Whenever he thought about it, he felt terrible. And so, at last, he came to a fateful decision. He decided not to think about it. ~John-Roger and Peter McWilliams
Question #78813 posted on 08/20/2014 4:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am EXTREMELY aggravated with Walmart! Okay, so, for the past few months I've been ordering clothes from Walmart.com. The receipt (and online) say you can return your items to Walmart.com or that "returns are easy!" in store. YEAH RIGHT.

Okay, yeah, well, the first times I returned items in store WERE easy. They'd scan the receipt and give me my money back--along with any tax I paid. BUT NOW, I guess that Walmart.com made it harder for the customer service representatives at the Walmart stores to return things. Now they don't give you tax back! Ridiculous!

Well, I'll go further into detail. The Walmart customer representatives in South Jordan know what's up and they know how to give me the tax back that I paid online. They're cool and educated.

But the Walmart associates in American Fork told me that they no longer give tax back on purchases made online. What???!!! He also said that all of online is trying to make anything bought from online tax free. Okay, so what does that have to do with me not getting my tax back?? Complete and utter crap. Sorry. Anyways, I tried to explain to them that the one in South Jordan knew how to do it and that since items ordered from online are cheaper than in-store, when they scan the receipt, they DO NOT change the price that shows up on the computer because that price INCLUDES tax. The American Fork people didn't want to listen to me and told me he can't give me tax and blah blah. A different person from that store told me that some tax is different state by state and that maybe the items I got from online were from a state outside of Utah (yeah, duh) so the tax will be different. Okaaaaay. But that doesn't mean that that if I was charged $10 in taxes I should get $0 back for Utah...

Then the stores in Springville and Payson are just as bad as American Fork. I was trying to return a few items and it took the guy in Springville an HOUR AND A HALF to give me a Walmart gift card, EVEN THOUGH I had my receipt and had all the clothes in their original packaging with the needed bar codes and such, of which the money should've been returned to my credit card. I tried telling him, too, that the people in South Jordan know how to do it and you don't change the price that shows up on the computer and stuff. But he wouldn't budge. He said, I probably shouldn't even be giving you tax back (because he wanted to give me the price I paid for the items, excluding tax. For the tax he recommended I call Walmart.com and tell them that Walmart didn't give me back tax but that they did return the items. This is all so complicated.).

I don't drive up to the South Jordan area very often and as I write this I vow to never order from Walmart.com again. But I still have shipments coming my way. What can I do to have Walmart.com educate their American Fork, Springville, and Payson locations on how to properly return items ordered online? Yes, I've spoken to the customer representative supervisors and they're just as clueless as the people "helping" me. And, if all of this were resolved, I would rather return in-store than ship it back, because I receive money back instantly.

-needed to vent. sorry 'bout that

A:

Dear Doctor.

Calm down. Basically, you can't do anything. You've already talked to the people it'd be helpful to talk to.

To be completely honest, I'd be more careful about what you're ordering online, since you seem to be returning things an awful lot.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #78724 posted on 08/20/2014 2:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Let's say there is a single parent with a child who is 4-5 years old. Would, on average, the child fare better to have his parent marry someone else with a kid (who is roughly the same age as child in question) or if his parent married someone without kids? I know a lot of factors are involved, but does research show that young children of divorce do better when their parents marry someone who has kids too or someone who doesn't?

-Susan Bones

A:

Dear Hufflepuff,

I looked high and low for any type of supporting research but I couldn't find anything. It's hard to find conclusive evidence for something like this because there are so many variables that contribute and influence the outcome. I did find some data about the child's age being a factor in acceptance of the new stepparent if you're interested in reading that. 

I would think that with that particular child being so young it wouldn't really matter either way. A new blended family would be a transition for a child, no matter if there are other children involved or not. One of my favorite developmental websites has a page about stepsibling relationships that you way want to look over. 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #78808 posted on 08/20/2014 11:18 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I don't mean this to be disrespectful at all but if I come across that way, I apologize. I'm just curious as to why the color of the gay community is purple. Purple used to be a symbol of royalty, so is it now "their color" because some of them are drag queens?

-don't hate me

A:

Dear Wade,

I didn't find anything conclusive but I have a theory. In 1856 Sir William Henry Perkin discovered a purple-colored dye which lead to some changes in fashion resulting in the 1890s being coined "the Mauve decade" (although its other nickname, "the Gay Nineties," was not related to homosexuality). One person who, according to various sources, took particular liking to the fashion trend was playwright Oscar Wilde. In the latter half of the 20th century Wilde became a gay icon, which coincides with the early use of purple as a gay pride symbol in the "Purple hand" and purple rhino. It's just my speculation but I would guess that Wilde's fondness of purple clothing could have had some influence on the choice of purple.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #78767 posted on 08/20/2014 11:12 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I need some advice. My husband will be gone for a month in the fall. My mom wants my child and I to fly to her place and spend time with her. Normally this would be no big deal. But my mom is currently enabling an older sibling to the point that I can't stand it any longer. This sibling makes double what my husband does and yet they have one car and my mom drives my sister and her kids everywhere everyday. She has them over for dinner all the time and I do not doubt there is more going on that I do not know (note: I receive no assistance from family nor do I want any). I feel like my mom's relationship with me is hanging by a thread and she doesn't care. In addition I have no desire to "go on a vacation" that consists of driving my sister all over town. I really don't want to go but I don't know how to tell her (or should I just suck it up?). What would you do?

-My Name Here

A:

Dear human,

If I was you, I wouldn't go. I also have some troubled family relationships and if I visit certain family members, I am careful about my boundaries. And one of my boundaries is basically, "If I really don't feel like seeing you, I won't."

That might sound harsh to some, but I don't feel bad doing this because (A) they are capable of taking care of themselves and (B) I am not obligated to try to be emotionally close to people who hurt me, even if they are my mother/brother/uncle/whatever. If people make me feel crappy, I reserve the right to interact with them on my own terms, not theirs.

-Sheebs


0 Comments
Question #78784 posted on 08/20/2014 10:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What has been the biggest surprise of your life? And if it wasn't recent, what has been the biggest surprise of your recent (let's say the past 3 years) life?

-lalala (I'm on a roll!)

A:

Dear roll,

The biggest surprise of my recent life is probably that I'm not on a mission right now. For various reasons, it doesn't look like it's happening in the near future, despite my "preparation": wanting to go on a mission since I was ten; reading Preach My Gospel, The Power of an Everyday Missionary, and other resources; taking mission prep. in singles wards and for credit at BYU; enjoying and gaining experience in teaching-related ward callings, volunteer participation, and jobs; being comfortable leaving the country and/or learning a new language; thinking "Would this skirt still work if I were a missionary?" when I go shopping; saving up money; and being, quite frankly, talented at learning and teaching. It's something that I always planned on and talked about for many years, but it's not actually happening at the time I thought it would. I'm cool with that; there are a lot of other great things I'm doing, and all that preparation just makes me a better teacher and disciple overall. But it's definitely a surprise, and multiple friends and family members have expressed surprise at that decision as well.

-Owlet

A:

Dear la,

Being able to go through the temple as a female in her early 20s.

-A writer

A:

Dear repeated A in C major,

I'll include a few: what my mission call was, who I'm dating right now, and what my current job is.

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear friend,

It's a toss-up between actually getting a job in my field and marrying that goofy kid from dinner group.

Peace,

-Stego Lily


0 Comments
Question #78687 posted on 08/20/2014 10:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board Marauders,

What would be a cool design for a Board Marauder t-shirt?

-Up to know good

A:

Dear up,

Maurauders part 2.jpg

Marauders part 1.jpg

One of these would be the front, one would be the back. Take your pick as to which is which.

-The Marauders


0 Comments
Question #78777 posted on 08/20/2014 7:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Approximately how fast would a typical car have to be going in order for the "centrifugal" force on the tires to equal the force caused be the internal pressure?

Or, in other words, say that I have a car with a 1/4" hole in each of the tires. How fast do I need to drive before I can't tell that I have flat tires, because of the forces acting on the rubber in the tires?

Thanks!

-Fredjikrang

A:

Dear Fjord,

If I were an engineer, this would be a really difficult question to answer. This is because as a tire rotates faster centrifugal forces cause the tire to expand in diameter and decrease in width. Also, the contact between the tire and the road causes some issues because the tire is deformed while in contact with the road and additionally when it leaves the area of contact it makes a wave in the tire as it tries to return to its normal diameter. Not to mention the increase in temperature of the air inside your tire as you go faster...

But I'm not an engineer; I'm a physicist. Let's ignore all that.

Let's imagine your car is in a friction-less vacuum and that the tires remain perfectly circular without any kind of deformity. Never mind how your car is going to move forward. What we want to do is figure out how fast your tires have to rotate so that the centrifugal force pushes against the tires with enough force to simulate a typical tire pressure. Let's say we have a minivan and we want a reasonable 32 psi. The centrifugal force pushing the tires outwards in this case is an inertial force (as opposed to a centrifugal force that results from a 3rd-law reaction to a centripetal force) and thus will be proportional to the mass of the tire. The inertia is opposing the centripetal acceleration so this is pretty easy to calculate once we get some data on a good example tire.

Michelin's website recommends these tires for our hypothetical 2001 Honda Odyssey (Did I not mention we were using that? Well, we are.) which according to the specs are 27" tall, weigh 23.3 pounds, and are 215mm wide. Let's make the assumption that it is an infinitely thin, perfectly cylindrical cylinder (because, again, I am a physicist). Now we just solve a few equations and we get our answer.

It comes out to be about 130 mph which teaches us that physicists make a lot of assumptions.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #78750 posted on 08/20/2014 7:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

A Facebook friend just shared Matt Walsh's article on Robin William's death. This article made me very angry. What do you think of this article?

-Needing a reality check

A:

Dear Wanda,

I can't stand Matt Walsh and I am most certainly not going to be able to stomach his article on this issue for a host of reasons. Yayfulness shared the "What Is Matt Walsh Wrong About Today?" blog which is a favorite of mine and this is also a good response to that particular Matt Walsh post.

On a more pragmatic level, I would recommend hiding updates from themattwalshblog.com on Facebook. I went a step further and installed the SiteBlock extension on Chrome and blacklisted Matt Walsh's blog along with other websites that irritate me like Thought Catalog or Buzzfeed (though Buzzfeed is for different reasons).

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Needing,

Depression and other mental illnesses are not choices. They are diseases and like other diseases bring pain and suffering. Matt Walsh claims that he has dealt with depression but from what he said I cannot believe that. Let me share my perspective.

I deal with a condition known as "double depression" which is depression coupled with a similar illness known as dysthymia (there is, unfortunately, no 5th amendment mental illness right). I have dealt with it for a long time and for the first several years I thought that this was a spiritual issue. Don't get me wrong; there are spiritual cases of depression. I just don't believe that clinical depression is a "spiritual issue" as Matt Walsh tweeted, and as I've occasionally heard preached at church. If it were, then it surely would have gone away or at least gotten better with repentance, faith, and so on. It didn't. The classic answers of "reading my scriptures, praying, and going to church" have had far less impact on my depression than medication, counseling, and other physical things. We know that the spiritual and the physical are connected, but my issue is not with my spirit—it's with my body.

Matt Walsh said suicide is a choice. While that is technically correct, signing a two-year contact with the Cavaliers is also a choice. It is a decision that one makes but there is so much that goes into it before that. It's not a simple "I'll wear this t-shirt today" decision.

I find it interesting that we say someone "lost a battle with cancer" but we never say someone "lost a battle with depression." They are both illnesses that can kill you.

-a writer

A:

Dear human,

My opinion seems to differ from most of the other writers. I don't mean to offend anyone with this response, and I hope the fact that I believe that all suicides should be viewed with compassion comes through in what I say.

I don't agree with everything Matt Walsh says but I think that he added a needed dimension to an important discussion that was already happening everywhere on the internet. I am glad he came out and said that suicide was a choice. Because I agree that yes, ultimately the act of killing oneself is a choice.

Did he say that people who commit suicide will go to hell? No.

Did he say that God does not have compassion on the immense suffering of people who commit suicide? No.

Did he say that people who commit suicide are weak and cowardly? No.

Did he call suicide a heinous and disgusting sin? No.

What he said was that suicide is a choice made by individuals who are in complex and difficult situations. It did kind of seem like people were reacting like this: suicide means depression which means chemicals. Therefore blaming is necessarily wrong and also judgmental. But, as Matt Walsh pointed out, suicide is not an inevitable thing, and it is a bad way to escape suffering because life is so precious. I think that's something that needed to be said. I don't think his post was meant to be "ROBIN WILLIAMS IS A TERRIBLE PERSON FOR DOING WHAT HE DID." 

My own personal opinion is that even though suicide is a choice, a lot of things that lead up to it are not. I think it is impossible for us to clearly separate which factors are in or out of a person's control. But clearly anyone who commits suicide - no matter whether they are "to blame", or not - is suffering deeply. My personal opinion is that the Lord responds with compassion to suicide, even though choice is involved. 

-Sheebs

A:

Dear Check,

I find it to be very callous to use a recent death to promote your own personal views and ideas.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger

A:

Dear Matt Walsh could really use a reality check too,

Something about that article bugged me on a very fundamental level, but I couldn't put a finger on it until I read some comments on two responses on the blog "What Is Matt Walsh Wrong About Today?" I still don't feel fully capable of articulating what I mean, so I'll let the comments do that themselves.

As someone who used to struggle with depression, whenever I heard anything that said things like “it’s just a choice, you have to choose joy”, it would make me feel all the more like I should commit suicide because clearly everyone ELSE who is depressed can just choose joy, and since I seem unable to do that, I am especially broken and unworthy of taking up space because I’m so weak and pathetic, and me ending my life is a BLESSING to those around me so they don’t have to put up with someone who can’t just “choose” to be happy. This is how depressed people think. It’s not logical, but it is dangerous.

...

I don’t believe that suicide is ever something we want to do… sometimes it feels like our only choice, because rather than facing every day with such pain we feel it would easier for us and for others to get it over with, so that we could cause no more grief to them… What would be done would be done. Of course this logic is incredibly flawed… but when you believe all you do is cause misery the idea is that they’ll be able to live a better life after you’re gone.

...

The problem with hoping people will reach out for help is that sometimes, we don’t want it. I’ve had the absolute **** kicked out of me by depression so many times, I’ve lost count. I’ve taken my meds and done my therapy and done everything right and it still comes and kicks my *** AND THERE’S NOTHING I CAN DO TO STOP IT. That’s the nature of this awful, terrible beast. And there are times where I just want that to be over. People talk about suicide being a selfish act, and I’m not saying that it isn’t, but at what point is it selfish to want or me to continue to hold on when the life I live is filled with pain and sorrow and struggle?

Suicidal people also generally TOTALLY BELIEVE they are doing the right thing by their friends and family. They believe they are a burden, they are a problem, etc. It sounds cliche, but as someone who has been there, it’s as real as the green grass and the blue sky sometimes. When I feel this way I’m not being weak, I’m not seeking attention (in fact I’ll usually go to great lengths to hide it), I’m not being dramatic just for fun… Whatever it is is out of my control, and I HATE that.

These comments come from post the first and post the second. I'd add my own feelings, but it would be redundant. Instead I will just say that as someone who has struggled with at times severe and dangerous depression, I can agree wholeheartedly with what I've quoted here.

I wouldn't say this normally, because normally I don't think it's a fair comparison, but today I feel like Matt Walsh is playing the role of Westboro Baptist Church, using someone else's tragedy to further his agenda and line his pockets with ad revenue. I think the best thing we can do is simply ignore him. The suicide of Robin Williams is a tragedy. The other less-well-known but no less painful suicides that happen every day are also tragedies. Anything that detracts from the tragedy and fails to provide a real solution is irrelevant.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #78809 posted on 08/20/2014 7 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

At what point in a (romantic) relationship should one disclose mental illness?

Under what conditions, if any, do you think mental/emotional difficulties would render someone unfit for a committed relationship?

-Someone

A:

Dear Doctor,

I kind of sort of dated a guy two years ago that struggled with a couple of different mental illnesses, primarily manifest in anxiety and depression. It actually came up about a month into our friendship, when we were talking about the Mission Prep class, and he mentioned not being able to serve a mission. For us, it was at a point where he knew he could trust me, and I knew him as more than just a mental illness. With my ex, Spencer, he found out about a month into our friendship as well, when I opened up with some of the stuff that I deal with in a bit of a mini-breakdown I had. That one went okay, but mostly because I kind of hit him with it and we weren't super good friends at that point (though the conversation helped push us into that territory).

I think that it's best to disclose it when you feel like you trust each other and know each other fairly well. Sometimes it just comes up because of circumstances, say an emotional breakdown, and you have to, or you feel like you have to, explain. Regardless, it'll probably come up fairly naturally.

As for problems in relationships, I think that yes, they do have the potential to make someone unable to participate in a committed relationship. At the beginning of last summer, this happened with one of my friends. His emotional state made him incapable of pursuing a romantic relationship, regardless of his desire to do so. However, this isn't to say that they are automatically unqualified for such a relationship. It just means that at that current point in time they're unable to do so. (Case in point, my friend is now happily married.) Often times, it's easier to stay in a relationship when something emotionally difficult happens than it is to get into a relationship while that thing is happening.

I wish you the best of luck, and if you have anything you'd like to discuss with someone who's been through similar stuff, feel free to e-mail me.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #78804 posted on 08/20/2014 3 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Where did you serve your mission? What language?

How do you say "Good morning" or "Good afternoon" or "Good evening" in that language?

Danke!

A:

Dear Bitte,

I served somewhere in the Eastern Hemisphere, speaking Mandarin Chinese.

Rather then attempt to write those translations so that you can pronounce them correctly, just go here and click on the speaker in the lower right. But I will vouch for those translations.

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear Ghost Rider,

I served in southeastern Idaho speaking a regional dialect of English, though I assure you it is wildly different from any English you've ever heard. To say "good morning," "good afternoon," or "good evening" you say "good potato," "good potato," or "good potato," respectively.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Danke,

I haven't served a mission yet, but I did learn some Quichua when I was in South America for a couple months. "Good" is alyi (AL-yee), "morning" is tutamanda (TOO-tah MAHN-dah, literally "from night"), "afternoon" is chishi (CHEE-shee), and night is tuta (TOO-tah). Alyi pundzha (POON-jah, meaning "day") is a common greeting, although linguistically "good morning/afternoon/night/day" carried over into Quichua from Spanish and the form isn't really traditional, although it is frequently used now.

-Owlet


0 Comments
Tuesday, August 19, 2014
Question #78781 posted on 08/19/2014 10:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How many kisses does a cute little baby receive in his/her first year of life from smitten parents?

-lalala

A:

Dear fa,

After some extensive modeling I found that the typical cute baby receives on average 4091.3 kisses from his or her parents in his or her first year of life (whereas the typical ugly baby only receives 1786.2). The sampling methods I used provided no method of measuring the smitten-ness of the baby's parents, though I would like to conduct further research on that if you are willing to supply the grant.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #78759 posted on 08/19/2014 10:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

If we were a ward, what callings would we have?

-Concorde

A:

Dear Concorde,

I had no intentions of actually answering this question other than to say that I'm an eternal music person and would probably end up being an organist or pianist. But then this question got 10 flagettes with calling suggestions, the first from Anne, Certainly saying that I'd been "nominated" as the Relief Society president. Ha. Way to pick out the calling I'd never wish upon myself.

I figured I may as well just come up with callings for everyone (with some help from the other writers). See how many you agree with.

Maven – Relief Society president or nursery leader. I want to comment that RS president and nursery leader are some of my last choices for callings if I were given a choice. Nursery is the Holy Bastion of Parental Sanity. I'm not worthy enough for that.

Tally M. – Gospel doctrine teacher, ward librarian, or Relief Society secretary. I think she'd do a great job teaching because she always does such a good job on research-based doctrinal questions. Anne, Certainly thinks Tally is really organized and would be good in callings that require such a quality. Tally, on the other hand, believes she's also an eternal music person.

Haleakala – Elder's quorum president. Probably because he's simultaneously sensitive and always willing to help. I hear someone's moving, Haleakala!

Concealocanth – Gospel doctrine teacher or Assistant-to-the-assistant ward greeter. She nominated herself, I might add.

Anne, Certainly – Activities committee, or something else with people and food. Although she suggested these herself, I concur that such a calling would be a good fit for her. Have you tried her homemade truffles?

Stego Lily – Activities committee or nursery. I can totally see Stego planning some fun, outdoorsy activities. She comments that nursery is the best calling she's ever had and since Mavenbaby is currently the only Board baby in nursery, she'd be down with that.

Owlet – Program designer. There's a technical name for that calling that's not coming to me, but I like to think she'd put fun illustrations on the cover every week. And she'd never use boring fonts or Comic Sans.

El-ahrairah – Young men leader or scout leader. He just seems like the fun kind of guy young men want to hang out and set abnormally large fires with.

Sheebs – Compassionate service leader. I definitely see this being a good place for her, since she's so good at empathizing with others.

Concorde – Young Women's camp director. You would make camp a hoot, and I can see you making it more like actual camping than the "stay in a cabin, do crafts, and get weirdly sentimental" thing that many YW camps are (not that it's a bad thing, it's just not everyone's preference). Plus you'd have the greatest stories for campfire time. Please tell me you'd terrorize the Beehives with an intense snipe hunt?

M.O.D.A.Q. – Primary teacher. Because the newest members in the ward have a knack for getting called to teach primary. Take heart, the only two primary kids we have are Yellow's adorable girls!

Divya – Ward welfare specialist. I feel like she'd be really good at giving people guidance in welfare-oriented areas.

Curious Physics Minor & Yellow – Ward clerks or executive secretaries. They're the people that keep everything running behind the scenes, right?

Hobo – Ward magazine representative. What? It's a thing.

Marguerite St. Just – Relief Society counselor. Well, you made me the president, so I get to choose a counselor who's fun, hip, and will always keep me laughing.

Ms. O'Malley – Primary president. She is a creative elementary school teacher, after all.

Ozymandias – Bishop. Everyone seems to like him, and he's a smart, capable, spiritual guy. Works for me!

Squirrel – Compassionate service committee. She and Sheebs would be a really great team.

The Entropy Ninja – Relief Society meetings committee. I can see her helping plan cool activities like a Pi Day showdown to show how well math mixes with food, along with other nontraditional activities. I can't see any cheesy program-oriented events coming from her.

The Soulful Ginger – Ward sports director. This is, after all, the place in the ward where souls are ripest for stealing.

yayfulness – Family history consultant. I feel like yay's superb internet research skills could really be put to excellent use here. And if he threw in a meme or Youtube video every so often it might make people more excited about family history!

There we are! One big, happy, dysfunctional ward Board family!

--Maven


0 Comments
Question #78771 posted on 08/19/2014 7:48 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

A couple years ago, I went to return an item at the BYU Bookstore (excuse me, the BYU *Store*) and ended up getting charged for it a second time. I was too worried that if I went in there again I'd just lose more money, so I avoided pursuing the issue.

Between then and now, I've frequently been frustrated waiting to check out. Sometimes it's been my fault for "shopping in a hurry" but other times it's like... the lady in front of me has two items, and you're spending two minutes on her for what should be a "scan-scan-boop-you're-done" job. Maybe I'm just too used to grocery store check-outs, and yet I can't help but feel like the employees have no idea what they're actually doing.

This week, I went to purchase a UTA farepay card from there ($3), and they neglected to activate it when I bought it. I was a little miffed, of course, when I tried to set up the online component and was greeted with "please enter an active card number," but you know, I went in the next day to the Bookstore and asked them to activate it. Not only did it take them a ridiculous 30 minutes to figure out *how* to activate it, but $20 later (I had to put a starting amount of money on the card), I come home and try to link it to my UTA account. "Please enter an active card number." By now I don't even want the UTA card anymore. Frankly I'm appalled by the idea of having to lose $23 as a result, possibly twice over if I go in the store and ask for a card refund (knowing that with my luck they'll just charge me again for the same amount), so I'm crossing my fingers and hoping they'll give me a cash refund instead so I don't have to worry about swiping my card again through their system and getting even more screwed over. It's been really stressing me out because I'm on a budget--I thought I was buying a convenient way to allocate budget money just for transportation costs, instead I've been getting pretty schooled in "patience" and just losing more money as a result. I'm worried they won't give me a cash refund and just keep charging me more money on my card, which I absolutely can't afford.

Have any of the Board members had similar frustrating experiences making transactions at the BYU Store? I know we're all college students, but that doesn't really seem like an excuse to do a sloppy job. I've worked at the MTC cafeteria before so I understand the stress that comes with a customer service job, but sometimes it just seems like no one has training on anything besides locating items and charging money.

-the customer who probably isn't always right

A:

Dear Customer,

One time I bought a drink that was hideously out of date (my fault for not checking when I bought, but I trusted that they would keep expired things off the shelf) and then I drank it and got really sick (it tasted a little off but I had never had that drink before so I figured it was normal and didn't want to waste my money just because I didn't like it) and then when I called to alert them about the expired drink they yelled at me, told me I was a liar and that they didn't even sell that product and hung up on me. Unfortunately for them, I have some connections in the store's PR department and immediately contacted them and got my problem more adequately addressed. 

A lot of my transactions with the BYU Store are frustrating, to be honest. I don't want to denigrate the student employees who work there, but I've worked retail and register and all of that before in other capacities. It's really not that hard, especially to just smile and be friendly, even if you can't be quick or organized or you're still learning how to do certain things. Maybe I just go at all the wrong times or go to all the wrong registers. I'm willing to give them the benefit of the doubt. 

-Concorde

A:

Dear right,

Like Concorde, I'm willing to give them the benefit of the doubt. However, I distinctly remember one time when I was purchasing a large sheet of butcher paper. After rolling it up very carefully to avoid any folds or creases, I brought it to the counter and the helpful cashier person asked if I'd like him to put a rubber band on it. I said sure, which was a big mistake. I spent the next two minutes looking on in dismay as he proceeded to smush and wrestle with the paper as he struggled to get the rubber band on. I bought it anyway, as I was in a hurry, and it wasn't expensive at all, but it was a bit disappointing. On a positive note, he and the other employees I've encountered have been very nice and friendly; I'll just keep a better eye on my purchases in the future, and try not to go to the bookstore when I'm on any kind of time-sensitive errand.

-Owlet


0 Comments
Posted on 08/19/2014 7:30 p.m. New Comment on: #78508 Why is the Church so ridiculously supportive of Boy Scouts to the extent that it is? ...
Question #78754 posted on 08/19/2014 6:24 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are some clean Whose Line is it Anyway sketches?

Thanks,
doesn't appreciate innuendo

A:

Dear appreciate, 

I did a lot of research for this question, lemme tell you. I watched several hours of the old Whose Line and then watched several hours of the new CWTV version. I sat down with a pad of paper to write down clean sketches and at the end of all of those hours, my pad was completely empty. Every single sketch either had innuendo or something else that would not be classified as clean. I was not really surprised. 

Fortunately, there are pre-made Youtube playlists of the relatively rare clean Whose Line sketches. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #78737 posted on 08/19/2014 6:24 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Concerning Board Question #78534, what do you think the results would be of these pairings?

-Sheebs

A:

Dear Sheebs,

We would be the best companionship ever. Just like when I was your mentor, I'd start off being really mean (per the usual) and then grow to adore you. Also we would convert just about everyone. Maven and Squirrel would be that super spiritual, soft-hearted companionship that converts everyone by baking them treats. 

Mo and I would have an awesome date, proceed to date for a while longer, get married and have blonde children since we're both blonde. Mo would become fabulously wealthy and I would channel the instincts of a Black Widow and kill him off for his money. Divya and Ozy would be a total power couple. TEN and Hobo would be a brilliant, science-y couple. 

Owlet and I would rock the deserted island. I don't think we'd be particularly adept at anything special, but we'd be just fine. I feel like CPM and Ozy would become like two halves of The Professor on Gilligan's Island and invent lots of useless devices out of bamboo and grass. Mo and Anne would sit on the beach all day long and trade sarcastic jibes until they died while Squirrel and Stego would be the perfect pair for a deserted island. The two of them are so earthy and would be perfectly fine. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #78797 posted on 08/19/2014 5 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Who is prettier: Emma Watson or Jenna Coleman? (I vote for Coleman, although Emma W. is pretty gorgeous.)

-Dinosaurs Harbinger Museums

A:

Dear Museums,

Emma Watson, because she has more of an oval face, but I do love Jenna Coleman's long dark locks and her coloring in general.

I was trying to do a face symmetry test to see which of them is more scientifically "beautiful" (more symmetrical faces are considered more beautiful), but it wasn't working on my computer. Suffice it to say that they both look amazing, and they both have British accents, which I hear is a plus.

-Owlet


0 Comments
Posted on 08/19/2014 2:38 p.m. New Comment on: #78716 I'm extremely squeamish when it comes to other people's bodies. I get grossed out by body ...
Question #78787 posted on 08/19/2014 1:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm working on starting an editing service for students and faculty in the Utah Valley area. How valuable (money-wise) is it to students to have their work edited/proofread before they submit to professors? How much would they be willing to pay?

-Jo

A:

Dear Jo,

Just speaking for myself: I think it's valuable to have my work edited, but I wouldn't be willing to pay anything for it. I would just ask one of several friends to edit it for free, or for cookies at most. BYU and many other universities also offer free editing services such as Writing Fellows and the library's research center. I know a good number of students would still be willing to pay, but I suspect many are like me in this regard.

However, you can get an idea of what to charge by looking at other editing services. Various online services charge 2-4 cents per word, $20 for an essay, $8 per page, and about $10 for a couple pages.

-El-ahrairah


0 Comments
Question #78798 posted on 08/19/2014 12:54 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

On a scale from one to 10, how legible is your signature?

-10. Basically textbook D'Nealian cursive

A:

Dear Wade,

I don't even think I have a signature. Whenever I sign something I either scribble a wavy line or take the time to deliberately write out "Mickey Mouse" in the most loopy, immature-looking cursive I can, complete with three circles at the end depicting Mickey's head.

I guess I have a consistent "official" signature but it is horribly illegible. You could maybe get my initials out of it, but that's it. So since one is the bottom of the scale I have to put myself there.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear 10, 

My signature is about a 9.5 or 10. It's made of easy-to-read letters and my general cursive is pretty dang neat as well. 

When I started answering this I was like "I'll write it out and upload a photo to show them!" 

And then I realized why I shouldn't do that. 

I am not very smart. 

-Concorde

A:

Dear Psychic Paper,

I was about to do the same thing as Concorde, so despite the Board's relatively high ACT scores, we still have got some intelligence missing.

My signature itself is probably about a 6.5. You can make out my initials and the last letter of my last name, but nothing more.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Basil,

I was going to give myself a seven (because I LOVE sevens), but then I signed some things and realized I deserved maybe a three or four. You can kind of make out my first name maybe, my middle initial is totally clear, as are the first two letters of my last name, but then the n's and e's and i's in my last name all blend together in a mass of squiggles. There's no way anyone could make it out.

-Marguerite St. Just

A:

Dear opposite,

This is the conversation that just happened.

Wife: Negative seven thousand.

Me: I'm giving myself a one.

Wife: That's being generous.

My signature is basically a bunch of scribbles. On a good day you can make out the first letter of my first name. That's about it, though.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear 10,

I'm going with an 8. You can definitely read it, but I could see how people would get a bit confused on my middle initial and possibly a couple letters in my last name if I sign quickly.

--Maven

A:

Dear cursive,

I'll give myself a 6 or 7. You can read my first name just fine, but there are too many similar-looking letters in my last name, so it becomes a squiggle.

-Owlet


0 Comments
Posted on 08/19/2014 11:14 a.m. New Comment on: #78621 I have learned from my education that in general, it is best not to meddle in ...
Question #78783 posted on 08/19/2014 9:18 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is/are you favorite/some of your favorite movie or t.v. proposals?

-lalala

A:

Dear fa,

This one.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Laaaa!!

Barney's proposal to Robin in How I Met Your Mother.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger (who is still bitter about how that show ended) 


0 Comments
Question #78792 posted on 08/19/2014 12:54 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

1) Have you seen any wedding announcements where one member of the couple has a child (from a previous relationship) and the other person doesn't have kids?

Let's say that the child mentioned is very close to their parent.

2) Do you think it would be nice on the wedding invitation to have a picture of the couple plus the child, or do you think it would be more classy to have just the couple pictured for the announcement?

I know that it's each individual's preference, I'm just wondering which picture you think would best suit a temple marriage. And let's say there can only be one picture in the announcement, so you couldn't have a collage of photos with at least one picture with the kid featured.

-RedLocks

A:

Dear Redlocks,

My brother married a woman who had a daughter from a previous marriage. In their wedding announcements they had pictures of both themselves, and themselves with the daughter. I like that it wasn't just one way or the other. If they hadn't been able to do a collage, my brother and his wife would probably still have had the daughter in the picture, because that is what their relationship was like.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger


0 Comments
Monday, August 18, 2014
Question #78770 posted on 08/18/2014 11:48 p.m.
Q:

Hi ya, 100 Hour Board,

So we all know how cool google translator is, right? Well, is there something similar for ancient languages? For instance, if I want to work on Biblical Hebrew or Koine Greek -- I can't really type them in on google translator because google translator only does modern languages and modern languages are way different than the ancient languages (extreme!).

So is there a good online lexicon/translator for Koine Greek and for Biblical Hebrew?

-Fossilized Typewriter

A:

Dear TARDIS Translation Circuit,

I'm not sure of the quality of these sites, considering my unfamiliarity with those languages, but Lexilogos is a site for Ancient Greek and the Ancient Hebrew Research Center has one for Biblical Hebrew.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #78790 posted on 08/18/2014 11:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board:

When I'm on BYU campus and look up to the north-east at the pointy mountain that I think of as the Lion King rock, if I really look hard I think I can see something on top of it -- like maybe a pole or a flag.

Is there really something up there? If so, what is it? How did it get up there? Or am I imagining it?

-Nala

A:

Dear Nala,

Day 1: Dear Diary, today I start my journey to Squaw Peak, in order that I might discover what it is that sits at the top and towers over all. I am optimistic that I shall reach the top in good time and safety. I travel alone and I leave early this morning, long before the sun has yet risen over the tops of the mountaons. There is a distinct chill to the air and the crunching of my shoes on the gravel echoes in the canyon. I shall shoulder on.

Day 3: I have underestimated the length of this journey. I thought I would be done by now but I wandered onto the wrong path and took much time to recorrect. My provisions might run short. 

Day 6: I came across a rock earlier this morning, with strange etching on it. My spirits fell. I am only now just reaching the proper trail. 

photo 3 (4)_1.JPG

Day 8: I wander long hours and find my nights are filled with terrors rustling in the bushes. There is little to eat in the natural environment and I fear my rations are running short. I have emptied my bag to find two water bottles, two fiber one bars, a strange curvaceous yellow fruit, headphones, an umbrella, keys, my journal, a hairbrush, Chapstick, contact solution and breath freshening drops. I also have a fork and a single band-aid for any grievous wounds I may suffer. I have included a bit of my finger for size reference.

photo 4 (3).JPG

Day 15: I ate the curvaceous fruit. I was desperate. Even the rocks look appetizing to me now. I fall asleep dreaming of their hot, freshly boiled cracks, oozing with butter. I wake with the gritty taste of dirt in my mouth and stones clutched in my fists. 

photo 1 (6).JPG

Day 29: My legs ache and my lungs burn as I ascend this God-forsaken mountain. When will it end?

Day 35: I hate you. 

Day 47: I hate me. 

Day 82: Such agony is surely unbearable. The heat is rising quickly and the flies descend upon my delicate flesh. They bite and tear and I itch as if hot with fever. There is no respite.

Day 134: A miraculous gift has been bestowed upon me. I am able to draw from a hidden well of energy deep within. I shall call this gift a second wind. 

Day 134.5: Second wind gone as quickly as it had come. 

Day 254: Third wind? 

Day 254 1/4: False alarm. 

Day 745: Sometimes I am struck by the beauty of this barren, murderous landscape. Mostly I just cry myself to sleep, listening to the howl of the coyotes and the buzzing of the malaria-infested mosquitoes. 

photo 5 (4).JPG

Day 642: Lost track of the days. Could be Tuesday. Could be Friday. Could be Halloween for all I know. Time moves strangely up here where the wind blows across the hot rocks and weaves the dust into my hair. 

Day 1,333: I have discovered the Fount of Life-Giving Water That is Also Really Cold Which I Like Because Warm Water is Gross. It burbles forth from sort of man-made creation and has greatly refreshed me. 

Day something or other: I have dysentery. 

Day 513: At last. I can see it. I can hear it and taste it and feel it and very nearly touch it. I have reached the top of this arduous peak. I am collapsed, exhausted and alone but I am here. And all I can see is one stolid black flag pole with the American flag atop, blowing in the wind. I would cry tears of joy and wonderment if I was not severely dehydrated. How it got there and who put it there is henceforth unknown, but it has been cemented into a crevice in the rock and there it remains, night and a day. I shall return to the valley, forever changed by my solitary journey into the unknown darkness. 

photo 2 (8).JPG

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #78789 posted on 08/18/2014 10:48 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

When James E. Talmage compiled his lectures about Jesus Christ into the Book "Jesus the Christ", I understand he did this in a study room on the 4th floor of the Salt Lake Temple. I have heard that he lived in the temple from start to finish of that project. Is that true?

courious Jim

A:

Dear Doctor,

While Talmage worked for long hours in the temple on the book, he did not sleep in the temple. Rather, he returned home late at night to sleep (and presumably, to eat).

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #78785 posted on 08/18/2014 10:42 p.m.
Q:

Dearest 100 Hour Board,

So SLC has been putting on really cheap concerts of famous musicians for a few years now. Like 2 weeks ago, Train and The Wallflowers played and it was FREE. Tonight Beck is playing and it's only $5 admission. A few years back I went to see The Decemberists and Lupe Fiasco for free. So my question is how is it worth these bands' time to play in Pioneer Park or on the street of SLC? Who's paying them and how much are they really earning? Sure, yeah, they may be getting more publicity, but I'm interested in dollars.

Best regards,
Scarlet Flamingo

A:

Dear Doctor,

It appears that there's some decent sponsors behind things like the Twilight Concert Series, which may be shouldering some of the cost.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #78775 posted on 08/18/2014 10:36 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why did Google take AdSense off Google Sites? Seems like if AdSense makes them money, removing it from Sites would lower their revenue (however slightly, but it's still money).

-Jake

A:

Dear Doctor,

The internet is not entirely sure, and I can only suspect that they were just weren't receiving anticipated benefits and pulled it. It being Google, who knows what exactly they're getting up to?

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #78621 posted on 08/18/2014 9:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have learned from my education that in general, it is best not to meddle in other people's affairs or offer advice. So I really, really try my best to just let people talk and come to their own conclusions/decisions.

This is a super sensitive situation in my husband's family and it's really difficult to figure out what boundaries to hold, etc.

I am struggling right now with my sister-in-law and mother-in-law right now (hereafter referred to as SIL and MIL). They have a very enmeshed, unhealthy relationship. Everything is enmeshed-- their physical location, their financial situation, and most of all, their emotions. Whatever my MIL thinks/feels about something, my SIL will think/feel it too. I have yet to see them disagree-- sometimes my SIL will parrot my MIL exactly. The issue here is that my MIL has some pretty severe mental and emotional issues, at times requiring her to be in treatment centers. She often has suicidal ideation and will threaten to commit suicide about once a year. My MIL still has one child under 18 living at home. My SIL has 3 younger children living at home, with a husband who is not the father of the kids. My MIL and SIL both don't work, but receive money from divorce settlements/child support. They will often ask my husband and I for money, which we are sometimes able to do and sometimes not. We don't want that to be the bulk of our relationships. We try to visit once every month or two (they live a few hours away).

My question is, what can I do here? It is really hard to see my SIL following down a path of irrational decisions that are damaging her relationships to other family members and look very much like she will also head down a path of mental illness. Is there anything I can do to help her in this situation?

--A Healthy Example?

A:

Dear friend,

This is a hard situation, and I am in no way qualified to advise you on it. I would recommend that you speak to a counselor, your bishop, or someone else in a position to give you advice. However, since you asked, I will give my opinion. This sounds like a situation where you need to tread lightly. I think the best thing you can do for your sister-in-law is to be her friend. Let her know that you are willing to listen and help out when she needs it, but be willing to draw the line if she is asking too much from you. If you feel like you are in a position where she will hear your concerns, you could try speaking with her. I don't think you would need to mention your mother-in-law at all. Let your sister-in-law know that you love her, and because you love her, you are concerned about some of her decisions. Ask her questions about how she feels, and then listen. If you feel its appropriate, recommend counseling. If your husband is closer to his sister than you are, maybe he could speak with her. At some point though, you simply need to love her and allow her to make her own choices. It's hard, but she has her agency, and you can't take that from her. 

Peace,

-Stego Lily


1 Comment
Question #78780 posted on 08/18/2014 8:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Who do you think is the best looking male celebrity? This is based purely on physical looks alone, so try to rid yourself of good or bad feelings you might have towards that person for whatever other reasons (you think they're a good person/bad person, etc) and pick just one. Okay, or maybe three.

Corellative question: Am I strange if I think it might be John Stamos 20 years ago? Yes, like, Uncle Jesse?

-lalala

A:

Dear fa,

Ryan Reynolds, obviously.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear friend,

Ioan Gruffudd fifteen years ago, in A&E's Hornblower miniseries.

 horash.jpg     hornblower.jpg

happy.jpg

grin.jpg

...I'm sorry, what were we talking about?

Peace,

-Stego Lily

A:

Dear LAAA!,

This is a hard question! You see, you are forcing me to choose between the handsome, debonair, classy Tom Hiddleston...

tom-hiddleston-sherlock-season-4-brother-rumor-gi.jpg 

rs_1024x759-130906144949-1024.Tom-Hiddleston-Cookie-Monster2.jl.090613.jpg

and the dashing, talented, beautiful Shaun White. 

 

07d584927c2dee50bf06feb221b3e56c.jpg

Shaun-White-Jan-2013-480x368.jpg

 How in the world am I supposed to make that choice! 

Sincerely,
The Smitten Ginger 

A:

Dear Ten,

Tennant1.jpg

Tennant2.png

Tennant3.jpg

I don't think anyone is surprised by this.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #78786 posted on 08/18/2014 7:36 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

School is expensive. I have friends that do great in school, and so they get a scholarship. I had a very poor first semester before my mission. Does this ruin my chances of receiving one of those "scholarships for good grades"?
Are these scholarships based off of my cumulative GPA? If so, I'm a bit screwed! Or is it possible that they would base it off of the previous semester? Like, if I get a 4.0 this upcoming semester, will my past haunt me, or will I maybe get some of my school paid for?

-Broke college student

A:

Dear broke,

BYU's basic scholarship is maintained or regained purely on the basis of your cumulative GPA. So, unfortunately, one bad semester does have the ability to mess everything up. (Been there, done that.) The good news is that there are still other scholarships out there. Many of them are associated with specific departments; for instance, I'm financially surviving the upcoming year with the help of a FHSS scholarship that I presumably got as the result of an application I submitted through the Geography department. Honestly, keeping your eyes and ears open is probably the best way to find opportunities like these.

Also, I know this won't actually make things easier for you, but it's good to keep in mind that simply being a student at BYU means you're getting thousands of dollars' worth in scholarships. Most of the cost of your education is paid for by the Church before you even see the bill for your tuition.

-yayfulness


0 Comments