard about Joseph Smith, I don't care about quotes you have found from Brigham Young, I don't care about your crazy stories about excommunicated bishops.  I simply don't care.  I believe with all that I am that the Book of Mormon is true.  And if the Book of Mormon is true, it's all true.

The last way I gained my testimony was through spiritual experiences. I have had a handful of experiences, mostly in my mission, where I truly can say that, in those moments, I knew that the church was true. When difficulties or moments of doubt come, I cling to the memories of those experiences and they give me strength. I felt things as a missionary that I could never describe. Sometimes, in my journal, I would attempt to describe the feeling by saying that it felt like the sun was inside of me. That's still the closest I can get to describing it.

In the end, I think the best way to keep your testimony alive is to never give up. Never, ever give up. This one is so important because trials of faith are a necessary challenge of life, meaning that we are each going to need to overcome moments of fear or doubt. Sometimes, we may feel like we are completely in the dark, wondering where God is.  But I promise you, when you keep going, when you keep doing all you can to live the gospel, despite your doubts, you will come out of the darkness a stronger person.  Maybe that's why God let's us struggle through the dark sometimes.  Just remember that there is always light at the end, and that He has never forsaken you.

As Elder Holland teaches, it's not about how much you know, nor is it about all that you don't know. It's all about how much you are willing to commit to those things that you do know. It's all about being willing to let go of all that you don't know in order to fight for what you do know.

Love,

Vienna

A:

Dear Curious,

To some extent, my testimony has always existed. I have never experienced a time in which I didn't believe in the Gospel. That being said, it wasn't really solidified until I was a junior in high school. During that time, about 80 percent of my friends were atheist, including my boyfriend. We all thought we were really intellectual and so we would talk and argue and debate about philosophy and often times religion. I had to defend the Gospel a lot that year. My friends would point to inconsistencies and I would try to explain them, and other times I would simply accept them. This time taught me a lot about faith, and a lot about humility. I did not always know the answers, and sometimes there wasn't always an answer to their questions, or a rebuttal to their objections. It forced me to become comfortable with the touchier subjects of the church, and it let me explore my own feelings, beliefs and doubts, on many topics. Through this exploration, I was able to build a foundation; a foundation, whereupon if I build, I cannot fall. 

I tend to say "I believe." I do this partially because I don't know, and partially because a belief, to me, is something that has been internalized and will change you. Knowledge doesn't do that. You have to believe what you know for it to change who you are.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Question #81374 posted on 03/04/2015 11:38 a.m.
Q:

at the highest abstraction, there are only two kinds of questions in humanity:

* problem-driven questions (howtos, whys, etc. w/e)
* curiosity-driven questions (howtos, whys, etc. w/e)

do you have any other suggestions i should add to my list? or feel free to include yours at w/e abstraction level you desire. links are good.


~~~
beautiful (n.), more, takes time. i ask questions i actually care about.


A:

Dear meta-question,

I can come up with plenty of arbitrary or non-arbitrary question divisions along the lines of the one you've created, but none of them would actually be a part of the binary division you've created. The best additional binary division that I can give you (to complement the one you've already created) is the division between questions with empirically verifiable answers and questions with subjective or unverifiable answers.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #81304 posted on 03/04/2015 11:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

During my ecclesiastical endorcement interview, I told my bishop about some recent mistakes I've made. I have two questions about what he said:

1) He said he was going to endorce me with reservations. Does this just mean he personally has reservations about endorcing me, or is this an option Bishops actually select when endorcing us? If so, what does this mean and entail?

2) He said he's not going to report me to the Honor Code office, but suggested I think about self-reporting. When you self-report, what happens?

-Thank you

A:

Dear friend,

The answer to your first question is that yes, "endorse with reservations" is an actual option bishops can select, at least according to this IT page. I can't find any information on what this actually entails, but my guess is that it sends a notification to the Honor Code Office. I'm not sure whether they act on that notification, but this page outlines the process of reviewing an Honor Code violation, and I would guess that it's within their discretion to pursue an investigation if they feel the that the violation is serious.

I wish I could give you a more concrete answer on your second question, but it really depends on what kind of violation it was. This PDF gives some idea of things the Honor Code Office may take into account, including the severity of the breach, its impact on others, and your own attitude about the process. I'd note in particular that it lists "timely and voluntary self-report" as one of the factors, meaning that if the Honor Code Office knows that your bishop is endorsing you with reservations anyway, it's probably in your best interests to self-report.

Good luck! Don't get down on yourself. We're rooting for you.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book


0 Comments
Question #81379 posted on 03/04/2015 5:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Thanks, MODAQ, for your insights on the Olsen Twins. Now can you clear up another Full House twin mystery for me? So Alex and Nicky are identical twins. Don't identical twins have the same finger prints and also footprints? Or no? If so, why does Uncle Jesse take baby footprints of the twins when he got them mixed up and he was trying to figure out who was who (he took off their booties because they were "uncool"). Wouldn't they be the same though? So confused.

How do parents usually tell their identical twins apart when the twins are wee little ones and can't talk?

-Tom on a Cruise

A:

Dear Wade,

This is one of the many times Full House featured astonishing scientific accuracy. Identical twins come from the same fertilized egg and have the same DNA, but never have matching fingerprints or footprints. As far as other people telling their twins apart, I've heard of several different ideas, including color coding outfits or painting a toenail. I understand some have even considered tattoos.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #81378 posted on 03/04/2015 5:32 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Where is d best place 2 make-out n d theaters? Admit it, yall done it & u like it. Am I wrong?

-Provo Pucker

A:

Dear Pucker,

d best place 2 make-out n d theater iz rite in d very front. Then every1 can c how much u love ur SO.

-zedability

A:

Dear Puker,

You are wrong. I have never done it.

And if you make out half as loudly as my brother and his wife do, you should only make out in soundproof rooms.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Provo,

Moment of truth that you probably don't really actually care about (I just want to prove that no, we all haven't done it). While I've kissed my SO, I've never made out with him. He tried once and I panicked and totally rejected my SO of nearly 6 months. He handled it like a champ. But I'm all cringe-y just thinking about it. Oops. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #81377 posted on 03/04/2015 4:44 a.m.
Q:

dear 100 hour board,

I'm having trouble finding one more 1/2 credit class. Is there any chance you can list all of the 1/2 credit classes for me?

sincerely,
desperate for a degree

A:

Dear Wade,

Filtering by credit hours is possible in BYU's class schedule search.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #81373 posted on 03/04/2015 1:32 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is your favorite Leonard Nimoy moment?

-LLAP

A:

Dear Spock,

His appearance on the classic "Marge vs The Monorail" episode of The Simpsons.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Spock,

His musical triumph, "The Ballad of Bilbo Baggins."  Classic.

I had an aunt who had Down's Syndrome who passed away a couple years ago. One of my favorite memories of her was one time when my cousin and I had her listen to "The Ballad of Bilbo Baggins." She was on the floor laughing the whole time. Now, I think of her whenever I hear that song, which is fairly often ever since I decided to download it onto my iPod.

Thanks, Leonard.

-Vienna


0 Comments
Question #81315 posted on 03/04/2015 12:20 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

At what age do babies know their mother? My niece was born a couple of weeks ago and since then a lot of different women have held her. Does she know when I'm holding her that I'm not her mom? She'll try to nurse from everybody so when will she know her mom's sense of smell, etc?

-Diaper Sniper

A:

Dear Sniper,

Babies, and newborns in particular, are really bad at being humans. Their senses are incredibly terrible, which makes it hard for them to get information. For example, most newborns can't see anything that is over a foot away. You have to literally get in your baby's face for them to be able to see you. Visual recognition will vary from child to child, with this article saying sometime between a few days to a few months. 

As for identifying their mother through smell, I was able to track down this study recap on WebMD. The scientists concluded that scent recognition occurs "early in life" because the child links their mother's scent with being fed. Since babies are exposed to their mother's scent multiple times a day, the repeated exposure makes it easier for them to process and remember the information.

So, most babies will be able to identify their mother or main caregiver within a few weeks of birth. Keep in mind that it's not a definite "That's my mom!" identification but more like "This person looks/sounds/smells like the person who feeds me so I'm okay with them." 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Tuesday, March 3, 2015
Question #81372 posted on 03/03/2015 11:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

A few questions here.

I have been accepted to excavate in the Enna province in Sicily, Italy. Do you know what stake, ward/branch boundaries that is in? and who my Bishop or Stake President would be? I'd like to contact them.

Additionally, if I were to be excavating in Sicily from early May to mid June -- would I be able to attend the Rome Temple dedication this summer? (not in person, but via satellite since I'd be in the Rome Temple district, right?). I have my temple recommend, but I'd think I'd need to meet with the local LDS authority to get one of those ticket thingys, right? But do you know if they will be doing the Rome Temple diedication via broadcast to those within Italy?

-Bones & Butterfly

A:

Dear Bone,

You can find your ward on this website. It looks like it needs more specific information than simply Sicily, Italy, but you should be able to find all the information there.

As for the temple, due to various construction delays, it won't be completed until early 2016.

Sincerely
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why are "hearing" aids and hearing associated medical fees not covered by Canadian National Health care? Why is it private? Is hearing not valued in Canada?

Do you know of any way to get compensation for hearing aid repairments or replacements in British Columbia? What is a poor hearing impaired person supposed to do in British Columbia?

-Candid non-Canadian

A:

Dear Candid,

First of all, I'd like to point out that this policy is not unique to Canada; Michigan seems to have similar coverage-based options as Canada does. Because this is similar across countries, I would guess that the answer comes down to some sort of statistical analysis about cost vs. how many people actually use them. If few people would make use of such coverage, but the coverage would be very expensive, overall premiums might be higher for all users without much benefit to most, which would put an insurance company at a disadvantage. In the future, I'd suggest specifically shopping for an insurance policy with hearing aids, if that's important to you.

Hearing aids are covered under Canadian health care, but in such a way where those who will be most affected by a loss of hearing, i.e. developing children, can receive hearing aids free or at wholesale cost. According to this website,

Worker's compensation, the veterans' program, and other groups provide aids to adults free or at a significantly reduced rate following an evaluation by a qualified audiologist at a provincially funded clinic or by an approved private provider.

The website also mentions that many private plans do provide $300-500 that can be used towards hearing aids every three or four years. However, it seems like your plan does not have this kind of provision. In BC, there is an initiative for people over the age of 18 to receive hearing aids, but you have to be a resident of BC, so your international status would probably work against you. (After a few years of school in the states, I've come to the conclusion that being international is pretty much always a pain.)

Because you're a US citizen, your best bet is probably to look at American associations and work with those. You may have to take a trip down to the States to actually get the hearing aid, but fortunately Vancouver isn't too far from the border. I found lists of different organizations here, here, here, and here – call and explain your situation, and they should have the expertise to direct you. I hope you find something!

-Shifty Canadian


0 Comments
Question #81365 posted on 03/03/2015 9:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What exactly is the circumference of a moose?

-Arthur Weasley

A:

Dear Arthur,

It's about 14 beaver tails.

-Shifty Canadian


0 Comments
Question #81366 posted on 03/03/2015 5:20 p.m.
Q:

What are 1-3 of your most helpful posts that gets close to fully solving a problem, or a pattern of problems, that someone had asked about on this site?
~~~
beautiful (n.), more, takes time. i ask questions i actually care about.


A:

Dear reader,

In general, at least in my experience, the degree to which an answer fully answers a question is inversely proportional to the length of the answer. This isn't because of the nature of the answer, it's because of the nature of the question. For instance, my answer to Board Question #81177 provides a fairly comprehensive answer to the question with only 65 words and one picture. On the other hand, there are quite a few cases like Board Question #80591 where several writers provide great answers to the question, but the question is not comprehensively answered because, by its very nature, a comprehensive answer is impossible.

What you're probably looking for, in this case, is an answer that is both extensive and comprehensive. The single best example I can think of is the great culminating project of Zedability immediately before her mission, Board Question #71118. Such wonders are few and far between, so treasure them when they do appear.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear AMBW,

There are a lot of different ways in which an answer can fully solve a problem or respond to a question, and sometimes the amount of effort required isn't readily apparent. For instance, I answered Board Question #67627 and Board Question #68841 about various campus-related questions. While the responses are short, they were very difficult to track down, but provide all the information the reader asked for.

Others are easy to answer, but take time. Some personal examples are Board Question #70806 and Board Question #70687. Each individual row in those tables was pretty easy to fill out, but it just took a lot of effort to do so.

In general, if you're looking for examples of excellent answers, I'd suggest browsing the popular questions section, particularly the Editor's Choice. Some prime examples are Board Question #80592Board Question #79801Board Question #78238Board Question #78182, and Board Question #62771.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #81364 posted on 03/03/2015 2:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What should I do if I am never warm? I can layer and layer and layer.......and it's like I'm not wearing anything at all!

Literally, the only times I feel warm is when I am in the shower with the heat cranked up and when I'm wrapped up in my electric heating blanket.

What's wrong with my body!?

-Frostbitten

A:

Dear Elsa,

You should not shower in an electric blanket.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Frostbitten,

Just as an obligatory disclaimer, we are not doctors, but we can Google things to give you a starting place.

According to WebMD, a variety of medical conditions cause feeling colder than usual, such as anemia, hypothyroidism, diabetes, anorexia, and various blood vessel problems. If you're concerned about constantly feeling cold, it might be good to talk to your doctor and get screened for any of these things.

Additionally, some people just tend to run cold. My fiancé is always cold. Often when we're cuddling, he'll feel cold against me, even if we're under a blanket and he's wearing a sweater. I've heard similar things from other people as well.

If layering isn't enough, you could consider purchasing a product such as HotHands Super or Body warmers to provide you with some portable heat.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #81363 posted on 03/03/2015 2:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Short of wearing my winter coat indoors, and assuming that all attempts to bribe the facilities manager have been futile, what are some things I can do to stay warm in my very freezing cold office?

-Popsicle

A:

Dear Popsicle,

Here are some ideas I came up with for you:

  • Use any of the HotHands products, such as hand, body and feet warmers. 
  • Invest in a nice mug and some hot chocolate or herbal tea packets to drink throughout the day.
  • Wear more layers! Get a nice pair of long underwear. (It makes a huge difference.)
  • Eat really spicy foods for lunch.
  • Avoid drinking anything cold.
  • Ask for permission to bring a personal space heater.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #81350 posted on 03/03/2015 12:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board:

I have to say, the response posed by the anonymous woman in Board Question #81277 depresses me just a little bit. To elaborate, I'll give you the context:

Late in my senior year of college, I developed a serious degenerative chronic illness, one that will probably leave me confined to a wheelchair or even to bed at some point. Likely, before I'm old enough to become a grandparent. Right now, the symptoms are mostly invisible, and thus, no one in my current ward really knows about it, but in the context of a romantic relationship, I do have to disclose it at some point.

As you might guess, it has put a real damper on dating. If I get far enough how long in a relationship, it has been my experience that when I tell them about my condition, everything falls apart. And given that my condition is not curable, I feel broken to the point of giving up. I haven't been on a date in more than a year, and I just don't care anymore.

So my question is, how do I deal with this? When do I tell people about it? Should I just go public? Given that some people have advised me not to say anything now, including of all people the Bishop's wife, I feel trapped in unable to figure out what the next thing I should do.

-Falling to Pieces

PS: if you need more of the non-public details to answer this, please contact me directly.

A:

Dear Doctor,

I had similar thoughts to the anonymous writer, but the thing is, everyone has something serious that they will be afflicted with at some point in life. My mom has cancer, and my dad had no way to know that going into their marriage (mostly because my mom didn't even know until a year ago). However, I used to date someone with a chronic illness, and it was kind of nice knowing in advance the problem that we'd be facing. 

I've dealt with a mild form of depression, and whoever I date is going to have to deal with that. But they would have to deal with that even if I didn't develop the problem until years later. Honestly, I'd bring it up sooner rather than later. The later you bring it up, the more it feels like you're hiding it. You don't have to bring it up super intentionally, but it doesn't have to be a secret.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Falling,

I am sorry. You sound like a nice person and this does not sound like something that is easy to go through.

There are a couple of things that I want to say to you. First, do not let your fear turn into apathy. I can't tell you how many times I have sold myself short and missed out on life opportunities because I did just that. Sometimes, when we fear rejection, failure, or letdown, we allow our fear to completely immobilize us.  We tell ourselves that we simply don't care, because it feels like it might be easier to not care.

You are worth so much more than that. One of the secrets of happiness is to value yourself enough to be willing to face your fears. Love yourself enough to push yourself. Love yourself enough to believe that someone else will love you back, despite your illness.

Deal with your illness by not allowing it to control your life or your hope for the future. Read stories about hope in the scriptures. Make goals for yourself, including goals about dating. Surround yourself with positive, uplifting things. I know this is all advice you have heard before, and I know that it is all easier said than done, but your life is worth doing all of it and more. Please, don't sell yourself short. There is more than one person out there who would love and commit to you despite your illness, but you need to believe that before it happens.

I agree with what Tally says about when you should bring it up. I would suggest letting someone know about your illness as soon as you are at a point in the relationship that it feels natural to tell them important details about your life.

Good luck with everything.

Love,

Vienna

A:

Dear Falling,

I'm the writer who wrote that answer, so I wanted to write in as well and say that I am in no way representative of all women. Who I am as a person influences how I think and the ways I make decisions, but that does not mean that I know myself perfectly (and could say that I would "never" do such-and-so) or that I understand life that well. You deserve love just like any other person in this life.

-A Sister

A:

Dear Falling, 

My SO has a debilitating, incurable and extremely rare genetic disease in his family and when we started dating, he revealed that he had it and most of his family had it, resulting in nine different cancers in his younger three siblings and father, with more than a dozen lined up in the future. The three of his siblings that had had cancers had all been granted Wishes from Make-A-Wish, even. I remember being more than a bit shocked and seriously considered it for a few weeks. We'd only been dating two weeks and this was the kind of thing that I would pass to our children, if we had any. He would likely die young, or live through several horrible cancers. It would be so easy to break up with him, right?

In the end, I decided that I couldn't fault him for having this genetic disease. I would feel pretty horrible if I had the disease and I was alone because of something outside of my control. I stuck with him and decided that I would just commit to this and find ways around it (selective IVF, for example), with the hope that everything would be perfect and restored in the next life. He ended up testing negative for the disease (about a month ago), but four of his siblings and his father are positive, and this will still be something his family deals with for the rest of their lives.

I appreciated that he had told me in the beginning. I would have felt somewhat betrayed and trapped by a confession six months on, after I was already committed to him. This isn't the same for everyone, but I feel that telling them early on would be the better thing to do, and that way you aren't wasting your time on someone who can't cope with that kind of news. I won't sugar coat. There may not be someone for you in this life, but that's the case for people without the same physical ailments as you.

My advice would just be to become the best you possible. One reason I stuck with my SO even though we thought he had this disease was because he had become the best possible version of himself. He was worth any sacrifice on my part in that regard. You are worth love and sacrifice regardless, but it's easier for others to be willing to make that journey with you if they can see it immediately. 

Be strong, keep an eternal perspective. 

Love and hugs, 

-Concorde


0 Comments