Keep your friends close, and your enemies closer. -Sun Tzu
Question #81311 posted on 02/28/2015 1:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do you have any tips for dealing with a family member who is a narcissist? This person tries to blame everyone else in the family for her feelings and acts like we should all walk on egg shells to please her. Then if I (or anyone else) does something she doesn't like, she tries to manipulate and talk badly about me to other family members about how she is the victim and I'm just so mean. It's really hard and is hurting my relationship with other people in my family.

-say no to drama

A:

Dear Drama, 

I think there is a point in every relationship in which a person ought to be bluntly informed how they are coming off to other people. Perhaps a family intervention is necessary. Perhaps a very loud personal chat. I can't prescribe what kind of conversation should take place, because I am not in the situation, but a conversation should happen. Come prepared with specific examples, and at least one other person (out of the mouth of two or three witnesses...), and see if anything can be done.  If not, well I guess you will either need to learn to live with it, hope that they eventually change, or avoid said person as much as possible (Harsh? Yes. Necessary? Perhaps.).

I would also like to add, before you do any of the above, you may want to take some time to pray about it. See what you yourself can do to change the situation, what the Lord can help you to do, before seeking change elsewhere. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is happening in ukraine right now?


....well this is embarrassing....

A:

Dear Embarrassed,

Don’t feel too bad, I was talking to my roommate the other night and she had yet to learn of the debacle over The Interview , or what ISIS stood for. Needless to say, you are not the only human who doesn’t know what is going on in the world.

Also for those of you who do know what was going on, I am sorry if I get anything wrong with this. I am trying to take a great deal of information and condense it down into a short summary, and I will almost certainly get something wrong or miss something important. 

Background

This conflict embodies the pressures placed on many post-Soviet states. There is a pull in one half of the country (Western Ukraine) to have closer ties with Europe , while the other half of the country (Eastern Ukraine) wants nothing more than to regain its close alliance with Mother Russia. In Ukraine, this conflict divides on these geographic lines, as well as ethnic lines. In Eastern Ukraine, there is a very large number of Russians, who are certainly being repressed. Meanwhile, in Western Ukraine, the population is almost entirely Ukrainian. They speak Ukrainian, they have Ukrainian blood—they are Ukrainian. This divide is well illustrated with this map:

 ukraine_0.jpg(Source)

Recent history is also a very important element of this conflict. Up until 1991, Ukraine was part of Russia. It had not been its own state since the 19th century. In essence, there are many Russians in Russia, and in Ukraine, who consider the loss of the country to be an accident of history, more than anything else. And given the large number of Russians in Crimea (58.3 percent of the population) and Donbass (39 percent of the population), it is no wonder Putin moved in on the region.

Conflict Overview

In late November 2013, Viktor Yanukovych, the Ukrainian president, abandoned an agreement to make closer ties with the European Union in favor of improving relations with Russia. Protests immediately erupted throughout the country. They started small, and quickly escalated to there being 100,000 people demonstrating in Kiev. These protests became known as the Euromaidan, because of their desire to align the future of Ukraine with the future of Europe. By early December, protesters were occupying Kiev city hall, and hundreds of thousands of people were flooding the streets in protest against Yanukovych's actions. In spite of these protests, Yanukovych signed a deal with Vladimir Putin.

By February, Yanukovych’s government tried to squelch the protests, which started the worst violence Kiev had seen in almost 70 years. Eighty-eight people were killed within 48 hours of February 20th, and by the 22nd, Yanukovych had disappeared from Ukraine, and a warrant was out for his arrest. An interim Prime Minister was elected, along with a new government. In the western half of the country things have quieted down for the most part, but in the east fighting has escalated.

While the Euromaidan protests were in full swing, the Anti-Maidan movement made waves in Eastern and Southern Ukraine. Unlike the Euromaidan, the Anti-Maidan supported President Yanukovych and closer ties to Russia. So while the pro-European movement succeeded in Kiev in removing Yanukovych, it spurred conflict in the East. By February 28, 2014, pro-Russian gunmen seized key buildings in the Crimean capital, Simferopol, and gunmen appeared outside of Crimea’s main airports. Unmarked pro-Russian forces rapidly occupied strategic positions throughout Crimea (none bore the insignia of the Russian military, but it seems pretty clear that they were Russian).

With military support, the Crimean Parliament voted to dismiss the Crimean government and replace its Prime Minister. It additionally called for a referendum on Crimea’s autonomy. According to the BBC, secession was supported by 97 percent of voters and, reportedly, 83 percent of the region participated in the vote. The vote is condemned by the West as a sham. Russia accepted it, however, and on March 18th, Russia agreed to absorb Crimea.

Throughout the remainder of spring and throughout the summer, fighting escalated throughout the East. Protesters occupied government buildings throughout Donetsk, Luhansk, and Kharkiv, calling for referendums like those in Crimea. The Ukrainian army was sent into these areas.

Also during this time:

  • Petro Poroshenko was elected as the new Ukrainian president
  • Pro-Russian separatists shot down a military plane in the east killing 49 people
  • The EU and Ukraine signed an association agreement
  • Another plane, Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 from Amsterdam, was shot down
  • The US and the EU began sanctioning Russia
  • Also this went down on Twitter between Russia and Canada

On September 5th, separatists agreed to a ceasefire to halt the violence and free the prisoners on both sides of the conflict. While the ceasefire decreased fighting, it never entirely held. Both sides used the period to build up their own forces.

By January 2015, fighting was back up to scale and the pro-Russian obtained the strategic Donetsk airport in the Donbass region. The rebels now have a strong line against Ukraine, as picture below. They continued their offensive into February.

donestk.gif(source)

Recent Developments

All of this brings us to February 12th. While clashes continued in Donetsk, the leaders of Russia, Ukraine, Germany, and France had been discussing peace in Belarus. They announced on the 12th a ceasefire, which would begin on February 15th. This deal held that there would be:

  • An immediate and full bilateral ceasefire
  • Withdrawal of all heavy weapons by both sides
  • Effective monitoring and verification of both the ceasefire and weapon withdrawal
  • Once the ceasefire is established, a dialogue would begin on the holding of local elections
  • Amnesty would be granted to any figures involved in the Donetsk and Luhansk conflict
  • All hostages would be released 
  • Humanitarian aid would be distributed without impediment 
  • Full Ukrainian government control would be restored over conflict zone (this does not include Crimea)
  • Foreign armed forces, weapons, and mercenaries would withdraw from Ukraine 
  • Ukraine will begin considerations for constitutional reform. 

While in ways this ceasefire has been effective violence continues to spring up throughout the area. What will happen going forward is anyone’s guess. The ceasefire is very fragile, and it is made even more fragile by Putin’s large control over the conflict. What happens next will depend greatly on what happens in Russia, and what Putin decides.

If you want a fuller picture of the Ukraine conflict, you may want to check out these additional sources. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Question #81272 posted on 02/28/2015 12:02 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Friends since 2006 (for me),
Thank you for staying positive. You do excellent work! What are your summer plans?
Thanks,
Kemosabe

A:

Dear Kemosabe,

I will be finished with classes in June and will officially graduate in August!

Graduation is going to bring a lot of changes to my life. The awesome: no more homework. The awesome but terrifying: starting a real-world career. The confusing and terrifying: finding a job in which to start my real-world career. The ridiculously happy: moving (probably out of Provo and closer to my wife's job and my job prospects) to an apartment where we can ACTUALLY HAVE A CAT. The sad: leaving behind a ton of good things at BYU (including, unfortunately, writing for the Board—I'm not retiring yet, but it'll be happening sometime this year).

Really, though, I just can't wait to have a cat.*

-yayfulness

*After I wrote this answer, my wife informed me of a reprehensible institution known as a "pet fee" that most apartments seem to have and that may make a cat unfeasible in the immediate future. Heartless monsters.

A:

Dear Kemosabe,

I'M MOVING BACK TO PROVO AND I HAVE NEVER BEEN MORE EXCITED IN MY LIFE.

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear Kemosabe,

I'm graduating, then going home and getting my wisdom teeth out as a graduation present from my parents. 

Then I sit around for two months and move into my new apartment. In July I start my job with Goldman Sachs and head to New York for training and then come back and settle down for the monotony of well-paid adult life. 

-Concorde

A:

Dear Rose,

I have literally no idea.

I've been waiting to hear back regarding a few different internships, which means I could either be moving to California (unlikely), commuting an hour every day (fairly likely), or staying in Provo (also likely). Depending on how the internships pan out, I'll either be taking classes both terms or no classes both terms. 

Ask me again just before finals week, and I might be able to tell you what's going on.

On a mildly related note, is it too much to ask for someone to fall in love with me this summer?

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Tanto,

It's up in the air right now. Possibly I'll go to DC on an Ag Policy Internship. Otherwise I might be moving to Logan. All I know is that we are for sure moving as soon as I graduate. Hopefully we'll have a place to go.

Mostly, though, I'll be going on lots of evening walks with my fabulous wife and incredible baby, playing a bunch of Kingdom Hearts, and dabbling in cartooning.

-Inverse Insomniac

A:

Dear Kemosabe,

Get married!!!

...and then show up to school that Monday for spring classes. Yayyyy.

-Zedability

A:

Dear Amigosabe,

Thanks for being our overnetwork ally.

I am going to get an internship for this summer. Preferably it will be somewhere outside the U.S. or at least at a national park... but if we're being real about my general apathy in applying for things so far this year it seems likely I'll probably just end up digging holes in the desert again.

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Dear Wade,

I will be going to visit my sister in Norway right after finals. Then I will come back to Provo and continue working at my current job, and will take my last two GEs during summer term. I will also be working a lot on my senior thesis and preparing for the GRE(s). Aside from that, who knows? Maybe I'll get married. I did recently have a fortune cookie say a surprising twist would soon be coming to my life.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Kemosabe,

This summer I hope to accomplish the following:

  • Learn how to scuba dive.
  • Go to every Mexican restaurant in Provo to determine which is best.
  • Hike. A lot.
  • Train to bike 100 miles because one of my friends is crazy and is making me do it with her.
  • Travel to a couple different states to visit family and friends.
  • Go to a few concerts.
  • Find a boyfriend.
  • Pretend that school doesn't exist until fall starts again.

Basically I just want to take advantage of the fact that I don't really have any responsibilities this summer, since this may be the last time that ever happens.

-Vienna

A:

Dear Tonto,

Aside from working 70 hours a week at my internship, I will hike all the things, mountain bike all of the other things, become a champion rock climber, and take over the world read lots of books. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  

A:

Dear Kemosabe,

Every summer I live with my parents and work at Home Depot. I'll probably be dusting grills, restocking pest control and cleaning supplies, and catching moths in the outdoor garden area. Overall, it's a pretty good job. Also, my mom and I are going to go to a seed bank and plant new vegetable varieties!

-Squirrel


0 Comments
Friday, February 27, 2015
Question #81276 posted on 02/27/2015 11:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is your favorite thing about Concorde?

-Loving to Share

A:

Dear Wade,

have to kind of be friends with her. Sometimes.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Martha,

I love that she lets me be her best friend. Seriously, both of us have this great relationship where we can message something to each other and not be concerned with getting a reply. But then we still manage to have great conversations. Plus she brings me pizza and we watch forensic TV shows together.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear sakura,

She's always kind to me and encouraged me to apply to be a Board writer, for which I am grateful. Concorde also has gorgeous hair. It matches the rest of her. 

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Dear Share,

She likes cats! She has three cats (apparently), and one even lives with her! Cats are amazing, and therefore, she is amazing.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  

A:

Dear lovely,

Concorde is just plain cool. I got that from her answers, and when I met her in person I was surprised to find out that she's just as cool in real life! Cool name, cool hometown, cool job, cool boyfriend, cool answers. And cool questions.

-El-ahrairah


0 Comments
Question #81296 posted on 02/27/2015 11:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So I read a surprising fact that the Olsen Twins (ya'll aren't too young to know who Michelle Tanner is, right? Some guy had no idea what Full House was the other day.... He was 22. That can't be before his time, right? Made me feel old...) are not identical twins -- they are fraternal twins. But dude, they look exactly the same to me, I could not tell them a part for the life of me! They look too similar to be fraternal twins -- they seem identical? Are they not technically identical because one is an inch taller or is it because their DNA is different? Is there a word for fraternal twins that look like identical twins? Can you do a comparison of the girls side by side, pointing out the differences? I want to be able to tell which one is Mary Kate and which one is Ashley when I'm watching Full House.

-Tom on a Cruise

A:

Dear Wade,

I really like this article on the Olsen twins. Basically, they say that they are not identical (meaning they are from different eggs) but nothing has proved that to anyone so we're pretty much going on their word. (Also - did you know that "sororal twins" refers to non-identical twin sisters? Because I didn't.) I've noticed as of late that Ashley seems to have hair with more volume, larger eyebrows, and a fuller face.

But let's not forget who the best Olsen sister is.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #81255 posted on 02/27/2015 11:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do you believe that our spirit bodies are made out of dark matter? Why?

7 There is no such thing as immaterial matter. All spirit is matter, but it is more fine or pure, and can only be discerned by purer eyes;
8 We cannot see it; but when our bodies are purified we shall see that it is all matter.
https://www.lds.org/scriptures/dc-testament/dc/131.7-8?lang=eng#6

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_matter

-The Dark Side

A:

Dear Vader,

No. I don't believe that at all. The scriptures using the word "matter" has little do with the usage of the word "matter" in science.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #81260 posted on 02/27/2015 11:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

THIS: Board Question #81063

Why on earth do the Japanese have vending machines that sell used women's underwear? Who buys them? If men, what do they do with them? How does the vending machine get the undies in the first place? Do women donate 'em? How much are they sold for? Are the panties washed before being sold? DETAILS!

-Red Skeleton

A:

Dear Johann Schmidt,

I'm not going to explicitly say why someone would buy them, but they're targeted at men with a very specific preference. As I mentioned, they are marketed as used but it's unlikely that they actually are. And as best as I can tell they were a fad that has largely disappeared (meaning they have mostly been removed).

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #81218 posted on 02/27/2015 11:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Which society can I blame for coming up with the idea of capital letters? I hate it!!! Why can't we just have one set of letters to memorize for each language instead of 2? This is why Hebrew seems chill... No upper and lower cases ... Just 1 case. And what other languages only have one case?

-Mumbo Jumbo

A:

Dear Wade,

So, this is mostly just semantics, but technically upper-case letters were first and the lower-case (or minuscule) letters came afterwards. While differing letter cases existed prior, the society you have to thank for really cementing the use of lower-case letters is Greece. Most Western scripts are bicameral (meaning they have upper- and lower-case letters) while most scripts that are unicameral are Eastern.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #81308 posted on 02/27/2015 8:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
Today for probably the 10th time I saw a professor exit from a building on campus by using the "Emergency exit only" doors. I've seen several professors do this in the JKB, the JFSB and the Auxiliary Building. I'm not asking this question to try and get them in trouble. I was just wondering, are those doors suppose to have alarms that go off when someone uses them? If they're unlocked all the time why are we told they are only there for emergencies? Does everyone else just use them and for some reason I've only noticed my professors going in and out of them? Thanks!
-Emergency Personnel

A:

Dear EMT,

Those doors are most likely alarmed whenever the door opens, but it's a silent alarm that only shows up to the police dispatch in the JKB. They are able to see where and when the breach took place. They can also tell how long the door is/was open and how to respond to the alarm in the system. This could be anything from acknowledging and ignoring the alarm online or dispatching someone to go check it out if necessary. I'm guessing they get a lot of people using doors that aren't "official" during the daytime hours and just ignore a lot of them. 

If emergency doors were always locked, how would you use them if there were actually an emergency? Crash bars make it easy for people to get out from the inside, but you'll notice those doors are probably locked from the outside.

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Comments
Question #81303 posted on 02/27/2015 12:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Wow. I thought this was mostly BYU-related stuff, but there's loads of stuff on here irrelevant to BYU. Anyway, I have a very BYU specific question.
I have not been in school for a few semesters and a few weeks ago I took my friend to show him my favorite thing on campus, the aquaria in the Widtsoe. To my dismay the first doors we tried were locked. Yet determined to visit my beloved piscine amigos, we pressed on, hoping for an unlocked door (this was like 4:30 on a Wednesday afternoon, btw). We finally came to the realization that the Widtsoe is being gutted to get rid of the asbestos inside. It seems like they are going to tear the Widtsoe out. Assuming this is true, please answer me these questions: What happened to the fish and tanks that were in the Widtsoe basement? Were they relocated, vacated, or evaporated? Are they available to be seen on or near campus? And lastly, will there be further ichthyology classes here at BYU?

Thank you much,

-Benji

A:

Dear Adelaide,

So, according to one of my sources who used to feed said fish, it turns out most of them had tuberculosis, and they gave a bunch away. Concorde added that the fish would also have other unwanted microbes and bacteria. There was some thought they'd end up at the Bean, but it turned out to not be the case.

I'd think that ichthyology classes would still continue, just sans aquariums.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #81302 posted on 02/27/2015 4:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How long does it take to laminate something at Cougar Creations in the Wilk?

-Not Enough Time to Finish my Project Early

A:

Dear I'm not even going to bother trying to turn that into an acronym,

Unless you're laminating something ridiculously large or elaborate, or unless something goes horribly wrong during the process of lamination (machine dies, aliens attack, your project gets transported to an alternate universe), I can't think of any reason that it would take more than five minutes.

In the interest of random acts of education, here are two videos demonstrating how the two main types of laminators work: a pouch laminator and a roll laminator.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear you,

I've used the location in the basement of the JFSB multiple times for printing and laminating. They're usually pretty quick unless the laminator needs to warm up or if you go during class change. If it was more than a few sheets, I usually dropped it off on my way to class and then picked it up an hour later. 

You could also use their website and skip the line. Simply upload your document and customize the print. While there is no option for lamination, the customer service representative I talked to over the phone confirmed that if you write it in the "Special Instruction" box, they will laminate it for you.

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #81291 posted on 02/27/2015 12:02 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have PowerPoint 2013 edition and while I have noticed several templates to use and supply my own data, I feel like I'm not taking advantage of all the options. I only see about 50 templates. Aren't there more? Or do you have to pay to download them? Or is there a free website in which to download more templates?

-Fossilized Typewriter

A:

Dear Apollo,

There are a ton of websites from which you can download free PowerPoint templates. Unfortunately, some of them are a bit dodgy and employ tactics to make you download things you don't want, sign up for things you don't want, or follow things you don't want on social media. This one seems to be legit and it has thousands of options, so it might be a good start.

Microsoft offers some free ones online, though it doesn't seem to be a very large selection. You could definitely find someone to pay for a similar service, but I'd see what you can do with the free ones first. You can personalize them yourself, too, by mixing up the typefaces, colors, etc.

-Owlet


0 Comments
Question #81146 posted on 02/27/2015 12:02 a.m.
Q:

Editor's Note: This question has been edited for clarity.
Hey, looking for a more insightful understanding of temple design and their overall creation process, and do not have any specific questions:

Who decides (like is it one lead person or multiple) on the design and structure of temples? And who decides on the selection of the person.

Do they use GIS for location analysis (or w/e the terminology the GIS field is). They likely do, but who's blog to see this on?

How far ahead are temples planned (before actual groundbreaking), and is there a consistent basis for the timeline?

(question #10, highscale material) [Reinput]

Qualifying this question by saying that any relevant links or approach to solving this kind of problem would be helpful. If you know the specific answers though, what was your approach? As I clearly do not have research talent for this.

Links are wonderful. Beautiful needn't be hasty.

~ ambw (A More Beautiful World)

A:

Dear ambw,

I spent quite a while looking for answers in all the wrong places before realizing that the right answer was actually just a Google search (terms: LDS temple construction process) away. The Mormon Newsroom outlines the entire process in this article.

From what the article says, I'm pretty sure that temple design is a collaborative process carried out by various members of the Church's Temple Department.

I don't know for certain, but I'd be willing to bet just about anything that the Church uses GIS programs to help determine the ideal locations for temples. That said, I'd also be willing to bet just about anything that the details of that process aren't available to the public. Do you remember when the Paris temple was announced in the middle of the summer rather than during General Conference? The Church actually rushed that announcement out because French media had somehow caught wind that a temple would be built there, and the Church preferred to announce it rather than let someone else announce it first.

As far as how far in advance temples are planned, part of my data comes from available resources and part comes from various discussions I've had with other people on the subject. How far in advance are temples planned before they are announced in Conference? More than a little while, I'd guess, but I don't think we know for certain. As I understand it, the Church purchases the land required before the temple is announced, and before purchasing the land, there would have to be a process of determining whether an area is ready for a temple.

How much time passes between the announcement of a temple and the groundbreaking? This varies from temple to temple. For the fifteen most recently dedicated temples for which all information was available (see here), an average of nearly 27 months passed between announcement and groundbreaking, with a minimum of nine months (Brigham City, Utah) and a maximum of 107 months (Kiev, Ukraine). Construction took an average of 33 months, with a minimum of 15 (Gila Valley, Arizona) and a maximum of 48 (Manaus, Brazil). Total time from announcement to dedication averaged at 60 months, with a minimum of 25 (Gila Valley) and a maximum of 145 (Kiev). Apart from the Kiev temple, most temples followed a fairly consistent timeline.

As a final point of interest, while this isn't directly within the scope of your question, I do think you might enjoy reading the answers to Board Question #70656, which also deals with the locations of temples.

Trying my best to be beautiful without being hasty,

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Thursday, February 26, 2015
Question #81295 posted on 02/26/2015 11:14 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How does one wear a beret hat without looking dopey? Well, not exactly a beret, but one of those floppy, girly hats that sit on the back of your head? I like the idea of them, and I think they look cute on people, but I can never get mine to stay on my head, it slips and slides all over the place, and just falls off. If I do wear mine, I can only wear it for like 10 minutes and I have to be sitting perfect still for those 10 minutes. Do you wear them with your hair down or in a side pony tail? How in the world are those other girls wearing them and pulling the look off? Tips on how to wear those stylish hat things?

-Vogue Villain

A:

Dear Vogue,

Attach your slouchy hat to your head with bobby pins as shown here.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  

A:

Dear Kronos,

As far as the hair thing, I'm sure I've seen it both ways. I prefer hair down. Tips, besides how to keep it on? Decide now if you'd feel uncomfortable wearing it during class prayers or whatnot, because the bobby pins/hair dealio will make it hard to slip on and off. If you do put your hair in a ponytail or braid, I'd recommend leaving some loose pieces of hair on the sides to soften things up. I would forego any big flowers or flashy embellishments; if you're not used to the style, it's better to start out simple, and it won't be so vulnerable to changes in trends (remember when big crocheted flowers were so huge?).

-Owlet


0 Comments
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So missionaries are not allowed to swim and such when they are on their mission because Satan has power over the waters or something, right? Or do I misunderstand something? But why does Satan have control of the waters (well, God has control and greater power, but Satan is somehow associated with water)? Or where does that idea come from?

Water, seems to me, to be very symbolic of purification, and is what makes the world go round, and... Christ is the Living Water so it's hard for me to perceive water with a negative connotation. I mean, I get water isn't supposed to be seen in a negative light, but why is water the domain of Satan? Because it's dangerous? But lots of things are dangerous. I know I'm confused, I'm rambling -- straighten me out?

-Sage

A:

Dear Adelaide,

Missionaries don't swim so that they don't drown. Cuts down on potential deaths quite quickly.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Sage,

I was always told that it was for modesty's sake.  Frankly, I would have felt kind of uncomfortable in a swimming suit while I was a missionary, and not just because of my horrible tan lines.

Plus, as Zedability reminded me, there would be a huge potential for time wasting and undignified conduct. Truth.

Also, you should know that, while missionaries can't swim, there are occasions where missionaries are allowed into the ocean.  I served the majority of my mission near the beach and a lot of beach baptisms took place with the permission of my mission president. I know that's just a small piece of evidence, but in my book it supports the idea that Satan is not in control of the ocean.  If he were, I definitely don't think he would approve of all of the baptisms going on there.

-Vienna


0 Comments
Question #81288 posted on 02/26/2015 8:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Ardilla mentions here that rock hyraxes are related to elephants. I'd heard this before when I climbed Mt. Kenya a few years ago, but honestly I thought the guy was just pulling my leg!

Are there any depictions out there of what a common ancestor of the elephant and the hyrax might have looked like?

-Emiliana thinks rock hyraxes are awesome for taking on baboons.

A:

Dear Emiliana,

Unfortunately, after a fair bit of searching, I came up empty on artist illustrations of the common ancestor. It's possible that this common ancestor can only be inferred from genetic analysis, and that no actual fossils have been found. That said, I'm no biologist, so I'll welcome any reader comments if I'm mistaken.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #81287 posted on 02/26/2015 4:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I graduated from BYU in December and have been looking for employment since. I have a job offer in the Phoenix, AZ area. I was wondering if any of you knew anything about the singles wards in that area. Specifically I am curious as to the average age of the singles wards. ( I am a 24 year old female who would like to have dating opportunities). Also I would like to know if there are a lot of people who have their own apartments or if most people live with roommates. Any information would be helpful. Thanks in advance!!

- Going to see new places

A:

Dear you,

Regarding age of singles' wards, that's going to vary depending on where you go. Phoenix is home to several universities, and if you live where students of these universities live, you'll probably get a younger population. By contrast, if you move into non-roommate housing areas for people with more established careers, you'll be more likely to be in an area where younger people can't afford to live.

I would highly advise getting in touch with the directors of the local institutes for areas where you can live, because they'll be able to give you an on-the-ground view of what the scene is right now. In addition, the page I just linked to tells you how many people are enrolled in institute in the different areas, which may help you get a feel for relative strength in numbers.

~Anne, Certainly


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Question #81221 posted on 02/26/2015 12:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is a wonder bra? Is it the same thing as a push-up bra? (Im looking at you, Concorde, since you seem very open and knowledgeable about these things).

- Vogue Villian

A:

Dear Vogue, 

I'm not entirely sure how I feel about being known for my knowledge of bras, but here goes? 

The Wonderbra is essentially just a brand of push-up bras and was really the first majorly popular bra with underwire. There's a surprisingly thorough Wikipedia page on them if you care to Google it. I won't link it here because it has pictures of women in bras (which is really no surprise, given the subject), but yes, a wonderbra is a push up bra that does wondrous things to your cleavage. 

-Concorde


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Question #81277 posted on 02/26/2015 11:20 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My uncle had a tumor a few years ago, had surgery to get it removed, and the lump turned out to be benign. Since then he's been claiming he's a cancer survivor as a way to manipulate people (especially women). I find it offensive to REAL cancer survivors that some bimbo walks around claiming he had cancer, when really, the tumor did nothing to effect him except make him tired and force him to have surgery. Despite my bitterness, though, I want your opinions. If you were a woman in her forties to fifties and you see a guy's online dating profile stating that he's a "cancer survivor!" would that be more attractive to you or not? Why?

-Paul Watts

A:

Dear Adam,

First off, "bimbo" is probably not the word I would've used to describe your uncle. I feel like that word is almost always associated with females, among other things.

No, that wouldn't make me more attracted to him, mostly because cancer survival ranks really low on my list of "desired traits." I can see how some women may be attracted to that, but it's not for me.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Paul Watts,

I'm going anonymous to say this, but knowing that someone had a serious past health issue with potential to recur might actually be a negative thing for me.

-A Woman


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Question #81253 posted on 02/26/2015 10:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

It seems unlikely that very many people will attain perfection in 1000 years. I know it sounds like a long time, but perfection is pretty hard to attain, at least for me. If we have eternity, why does God give us 1000 years to become perfect? Is the millineum actually 1000 years? Or is it metaphorical, like the creative periods wherein a 'day' was really just a timespan?

One Final Struggle after the Millennium
• What will be the final destiny of the earth?
At the end of the 1,000 years, Satan will be set free for a short time. Some people will turn away from Heavenly Father. Satan will gather his armies, and Michael (Adam) will gather the hosts of heaven. In this great struggle, Satan and his followers will be cast out forever. The earth will be changed into a celestial kingdom. (See D&C 29:22–29; 88:17–20, 110–15.)
https://www.lds.org/manual/gospel-principles/chapter-45-the-millennium?lang=eng

Celestial

“They are they who received the testimony of Jesus, and believed on his name and were baptized, … that by keeping the commandments they might be washed and cleansed from all their sins, and receive the Holy Spirit.” These are they who overcome the world by their faith. They are just and true so that the Holy Ghost can seal their blessings upon them. (See D&C 76:51–53.) Those who inherit the highest degree of the celestial kingdom, who become gods, must also have been married for eternity in the temple (see D&C 131:1–4). All who inherit the celestial kingdom will live with Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ forever (see D&C 76:62).
https://www.lds.org/manual/gospel-principles/chapter-46-the-final-judgment?lang=eng

19 And no unclean thing can enter into his kingdom; therefore nothing entereth into his rest save it be those who have washed their garments in my blood, because of their faith, and the repentance of all their sins, and their faithfulness unto the end.
https://www.lds.org/scriptures/bofm/3-ne/27.19?lang=eng#18

-Millennium Falcon

A:

Dear Eleven,

You know, I don't think we really know. Perhaps we'll have a greater capacity with which to reach perfection, which is why 1,000 years will be plenty of time. Perhaps the time is exactly 1,000 years, perhaps it's a metaphor. I don't really know that there are any answers right now, most likely because General Authorities want us to focus our efforts on working towards becoming perfect in our mortal lives.

-Tally M.


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Question #81264 posted on 02/26/2015 10:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I know our eternal salvation does not depend on this, but I'm curious -- do you think Job was a real person or just an allegory/type/symbol? Can you please tell me why people think he is real? What's the rationale? And why do people think it's just an allegory? What supports that camp?

And again, I know my eternal salvation isn't depended on it -- it's just my non lds friend asked me and it got me thinking.......

Thanks!

-Sage

A:

Dear Five,

It depends on the day.

No, really. Sometimes I've thought he was someone that actually existed. A lot of the stories in the Bible are about real people, so why wouldn't Job be? But on the other hand, what he went through seems kind of extreme and the whole story in general reads more like an allegory. To me it doesn't really matter which I'm preferring at the time as long as I'm learning something from it.

-Tally M.


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Question #81282 posted on 02/26/2015 10:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How do you tell a friend that THINKS she's a great wingwoman that she's actually....whatever the opposite of a wingwoman is?

-She's really sensitive to criticism…

A:

Dear Mickey,

Unless it's directly interfering with your goals, I would just let it go. If it's making things incredibly difficult, then politely mention that you would like to handle it on your own, mentioning that you appreciate her desire to help. It's a difficult situation, but it is possible to be delicate in explaining things, which is definitely what I would do.

-Tally M.


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Question #81286 posted on 02/26/2015 6:32 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
Ok, since we're on the subject just one more question: Do any of you watch the Mentalist? The main character Patrick Jane is a man that uses mental tricks, such as cold reading, hypnosis etc. to solve crimes. I know these skills are grossly exaggerated for entertainment purposes, but I was just wondering, is any of it true? Are there people that can really cold read other people just by watching them and seeing how they react to certain things? Also, I am a huge skeptic when it comes to hypnosis but has there been any proof that people can actually be hypnotized to help them remember things or to help them get over certain things, or see things differently? I love the show and I think Jane's character is very intriguing, but until I hear otherwise I feel that his character is far from believable. Thanks for you help on this, and if you do watch the show how do you feel about the last season?

-Lisbon and Jane are weird together

A:

Dear Cho,

I used to watch the Mentalist regularly, but after my friend moved away I basically stopped following it. Patrick Jane cracks me up.

I'm not going to address hypnosis in this question, but fortunately the archives can tell you all about that.

I think some people are certainly better than others at cold reading, and it makes sense to me that people who get a lot of practice doing this could get pretty good at it. Much of the technique relies on making broad, general statements, watching how the cold read reacts, and adjusting accordingly. Here's some more information about cold reading and a great article on how to become a better cold reader yourself.

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz


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Question #81284 posted on 02/26/2015 6:02 a.m.
Q:

Dear Concorde,

Referring to question #81199 (http://theboard.byu.edu/questions/81199/) do you maintain on 1400 calories then or are you still trying to lose weight? That seems like a low amount to maintain on or am I wrong? I'm not very aware of calories so I could be wrong.

-M

A:

Dear M, 

No, I'm not maintaining on 1400 calories. I maintain on around 1500 to 1600 depending on the time of year (which influences my activity level). I'm still trying to lose about ten pounds. 

-Concorde


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