"Meetings don't have to be endless to be eternal." -Pres. James E. Faust
Monday, July 6, 2015
Question #83023 posted on 07/06/2015 9:25 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Recently while at baggage claim in a US airport, I saw what appeared to be an elderly Buddhist monk seated (in a wheelchair) with about 8 or 10 people kneeling around him. He was speaking to them, and their hands were steepled together in what appeared to be some act of respect. This took place in the middle of the main foot traffic pattern through baggage claim, which suggests that it was perhaps an impromptu thing. I didn't stop to observe closely. Not that it's necessarily relevant, but all of them including the monk were of Asian ethnicity.

I served a mission in Taiwan, lived in mainland China for a couple years, and have traveled extensively in Asia. I've been to scores of Buddhist and Taoist temples but have never seen this happen before. I've seen Buddhists & Taoists praying and and doing other rituals, of course, but never this. I admit that I'm not all that educated about Buddhism. My first thought was that it was simply a gesture of respect, similar to how Mormons typically stand when the prophet or an apostle enters the room. Or, maybe these were adherents of a particular sect or something. Any idea?

-Passenger

A:

Dear Passenger,

Sorry, but it doesn't look like any of the rest of us have been able to figure out what was going on, either! If any of our readers are familiar with this custom in Buddhism or other Eastern religions, feel free to submit a correction.

-Zedability


0 Corrections
Question #83053 posted on 07/06/2015 8:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Will this question be rejected?

-Nope

A:

Dear bored,
 
Nope.

Dang, that was easy. Keep these coming.

Suerte, 

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Corrections
Question #83052 posted on 07/06/2015 8:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do my hips lie?

-Shaki$ha

A:

Dear reader,

Hips are said to not lie if they unilaterally and sincerely show your emotions, regardless of the words which are spoken from your mouth. Since it looks like none of the writers are familiar with your hips, specifically, we invite you to consult an expert.

-Auto Surf, with help from reddit


0 Corrections
Posted on 07/06/2015 6:05 p.m. New Correction on: #83018 My phone keeps running out of storage space. I don't have that many apps or pictures ...
Question #83047 posted on 07/06/2015 4:14 p.m.
Q:

Dear The Board,

When I'm having trouble connecting to the Internet on my Chromebook a little dinosaur shows up on the screen along with an error message. At first I just thought, hey, cute dino, but one day I accidentally pressed the space bar and he took off running...right into a cactus. I think Dino Jump (as I call it) is pretty awesome, so my question to you is this: will you guys spend the next four days competing to see who among you can get the highest score?

-Nellie Bly

A:

Dear Wade,

This was my first run after realizing you could run under the pteranodons. I only played it for like five minutes and then got bored.

 This is a terrible inaccurate representation of T-Rex

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Nellie,

I remember back when there were no pteradons. Just you and the cacti. Those were the days...

...Anyway, I ended up with a high score of 1294. I maybe could have done better, but that's all I had time for.

-Frère Rubik, who has to go yell at some kids to get off of his lawn.


0 Corrections
Question #83046 posted on 07/06/2015 2:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What's your favorite question to ask Siri?

-Siri, what's zero divided by zero?

A:

Dear Human, 

My co-worker showed me that one today at work... weird. Do you work with me, Human?

I really like asking Siri "What does the fox say?" and "Where did you hide the bodies?". 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Corrections
Question #83037 posted on 07/06/2015 2 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Are any of the international internships offered through the Kennedy Center paid? I am wanting to do an international internship for my major because I love to travel, and I want that kind of work experience that an internship offers, but it would be extra awesome if I would get some of my funds back with a paycheck. Most of the programs I've looked at don't specify whether they are paid internships or not. Also, do any of you have any experience with an internship through the Kennedy Center? I'd love to hear about your experiences!

-Purple Crayon

A:

Dear Crayolin',

My Kennedy Center contact is pretty sure they don't offer any paid internships. However, he did mention that some programs provide grants, and some sponsored through the College of Engineering offer living assistance or stipends. 

I'm actually doing an international internship right now. I got most of the cost covered (including flights, living expenses, tuition, etc.) through grants and scholarships. Which was the nicest blessing ever. Thanks to random scholarships and college grants, traveling as a student is way more feasible than people think. 

Everything from preparation to stipends to free time will depend on the specific program you choose. For example, my friend just finished a program this Spring in which she and 20 other students got to travel around Asia and assess businesses. They had a few chaperones traveling with them and most everything was planned out beforehand. My program, on the other hand, has me and my roommate as the only two interns in the country, mostly setting our own schedule. We work 20-30 hours a week, do online classes, and every so often go do something awesome. 

I highly recommend doing an internship with the Kennedy Center. It gives you great work experience, a chance to go abroad, and an opportunity to figure out what you want to do. For instance, before this summer I had a plan to move all around the world after graduation. I haven't totally put that dream to rest, but I'm realizing that I actually really like English and heating pads and hot water and stuff. My life plans and careers goals have adjusted accordingly. 

If you'd like to learn more about available internships, the Kennedy Center representatives are super friendly and knowledgeable. You can also email me if you want learn more about my program. (I kept the description pretty vague for anonymity's sake.) Good luck! 

-Auto Surf

A:

Dear Harold, 

I went to China last summer through BYU. I did a few months of student teaching and then a couple of weeks of English teaching at a summer camp. The money I earned while teaching summer camp basically paid for my airfare, so not all of the program cost but a good chunk of it. 

It's hard to write about about my experiences in China because I have a lot of conflicting feelings about it. I loved that I was able to live in another country. I hated our apartment. I loved being able to experience another culture. I felt significantly under prepared pretty much the entire time. I appreciated that the university scheduled certain trips and planned some group outings. I wish we would have been allowed to venture out on our own more. Some of my negative experiences I could definitely fault to the McKay School and others to the Kennedy Center. I could blame some on myself and others to the nature of China. I definitely learned a lot about myself and I was more appreciative of our culture and lifestyle. Overall, it was a good experience for me to grow as a person, but not necessarily as a teacher. 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Corrections
Question #83039 posted on 07/06/2015 1:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is it possible to be in Utah and not be able to see a mountain? assuming you are out doors, and don't have buildings or foilege blocking your view, nor are in a deep hole

mountain max

A:

Dear Mountain Max,

I present to you, Green River Utah. I'm not overly fond of it; I think it's kind of an ugly town. They are famous for their watermelons, though. While there are large mounds off in the distance, I don't think they technically qualify as mountains. 

There's actually lots of places in Southern Utah that don't have any visible mountains, especially as you approach the borders of Colorado and Arizona. Not the most impressive scenery, let me tell you. 

-Frère Rubik


0 Corrections
Question #82982 posted on 07/06/2015 12:28 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is hippopotamus milk pink?

-Blind baby hippo

A:

Dear reader,

The googles are rather divided on this matter. This page claims that hippo milk is in fact pink, not by virtue of the milk itself but rather because of a reddish skin secretion that is the hippo equivalent of sweat. (You can read more about that here.) However, that page doesn't actually list any sources. These two, on the other hand, do—and they come to the opposite conclusion. Hippo milk itself is definitely white or beige, and it seems fairly certain that the skin secretion would not typically mix with the milk.

I think it's safe to say that the answer is probably no.

-yayfulness


0 Corrections
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

There's an old (probably from the 90's) airline commerical that I'm looking for. I believe it was either Delta or Southwest or possible American Airlines. The song it used was Clair de lune by Debussy. It was animated and there wasn't any dialogue. A father left his family on a business trip and then returned. I've looked for it a lot over the years but maybe I have looked in the wrong places or haven't unleashed the full power of the World Wide Web. I also believe it was sketch style animation. If you can find it, you have some special skills! And I would thank you immensely.


-commercial hunter

A:

Dear reader,

Due to the excellent searching skills of my wife, I have three candidates for you. The song is "Rhapsody in Blue" and the airline is United, and none of the stories are exact matches, but the style fits more or less perfectly. Hopefully one of these is the video you are looking for!

Video one.

Video two.

Video three.

-yayfulness


0 Corrections
Question #83029 posted on 07/06/2015 12:19 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are some hymns that show off good vocal range for a second soprano? I'm auditioning for a choir (Not BYU) and they are having me sing a hymn unaccompanied. I'm having a hard time picking one! What do you think would be a good hymn to sing for an audition?


Thanks in advance

A:

Dear Rose,

  • "On This Day of Joy and Gladness" - as long as it's up to tempo
  • "Joseph Smith's First Prayer"
  • "Let Zion in Her Beauty Rise"
  • "Come, Ye Children of the Lord"
  • "All Creatures of Our God and King"
  • "Praise to the Lord, the Almighty"
Those should be good to get you started!

-Tally M.


0 Corrections
Question #83032 posted on 07/06/2015 11:52 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Really excited about the new Provo temple. How can I help with the open house?

-City Center

A:

Dear you,

Your best bet would be to ask your bishop, who will have specific information about what your ward has been asked to do. When a temple got built in my hometown, all of the information came through the stake and ward leadership.

-Zedability


0 Corrections
Posted on 07/06/2015 11:38 a.m. New Correction on: #82995 In a couple of months there's a community event for my job where I'll be required ...
Question #83030 posted on 07/06/2015 11:04 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Are you excited for Windows 10 to come out? Do you think it will be successful?

-Spectre

A:

Dear Spectre,

Windows seems to follow a pattern of a good OS, then a terrible one, and then another good one. Windows 7 was good, Windows 8 was terrible, so Windows 10 should be good. I'm excited for it because I really dislike Windows 8 and I'm hoping for my Macbook to cling to life long enough for Windows 10 to be the default when I get around to buying a PC.

But yeah, I think it will be fairly successful. Most people using Windows 8 will be willing to try it since it's almost impossible to have anything worse, and I think a good portion of Windows 7 users will be interested in it just because their system would be a bit old at this point.

-Zedability


0 Corrections
Question #83013 posted on 07/06/2015 9:51 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Can you give me a 5 word summary of your favorite song? (ex. Shake it Off by Taylor Swift could be "People suck, I don't care")

-Spectre

A:

Dear reader,

A couple examples from two of my favorite bands:

"The revolution becomes the establishment." ("Won't Get Fooled Again," The Who)

"You're not unfaithful, I'm lost." ("Fool in the Rain," Led Zeppelin)

-yayfulness

A:

Dear you,

This really great flute bit.

-Zedability

A:

Dear Spectree,

"I need this dismal town."

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear Specs,

Right now I really like "Why Do We Build a Wall?" by Anais Mitchell. It basically sounds like she is singing "boundary activation" with every word. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  

A:

Dear Tre,

"With his stripes, we're healed" summarizes "This is He" from Rob Gardner's Lamb of God. I feel like that whole album could be summed up with something like, "He loves us, trust him." Now excuse me as I continue to binge listen to all 25 tracks.  

-Auto Surf


0 Corrections
Question #83024 posted on 07/06/2015 9:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What's the express nutshell version of how Greece ended up in such financial shambles? Was it spending money it didn't have for the 2004 Olympics that was the major catalyst or something(s) else?

-tl;dr

A:

Dear tl;dr,

Greece spent lots of money it didn't have. That includes the Olympics, but also other things, like excessively large pensions for retirees. Every country that spends money it doesn't have has to get other people to buy bonds. "Bonds" are like a loan - you offer the Greek government money and they promise to pay you back more money later on.

Basically, everyone on the same day realized that there was no earthly way Greece could pay them all back, so suddenly everyone tried to cash out their Greek bonds at one time. Since the whole point of bonds is to spend money you don't have, the Greek government couldn't fulfill all the requests it got. Have you ever heard of a bank run? This is basically the same thing.

The European Union bailed Greece out, motivated partly by self-interest. It would hurt the rest of the Eurozone if Greece collapsed, because they all share the same currency. Greece applied for a loan from the International Monetary Fund, and the rest of the Eurozone backed its application. They helped Greece make debt payments with the understanding that they would eventually get their money back. As part of the agreement, the Eurozone required Greece to make some changes to its government in order to stay financially viable. These are called "austerity measures." A lot of economists think that some of the austerity measures went to far, but no one agrees on what the "right amount" would have been.

Anyway, all this happened several years ago. More recently, Greece got tired of these austerity measures (no one particularly loves high taxes and low government spending), so several months ago the Greek people elected a party that promised to try to renegotiate its debt deal with the rest of Europe. It went very badly. The rest of Europe refused to back down from their position. This is dangerous because Europe's economic situation is still tied to Greece's economy since they all share the same currency.

Several days ago, the Greek government failed to make a payment to the International Monetary Fund, placing it in default. It can't print new money because it now shares its currency with Europe, and the creation of new Euros is controlled by the European Central Bank. In order to protect its financial system, Greece has now begun using a tool called "capital controls." Capital controls prevent people from withdrawing too much from their bank account at one time. This is a very, very bad situation for Greece. Unless it manages to renegotiate its debt deal, it's on the verge of financial ruin.

As an interesting side note, the United States' debt operates in basically the same way that Greece's does. You can go buy a U.S. government bond right now and own part of the national debt. The only reason we aren't in Greece's situation is that people still think we'll eventually pay them back. If too many people at one time happened to decide they wanted to cash out their U.S. government bonds, the entire world financial system could be left in ruin and the U.S. government would not be able to function.

Sleep tight.

- Haleakalā

Yes I know that last bit was an oversimplification. Do not submit corrections telling me this. It was a joke.


0 Corrections
Question #83022 posted on 07/06/2015 9:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So, we all know the counsel for women to only have one set of ear piercings, and preferably only in the lobes.

Would you consider wearing a non-pierce-related ear cuff (like this: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/cf/5b/72/cf5b728c988130fd284f61506276d766.jpg) to be a violation of this counsel?

What is the basis for the one-piercing-only rule, anyway?

-pinterest lurker

A:

Dear Rose,

I see it as a test of obedience and following the prophet. Yes, it's small. Yes, it's simple. But following that counsel can mean a lot.

And no, I don't think it would be. It's temporary, rather than permanent.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Pinterested,

In short, I agree with Tally. In long, I didn't think it was too serious until I looked into it and found this talk from Elder Christofferson. It's a fantastic talk as a whole, but I'll just include the part that talks about piercings. 

"I now turn to another example of our theme—the sacred nature of our physical bodies. As God and Christ are deserving of our reverence, so Their works are deserving of our respect and reverence. That of course includes the marvelous creation that is this earth. And yet as wonderful as this earth is, it is not the greatest of God’s creations. Greater still is this marvelous physical body. It is in the very likeness of the person of God. It is essential to our earthly experience and key to our everlasting glory.

Some have mistakenly supposed that, with respect to their body, they answer to no one. We are specifically told, however, that we remain accountable to God.

Know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost which is in you, which ye have of God, and ye are not your own?

For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God’s. [1 Corinthians 6:19–20]

'If any man defile the temple of God, him shall God destroy; for the temple of God is holy, which temple ye are' (1 Corinthians 3:17). 'I beseech you therefore . . . , by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service' (Romans 12:1).

How are we to preserve the sanctity of this most important and sacred of God’s creations? At a minimum, we would not in any way defile our bodies. To be specific, if we possess a sense of the sacred, we would not deface our body as with tattoos and piercings. Some wonder at the fact that the President of the Church has taken notice of this matter. They are puzzled at the directness and specificity of his counsel on this subject. He has stated:

'A tattoo is graffiti on the temple of the body.

Likewise the piercing of the body for multiple rings in the ears, in the nose, even in the tongue. Can they possibly think that is beautiful? It is a passing fancy, but its effects can be permanent. . . . The First Presidency and the Quorum of the Twelve have declared that we discourage tattoos and also “the piercing of the body for other than medical purposes.” We do not, however, take any position "on the minimal piercing of the ears by women for one pair of earrings"—one pair.'

Why would the prophet of God talk about things so seemingly insignificant? Because they are not insignificant. Defiling or defacing God’s creation, His temple, makes a mock of that which is sacred. This can be perceived as insignificant only to one who has lost a sense of the sacred. Don’t do it."

So, dang. I was surprised and a little blown away the seriousness of this topic. I feel the need to make sure I'm not making light of other prophetic declarations. 

As for as the cuff you asked about, I don't think it's bad. Other people may have different interpretations based on the quote above. Pray about it and see what feels right for you according to the given counsel. 

-Auto Surf


0 Corrections
Question #83021 posted on 07/06/2015 9:25 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have just accepted my first teaching job! I'm so excited! I'll be teaching 3rd grade. What was your favorite thing about 3rd grade? Is there a particular experience, lesson, etc that stands out? Did you have a favorite book? Is there anything that would have made 3rd Grade better?

-Ms. Caracatus

A:

Dear Caracas,

I can't remember a lot about third grade other than the time I cut out letters from the newspaper to make anonymous love notes for a boy in my class...

My roommate, on the other hand, has a lot of repressed emotions about third grade. I asked her what her favorite part was and she said, "The best part was that the gang in my class didn't beat me up like all the rest of the uncool kids because the gang leader had a secret crush on me and would protect me. That was definitely the highlight."

She then proceeded to tell me what could have made third grade better, which included not being the teacher's pet because it made her uncool; not having a gang in her class; not having the teacher get mad at her and her friend when they had pencil sword fights under their desks; and not ignoring the uncool boy who liked her. 

A lot of this was said in humor, but it reminded me how important it is to create a safe environment in the classroom. As a teacher, you get the chance to create that special atmosphere with the help of your students. I think it'd be awesome if you planned every activity or lesson with the goal of uniting the class and helping the students understand their own worth. Both of my sisters taught elementary school so I know that it's easier said than done, but it's important nonetheless.  I also realize that you've had far more education on the subject than I have, so I won't advise you too much more. 

I can't remember a lot of specific lessons or activities that made any elementary school class fantastic, but I remember the feeling of each class. The best ones were with teachers who really believed in their students, and showed that belief in all that they taught. The excitement in your question makes it seem like you can be that kind of teacher, too. Congratulations on your new job, and good luck!

-Auto Surf

A:

Dear Ms. Caracatus, 

I have a love/hate relationship with teaching third grade. They were by far the hardest grade to sub for because they're old enough to do a lot of things and therefore think they can take on anything. They're still young enough to want to do the right thing and what the teacher may ask, but you can get attitude from some kids. But the best thing by far about 3rd grade is that you get to actually teach! K-2 students are still learning how to "do school." Want to teach about volcanoes? YOU CAN DO THAT IN 3RD GRADE. Want to learn about the Declaration of Independence? YOU CAN DO THAT IN 3RD GRADE. Want to go on a field trip to the Levell Edwards Stadium to calculate how far a collegiate football player can throw a ball? YOU CAN (probably) DO THAT IN 3RD GRADE!

Thinking back to my personal experiences, I loved that we had a pet frog. I'm sure it was a pain for the teacher but I thought it was awesome! We also played a game every Friday using Brain Quest. My teacher was energetic all the time which kept everyone in class engaged. We sat in groups of 6 or 7 and I remember wishing they were smaller because I never got along with all of the kids at my group. I can also clearly remember her reading The Best Christmas Pageant Ever aloud and thinking it was the funniest book I've ever heard. 

Best of luck! Send me an email if you ever want to chat education! 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Corrections
Question #83035 posted on 07/06/2015 8:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

If you're a girl who doesn't flirt how are you supposed to get dates?

-The Mango

A:

Dear Mango,

From my experience, you don't.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 

A:

Dear Mango,

Start flirting!

Also remember that flirting doesn't have to mean batting your eyelashes, laughing at everything boys say, or acting like a ditz to get attention.

You can flirt and still be yourself. After all, there is more than just one way to be flirtatious. If you think physical touch is awkward, show a guy you are interested by complimenting him or by inviting him to go do something. If you are afraid to invite him out, start by asking sincere questions to better get to know him and be a good listener when he responds.

If it helps, think of flirting as just... being extra nice.

Good luck!

-Vienna, a girl who knows exactly what you are going through

A:

Dear Mango,

Go to a party. Awkwardly hover behind your roommate as she socializes. Make eye contact across the room with someone you met briefly. Don't smile or make any attempt to acknowledge him. Make him approach you and start up the conversation. Admit you've forgotten his name. Discover you like the same music. Somehow end up in a deep, 5-hour conversation. Add him on Facebook. Awkwardly avoid him when you seem him on campus. Run into him in line. Get walked home. Get asked on a date because he's having relationship trouble with the other girl he's interested in. Enjoy the date. Repeat the last several steps. After several months, he will ask for your phone number. Make sure to wait a good couple of months before you text him. Start texting regularly. Hang out five days in a row. Go on an awkward dollar theater date where you feel super friendzoned. Have an 8-hour conversation after a devotional. Agree to start dating. Get married three years later.

-Zedability doesn't know how she managed to get married
(But is proof that you can be really bad at flirting and still end up on a date)


0 Corrections
Question #83033 posted on 07/06/2015 8:32 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are some silly competitions you compete/used to compete in? (My old roommate said he always tries to pee longer than the guy at the urinal next to him. We even slow-clapped for a different roommate who had a particularly long urination at home, which made roommate #2 feel sufficiently uncomfortable.)

-World Champion of Landing Half-Full Water Bottles on their Caps

A:

Dear reader,

When I was in high school, my friends came up with a set of events we called the "Nerd Olympics." I don't remember much about it except that there were competitions in pencil flinging and endurance water fountain drinking. I wasn't the best at flinging pencils, but I did capture the water fountain drinking record at just a few seconds past ten minutes.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Champion,

Let me start off by saying that I had the coolest 4th grade teacher of all time: Mr. Sonovich.

He made up all sorts of cool games and competitions. I actually remember learning about the Revolutionary War because he made it so fun! He assigned us all revolutionary characters and split us into the Loyalists and the Patriots. Every day we had to write in our journal as if we were our assigned character.

Then he made it even more exciting by putting a Survivor spin on it. We had immunity challenges and everything. My friend, Kevin, ended up winning the whole competition and he got to invite 6 friends to a pizza party to celebrate. Given the fact that I thought I was in love with Kevin, that pizza party (and the fact that he had invited me) was pretty much the highlight of the 4th grade.

Probably the weirdest competition that Mr. Sonovich invented was the "Stuff 'n' Fluff Pagaent."

It was pretty much a beauty pageant for stuffed animals. There was a runway portion where we had to walk our stuffed animal down the catwalk. There was a talent portion where we had to make our stuffed animal do something impressive. What any of this had to do with the 4th grade teaching curriculum, I have no idea, but it was pretty fun. The winner was a giant stuffed bear that could rap. Which you gotta admit is pretty impressive.

Guys, these memories are making me think that being a 4th grade teacher could be pretty fun.

-Vienna


0 Corrections
Question #83020 posted on 07/06/2015 8:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am a very pale Caucasian woman. I was walking down the street and a Latino man started shouting at me, "Hey! The sun is out! Why don't you get some?" And then he started slapping his arm, indicating his very dark tan.

Would you consider this racism? Why or why not?

-Whatever

A:

Dear Whatever,

I wouldn't consider that racism.

I have pretty pale skin myself and have received a decent number of such comments over the years.

In fact, just yesterday I was sitting outside with my family when my uncle turned to me and said, "Hey, you're really pale. Oh wait, you've always been pale, huh?"

Um...Yep. Thanks, uncle, for bringing that to my attention. I haven't been self-conscious about it since 8th grade, but I'm glad you're trying to bring that back.

In all seriousness, embrace your fair skin! Fair skin is classic. And beautiful.

People may continue to make comments about how pale you are, but in my experience I have found such comments to be pretty harmless.

I wouldn't consider the example you gave to be racism because it seems he was poking fun more at how pale your skin is, rather than at the fact that you are Caucasian. It may not be the nicest thing anyone has ever said to you, but I doubt it was said with the intent to hurt your feelings.

Sometimes we assume there is malice behind the things people say or do when, in reality, it's just a momentary lack of filter. People are people, yo.

-Vienna


0 Corrections
Question #83025 posted on 07/06/2015 7:08 a.m.
Q:

Dear 300 Hour Board,

A lot of my questions seem to take more than 100 hours to answer. If it takes a long time to answer a question, is it because they require more research than the average answer, or because nobody wants to do it and you spend a week arguing who has to answer it?

-Deep thinker

A:

Dear Deep Thinker,

To answer your question, yes! Both of the things you mentioned contribute to questions being answered over hours.

But there is a third reason why so many answers come in late, and I feel like it's about time I admit it.

To the general readership:

I confess. I am one of the worst when it comes to getting questions completed in time.

I honestly start to feel kind of guilty about it when I remember that there are actual people out there checking to see if we have answered their question yet. So, to everybody who has ever received a late answer from me, I am sorry!

If you want the honest reason as to why my answers often come in late, well, it's a simple matter of priorities. There are just a lot of things that come before the Board on my list of priorities—things like family, temple attendance, work, school, exercise, my social life, doing my calling, etc. Us writers are really busy! And sometimes, when I'm not busy, I'm just so exhausted from being busy that I decide I would rather paint my nails or strum my guitar than put intellectual effort into answering a Board question.

The point is, there are various reasons why Board questions get answered over hours. Sometimes they are good reasons and sometimes they are bad reasons. We are all just people.

Except for Tally M. and Zedability. I'm pretty sure they are superhuman. I hope you readers all know that it is because of consistent, responsible writers like them that the Board is still functioning. If all the writers were like me, half the questions would never get answered and we would probably cease to exist.

So, dear readers, if you ask a question that gets posted a day late and Tally, Zed, and I were the ones that answered it, I give you full permission to blame me because I was almost definitely the reason it was late. Sorry!

Love,

Vienna

P.S. Yes, I finished this question late. It's currently 108 hours old.

A:

Dear thinker, 

Unfortunately, I keep quite a few questions over. Like right now, I have two that are way over 100: one that I actually finished within hours but have yet to get around to typing up and another that is so ridiculously easy to answer it's a little embarrassing that it's over. 

Finding a balance between life and writing for the Board can be hard. For example, I've spent the last two weeks trying to find a new apartment that is closer to the school I will be teaching at this fall. I have literally spent more time in a car just commuting between Provo and West Jordan than I have spent on the Internet TOTAL. It's crazy! And while I know that it would take me 30 minutes max to type up an amazing answer with pictures and puns and opinions and what have you, sometimes all I really want to do after a long day is read or relax by the pool. I don't want to look up how many calories are in an ear of corn or which breed of dog is the best for underwater basket weaving. Now don't get me wrong- most days the majority of us would be happy to definitively rank countries by cheese exports or lineup all of the dinosaurs in an epic battle to the death, but we're people too and sometimes we just need a breather. 

So, yes, sometimes research questions take longer and yes, we do have questions that nobody immediately wants to answer so they sit in the inbox until they're at 90 hours or more, but we all do love the Board and try our best to answer your questions in a timely manner.

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Corrections
Question #83038 posted on 07/06/2015 4:50 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is this tumblr post about vaccines true?

http://carlboygenius.tumblr.com/post/117176412426

Thanks,
might as well double check

A:

Dear reader,

Short answer: Yes.

Slightly longer answer: You'll notice at the bottom of the page that there is a "source" link, which takes you to this page. (If you didn't notice it, don't feel bad. I didn't notice it either until after several minutes of googling... which had already led me to the same result.) Pears are included in the list of foods containing naturally occurring formaldehyde, clocking in at between 38.7 and 60 milligrams per kilogram of pears. The picture assumes that the higher value is most accurate, but even taking the lowest possible value, that's still around 80,000 micrograms of formaldehyde in a 200 gram pear.

For more information on formaldehyde in living things, click here. For instance, did you know that the human body naturally produces formaldehyde? Now you do!

-yayfulness


0 Corrections
Sunday, July 5, 2015
Question #83036 posted on 07/05/2015 11:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Does the BYU Air Force ROTC detachment allow law students to join if they want to become a Judge Advocate for the AF?

http://www.airforce.com/jag/entry_programs/students/graduate_law_program#how_to_apply

This program says that if your school is willing to enroll you as a cadet while you attend law school, you can graduate and commission directly as a judge advocate general for the Air Force. Does Detachment 855 allow graduate student cadets?

-Future JAG

A:

Dear reader,

According to my contact in the AFROTC wing staff, it sounds like the answer is yes:

Yes, Detachment 855 does allow graduate student cadets. There is currently a student enrolled as a cadet who is attending law school. You can contact Colonel Kucharek for more information:

Colonel Paul M. Kucharek
Professor of Aerospace Studies
Detachment 855
Brigham Young University
380 Wells ROTC Building
Provo, UT 84602
(801)422-2671
paul.kucharek@byu.edu
paul.kucharek@us.af.mil

Best of luck!

-yayfulness


0 Corrections
Question #83034 posted on 07/05/2015 10:14 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I expected that I would be living in my current place of resident for at least 2-3 years, and I needed to order some new checks. In doing so, I now have two boxes of checks with my current address. However, I unexpectedly will be moving before I even make it through the last box of my old checks (that had my parent's address on them).

How bad is it to keep using my new checks even though my address has changed? Should I just order new checks? I don't really know how long I'll be at this new place, but I suppose I could put my parent's address back on them.

-My Name Here

A:

Dear TARDIS,

I've been doing that for two years, since mine still has my Heritage Halls address. I just cross it out when I remember. Sometimes I write my current address if it's really important, like when I was applying for a passport. I only ever use checks for tithing though.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear reader,

I've been doing the same thing as Tally, except with checks with my Helaman Halls address where I haven't lived since 2009. I've never had a problem, but then again, I literally only used them to pay rent.

-yayfulness


0 Corrections
Question #83028 posted on 07/05/2015 3:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is the easiest/best class to take to fulfill the Civilization 1 GE?

- Someone who really doesn't like homework

A:

Dear Homeworkphobe, 

ENGL 201: Masterpieces of World Literature (I took it from Dana Bunn, but I've heard good things about the other professors who teach it, too). Let me warn you right off the bat that this is probably not going to be very light on homework. In my class, besides reading, we had a weekly one-page response to write, as well as two research papers and a group presentation spread throughout the semester. But don't let that faze you by any means; I still think ENGL 201 was one of the best classes (if not the best class) I've ever taken at BYU. The literature was interesting, the class discussions were engaging, and I walked away with broadened horizons and a greater understanding of different cultures (not as great as what you could possibly get from a study abroad, but still significant).

Seriously, take the class. It might be hard, but it's one of those hard things that is totally worth it in the end.

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear Wade,

I'm taking Western Humanities right now. In my class we have two short paper assignments and like, maybe 6 or 7 reading quizzes. Just throwing that out there.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear sorry,

I don't know if this is the same course Frère Rubik is advocating, but ENGL 201: Masterpieces of World Lit (with John Talbot) may have changed my life. You will read more than you ever thought possible and be more enlightened than you ever thought possible. It's worth the homework.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book


0 Corrections
Posted on 07/05/2015 3:36 p.m. New Correction on: #83017 Board Question #82906 (about people being sealed to multiple people) got me wondering about a proxy ...
Posted on 07/05/2015 3:35 p.m. New Correction on: #82935 Japanese student and incoming freshman here. What are some resources BYU offers to language students? For ...
Question #83027 posted on 07/05/2015 3:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've just recently learned how to express interest in guys and get asked out on dates. While I've had much more success than previously anticipated, I'm still having some trouble gauging the right level of interest to show for various guys and situations. What are the social cues I should be looking for to try to hit the sweet spot between expressing too little interest and coming on too strong? Any other helpful advice you could give me for putting my new skills into practice?

-flirting novice

A:

Dear Martha,

The point system is sometimes good, but the basic idea is to pursue them at the same level or slightly more than they're pursuing you. Is he asking you to do things? Is he responding to texts? When you bring up something you'd want to do, does he say, "Hey, we should do that some time"? 

It's also important to remember two things. First, you may be more subtle than you're intending, which means he might not pick it up. And second, he may actually be picking it up but not responding because he doesn't want to make things awkward (which in my experience just ends up making things more awkward).

In the end, it's okay if you end up coming on too strong or expressing too little interest once in awhile. You're not always going to be able to figure out the perfect amount of interest to show, and it's always going to be different with every guy. When that happens, cut your losses and move on; it's never worth pining over someone it didn't work out with.

-Tally M.


0 Corrections
Question #83026 posted on 07/05/2015 3:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Who manufactured the PCBs for the very first batch of Apple Is when they were literally in the Jobs family garage before Mike Markkula or any other investor with real money had come along?

-Jeff

A:

Dear Jeff,

I think it was just Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak themselves. I found an old copy of Byte online that has an interview with Wozniak about the beginning of Apple. Talking about an Atari project they worked on before making the Apple I, Wozniak said "I was the designer—the engineer—and Steve was a breadboarder and test technician." So, Wozniak designed the boards and Jobs actually put them together. When it came to the Apple I, I believe something similar must have been the case; Wozniak doesn't mention anyone else being involved in the process. They funded the venture by selling Jobs' van and Wozniak's calculator, and by borrowing some money from a friend. 

Wozniak doesn't just come out and say "we built the computers ourselves;" the closest thing I can find to a statement like that is him saying "We had everything set up to build the computers and deliver them in 10 days, and it worked out great..." So, I'm pretty sure that was the case.

-Frère Rubik


0 Corrections