Strange things are afoot at the Circle K. -Ted Theodore Logan

While we appreciate factual corrections, consider posting on the Board Comment Board, brought to the readers by popular request.

Posted on 05/27/2016 11:28 p.m. New Correction on: #86785 What are the chances that cell phones are giving us all cancer? -Para Noid
Question #86780 posted on 05/27/2016 4:25 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Does checking my credit score really lower my score? Or is it urban legend? If so, why? How does one check without impacting it? (And for free?)

-Liquid Paper

A:

Dear Human,

I thought this was utter bunk when you asked this question. Before I got a credit card, I did an incredible amount of research on how to build a good credit score, and this was certainly never mentioned in my research.

Apparently, it's not bunk. 

According to Credit Karma, there are two types of credit inquiries: soft inquiries and hard inquiries.

  • Hard credit inquiries generally occur when a financial institution, like a credit card institution or a lender, checks your credit report when deciding to lend to you. These types of inquiries lower your credit score by a few points for up to two years. I expect that this is part of the reason why having multiple credit cards lower your credit score.
  • Soft credit inquiries occur when a person or a company check your credit report as part of a background check. This includes when you get a credit report, or when your employer looks at it for a background check. These will have no effect on your credit report. 
So in answer to your real question, "Does checking my credit score really lower my score?" No, it doesn't. Go to Credit Karma and get your free credit report, and don't worry about having any effects on your score. This will only happen if a company is looking to extend credit to you. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Corrections
Question #86790 posted on 05/27/2016 4:24 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm a conservative in the south, but I haven't met anyone that has actually voted for Donald Trump in the primaries. Are they scared to admit it? Have you guys met Trump fans? What are they like? Do you think everybody actually voted for Kasich and Trump just bribed the right people?

-Mr. Rose

A:

Mr. Rose,

So I don't know that he qualifies as a "Trump fan," but my cousin's husband is a Trump supporter. I don't know if he voted in the primaries in his state or not, but he said he will be voting Trump in November unless by some strange turn of events someone else gets the GOP nomination. He says it's important to him to support his party and if the party picks Trump, then he will support Trump.

Now, my cousin-in-law is a great guy. He's super friendly, fun, and as far as I know him, doesn't exhibit any traits of your stereotypical "bad person" that I feel people tend to assume would support the Donald. Why do I say this? To show that there isn't necessarily a single "type" of person who supports Trump (or any candidate, for that matter). You'll find people of all flavors (some more savory, some less so) at rallies for every single candidate, regardless of which side of the aisle they're on. Cracked wrote an interesting article about this a couple months ago where the writer attended a Trump rally and talked to a bunch of the supporters there to get a feel for "what [they're] like", as you said.  I won't link to it here because of language, but if you're okay with a bit more crass language you can find the article by Googling "cracked trump rally" (it's the first link to pop up as of writing this answer). The jist of the article, though, can be summed up by this quote from the article's introduction:

"While there are plenty easy laughs to get out of how dumb the stereotypical Trumper is, making fun of that guy and his stupid red hat generally means ignoring the hundreds of thousands of real people who have rallied to his banner."

So based on all that, I'm gonna answer your second question by saying no, Trump did not "just bribe the right people" to get where he is.  He actually does have a very large fan base and has done a very good job so far of actually getting them out to the polls during primaries. Some of this might be due to people just assuming that he would never actually get the nomination and not worrying about voting for their preferred candidate (be it Cruz, Kasich, or whoever) in the primaries. The fact remains, however, that Trump has run a stellar campaign in terms of garnering actual votes up to this point.  Whether that will continue past the party conventions in July remains to be seen.

~Dr. Occam


0 Corrections
Question #86792 posted on 05/27/2016 4:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

During reunion week, did it surprise you how many board alumni have left the church?

-beanbag

A:

Dear person,

Yes, I knew that a quite a few former Board writers left the church but didn't realize just how many. I'm pretty orthodox and I don't know many people who have left because of a doctrinal/policy issue so still I tend to be a little surprised when people leave for those reasons. 

-Sheebs

A:

Dear Doctor,

Yes and no: the census already showed us former writers were the most disaffected, but it's still surprising as to why.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear beanbag,

Not especially. As a generation, millennials are more disaffected with religion than the generations preceding them. I think we also value equality and inclusion more than preceding generations. And so the church's policies regarding gay marriage, particularly the policies that were publicized last November, really rubbed millennials the wrong way, myself included. As time goes on, the teachings of the gospel become seemingly less compatible with American culture, therefore many feel the need to disassociate themselves from the LDS church.

It might be hard to imagine for young people who've lived in Utah since adulthood, but in a lot of places, when you identify as a Mormon people immediately associate you with the idea of bigotry against gay people. When I lived in Florida, at times I actually felt really uncomfortable identifying myself as a Mormon. At one point a friend of mine asked me about my thoughts on religion. This friend also happened to be gay, so I felt the need to immediately add the caveat that I don't agree with the Church's teachings about gay marriage. When there are prominent teachings like that which I disagree with, it's easy to see how people would leave the Church, especially the more liberal people that the Board often attracts.

Love,

Luciana


0 Corrections
Question #86791 posted on 05/27/2016 2:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear Frere Rubik,

I'm still too lazy to learn your special symbol. Will you please share all your thoughts about Catch-22?

-Luciana

A:

Dear Luciana,

First, an important lesson:

If you're on a Windows computer, hold down the alt key, then press 0-2-3-2. If you're feeling shouty, hold alt and then type 0-2-0-0 instead.

If you're on a Macintosh computer, hold the option key and then hit the grave accent/tilde key. Then either press E or Shift-E depending on your level of shoutiness.

...Or, you know, copy and paste. Or just keep writing it as Frere. Whatever floats your boat.

***THIS HAS BEEN A PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE È-FILES. THE È-FILES: INVESTIGATING SEMI-PARANORMAL ACTIVITY AND SPREADING AWARENESS OF GRAVELY-ACCENTED VOWELS SINCE 2015.***

Anywho, on to your actual question.

I find that I have to keep making new qualifiers when I talk about books. For the longest time, All the King's Men was my favorite book, and I left it at that. Then, last summer, All the Pretty Horses came along and I was just astounded by its quality. It felt perfect. At the same time, though, I felt more of an emotional connection to Jack Burden and the events of ATKM, so I wasn't ready to displace it as my favorite quite yet. So, I just made a new category: while ATKM remained my favorite book, ATPH gained the distinction of being the most perfectly crafted book I've read.

Then along came Catch-22, and suddenly I'm back to coming up with more qualifiers. Did it become my favorite? No; it's going to take something mighty strong to knock ATKM off of it's pedestal. Is it more perfectly crafted than ATPH? Not necessarily. That's not to say that Catch-22 is shoddily written or put together badly; quite the opposite. It's just that ATPH had this deep sense of harmony and balance, every scene and description working together and making things feel wonderfully united by the end. Catch-22 is carefully constructed as well, but it's done so in a way that seems to upend traditional senses of harmony and aesthetic, so Catch-22 doesn't take ATPH's qualifier, either. It's something unique, and it seemed to deserve a title all of its own.

As an honorable mention of sorts, Catch-22 makes a strong case for the most hilarious book I've ever read. I stand by my new British friend Nick when he said that it was "laugh out loud hilarious." That's not what I'm going to focus on in the end, though; I've decided that, of all the books I've read, Catch-22 has the absolute best ending. 

Does that seem like a small thing? I don't mean it to be. The thing is, after how diverse and varied the entire book is, I think it's absolutely incredible how the final pages manage to resolve the lingering conflicts in a satisfying way, both in terms of the story and in terms of the emotional feel of the book. Simply put, Catch-22 takes you through the ringer of emotions. It starts off hilarious. In between laughs, you catch small glimpses of intense fear or terror or melancholy. Things almost seem to take on a sense of normalcy, and for a second you start to get snatches of peace, tranquility, and beauty. Then, completely out of nowhere, it sucker-punches you in the gut with tragedy, then does so again and again. You'd think that after one sucker-punch the rest wouldn't come as a surprise, but you'd be wrong; each punch sends you reeling into a different emotion and before you can get your bearings you're being punched again. The hilarity comes back, but it feels different this time. You perhaps didn't notice before, but now the laughter seems to be defensive, covering up immense pain. Eventually, the laughter stops, as does the emotional sucker-punching, and you're left to ruminate on your wounds. You feel sick, and for a moment things go very, very dark. The darkness dissipates after a bit, but you feel broken. While things aren't getting worse, they're not exactly getting better. You consign yourself to this emotional limbo as the book enters its final pages.

Then, hope comes bursting in without wondering. You can't believe it at first, but it's there, and as you reflect you see that it's been there all along, but you hadn't noticed because of all the other emotional warfare taking place. Hope fills you and gets you excited again. Finally, brimming with hope, you hit the very last line, which sends you on your way with one last big laugh towards a brighter tomorrow.

That was all rather poetic and, admittedly, pretty corny of me to say. But really, so much of what makes this book amazing is how deftly Joseph Heller evokes emotions within you, the reader. So maybe what I'm wanting to say is that Catch-22 has the best ending, especially given the emotional journey beforehand.

To keep it short, I think I'll just say it's got the best ending (but it won't make sense unless you've read it all).

---

And that, I think, just about sums up all of my thoughts on Catch-22

That sucker-punching, though; it's brutal. I don't think I've taken an emotional hit from a book that hard since I first read Tortilla Flat

Also part of me wants to see if there's some ridiculous edit where they rearrange everything so that it's in chronological order. It probably wouldn't be as fun, though. Maybe I'll just have to re-read it some time now that I know what's going on.

-Washington Irving (Frère Rubik)


0 Corrections
Question #86788 posted on 05/27/2016 2 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What's your favorite Disney movie?

What's your favorite Disney Princess movie?

-My Name Here

A:

Dear person,

My favourite Disney movie is Meet the Robinsons. You didn't ask for it but second favourite is The Lion King. And my favourite princess movie is probably Tangled. 

-Sheebs 

A:

Dear you,

I grew up watching Newsies, and it remains my all-time favorite Disney film. For some reason, it makes me really happy to watch famous actors sing and dance. Everyone should see Marlon Brando in Guys and Dolls.

For princesses, I'm partial to The Princess and the Frog. In my opinion, Tiana is a much more admirable character than most princesses, plus she's got spunk.

Love,

Luciana

P.S. I'M FINALLY GOING TO SEE THE STAGE PRODUCTION OF NEWSIES THIS SUMMER AND I'M SO EXCITED.

A:

Dear Curious,

Favorite princess movie: Tangled.

Favorite princess: Belle or Mulan. Yes, my favorite princess is not the one from my favorite princess movie. I simply like the characters of Belle and Mulan more than those of Rapunzel.

General favorite movie: now that's harder because I'm terrible at favorites, but top 3 would probably be The Emperor's New Groove, Hercules, and Mulan. (Tangled is already up for fave princess movie but it's in my top list as well.)

~Dr. Occam

A:

Dear you,

My favorite Disney movie as a child was The Sword in the Stone, and my vote for best Disney princess movie is Atlantis. This movie counts for four votes because the princess is in line for her own throne, becomes Queen, and her father, the king, passes his throne to Milo while Kida is busy being the heart of Atlantis, so in the end, both Milo and Kida end up as rightful heirs to the kingdom in their own right. Also Leonard Nemoy plays the King. If you were looking for a typical Disney princess movie, it is the 2015 Cinderella. 

-Squirrel

A:

Dear MNH,

It depends, but I'm a big fan of Big Hero 6 these days. Robots! Superheroes! Beautiful animation and soundtrack! Subverted stereotypes! Poignant commentary on mental health! It's all great. 

Wreck-It Ralph is technically a princess movie, right? Actually, screw technicality. It's a Disney movie and there's a princess, so I'm counting it. Fun fact: Vanellope is my default Minecraft skin. 

-TEN

A:

Dear Monty,

I know I've answered this several times, but really my favorite Disney movie is the 2012 version Winnie the Pooh. It's like my sense of humor in film form. And a hand-drawn throwback!

Favorite princess movie is Beauty and the Beast. But only because of this face: 

7mrjcu2Dvp20w1asHqChcwOPo1_500.jpg(source)

My brother and I used to pause the movie here and laugh for, like, ten minutes straight. Ah, the memories!

Cheers,

The Lone Musketeer

A:

Dear Enquirer,

Favorite Disney movie: easily The Lion King.

Favorite Disney princess movie: not as easily Tangled or Sleeping Beauty.

-The Skipper

A:

Dear you,

My favorite Disney movie is Captain America: The Winter Soldier, although I may decide to change it to Captain America: Civil War soon. I can't decide yet, I've only seen Civil War twice. And don't you dare try to tell me that Marvel isn't Disney.

My favorite Disney Princess movie is still Tangled, but I imagine I'll have a new answer in 2017.

-The Entomophagist


0 Corrections
Question #86785 posted on 05/27/2016 1:59 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are the chances that cell phones are giving us all cancer?

-Para Noid

A:

Dear "Avoid the Noid,"

This article (shout-out to Anne, Certainly for sending it my way) states that yes, it is "possible" that there's a small connection between cancer rates and cell phone use.  However, the link is usually found between cell phone use and a very rare and specific form of cancer called glioma.  Even the researchers that found the small connection between the two say that the trade-off is worth it:

 "Glioma is a terrible cancer, and if we could reduce the number of cases through simple means it would be worth it.

But cellphones also improve our lives in numerous ways, and the evidence of risk just doesn’t warrant much change. We could probably improve our health a lot more by avoiding charred meats, wearing sunscreen, eating vegetables, and helping people quit smoking. The cellphone cancer story just isn’t that scary—it’s barely even a pickle."

I love that word choice at the end - "it's barely even a pickle" - because do you know what other substances they've found to be as equally carcinogenic as cell phones?

PICKLES.

"The IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) has now elevated cell phone use to its Group 2B list of carcinogens, which includes many different chemicals and products, such as DDT (a common ingredient in hairspray and lotions), engine exhaust, and coffee, pickled vegetables and talcum powder."

A person definitely shouldn't be inhaling engine exhaust on a regular basis, but talcum powder and pickles are about as harmless as...well, talcum powder and pickles.  Just because it might increase an already small risk in forming cancer does not mean I'm going to stop eating pickles, driving my car, or using body lotions.  We live in Utah, for crying out loud, I NEED lotion to survive here.

More than any one harmful habit we may partake in, I am inclined to say that just being a human causes cancer.  People get cancer, and it's an undeniable suck-fest when that happens.  Wear your sunscreen, don't smoke or drink, test yourself for breast cancer (you too, men!), and eat healthy foods.  But also remember that cancer is a horrible part of the human experience that people sometimes cannot avoid.

-April Ludgate


1 Correction
Question #86789 posted on 05/27/2016 12:56 p.m.
Q:

Hey Board!

Let's name The Soulful Ginger's Bike for her!

Unless it already has a name.

-Lance (Definitely Not Armstrong)

P.S. I would call it Jeb.

A:

Thanks Lance,

But I think we are going to stick with Mr. Bike for now. Or if I get desperate, I'll just start calling him Kvothe. That's probably appropriate.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Corrections
Question #86787 posted on 05/27/2016 12:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do you want to build a snowman?

-Elsa

A:

Dear Elsa,

Like, does it have to be a snowman? Because I get that there's still snow way up in the mountains and on Timp and everything but that seems like a lot of effort. Plus my ankle is still recovering from that longboarding sprain and I just don't think it's such a good idea.

You might just want to get over this whole snowman thing. You know... let it go...

-Frère Rubik

P.S. The flagettes that came from this conversation are the real MVP's:

Snowman.PNG

A:

Dear Doctor,

Definitely not.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Corrections
Question #86786 posted on 05/27/2016 9:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Let's imagine for a moment three worlds where soulmates are a thing and people's compatibility is rated on a scale from 0-100.

In World 1, you know who your 100% match is, but you are completely forbidden from being with them. You are "matched" with a person whose compatibility with yours is around 75.

In World 2, you have every ability to choose who you end up with, but the highest compatibility score for all of your suitors is 50, maximum. (You still know what it's like to have a 100 though, so a 50 doesn't seem like a 100).

In World 3, you can choose your spouse, and you know who you are most compatible with (who has a 100 for you), but unlike the other worlds where the scores are mutual, they are (somehow) not compatible with you. You watch them fall in love and have kids, always knowing that they could be happier and wanting to change that, but not wanting to disrupt their life and cause them misery/pain.

Which world would you choose, if you had to choose one? Why?

-Adelaide's Late Night Insomniac Thoughts

A:

Dear Addie,

I'm going to assume that in your hypotheticals, compatibility relates to percentage of happiness. So that if you were with your soulmate, your 100% match, then you would be happy 100% of the time. This makes sense to me, because I tend to be attracted to men that are very different than I am. I also enjoy a good argument, and I want a husband I can disagree with, so I'm not sure how that would affect compatibility ratings. 

I eliminated World 2 right away. I wouldn't want to marry someone who only made me happy 50% of the time (at best). I make myself happier than that, so I'd much rather be on my own.

World 3 comes with a lot "what-if" questions for me. I'm assuming I still get to marry someone else. But am I genuinely in love with my 100% match, or do I just appreciate the possibility? Either way, since I'm free to choose whomever I want, I could end up with another high score, like a 95, which would be perfectly acceptable.

World 1 is intriguing, because 75 is a pretty good score. But I'm a rebellious person. I would hate being told that I couldn't be with my 100% man, which would then sour my arranged marriage with Mr. 75.

Therefore, I'm going to go with World 3. I appreciate my ability to choose, and if that other guy really was my 100% match, I like to think I would want him to be happy, even if it meant a bit of self-sacrifice.

Love,

Luciana

A:

Dear Addie,

Wait, what? Can I just choose ignorance? 'Tis bliss.

It would have to be World 2. I appreciate choice more than perfection. And what kind of sick world gives you your perfect person, then forbids you to be together? And World 3 would ruin anyone's self-esteem. What if the guy you were in love actually was in love with a totally different girl than the one he married, but she didn't love him and had chosen someone else, but that person she chose was in love with another person...ahhh!!!!! It's like love-ception. Or the circle of love!

I don't know, I pretty much believe that if you're compatible enough, you can fall in love with pretty much anyone. And I'm sure all of these situations have happened in our premiere world, here. I guess we all have to make due and learn to be happy. 

But I'm sad, now.

Cheers! Cheers! 

The Lone Musketeer

A:

Dear person,

World 1, 75% compatibility is pretty good and the other 25% will make it interesting.

-Sheebs


0 Corrections
Question #86706 posted on 05/27/2016 7:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is it normal to feel doubts about your relationship as it progresses towards marriage? What do I do about these doubts? I still love him but for some reason I'm just questioning all my feelings right now. Does being long distance play into that?

-My Name Here

A:

Dear Doctor,

Yes. All relationships I've been in have waxed and waned in intensity. With Significant M., the difference is that I'm choosing to let none of those waning periods shake my confidence. And with that, I want to recommend Elder Holland's "Cast Not Away Therefore Thy Confidence."

-Tally M.

A:

Dear MNH,

Yes, it is normal. I think we all have our doubts and I think it goes back to the fact that we are not able to know everything about someone or about the future. Something that has helped me in my relationship is recognizing that even if I date my girlfriend for 20 years there would still be things that I didn't know about her and that would still cause me to question certain things. Plus this is a long term decision, and if you are LDS then this is an eternal decision which is a big deal, and deserves a lot of consideration.

If you don't feel settled about it, that's okay. You don't have to be ready to marry someone right now. I think Luciana has made this very clear in her answers and I agree with her that you don't need to feel rushed or pressured into marrying someone. Do what feels right, and take your time if you feel like more time is needed. There's no clear cut answer of when the timing is right, because it varies from person to person.

As to your question about what to do about your doubts? Talk to your significant other and tell him how you feel and bring up your concerns, talk to people you respect and ask for their opinions, and I would suggest talking to God about them as well.

You are normal, and it's okay to question certain aspects of relationships. Just be careful that you aren't immobilized by fear. 

Good luck!

-Sunday Night Banter


0 Corrections
Question #86784 posted on 05/27/2016 2:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I vaguely recall that back in the day, you could drop something off at the BYU post office and they'd deliver it the same day to the MTC. Is that still true? (maybe it was never true) Also, I'm betting the answer is no, but is there a way to deliver something to the MTC for free? I'm guessing you can't just drop something off there?

thanks

A:

Dear Grateful,

Good news! Same-day MTC delivery through the BYU post office is still a thing. Just get your package to their location (on the first floor of the Wilk, by The Wall and the roundabout outside) before 2:45 p.m. and they'll get your package to your missionary on the same day.

-Frère Rubik


0 Corrections
Thursday, May 26, 2016
Posted on 05/26/2016 11:32 p.m. New Correction on: #86783 I recently read in a fact book that forks were not commonly used by people in ...
Question #86783 posted on 05/26/2016 10:28 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I recently read in a fact book that forks were not commonly used by people in the U.S. until after the Civil War. First, what were they using if not forks before? Second, what about the Civil War opened the gates for forks to be used more commonly? Third, tell me the story of the origins of forks!

-Ironic Chef

A:

Dear Ferrous Cook,

Wikipedia - and its one source that looked helpful and at least semi-reliable - confirms that forks were not commonly used in America until the mid 19th century. However, they were apparently common by the time of the 1851 World Fair, a decade before the Civil War.

Prior to the adoption of table forks, people used fingers and a knife. The American habit of switching the fork to the right hand after cutting a piece of meat seems to have come from using a spoon and a knife together.

Forks have been used since ancient Greece or earlier as cooking and serving utensils, but it took a while for them to be used at the table. It seems like it started in the Middle East/Byzantine Empire, and spread slowly from there to Italy, Germany, England, and finally America.

-The Entomophagist


1 Correction
Question #86782 posted on 05/26/2016 4:54 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I heard awhile ago that Ivanka Trump & Chelsea Clinton were friends... Or, at least, they used to be. True or false? What did their "friendship" entail exactly? How is their realtionship now? Torn to shreds by their parents?

-Tom on a Cruise

A:

Dear person,

I couldn't find anything definitive but it sounds like they are the kind of friends who have a lot in common and meet up for dinner a couple times per year. Chelsea Clinton apparently said, "I love Ivanka, and I think friendship always trumps politics — and that’s how it should be.” So I'm guessing they are still friends, but who really knows. 

-Sheebs


0 Corrections
Question #86781 posted on 05/26/2016 4:45 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Does the USA sell gravol, the anti-nausea medication? If so, why not? I've noticed it's the canadian go-to medication for nausea, but I can't find it in my homeland?

-Candid non-Canadian

A:

Dear Candid,

It's sold under the brand name Dramamine, and is most definitely sold in America.

-April Ludgate, who first heard of Dramamine by watching Sons of Provo, and now I have their music stuck in my head.

"Ooooooh, sweet spirit,

You're so.....nice."

A:

Dear person,

It's called Gravol in Canada because Dramamine is hard for Canadians to pronounce.

-Sheebs (who hopes that someone out there will get this mediocre attempt at humour)


0 Corrections
Question #86778 posted on 05/26/2016 3:34 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So I recently started a master's degree program and my new university's mascot is the husky, which I thought was interesting because I was also a husky back in Junior High. Is there anywhere in the US where you could have the same mascot from elementary school through college? Have any of you ever had duplicate mascots?

-Otto Didact

A:

Dear Otto,

I feel like lots of people at BYU would have had the same mascot at least in high school, because cougars/panthers/pumas/mountain lions (all different words for the same animal, by the way) are pretty common mascots, at least in the Intermountain West. Several of us writers have been cougars/panthers/pumas/mountain lions at least twice.

There is indeed somewhere in the US you can be the same mascot your whole life! Adelaide said that she went to a preschool through 12th grade school which had the same mascot as a nearby college. Where that somewhere is, though, will not be disclosed in the interest of anonymity.

-Alta


0 Corrections
Posted on 05/26/2016 1:05 p.m. New Correction on: #86766 Are we allowed to write thank you letters to apostles? There was a conference talk that ...
Posted on 05/26/2016 1:03 p.m. New Correction on: #86750 Does the church still have a stance against vasectomies? Back story: My husband and I have ...
Posted on 05/26/2016 1:01 p.m. New Correction on: #86744 How would one get the smell of rotten carrots out of the pages of a book? ...
Question #86779 posted on 05/26/2016 12:21 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Hi guys. I will be a new freshman at BYU this fall, and I'm hoping to be accepted into the BYU marching band. I sent in my audition video a few days before the May 1st deadline, and they said they would send out announcements of membership beggining May 15. So far, I haven't heard anything back. A friend of mine, who auditioned for the trombone section, heard back on the 16th. I'm auditioning for the drum-line, which I understand is more competitive. Do you guys know how long it usually takes for the marching band to make membership decisions?

Thanks for your help.

-Band person

A:

Dear Drummer,

I've been in the BYU Marching Band, and in past years, membership decisions for the drumline have often been made a bit after the rest of the band. The drumline staff has a lot of people to look through and they take decisions seriously, so it might be a few more weeks. If you want more information, you can always send a message through the band website. They're pretty nice people over there!

Best of luck!

-Kirito


0 Corrections
Question #86777 posted on 05/26/2016 9:20 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My friend is mildly allergic to tree nuts. Whenever I eat nuts around him, he tells me not to kiss him. I have never tried to kiss him before, during, or after eating nuts. Or ever. Is this a flirtation, a warning, or some weird joke? What is the appropriate response? It would make more sense if we were in middle school or high school or something but we are not.

Clueless girl

A:

Dear Alicia,

It sounds like flirting to me. I would try flirting back to see how things go (if you're interested in him, of course).

If you're feeling particularly bold, say something like, "So when would be a better time to kiss you?"

If he freaks out, act like you're playing along with his weird joke. If he's into it, then you have a date for this weekend. You win either way.

Love,

Luciana


0 Corrections