If you think someone is an idiot, it is far more likely that you have just not understood them than that they actually are an idiot. - Misaneroth's philosophy professor

While we appreciate factual corrections, consider posting on the Board Comment Board, brought to the readers by popular request.

Wednesday, September 28, 2016
Question #88086 posted on 09/28/2016 10:48 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

There's a great meme going around social media right now... Describe yourself in 3 fictional characters. What are your three?

-G.H.J.

A:

Dear Grant,

See Board Question #88068.

-Adelaide

A:

Dear you,

Every time I try to figure this out, I can't tell if I have a crush on the character, if I see myself in the character, or if I just like to daydream about being like that character despite being extremely different.

-Zedability


0 Corrections
Posted on 09/28/2016 10:38 p.m. New Correction on: #88026 I'm thinking of becoming an RA or Hall Advisor (Heritage Halls) in the near future, and ...
Posted on 09/28/2016 10:37 p.m. New Correction on: #88043 In December last year, just before Christmas break, I filled out intake papers for the counseling ...
Question #88096 posted on 09/28/2016 9 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How do you fight back when someone is tickling you who isn't ticklish? My boyfriend likes to tickle me and I don't mind it that much but I want to be able to do something back to him. I asked him what his weaknesses were and he didn't want to tell me for some reason...

-Ticklish girl

A:

Dear Tickled Pink,

Blow a raspberry on him. It will be hilarious (at least that's what my boyfriend and I think. We have an ongoing raspberry war). And even people who aren't usually ticklish tend to laugh at raspberries, so it's a fairly equal reciprocation.

-Alta

A:

Dear Female Target,

You are at war. The correct way to win this battle is to attack.

Think of his weaknesses. You said he won't say what they are, but that means you can infer that he is aware of some weaknesses. Think about places that are ticklish in you and other people you know. Some sensitive spots that are prime targets for tickling are:

1. upper hips
2. side of ribs near armpit
3. crook of the knee
4. crook of the elbow
5. bottoms of feet
6. base of the neck (around the clavicle)

Of course, wikiHow has an article on how to win a tickle fight. When the article refers to the "victim" that will be your boyfriend. I particularly like the article's "Four-way Tickle" and the deadly "Triple Tickle."

If you still struggle with finding your boyfriends ticklish spots you can quickly win the battle by striking his pressure points. Here is a picture of 3 basic spots on the arm where you can apply firm, direct pressure to quickly disengage in the tickling:

armpoints.jpg (source)

LI 11 refers to the crook of the elbow. LI 10 is just toward the inside of the muscle in your forearm. LI 4 is the inner part of the webbing between the index finger and the thumb, right above the place where your finger bones meet. If you are confused about the position of these points, try them on yourself first. Significant pressure may be needed at first to locate the precise position of the points. LI 11 and LI 10 would be most effective in a tickle fight especially if his hands are tickling you because LI 4 would be out of reach.

Apply the direct pressure with the tip of your thumb. If you have long finger nails and do not want to cut your boyfriend then you could use your knuckle. I would suggest the index finger or middle finger knuckles as shown here:

IndexFingerKnuckle.png(source)

Mid-KnucklePunch.gif(source)

These same strikes can be used on the upper ribs or sternum for the same effect.

Now for some defensive tactics. None of these attacks will be effective if he is in control. Don't let him pin your arms. If he grabs your wrists you can quickly escape using the techniques demonstrated in this video. I would just add that these techniques can be used while standing, sitting, or laying down. Note how the instructor in the video said to turn your hand so the small part is toward the opening in his grip. When you pull your wrist out, don't pull toward yourself but rather pull in the direction of the opening. Once your hand is free, act quickly to tickle one of the previously specified points.

It may take some time before these tactics become second nature so practice them often. Relish every victory you achieve. Recognize when the tables turn and you gain control of the situation. Practice often and soon you will be having giving your boyfriend a run for his money the next time he wants to start a tickle fight.

You may call this way of tickling excessive, I call it being tactically superior.

-Spectre


0 Corrections
Question #88094 posted on 09/28/2016 6:07 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Does the Nordic cultural attitude colloquially known as the "law" of Jante tend to stifle individuals' desire for self improvement?

-Sven

A:

Dear Sven,

I'm not a native Scandinavian or anything, but I did live in Sweden for two years. It's hard to talk about a culture since it's made up of very different individuals, but I'll share some of what I've observed in general.

Jante's law is the idea that an individual shouldn't stand out from the collective. Not everyone lives it the same way (or even follows it at all), but it's a fairly common part of Scandinavian culture.

Scandinavians are huge believers in equality. Americans are too, but in a different way. The American dream is that "all men are created equal." This implies that we can all progress through our efforts, and that anyone has the opportunity to eventually gain wealth and power and live like royalty. The Scandinavian view of equality is very different. They would prefer that no man was above another. Sweden, for example, has the most equal distribution of wealth in the world. Also, the Swedish language almost completely lost its use of the formal "you" during a very short period in the late 60's, as well as eliminating the use of most titles. That says a lot about their culture. From what I've seen, they don't like hierarchy, and would rather see everyone on equal  grounds.

I really admire the Swedish equality and the respect for others that comes with it. It's also one of the hardest things to get used to culturally. But to answer your question, no, I don't think it stifles a desire for self-improvement. You do see a lot fewer people seeking after wealth, power or status. But self-improvement goes deeper than that. I've seen many Scandinavians strive hard to build strong families and deepen lasting friendships. They eat healthy and exercise like nobody's business. They support each other and are extremely generous to refugees. These things are very important to them, and they work very hard for them.

-Kirito


0 Corrections
Question #88089 posted on 09/28/2016 5:54 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are some free things to do in Fall with a 2 year old in the Provo area? Like, Cornbelly's... would be fun but it costs money.

-below poverty

A:

Dear Beatrice,

Here are some ideas. Going to parks/on hikes are great, and the Provo library offers a lot of children's programs. Also, the farmer's markets are really fun to just go and look around even if you don't buy anything. 

Good luck!

-Adelaide


0 Corrections
Question #87794 posted on 09/28/2016 5:54 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How do I overcome the idea that I've always had that God and I are completely at odds all the time? For a variety of reasons, I have a tendency to just automatically assume that if it's something I really want, it's not right for me, no matter what it is - simply because I want it. It's not based in actual revelation. I just have this idea (inherited from a parent who thinks the same way) that God looks to make us miserable and that only in our misery can we ever be strong enough to be happy. Ish. Something like that. Or that He will always tell us no when we strongly desire something - even a good something like a certain job or to live in a certain place or another life goal or hope.

I realize that the best thing to do is to go to the Lord and work to find out what He would have you do because His plan ideally will make you the happiest. And I understand that the answer isn't always going to be what you think it will be or want it to be, but that's slightly different from what I mean. I proceed on the assumption that the answer is always no, just because it builds character or something like that. Does that make sense? I hate it, because it makes it really hard for me to trust God or feel like He's a truly loving parent. It makes me lack confidence in myself and makes all big decisions really hard because I just assume I will always make the wrong decision.

Help?

-girl

A:

Dear you,

I do this all the time. I guess I always heard so many lessons about how it's important to accept the Lord's will even when it's different from our own that I started to subconsciously assume that the Lord's will always would be different from mine. Especially because LDS culture tends to be fond of stories like "I didn't understand why the Lord would send me Trial X/deny me Seemingly Good Thing Y, but as I came to trust him, I got Blessing Z and it was totally worth it." Add this to the doctrine that we're here to be tested and tried, and I've developed a pretty strong logical fallacy that if I really want something, the Lord is going to take it away just to prove a point or something.

For myself, just recognizing the logical fallacy has been really helpful, because it makes me realize that I should reframe the issue. It helps that Mr. Z is good at pointing out to me when I'm making this mistake. If I were you, I'd find someone close to you that you trust, like a family member or good friend, and talk to them a bit about this.

I'd also recommend making a prayerful study of 3 Nephi 14:7-11 and 2 Nephi 2:25. Gaining your own testimony and personal revelation of how God does want to bless us and make us happy as much as possible can help you to place more confidence in this doctrine.

Finally, the Mormon Message "Shower of Heavenly Blessings" and the talk it's based on, Living the Gospel Joyful, testifies to the fact that Heavenly Father wants to say "yes" and bless us with good things as much as possible.

Remember that when Heavenly Father does say no to a good thing, it's only because He has something better for us, never because He simply wants to deny us a good thing to make things needlessly difficult. While "sacrifice brings forth the blessings of heaven," Heavenly Father intends to support us as much as possible in our trials; He doesn't require sacrifices and trials in order to make us miserable. Sadness is a part of the opposition inherent to mortal life, but there isn't anything inherently good or holy about misery.

-Zedability

A:

Dear you,

I recently came across this verse in Doctrine and Covenants 133:53 which in part states, "In all their afflictions he was afflicted." When I read that I also had a paradigm shift. I sometimes have feelings that when my life isn't going according to plan that somehow God enjoys watching me figure it out, but when I read verses of scripture like the one mentioned above, I realize that God finds afflictions in our afflictions. I do, however, think that God finds EXTREME happiness and joy when we overcome our trials/afflictions and when we learn to align our will with him (which doesn't always mean giving up what we think is good).

I hope that helps!

-Sunday Night Banter


0 Corrections
Question #88075 posted on 09/28/2016 5:13 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've been at BYU for awhile and have always had a question about the clubs at BYU. I am openly bisexual and for a long time that was really hard to reconcile with the Church. I think the members and policies of the Church have come a long way, but their is still not a GSA (or something similar) club on campus. I realize their is USGA at BYU group that meets at the Provo Library (I've been a few times), but that doesn't seem very "Church-sanctioned." I have a strong support group of friends and family who help me when I'm down, but I think that a lot if not the majority of students who fall in the LGBTQ scale feel isolated. I just wonder why there isn't a public support group for those students at BYU. Is there a reason? And if there isn't, what's the best way to get that started?

-Looking

A:

Dear you,

As far as I'm aware, USGA tried to get official BYU approval, but BYU was uncomfortable with the idea. Since I wasn't very closely involved, I'm not sure exactly why that was or if another form of GSA would be approved. Your best bet to try to get something like that started would probably be to talk to someone at BYUSA. You could also contact the USGA presidency to see if they have any suggestions - you said you've been a few times, or if you don't want to go in person again, you could message them through their Facebook or Twitter pages.

I've also noticed that a few professors in the JFSB have signs outside their office for I'll Walk With You. This is mainly an online initiative, but on their "About" page, they offer to put you in contact with a Mormon parent of an LGBT child if you need somebody to talk to. Although this doesn't provide an in-person support group at BYU, helping to raise awareness of this group could help other LGBT students to feel less isolated.

-Zedability


0 Corrections
Question #88057 posted on 09/28/2016 5:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 101 things on top of buildings,

What are they building on the roof of the west side of Talmage Building? It involves some sort of corrugated metal stuff it looks like.

-A Concerned Citizen, and Not On My Rooftop Garden Petitioner

A:

Dear Candice,

It doesn't look like any of us have any ideas. I tried calling the BYU Physical Facilities department, but it was after hours and I'm not totally sure what you're talking about. Their number is (801) 422-5504 if you'd like to call and find out for yourself.

Sorry I couldn't be of more help!

-Adelaide


0 Corrections
Question #88043 posted on 09/28/2016 5:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

In December last year, just before Christmas break, I filled out intake papers for the counseling center. While I probably would have benefited from going to counseling at the time, I ultimately didn't follow up and never made an appointment. Now I'm considering counseling again, this time for different reasons (the original reasons I'd considered counseling may well come up, if I go, but they're not my primary concern anymore). Do I need to fill out intake papers again? Should I just go to the counseling center and explain my situation? I'm probably overthinking this, as I am wont to do, but something needs to be done and I'm kind of tired of waffling.

- a christian

A:

Dear you,

It doesn't look like any of us know for sure, but I think the simplest option is to go to the counseling center and explain your situation. (Or you could call them, if you'd prefer a phone call to an in-person discussion). If you have to fill out the paperwork, they'll help you do it right then and there, and if you don't have to, they'll make an appointment for you. So by going and explaining things, you get to clarify the situation and take the next step all at once.

-Zedability


1 Correction
Question #88060 posted on 09/28/2016 5:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are your thoughts after Monday's presidential debate? How do you feel each candidate performed?

-Judgment Seat

A:

Dear you,

I'm not here to argue with people about whether or not they should like Clinton, but I cannot understand how anyone can genuinely think that Trump is the "lesser of two evils" in this scenario.

The rest of my thoughts aren't very different from what you'll read in any opinion piece in mainstream media: Trump was obnoxious and interrupted too much, it's ridiculous to accuse Clinton of being "overprepared," and Trump's policy proposals in basically every arena are frightening and un-American.

-Zedability

A:

Dear Judging,

I think my roommate summed it up best when she said, "Sometimes I wonder if Donald Trump has a small angry dragon running around in his head controlling him, and that's why he acts the way he does."

-Alta


0 Corrections
Question #88083 posted on 09/28/2016 5:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My Question Here. Do you have answers to the Thurston mental assessment test
i have to take it tonight
thank you

-My Name Here Karen Talley

A:

Dear you,

Unfortunately, it would be unethical for us to post the answers to a test. We hope it went well for you, though!

For future reference, answers are never posted before 100 hours, so if you want to get a time-sensitive answer, you need to ask at least four days in advance.

-Zedability


0 Corrections
Question #87824 posted on 09/28/2016 5:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My Question Here. What is a Wish List on OneClickDigital? The app has titles but sometimes when I click on the title the only option is to add to my wish list--unlike other titles where you can check out or place on hold. Does wish list mean that the app isn't actually in possession of the title yet or what

-My Name Here omar

A:

Dear Omar,

You've asked several questions about OneClickDigital in the past, and it's been firmly established that none of the writers have used this app. While we're happy to try to find out one or two questions in this kind of arena, the number of questions you've had suggests that you'd probably be better off emailing them directly at support@oneclickdigital.com for the answers to this question and all future questions regarding this app.

-The Editors


0 Corrections
Question #88021 posted on 09/28/2016 4:58 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I just had the unpleasant experience of confessing my feelings to a close friend, who (unfortunately but not unexpectedly) did not reciprocate. We parted on good terms, and I'm not angry, but the grief is pretty real and very intense. Writers who have had experiences with unrequited affection (or as many as want to share), what happened and how do/did you deal with it?

-It Feels like Somebody Died

A:

Dear friend,

I'm really sorry to hear that. That's rough.

I've been through something like this, but it's hard to feel like I can speak authoritatively on the subject. Every situation is unique. Though I hope you realize you're not alone. A lot of people have felt a similar pain at some point in their lives.

What I've seen is that in general, each day gets better than the last. Don't feel like you have to rush into moving on, but things will improve, especially as closure comes.

At least for me, I wouldn't trade away the pain I've been through since I would lose the lessons I learned with it. As you come to better understand what kind of person you're looking for, you get closer and closer to making that dream a reality. Things will work out! (That's what I keep telling myself anyway.)

Best of luck to you.

-Kirito

A:

Dear person,

All but one of the people that I've ever shown affection for (family not included) has not reciprocated it. I've dealt with it by having a cold, calloused heart that will probably keep me from ever loving again.

-Sam Vimes


0 Corrections
Question #88026 posted on 09/28/2016 4:58 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm thinking of becoming an RA or Hall Advisor (Heritage Halls) in the near future, and have looked into it somewhat. However, I am still left with unanswered questions which I turn to you for.

What is the pay? Are there any other benefits associated with the position (free/reduced costs, meal plan, better room, etc.)? What are the time commitments like? Where would I go to apply, and when would be the optimal time to do so? Are there any requirements to obtain the position?

Thank you greatly,

-Squirrel in the attic wanting a promotion

A:

Dear Sadie,

A hall advisor is full time, so you probably wouldn't want to do that if you plan on remaining a student. You actually can't. 

Perks of being an RA include a private room. Your room and meal plan costs come out of your paycheck. My friend who's an RA says he usually ends up with about $70 extra a week, and he works 20 hours a week, usually nights and evenings. You can apply through the housing website, which also provides more information on qualifications, responsibilities, and compensation. 

Good luck!

-Adelaide


1 Correction
Question #88058 posted on 09/28/2016 4:54 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do you think a good amount of personal revelation confirmation/answers have nothing to do with Heavenly Father necessarily giving us an official "stamp of approval"? But maybe more of a "that seems like a righteous desire so you should feel good about that." Perhaps because it has no bearing on our eternal salvation? Or because it's something we already know we should/shouldn't be doing? Or even because it is one of two good alternatives? Or because our own feelings get in the way of the spirit?

I don't mean to sound like I'm discounting personal revelation. Just wondering.


-Madam Moisel

A:

Dear MM,

God encourages us to do good, though at the same time, preserving our agency is one of His top priorities. So, personal revelation isn't often about telling us what to do. Rather, it's about confirming when choices are good. If you involve Him in your life, revelation will be available in pretty much all areas of your life, whether or not it's "relevant" to salvation.

-Kirito

A:

Dear you, 

Yes. 

I don't think this necessarily discounts it as revelation though. I think part of our purpose here on Earth is to align the desires of our heart with those of God. So when we personally desire a good thing, I think God lets that suffice as our answer so that we learn to make decisions that reinforce those desires and that unity. 

-Zedability 


0 Corrections
Question #88068 posted on 09/28/2016 4:49 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Describe Yourself in Three Fictional Characters?

-Inverse Insomniac (Wee Dingwall, Rabbit, Leslie Knope)

PS - Photos would be awesome, as the choice of photo says almost as much as the choice of character. Happy Thursday, everybody.

A:

Dear II,

Liz Lemon, Ron Swanson, and Hermione Granger. 

Love,

Luciana

A:

Dear person,

April Ludgate:

 april ludgate.gif

(source)

Liz Lemon:

 working on my night cheese

(source)

Rory Gilmore:

rory.gif

(source)

If I had to choose a male character, probably Jess Mariano:

 jess.jpg

(source)

-April Ludgate

A:

Dear Insomniac Inverse,

First and foremost, Anidori Kiladra Talianna Isilee, otherwise know as the Goose Girl:

the goose girl.jpg(source)

Second, Rapunzel from Tangled:

rapunzel.gif(source)

And lastly, John Watson, mostly because we share the same facial expressions.

john1.gif(source)

john2.gif(source)

john3.gif(source)

One of these characters is not like the other :)

-the Goose Girl

A:

Dear I2,

Bilbo Baggins (source)

bilbo.gif

Ron Swanson (source)

ron swanson.gif

Spock (source)

spock.gif

-The Entomophagist thanks Frère Rubik for reminding him how much he relates with Spock

A:

Dear Inverse,

Mabel from Gravity Falls (for her unchained enthusiasm and deep love of eating sugary things).

mabel.png

 

Belle from Beauty and the Beast (for her love of books and her dislike of being conventional).

belle.jpg

 

Ann Perkins from Parks and Rec (for the way she works so hard to be a good friend, but is also just really awkward sometimes).

ann.jpg

-Alta

A:

Dear Inverse,

Let's go with Mr. Spock (from Star Trek),

spock.jpg

(Source)

Ben Wyatt (from Parks and Recreation),

ben.jpg

(Source)

and Daniel Faraday (from LOST).

faraday.jpg

(Source)

-Frère Rubik, who finds it interesting that most of the Board writers' responses come from film and television.

A:

Dear Ida,

Wirt and Greg from Over the Garden Wall

14449884_10154081913694296_1573219984588449586_n.jpg

ogtw-wirtexasface.png

Also accurate, as I can easily be both:

35aabf0b1fc60c20a4e9653f2bec4bd4f5a2f406_hq.jpg

My third character is probably Ann Perkins. Please excuse the language. 

anigif_enhanced-buzz-9635-1368839771-2_preview.gif

-Adelaide, who is not very good at this. 

A:

Dear II,

Kirigaya Kazuto, Raoden, and Toph Beifong.

-Kirito


0 Corrections
Question #88092 posted on 09/28/2016 4:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are the statistics for the 2016 Monson scholars? I remember seeing something about past years before but can't find anything about any years anymore.

-Studious

A:

Dear you,

This article, published in January 2016, has information about the 2015 scholars. Based on that, my guess is that you'd need to wait until January 2017 to see information about the 2016 scholars.

-Zedability


0 Corrections
Question #88095 posted on 09/28/2016 4:16 p.m.
Q:

Hi guys!

Ok so I searched the archives for similar questions, but dating questions all vary with the situation, person, etc., so I figured I'd ask.

I met this girl in one of my classes, and we hit it off pretty quick. She has that same kind of dry humour that I have and love, and she's fun to be around. We swapped numbers, and I asked her one day if she wanted to hang out (repeat, hang out). She agreed and we talked for hours. Toward the end of our outing, she started showering me with compliments and saying I was attractive, all nice things, except I only viewed her as a friend and it seemed like she was maybe looking for more than friendship. At the end of our outing, she stood really close to me and I think she wanted me to kiss her... But instead I just said a quick goodnight and left it at that.

When I got back to my dorm, I started wondering it she had misinterpreted "hanging out" as "going on a date", and it mortified me. I'm completely used to the feeling of unrequited love on my side, but I absolutely hate it when it's on someone else's side because I feel really bad...

Now she'll keep texting me and we'll talk during class, and I don't know what to do. She's an awesome person and I think we could be great friends, but I think she wants more and I just don't.

I guess just saying "I don't know what to do" doesn't count as a question, so instead I'll say: what should I do? Is there a chance I'm misreading her and she actually just wants to be friends? Is there a chance she's misreading me and thinks that I want to be more than friends? Can two people successfully be friends when one had feelings for the other at one point, or continues to have said feelings?

- Loveless Lad Chased by a Lovelorn Lass

A:

Dear Alliterative,

Talk to her about it, explain the situation simply and let her know you're not looking for a relationship beyond the platonic right now. You can totally be just good friends. and who knows, maybe you'll develop feelings for her and you start dating. Maybe you won't and you guys just stay good friends and eventually invite each other to your weddings or whatever. Either way it's all good.

Do listen to Alta though and don't just drop it on her like a bomb. That wouldn't be good.

Good luck friend,

~Dr. Occam

A:

Dear LL,

Being a girl in Provo is sometimes really hard, because some guys say something along the lines of, "hanging out," and it actually means a date, and then it's awkward when you think you're on a fun friend outing and suddenly realize that he thinks it's a date. And sometimes guys say "hanging out" and you're so used to guys who are poor communicators/you're really hoping that this guy is actually asking you out that you think it means a date. Both situations are bad, and I'm sorry you're both tangled up in this.

Whatever you do, please don't say something really abrupt like, "Hey, I've noticed that you seem to be sort of interested in me, but I don't want to lead you on." She will be mortified. It's also not necessarily ideal to have a full-blown DTR where you explain that you think she's a good friend but don't see it going any further, because that's a lot of pressure on her, and again, it's really embarrassing to like someone and find out it's not even remotely reciprocated. Obviously she needs to find that out at some point in time, but it's best if you can do it in a more tactful manner. I know this sounds like the dumb dating game that everyone hates, but it honestly works pretty well if you say things about how she's such a good friend, or mention other girls you're interested in to her. She'll probably get the hint and back off, and you're both saved from an embarrassing and awkward situation. 

-Alta


0 Corrections
Question #88045 posted on 09/28/2016 8 a.m.
Q:

Dear Zed & Sheebs,

Why was Canada the first country to build a UFO landing pad? (Why does any country have a UFO landing pad for that matter?). Have you visited it in St. Paul, Alberta? How did they chose that location? What purpose does this UFO landing pad serve for Canada?

-Candid non-Canadian

P.S. Out of curiosity, have any of you seen the northern lights from Canada?

A:

Dear person,

The purpose it serves is for UFOs to land on. It's in St. Paul because most people from Edmonton are aliens. The Edmontonians wanted a landing pad that was close enough that they could go home and visit but out of the way of civilization enough to not have to deal with the Canadian paparazzi. 

-Sheebs


0 Corrections
Tuesday, September 27, 2016
Question #88091 posted on 09/27/2016 11:48 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

When does the Season of the Force end at Disneyland?

- really wanna ride the Star Wars-themed Space Mountain

A:

Dear you,

They haven't revealed an official end date yet. Once upon a time it was confirmed as closing in May 2016, but that was extended through the summer and then again, because it's still happening. I'm willing to bet it won't officially close until the new Star Wars Land opens.

Also, I'm bitter about the Star Wars Space Mountain so I'd like to grumpily add that I was not a fan.

Love,

Luciana


0 Corrections
Question #88090 posted on 09/27/2016 10:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board Men,

How often do you get a haircut? Where do you get it done? How much does it cost? Have you ever used the "I'll buy you dinner if you cut my hair" line to set up a date?

-The Bald Barber

A:

Dear BB Gun,

I get a haircut every 6-8 weeks at Studio 1080. It costs $12 (unless they have a special deal) plus tip.

No, I haven't even thought of that.

-The Entomophagist

A:

Dear Bald Barber,

I get my hairs cut about every 4 weeks. My aunt cuts my hair. Cost = $0.00. No I have not, have you?

-Sunday Night Banter

A:

Dear Baldber,

Curly hair has some disadvantages, mainly that it can sometimes act as a trap for small debris (twigs, leaves, petals, snow, etc.) and that often people want to touch it, which you kind of get used to but remains at least a little weird no matter what.

However, those are all outweighed by its main advantage: per Honor Code stipulations, hair must not cover the ears or touch the collar for men. Curly hair tends to curl upward, not down, so even after four months it still doesn't touch my collar or hide my ears.

So, I usually just get a haircut from Père Rubik about once a semester when I'm at home. He does a good job, it's completely free, and it gives us some time to chat. Everybody wins!

-Frère Rubik (who filled out his Board application with the 'nym "Curly" but changed it when it became time to actually be a writer)


0 Corrections
Question #88085 posted on 09/27/2016 10:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have an Android phone. An LG if you need specifics. I want to change the voice of the Google lady who answers "OK Google" to a suave, low British male voice. I managed to change my phone settings to do this, but it doesn't carry over to OK Google. Any hot tips?

-Ajisai

A:

Dear Ajisai,

Unfortunately, it doesn't seem like it's possible for me to set the Google Now voice to male. However, I was able to get the female voice to speak with a British (or Australian or Indian) accent. To do this, go to the Google Now screen and press the hamburger icon for more options.

Screenshot_2016-09-27-16-06-22.png

Press Settings.

Screenshot_2016-09-27-16-06-30-01.jpeg

Press Voice.

Screenshot_2016-09-27-16-06-36.png

Press Languages.

Screenshot_2016-09-27-16-06-43.png

Make English (UK) your primary language by tapping and holding it.

-The Entomophagist now has an excuse to use Google voice search more often


0 Corrections
Question #88088 posted on 09/27/2016 7:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Where's my iocain powder?

I certainly can't match his wits...

-Man in the Mask

A:

Dear you,

Insert Princess Bride joke here.

Love,

Luciana


0 Corrections
Question #88005 posted on 09/27/2016 2:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I used to have a friend who was an amazing conversationalist. He could talk to pretty much anyone about anything and it was always interesting or fun. He could also defuse the tension in what would normally be a difficult conversation. I felt like I could talk to him about anything which was a rare thing for me. I would love to develop this skill, but I don't know how. What can I do that will help others feel comfortable talking to me and make them enjoy conversing with me?

-Tongue tied

A:

Dear person,

I have been told I am good at this by people before and I think I am okay, so I will tell you some of the things that have helped me. I don't think there's only one way to do be good at talking to people and everyone has their own style, so don't take all of this as the gospel truth. Figure out what works for you! Also, don't be discouraged if it takes time to figure out how to do this all gracefully. Everyone is a little bit awkward.

The most important thing I can think of is this: be genuinely interested in who the other person is and what she or she feels and thinks. Try to understand them, like a puzzle. This helps to build up a connection and most people love that. So ask more detailed follow up questions about things that the person says ("You want to be a podiatrist? What inspired you to want to do that?" "You went to Germany last summer? That sounds so cool! What did you do when you were there?"). Start small and over time, figure out what their hopes and dreams are.

Use your judgment with this next tip because I think how it works depends a lot on your relationship with the person, but try to be aware of their emotions and be willing to engage with them on that level. If someone looks like they are feeling down, go over and talk to them and make sure they are okay. If you know your friend is hangry, tease them about it a little. If someone seems extra happy, find out why. It doesn't have to be a deep and dark thing, and most of the time it isn't. Talking about feelings creates more feelings, usually good ones. I find this particularly helpful for acquaintances I am interested in getting to know a bit better or friends who I want an ongoing relationship with. Feelings can be an endless source of interesting things to talk about. Sometimes people don't like talking about them in which case back off, but a lot do and will find it very refreshing that you are very comfortable to be around.

Also, be prepared for reciprocation. If you consistently do the above many people will show interest in you. Don't be afraid to talk about something you are thinking about! People want to know about your feelings and reactions to things. They want to hear your funny stories and your hopes and your dreams. Don't monopolize the conversation, but recognize that what you have to contribute is valuable. The more honest you are in your sharing of stories, feelings, and ideas, the more people will probably want to connect with you. Nice people that you want to be friends with, anyways. Also, if you have trouble empathizing with others in as sophisticated a way as you would like, pay attention to how you feel when you talk to other people. Why do certain people make you feel a certain way? What do you wish people would do? Your feelings are valuable feedback. They take time to learn from but if you are noticing a pattern, it might have something to tell you.

Finally, some people are just not interested in connecting for whatever reason. Don't take it personally, because it probably isn't. There are probably even people that reject your friend because they are busy or don't like to connect with others or are tired or whatever.

I hope this gives you some ideas! Good luck!

-Sheebs 


0 Corrections
Question #88082 posted on 09/27/2016 2:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I love instrumental music while I am studying, (the classical music section of the library is my home.) But I recently fell in love with Patience by the Lumineers as well as Interlude 2 by Alt J. Since these artists don't normally do instrumentals, it is really hard to find similarly relaxing songs. Could you help me find a study playlist that might include these songs and other hidden instrumental gems?

Thanks!

-Pseudonym

A:

Dear Pseudomonas,

I started a Pandora station using Patience as a seed, then proceeded to thumb-up any instrumental songs and thumb-down anything with words. I also thumb-downed the songs that got a little too fiddly, since I was looking more for the piano. The artists that it ended up giving me were Renee Michele, Jim Hudak, Gunnar Madsen, Boo Hewerdine, and The Well Pennies.

Also, April's suggestion below is a great one. One of my favorite video game soundtracks is Portal 2: Songs To Test By, which is available for free online.

-The Entomophagist

A:

Dear Sufedrin,

Pro-tip: Listen to music from video games.  Video game soundtracks are designed to provide stimulation but still stay in the background so it doesn't disrupt your concentration.  I personally love the music of Zelda (especially Twilight Princess), and the old-timey music found in BioShock.

If you really want to get motivated and work quickly and efficiently, the Tetris music is the best thing ever.

-April Ludgate


0 Corrections
Question #88069 posted on 09/27/2016 12:36 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

When people refer to "God's plan" I get really confused. Isn't God's plan for us just the plan of salvation? Wouldn't it sort of negate agency if God had a specific plan for where we lived, went to school, worked, who we married, how many kids we had, etc.? While I believe he loves us all, and there are a few people he had specific things in mind for (maybe they were even alternates if someone else screwed up), I just can't imagine him being that much of a helicopter/architect parent.

What do you think?


-Duchess of Nope

A:

Dear Duchess

As I see it, it's about opportunity. God knows us, and He knows that, outside of the scope of the Plan of Salvation, there are different things that will make us happy in life. These things might involve our different talents and/or interests and most certainly vary from person to person. Additionally, while God's overall plan for His children is the same, how it gets carried about is different for everyone. For example, hardly any of us will ever become an Apostle, and even fewer will lead the Church as the Prophet. Even in less extreme examples, it's possible that someone could go their entire life without serving in the Young Men's or Young Women's organizations. That would be according to God's plan as well (He directs the Church, after all), and it would all depend on the talents and skills the individual has, the talents that God wanted to help them develop, and the opportunities they would have to serve others.

Basically, God's main goal is to make us happy, and outside of the Plan of Salvation, there are a lot of ways to do that. If we live righteously and stay in tune with the Spirit, I believe we'll become aware of opportunities to be happy that we wouldn't have been aware of otherwise.

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear DN,

God isn't a micromanager. He'd much rather have us own our decisions (as long as they're good) than to decide everything for us. He lets us make the major decisions in our lives, though He's always there to help.

I firmly believe God has an individual plan for each one of us. The system of patriarchal blessings seems to support that. But to me, that doesn't mean that God has planned out my entire life for me. It feels more like God has prepared a number of opportunities and responsibilities suited for me, to give my life purpose and to teach me what I need to learn.

The whole point of the plan of salvation is to preserve our agency. Of course God makes plans to bless us. To not do so would be serious neglect. But life's purpose is not to uncover an imaginary timeline that God made without us. It's to make our own decisions and receive God's help along the way.

-Kirito


0 Corrections
Question #88053 posted on 09/27/2016 12:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have you ever set standards in a relationship on the types of things you do or don't feel comfortable doing? What if the other person doesn't agree with what you set??

-My Name Here

A:

Dear you,

Yes. Man, Certainly and I did this. We had a written set of "the rules" for us. In addition, I remember at least one thing that I just spoke to him about. I think consciously setting standards can be nice, because it helps put both of you on the same page so that you can be working under the same understanding of what the two of you are or aren't in favor of, rather than being pretty closely aligned, but having to deal with one of you being 10% off from the other one and that ending up in one individual being uncomfortable.

In my opinion if the other person doesn't necessarily agree, you've got a few things to consider:

1) If there are disagreements, people shouldn't be pressured to do things they're uncomfortable with. In fact, if someone is not willing to cope with another individual's comparable conservatism it may either indicate that A) one party (or both) has strong opinions on this subject that might not make the two a good match or B) the relationship experiences a lack of respect for closely-held beliefs of the one or both parties.

Is it theoretically possible that setting these boundaries could actually result in couples breaking up because they don't agree? Yes. However, I think that in this case that might not be a terrible thing, since failure to compromise means that one or both partners will feel uncomfortable with things they're asked or expected to do or not do in the relationship.

~Anne, Certainly

A:

Dear Reader,

When Tally and I were dating we had some rules. She was living alone and we liked spending time at her apartment more than in mine (with my 5 roommates) so we set some boundaries. They were specific to us like, no sleeping over on the couch (because it was a 45 min drive there and when I needed to do stuff near her apartment the next day I would stay at a friend's house), no showering in the other person's apartment (because I had a martial arts class near her so I was sweaty afterwards (not really a problem for her at my place)), no kissing with the tongue, curfew at 9:30(ish) so the other person could drive home and get to bed at a reasonable time, and other rules of the like.

We didn't create all of those rules at the same time, it was more like we created them as they came up. There were several times where we needed to reevaluate or reinforce those rules but we both agreed on our decisions and we were very open about our beliefs and opinions. Good communication was absolutely necessary for setting boundaries and enforcing them so we could say "Hey, maybe we should tone down the kissing" without feeling offended or defensive. 

Now, you asked about disagreements. Fortunately, we didn't really have many disagreements on rules and I think that was due in part to us have a similar goal. We both wanted to get married in the temple and create a healthy and happy family. We saw dating as a way to start good habits for a future family that we could have so, when we would have a question of morality or any other concern, we could ask each other if it would help us come closer together, get married in the temple, and/or have a healthy and happy family. Using that method we were able to communicate our expectations very clearly. Like I said, we pretty much agreed on all of the boundaries we had set so it wasn't much of a problem, but I was prepared to talk about disagreements because we had such open and honest communication. If you are currently disagreeing with your SO then I would suggest setting apart a time where you can talk openly and directly about the problem. Take turns talking, don't talk over each other or try to defend yourself while the other is talking. When it's your turn, explain your opinion and why you believe that. Allow the other to do the same. After both have sufficiently explained, ask which is better for your goals. If you decided to follow the other person's rule, would it have negative effects on either of you? What about your rule? Discuss those things until you both agree rather than just enduring the rule begrudgingly.

Now, I have not studied psychology, therapy, or counseling but that's what I would in that situation.

-Spectre

A:

Dear you,

As I've mentioned before, my first boyfriend was not a member of the LDS church. On our first date, I made sure he understood my religious beliefs, telling him that I was a virgin and I intended to remain that way. He was my first kiss, so he knew just how cautious and inexperienced I was with physical affection.

As our relationship progressed past the first-date stage, I had no real concept of what my boundaries were, and I had to learn as time went on. Slowly I figured out what I was and wasn't comfortable with and began to set standards.

Unfortunately, this guy (let's call him Mark) did not always respect those boundaries. He would stop if I outright told him to stop, but that wouldn't stop him from trying the same things again later. I don't think he was acting maliciously, and in some ways he probably thought he was helping me overcome my prudishness. But he was sexually manipulative and it was a really unhealthy relationship for me. I didn't want to engage in sexual behavior, and I made that clear to him, but that didn't stop him from trying. I was not in the mentally healthiest place at the time, so I didn't feel as if I could always say no. It was an all-around terrible situation. In the end, our different standards of sexuality were a major factor in our breakup.

From that perspective, it's totally okay if the person you're dating has different standards of physical affection that you do. But if they EVER try to pressure you into doing things that you aren't comfortable with, it is a MAJOR red flag. Consent doesn't apply only to actual sex. It applies to all forms of sexual behavior, even something as seemingly innocuous as kissing. If you've established that something is not okay with you, and your partner does it anyway, against your wishes, THAT IS SEXUAL ASSAULT.

I'm not necessarily advocating that you press charges against your boyfriend/girlfriend. But they need to understand that moving past established boundaries is 100% unacceptable. 

Have a frank talk with the person you're dating. Tell them your standards and make sure they understand your commitment to those standards. If they have different boundaries, that's okay. If they would be fine having sex but you aren't, that doesn't mean your relationship is doomed. But if he/she tries to undermine those standards, then you have a serious problem on your hands, because that is not behavior that anyone should have to put up with.

Love,

Luciana 


0 Corrections
Question #88066 posted on 09/27/2016 11:36 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are your favorite destinations?

My favorite destination is Munnar
Source [url="http://traveltriangle.com/packages/2nights-3days-kerala-munnar-tour"]

-Rohan

A:

Dear Rohan,

Mexico is pretty great.

-The Entomophagist

A:

Dear you,

I really enjoy Orlando (well, specifically, theme parks) and Southern Alberta.

~Anne, Certainly

A:

Dear Rider,

I love spending time on the California coast.

Love,

Luciana


0 Corrections
Question #88074 posted on 09/27/2016 11:18 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Re Board Question #88010:

Dr. Occam is Mr. Z??????

-Probably beaten to the punch by 24+ people

A:

Dear Actually Not,

Yes, I Dr. Occam am indeed the mysterious Mr. Z, and before we were wed I was the Board S.O. known betimes as M. I know I know, it's shocking! After all, when was the last time two active board writers were married to each other? Come to think of it, it might have been Owl-Ahrairah, I don't remember if they got married before Owlet retired... but regardless, it was before my time as a writer.

Now that we've let the proverbial cat out of the bag, I must say, I do hope, dear readers, that your newly gained knowledge of my status the husband of the great Zedability does not change your opinions of me or my answers for the worse. I'm still the same Dr. Occam you knew before. 

Finally, in case anyone was worried, I have been assured by the Editors that my admittance as a writer was not influenced by my relationship to Zed. The Board is above nepotism in any form.

Well, that's it, now you know. Do with this knowledge what you will.

Sincerely,

Dr. Occam (A.K.A. Mr. Z)


0 Corrections
Posted on 09/27/2016 10 a.m. New Correction on: #88051 I recently found a giveaway booth near the Tanner Building set up by the Ford Motor ...
Question #88072 posted on 09/27/2016 9:12 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

"Care and treatment for learning disabilities or physical or mental developmental delay, including pervasive developmental disorders or cognitive dysfunctions"

I read that ADHD is not classified as a learning disability, but would the rest of this paragraph include it? The "cognitive dysfunction" part makes me suspect that the answer is yes.

-Wondering

A:

Dear you,

It's really difficult to tell based on one sentence out of context. Your best bet would be to contact someone from whatever organization you're quoting from. If it's insurance, most insurance plans should have a customer service-type number you can call with these types of questions; if it's something related to BYU policy, the University Accessibility Center in the Wilk should be able to help you out.

-Zedability


0 Corrections
Question #88037 posted on 09/27/2016 8:24 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board Ladies,

I've heard something from a few different sources in the past few weeks that I had never heard before, and I'd like to know what your opinions and observations are on the subject.

Apparently girls don't like guys that play video games? I mean, I can understand associating obsession with video games with the kind of social awkwardness that isn't particularly attractive, but I was told that (all else being equal), just liking video games can be a deal breaker for many women. It seems to me that this would make it hard for them to find people to date, since so many people (guys and girls) play some sort of video game, but what do you think? Do you feel this way? Do you know other girls that refuse to date a guy who plays video games at all? Is the fact that I play video games (without being obsessed) a major contributing factor to the fact that I can't find any girls that want to go on more than one or two dates with me?

-Anonymous

A:

Dear Nonny,

Andy and I are both pretty avid gamers. We play different types of games (he likes shoot-em-up and racing games, I prefer strategy and storyline-based games), but gaming is an active part of our life together. However, we are not so enamored with games that we lack social skills, which is the case for many self-proclaimed gamers. There is definitely a difference between guys who play video games and guys who are wrapped up in their video games and lack any sort of sociability because their video games are such an integral part of their life. If you really do like video games, finding someone who also likes them can make all the difference. You might just be going after the wrong girls, because if you like video games and that's a dealbreaker for someone, they're probably not the girls you want to create a long-term relationship with.

You can always just tell them that it is Nintendo's fault, because as found in Adam Ruins Everything (seriously, this show is great), video games are only considered so male-centric because of the video game crash of 1983. In order to revive the market, Nintendo moved video games from the electronics section to the toys section of big box stores. The toys section was completely gender-segregated, and Nintendo randomly decided to market to boys, and all other video gaming companies followed suit. Imagine how much different our whole society would be if they had randomly decided to market to girls!  Maybe boys would refuse to date girls that played video games (disclaimer: while the attached video is highly entertaining and educational, there are some innuendos, strong language and potentially offensive images, so proceed at your own risk).

-April Ludgate

A:

Dear you,

When I was a freshman, I heard some girls state that they would never, ever date or marry a guy who played video games. At all.

I thought that was pretty crazy. As long as someone just plays recreationally and not at the expense of work, school, relationships, and personal hygiene, I don't see why playing video games is a bad thing. Games are fun, and can be super interesting.

There are guys who don't really play video games, so I assume those girls end up marrying those guys, but I've never understood the animosity towards video games. And I say that as someone who hasn't played anything other than Plants vs. Zombies, Tetris, and Mario Kart for her entire life.

-Zedability

A:

Dear Annon,

Tally M. just bought me Zelda: Skyward Sword for my birthday so it's obviously not a problem for us. I only play games occasionally now and Tally only plays DDR so it's not a problem for either of us.

-Spectre

A:

Dear you,

I'm totally okay with video games, provided they don't negatively affect my dating life. For instance, I once dated a guy who liked for me to sit behind him and scratch his back while he played video games and otherwise totally ignored me. Unless I stopped scratching his back, that is. Sometimes he could do this for hours, and then would get cranky when I complained. And sadly, those were probably the good times. That relationship was a mess.

Anyway, I don't mind a guy who plays recreationally. But I don't want to be in a serious relationship with a guy who prefers video games to spending time with me. Nor would I want to be with someone for whom video games are a primary form of entertainment, just because they aren't something I'm hugely interested in. I don't think there's anything wrong with such a hobby, but I'd rather date someone with whom I have more common interests.

Love,

Luciana


0 Corrections
Question #87991 posted on 09/27/2016 8:24 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Ecuador uses the U.S. dollar as its official currency. This makes sense in an abstract sense, but do the people use U.S. dollars in the stores and movie theaters? If not, what do they use? And if they use greenbacks, where do they come from? It's hard to imagine the Mint sending planeloads of currency to Ecuador for funsies.

-My Name Here

A:

Dear arha,

Yes, people use U.S. dollars there. You'll find greenbacks, as well as a ton of those Sacajawea and Presidential dollar coins you rarely see in the USA. When I was in Ecuador three years ago I actually had trouble getting them accepted as valid currency.

"Hey, could I please use the internet? I have three dollars."
"Yeah, right. Martin Van Buren? Whoever that is."
"Seriously, these are real money."
"I'll believe it when I see it."
"But it's right—oh, nevermind."

One guy did accept them, but basically as souvenirs. "Right," he explained, "You say they're official money, and they probably are, but the fact is none of us have seen them before, ever. But hey, they're in pretty good condition, and they're sort of cool in the way new-dead-people-on-coins is cool. I'll buy them off you for a dollar a piece," he said.

Worked for me. As far as your comment about the United States Mint sending planeloads of currency abroad, be aware the US dollar is a big deal in international commerce. That's an incredibly vague and unhelpful statement to make, so I'll leave the international trade aspect alone and supply you with a list of other countries (and territories) that also use the U.S. dollar as their official currency:

  • Puerto Rico
  • El Salvador
  • Republic of Zimbabwe
  • Guam
  • U.S. Virgin Islands
  • American Samoa
  • Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
  • Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste
  • Federated States of Micronesia
  • Republic of Palau
  • Marshall Islands

The official currencies of Panama and Belize are the balboa and Belize dollar, respectively, but U.S. dollars are easily accepted. I don't know what other specific questions you may have about the international use of the dollar, and I don't think I'll try to guess at present. I hope this satisfies your curiosity for now. And may you and I as citizens of Freemurica never forget President Van Buren's illustrious 'do:

Martin_Van_Buren_edit.jpg
Dat haircut tho. Hipsters, take note. 

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Corrections