Youth is a wonderful thing. What a crime to waste it on children. - George Bernard Shaw
Thursday, September 18, 2014
Question #79154 posted on 09/18/2014 9 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Pondering upon a pint of ice cream today, my mind began to wander. BYU seems to have an awful lot of signature food items (ice cream, brownies, bagels, chocolate-covered cinnamon bears, and the like). Is this common among collegiate institutions? If so, would you kindly accompany your answer with a few tasty examples?

-The Exquisite

A:

Dear The Exquisite,

I went up to USU this weekend and tried Aggie ice cream! It was delicious. Almost as good as tacos.

-Divya

A:

Dear Exquisite,

South Dakota State University is rather proud of their ice cream and other dairy products, and even claims to be the birthplace of cookies and cream ice cream (a claim that is widely disputed). I think it's fairly common for agriculture-oriented state universities to have signature food products, and considering the high degree of refinement required for dairy, it doesn't surprise me at all that university ice cream is so common.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Posted on 09/18/2014 8:54 p.m.

New Podcast: #25 Season 5, Episode 1

Dating, dreams, and service

Download Here! -- Length: 00:22:41 -- Size: 20.8 MB

Or Listen Now:

Referenced Submissions

#70968: I'm 100% serious with this question. I would like one person to explain the reasoning behind ...
#79057: Is it rude and/or ridiculous to not want to date someone (with some level of seriousness) ...
#79094: I feel like the big message today is to be a dreamer. Dreaming big is important! ...

Participating Aliases

Owlet Squirrel Tally M.

Posted on 09/18/2014 8:50 p.m. New Comment on: #79071 I once took a class from John Talbot of the Classics (or English?) department. It blew ...
Question #79168 posted on 09/18/2014 8:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How does one get in touch with the animation department on BYU campus?

- Ben

A:

Dear Ben,

You can contact the animation department with the information on this page, or you can drop by the College of Fine Arts and Communications advisement center in D-444 HFAC.

--Maven


0 Comments
Question #79128 posted on 09/18/2014 7:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,


I have a family issue I need help with. I have a SIL who is incredibly, incredibly negative about everything. She is also the most narcissistic person I've ever met. She will talk for HOURS about how "hot" my brother is (?) and how they both have great bodies, she has the best fashion taste, etc. She loves to give you advice, and if she EVER asks you a question about your life (it's very hard to keep a convo. going w/ her), she immediately turns it back around to tell you something about herself. I have tried very hard for 6 years to be her friend, or at the very least, be nice to her. Now that I'm pregnant, all she wants to do is tell me how much being a mom sucks, how hard breastfeeding, labor, etc., are blah blah blah! It's so hard to be around her! My mom wants me to come home for thanksgiving, and she's going to be there. I've never purposefully avoided her, (we live across the country from each other), but with all my pregnancy hormones raging, I feel like I am extra sensitive and it could very quickly turn out to be a not so wonderful thanksgiving. I am telling you---I HAVE TRIED. A thousand times. I text her to ask her about her life? She responds only to never, NEVER ask me a single question in return. I try to compliment her, befriend her, etc. I am at my wits end. It's awkward and uncomfortable. She has said some really hurtful things about my family members behind their backs.

What can I do?
What should I do?

A:

Dear you,

Well you have two options: go or don't go. 

I personally would go. Yes, it's hard to socialize with people we don't get along with, but nothing is more awkward than spoiled family relationships. People feel like they need to pick sides and it causes a lot of drama and pain. If you do go, just find your anchor (like your husband or your mom) and stick with them the entire time. Don't be stuck with your sister-in-law alone in a room. Let your anchor know how you feel about being alone with your SIL and have them come and rescue you if need be. If a conversation is heading in a direction you don't want it to go, change subjects. 

If you decide not to go, you obviously need to tell your family why. While you don't have to spill the whole truth about why you do not want to be there, you shouldn't lie either. Don't feign a case of food poisoning, tell them that you're hormones are causing you to be a little emotional and it would be best for you to stay home. 

With that being said, you're not going to be able to escape your sister-in-law forever. You need to explicitly tell her how she makes you feel. Tell her exactly what she does that you do not like, how it makes you feel, and that she needs to stop. For example, you could say something like "Sister-in-law, every time we talk, you always talk about yourself. You do not ask me how I am. It hurts my feelings and makes me angry. I can not continue to hang out with you if you do not contribute to your part of our friendship."

Relationships are hard. Just treat her how you would want to be treated. 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #79071 posted on 09/18/2014 6:54 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I once took a class from John Talbot of the Classics (or English?) department. It blew me away. I have spent the intervening years waiting for the opportunity to take another class from him, and finally, the moment has come—I should have extra room in my schedule during Winter 2015.

The problem is, I think he might not be teaching after this semester! When I do an instructor search on his name through the course catalog, it comes up with nothing. Could it be that he's found a job somewhere else? Is he going on sabbatical? Is that even a thing? Would you guys mind doing a little sleuthing to figure out why he doesn't show up?

-Too awed (and slightly embarrassed) to email him myself

A:

Dear awed,

Seeing as how I have yet to hear back from from him and his BYU directory page hasn't been updated since Fall 2013, it's a safe bet that he will not be teaching this coming semester. 

My Google tracking skills turned up fruitless, as did my massive LinkedIn search. Sorry!

-Ms.O'Malley (and sabbatical is a thing, and it is possible he is out on sabbatical/year long break from teaching to travel, study, and do research)


1 Comment
Question #79072 posted on 09/18/2014 6:54 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

When were The Riv apartments built? Have they ever been remodeled?

-Hate my apt

A:

Dear you,

The Riv Apartments were built in 1968. They have had renovations since then and the nice gentleman on the phone told me that they remodel quite frequently to keep the buildings nice. 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #79049 posted on 09/18/2014 6:54 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Did I make up this game, or do other people play it to?

When we were kids, my brothers and I would play a game called "Pendandrum". It takes two or more players, with all the cards being divided evenly. Each player had the cards face down in a draw deck, as well as a discard pile. The point of the game was to get rid of all your cards. We played with UNO cards, in ascending order of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, D, R, S. It can also be played with regular cards, A-10, J, Q, K.

Everyone starts with one card in the discard pile. At each turn, a card may be taken from the discard pile or the draw pile. Cards may be played in the middle in ascending order, in piles according to suite or color. If a card can't go in the middle, it can be put on someone else's discard pile if the top card on that pile is the number above and below. So, if the discard pile had a 7 on top, another player could put an 8 or 6 on that. Each turn continues until the player takes a card from the draw pile and can't put it anywhere else, so puts in in the discard pile.

Sound familiar?

-Zwerg Zwei

A:

Dear Zwerg Zwei, 

Parts of it sound like a few different games I've played. I see elements of Rook and Nertz but I've never played or heard of the game you're describing. 

Readers, if you've played this game before, let us know in the comments!

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #79164 posted on 09/18/2014 3:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why was it so difficult for Sarah Palin to tell Katie Couric which news sources she read? Why do you think she bumbled so excessively on such a straightforward question?

-Larry

A:

Dear Wade,

Because it's Sarah Palin. Even when she has her own web channel and is responding to a pre-taped bit and theoretically can write out her response, have a teleprompter, and re-record as many times as she needs, she still fails to produce a coherent statement.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Posted on 09/18/2014 1:03 p.m. New Comment on: #79097 Are there BYU approved student housing that are private apartments? As in, not just a private ...
Question #79156 posted on 09/18/2014 7 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How long do you hold on to electronic version of documents on your computer? Specifically things like papers you've written, old resumes, etc. I'd like to clean out my files, but I'm afraid to delete something I might need someday. Even though some of these files are ten years old... You never know!

-Electronic Hoarder

A:

Dear Hoarder, 

I keep everything now. My first year of college I went through old flash drives and floppy disks and deleted almost everything on them (and then I threw away the floppy disks because who has a floppy drive anymore?). Now I regret that so much. I lost an entire decade of old stories, assignments and work and there's just no way to get that back. I wish I had just transferred them all to an external hard drive or thumb drive. 

If you want to clean out documents, move them to an external source and save them. They won't take up much space, and you're right, you simply never know if you might need them. At the very least, down the road you can take a trip down memory lane and enjoy looking at all your years of work.

-Concorde 


0 Comments
Question #79162 posted on 09/18/2014 1:30 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I want to further my understanding out of the big world out there, the drinking world.

What does "Last Call" mean in bar culture? Is that a legal time that all bars have to close-up or is that just the last time that specific bar has to close up?

Also, I heard that a bar tender legally has to stop serving alchohol to someone if they look already wasted. But that puts a lot of pressure on the bar tender? How do you make that judgement? Is it a little tipsy or completely slammed? How does a bar tender know when to stop serving drinks to that person.

--Kool-Aid Man Smashing through a Brick Wall

P.S. Oh-yeaaaaah

A:

Dear Wall,

Last call just means it's your last chance to buy a drink before the bar closes.  There are legal mandates from state to state that determine by what hour a bar has to close, although often bars close before those mandates. Typically, the mandates are usually set for 2 AM. 

I've answered this as anonymous because I illegally served alcohol underage and was paid under the table, but yes, bar tenders have an obligation to stop serving if they know the patron has had too much to drink. It's a pretty easy judgement call to make and there's usually security who can throw out or deal with inebriated or unruly patrons, so the pressure on the bar tender isn't really that bad. I was 17 and had no problem declining service to drunk men two to three times my age. Service is usually declined right before they're slammed. Tipsy is acceptable, but when it gets to just raging drunk, service is ended. However, this point varies from person to person and according to what type of drunk they are and the behavior they're exhibiting. Some people can get completely plastered before you realize they've gone that far, while others get unruly after just two drinks. 

Nicer bars might have a drink maximum across the board to help, but good bar tenders can pick up on those nuances pretty easily. Bar tending is far harder than it looks and you have to be really well qualified and really know what you're doing to be a good one. And before you ask, I wasn't hired to serve alcohol originally. I was hired to wash dishes and bus tables because the bar also served some quick dishes on the side. One evening we had a huge rush and I was there cleaning in the back, following instructions and pretending not to exist so the bar wouldn't get in trouble, and I ended up being asked to help on bar with restocking, ice and some minor pouring of syrups and soda. From there it escalated into pouring the occasional drink, but I was garbage at it and the bar was in danger of losing their liquor license if they were caught, so I never made for than a couple dozen drinks in the time that I worked there, and most of them were very simply made. Also, the bar went out of business the summer after I quit.

-Anonymous


0 Comments
Question #79160 posted on 09/18/2014 1:24 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is an opinion only held by one of the current board members?
Bonus points if you can find more than one.

-The Questioness

A:

Dear Questioness,

Never have I ever liked Toy Story.

Also, we are all biased toward our niches, and we have different favorites, so those are some good sources of unique opinions among Board writers.

-Owlet

A:

Dear Questioness,

Because we on the Board apparently all desire to be Special Snowflakes, I fear we don't have too many opinions held singularly by any one member. 

The following were all opinions I attempted to hold all by my lonesome:

- Thor is a very boring movie. I fall asleep every time I try to watch either of them (Apparently Marguerite agrees).

- Scorched popcorn is the shiz (Tally also likes burned popcorn).

- Concorde is the best (Apparently MODAQ also believes this).

In return, I dashed the dreams of plenty of other writers and made them feel significantly less unique. 

-Concorde

A:

Dear Wade,

South Park, while inappropriate, is absolutely hilarious and one of the best TV shows ever.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear TARDIS,

[redacted] is one of the greatest countries in the world.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Paprika,

I get ridiculed for not liking peanut butter or Star Wars enough to suspect I'm the only one who doesn't like those things. 

-Marguerite St. Just


0 Comments
Question #79159 posted on 09/18/2014 1:12 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm a professor that has a bad reputation among students. Would you mind telling me how I can remove my "rate my professor" profile? I don't agree with them and I find it somewhat depressing. The best thing for me any my family to do is remove it. Is there a way to take down the comments?

-discourage, PhD

A:

Dear Doc, 

Sadly, Rate My Professor sent me the following:

Instructors and professors are only removed upon request when they are no longer considered active faculty at the institution they are listed under on the site.

If according to their school's website, they are actively teaching, the posting of their name and university affiliation on the website constitute accurate statements regarding which there is public concern and is therefore protected by the 1st amendment.

If a comment breaks their policy and is incorrect or inappropriate, then it may be removed but the professor themselves must get in contact with RMP to do so. 

-Concorde

A:

Dear Professor,

Most students recognize their professors are brilliant professionals who are concerned for their well-being. Many of my favorite professors have been ones with "bad reputations" or those that were known for being "boring." On several occasions a professor's comments have meant a great deal to me personally, and I've never really mentioned that to them. On the other hand, sometimes I'm appalled by the things people are willing to do in class or say to a professor. 

Most people who are really pleased they took your class will never say anything. Please ignore the small fraction of students who are so rude. I bet the majority of your students are really glad you're here.

- Haleakalā

A:

Dear you,

One of my favorite undergrad professors has mentioned (I think it's even in his syllabus) that he went to RMP once and then spent several hours curled into a ball in a corner or some such and he's never gone back since. His strategy is to simply avoid the site since some of the information on it is negative (even though his overall rating is now quite positive) and unhelpful. Using a site-blocker may help you resist the temptation.

~Anne, Certainly


0 Comments
Question #79158 posted on 09/18/2014 1 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour lady endowed Boarders,

I received my garments in March this year and I've noticed that I often forget to wear a bra. I wear my garments around the house and when I need to go somewhere I don on my regular clothes over my garments, but town times without a bra. It just escapes my mind until I'm already out the door. Do any of you garments women forget about the bra sometimes? Stories?

-Vogue Villain

A:

Dear Rose,

My aunt just changed to Carinessa recently and was telling me about how often times she'll go to work and not realize until halfway through the day that she's not wearing a bra. So you're definitely not the only one!

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Paprika,

I've definitely done that more times than I'd care to admit. Luckily, I keep a jacket at work and just wear that rather than going home. Though I did forget to wear a bra on a date, and that was a very uncomfortable date for me. Hopefully he didn't notice. I have another friend who forgot hers so frequently that she started keeping spare bras in her drawer at work (which would be interesting for anyone going through her drawers looking for files). I had another friend forget hers and she didn't realize it until a coworker pointed it out (I do not have coworkers who would do that, so I can't imagine how that situation would go down). It seems to only be a problem among the less-voluptuous girls I know, however.

-Marguerite St. Just


0 Comments
Question #79136 posted on 09/18/2014 midnight
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Where can I find Japanese children's songs? I want to have some that I could listen to/learn. Nursery rhymes, songs that teach things such as counting, little ditties children would sing in school or anything else along those lines would be great.


Thanks,
bye bye

A:

Dear Martha,

YouTube!

-Tally M.

A:

Dear you,

My roommate is Japanese, and she said that a lot of songs on this page are traditional children's songs.

-Squirrel


0 Comments
Wednesday, September 17, 2014
Question #79157 posted on 09/17/2014 11 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What should I call a Member of the British Parliament in a conversation? Not Congressman or Mr President or Senator or Your Majesty I presume.

-My Royal Highness

A:

Dear Lowness, 

Members of Parliament are usually abbreviated to MPs.

Also, because you asked about the British Parliament, I urge you to watch one of their sessions, in which they ask questions of the Prime Minister. It is called Question Time. During Question Time, MPs boo and hiss at each other. It is glorious.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Question #79155 posted on 09/17/2014 7:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I know you aren't doctors. I am already under treatment for this and I'll definitely be bringing it up with my doctor. I have asthma. Sometimes my attacks start in a very odd way and I don't always immediately identify them as an attack until later on. Like today. I just get that lump in my throat that signals strong emotions and I started getting very irritated and angry. Then it morphed into a feeling of impending doom. It wasn't til I was on the phone with my Dad a while later and he mentioned that I sounded out of breath that I realized that I was having an attack.

Anybody else have that sort of feeling? Do you know what it might be called? When I search out asthma and symptoms I don't think I've ever seen anything like what I experienced. They usually just say things like short of breath and wheezing and lethargic.

- A Curious Asthmatic

A:

Dear Curious,

I am indeed not a doctor, but what you're describing sounds like a panic attack.

Hope you are feeling alright! 

–Concealocanth


0 Comments
Question #79150 posted on 09/17/2014 5:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

As far as I can tell net neutrality is a) a really good thing and b) unrelated to internet pornography. I still wanted to ask though: if net neutrality passes, will we still be able to make laws regulating (or in a perfect world, eliminating) pornography sites? How do these two things related? Also, are there any good arguments against net neutrality?

Thanks,
kal

A:

Dear Jor,

I'm going to keep this really simple and short because there's a lot of information out there and it can get confusing.

Net neutrality is at its core the idea that all Internet traffic should be treated equally. This has been the de facto policy of the web for many years until recently when ISPs realized that they could charge websites for "priority traffic" and if they didn't pay the fee they would get slowed down. You know, kind of like how the mob charges people for protection money. Basically companies like Comcast have a river that flows to all the different websites like Netflix or Google and if Netflix doesn't pay their protection money Comcast will put a dam on Netflix's branch of the river.

Then there's the question on everyone's mind: What about porn? Will we still be able to regulate it? It's a difficult legal issue and the thing is we don't really know how it would affect porn. We never had to have a law telling companies "Hey, don't be greedy and evil with the Internet" before so it's uncertain how the law will be phrased. If it's passed and says that Comcast just has to stop building dams then surely we'll still be able to regulate the Internet. I mean, no one's going to argue against banning child pornography (well, very few people will). In theory we could still ban pornography (and certainly will still have age restrictions on its access) but Comcast just couldn't throttle the traffic going to pornographic websites while it is still legal.

In case you can't tell, I'm very biased on this issue so I would say no, there are not good arguments against net neutrality unless you're Brian L. Roberts. Of course, the "but it's stopping us from making exorbitant amounts of money" argument is very rarely used in court (unless you're a Libertarian, I guess?) so the people with lots of money in their pockets have put money in the pockets of lawyers to ensure that they can keep putting more money in their pockets. The arguments I've seen seem to stem from the same ambiguity as the pornography question and try to argue that net neutrality would stifle innovation or prevent ISPs from filtering spam, both of which seem like they could be moot depending on how the law is phrased.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Kaladin, 

See also Board Question 76877 for more Board opinions on net neutrality.

Good day, eh.

–Concealocanth


0 Comments
Question #79138 posted on 09/17/2014 5 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I heard once that BYU orders the most chocolate from Hersheys or the BYU bookstore sells the most pounds of chocolate per store or something like that. What's this random fact I know? And what's the truth in it? I'm fuzzy on the details.

-CIAO BELLA

A:

Dear Wade,

I wasn't able to find those facts but I did find these fun fudge facts:

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #79151 posted on 09/17/2014 5 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are the best songs (old, new, popular, unheard-of) that you've discovered recently?

-We Don't Really Even Care (About You)

A:

Dear Wade,

Recently I rediscovered the electronic music project Major Lazer. When I first heard about it I didn't invest a lot of thought into it because, I mean, it is electronic music... Then I heard a certain remix of a song by Major Lazer featuring Bruno Mars, Tyga, Mystic and (on the remix) 2 Chainz. I won't link to it for various reasons but after hearing it I have to admit Major Lazer is pretty impressive.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear get out of my back yard, or maybe don't,

I have for you three songs.

A couple years ago, I found a Journey record at Goodwill and decided to get it because I couldn't think of a single good reason not to. Upon marrying yayfulgirl, I finally came into possession of a record player, and eventually I got around to listening to the record. One of the first things I heard was an amazing song called "Stone in Love," which has been stuck in my head ever since. I have no regrets.

Angry Social Justice Yay has always been a bit of a fan of Rise Against. On my way home from work last month, I heard the last twenty seconds of a song that definitely sounded like them, which surprised me since they and the radio do not have much of a relationship here. I remembered the lyrics, though, and I was not disappointed. "I Don't Want to Be Here Anymore" is even more meaningful when you watch the music video and fully appreciate its meaning.

My sister got married last month in St. George. On the way home, late at night, my wife was driving and I was dozing off. In my semiconscious state, I expressed my surprise that she was listening to country. To my embarrassment, it wasn't country. It was Gin Blossoms. (I still maintain that my error should be excused since I wasn't fully awake.) Now that I've heard "'Til I Hear It From You," I know three songs by that group, and their good song score is three for three.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #79152 posted on 09/17/2014 5 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How can I help prevent the extinction of honeybees? It seems that science is showing that neonicotinoid poisons are behind honeybee death but they haven't yet been made illegal in America. I can't actually buy my own bees at this point in my life though I imagine becoming a bee farmer would help (would it?). What's the best way for me to help?

Thanks,
kimbly

A:

Dear Wade,

According to PapaD.A.Q., who is an amateur apiarist, "The only way to save the bee population in North America is to have thousands of backyard farmers." If you want more information on how you can help without caring for a colony yourself, shoot me an email and I'll talk to my dad for more ideas.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #79153 posted on 09/17/2014 5 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How would you explain TREE(3) to your friends?

-General

A:

Dear general,

I have no idea, but if you want to be my friend I'd be happy to let you test an explanation on me.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear General, 

According to Wikipedia

The TREE sequence begins TREE(1) = 1, TREE(2) = 3, then suddenly TREE(3) explodes to a value so enormously large that many other "large" combinatorial constants, such as Friedman's n(4),[*] are extremely small by comparison.[1] A lower bound for n(4), and hence an extremely weak lower bound for TREE(3), isA(A(...A(1)...)), where the number of As is A(187196),[2] and A() is a version of Ackermann's function: A(x) = 2↑x-1x in Knuth's up-arrow notationGraham's number, for example, is approximately A64(4) which is much smaller than the lower bound AA(187196)(1). It can be shown that the growth-rate of the function TREE exceeds that of the function fΓ0 in the fast-growing hierarchy, where Γ0 is the Feferman–Schütte ordinal.

My take: There's a lot of trees. 

-Concorde

A:

Dear Major,

I wouldn't. My friends hate when I start talking about things like that.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear General,

tree-clip-art_1404139671.jpg tree-clip-art_1404139671.jpgtree-clip-art_1404139671.jpg

(Source)

- Haleakalā


0 Comments
Question #79102 posted on 09/17/2014 5 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is the construction going on at DT fields? Don't tell me they're wrecking the field for more housing.

-Now fat Frisbee player

A:

Dear Frisbee, 

The following is a transcript of how I entertained myself while finding out the answer: 

On the phonnnnnnneeeeeeeeee with BYU info right now. They need to work on their hold music. 

Also this sound quality is awful...

The guy seemed nice though. Had a nice, authoritative voice. And he offered to find it for me....

I hope he's successful. 

Is this Pachelbel's Canon? That's a good music choice. Way to play it safe BYU. 

Man.... typing with one hand is hard. And it's my left ha--

At this point I was taken off hold and was given the answer. 

According to BYU info they're building some utility tunnels and that's it; So the field should be returned to normal eventually. Maybe they're building tunnels to the MTC? I dunno. But there you have it. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Posted on 09/17/2014 3:32 p.m. New Comment on: #79077 I need the recipe for the mini-loaves with honey butter from Sugar n Spice. Haven't found ...
Posted on 09/17/2014 3:31 p.m. New Comment on: #79110 100 Hour Board! I have a question! If I wanted to purchase ownership of the Lagoon ...
Question #79149 posted on 09/17/2014 2:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear QED and FAIL,

If you could only choose one of these options, do you think the world would be a better place if:

A) There were no more starving children
B) There were no more abused animals

?? Why?

-Tim on a Kruse

A:

Dear Tim,

importance(children) > importance(animals) -> A

assume importance(children) > importance(animals)

therefore A

QED

A:

Dear Tim,

Is this supposed to be a tough question?  Of course the world would be a better place if there were no more starving children compared to if no more animals were abused.  Well, this does assume a couple of things.  If the children are still alive and not starving then that's better.  Solving the problem by killing them all....not so much.  Even better though: feed the abused animals to the starving children.  No more abused animals, no more starving children.  Everyone wins.

Difficult moral decision FAIL


0 Comments
Question #79148 posted on 09/17/2014 1:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

If it's been over a month of a question waiting, is there a way to delete it if I no longer feel an answer is needed and I don't want to waste anyone's time?

-Ladybug

A:

Dear Ladybug,

Submit another question with a link to the old question asking for it to be deleted, and the editors will take care of it. However, know that you're not wasting anyone's time. If a question has taken that long to answer, then it's more like one of us is wasting your time, which is our fault, not yours. We apologize! We may be all-knowing, but unfortunately we're not perfect.

--Maven


0 Comments
Question #79140 posted on 09/17/2014 11:24 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are some of your favorite videos of dance performances? I'm looking for some more good ones to watch.

Thanks,
pizza pie cafe

A:

Dear Pizza,

I am really a sucker for any good dance video/performance, particularly if it is ballroom or contemporary. Here are some of my favorites though:

  1. "Turn to Stone", a cabaret by Sydney Jensen and Trevor Guthrie
  2. "Dangerous", by Keone and Mariel Madrid
  3. This Cyr Wheel Routine
  4. "Mad", a hip-hop routine from SYTYCD
  5. "Europe After Rain", a contemporary routine from SYTYCD
  6. Viennese Waltz, always 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 

A:

Dear Pizza, 

The sheer amount of raw talent along with innumerable hours of practice makes me get goosebumps every time I see this performance

-Concorde

A:

Dear cafe,

I don't watch SYTYCD, but I remember seeing "Fix You" and "I Got You" and really loving the stories those dances told.

-Owlet


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Question #79143 posted on 09/17/2014 11:06 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How does someone master the art of restricting themselves to eating one, and only one, incredibly crunchy and delicious Cheez-It. OKay, okay, we can allow them two or three. But how do they resist the urge to just devour the entire box? What is your technique on resisting the very powerful impulse contained in that very tiny square of heaven? Give me a play by play.

--Kool-Aid Man Smashing through a Brick Wall

P.S. Oh-yeaaaaah

A:

Dear Kool-Aid Man,

Portion the Cheez-Its out into smaller bags at a time when you're not hungry. Give yourself a rule that you can only eat one small bag a day. Keep the bags in a slightly unusual, out-of-sight area so you're not tempted every time you see them.

--Maven

A:

Dear Doctor,

The lone Cheez-It sits in front of me, the white cheddar powder lightly dusting the table beneath where it lays. The box is across the table beckoning for me to add a few more to create a pile. I shake my head and gingerly pick up the cracker, placing it in my mouth, savoring the tangy taste.

There. One Cheez-It.

But then I realize that I can't. I can't eat just one.

I have to resist. I stand up and put the box in the cupboard before returning to my laptop to work on homework, or so I tell myself. I find myself Googling more information about Cheez-Its and upon realizing what I've done, I hastily shut my computer, trying to figure out how to distract myself. Pulling up Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality on my Kindle, I settle on my couch, attempting to focus on the story rather than flavor that I could be enjoying as I read. 

I'm saving them, I tell myself. They're for special occasions. I stand up and go to the fridge, opening it and hoping to see something else I can satisfy my cravings with. Grapes? my inner voice suggests. 

Not now, I counter.

You always like grapes.

But right now I want Cheez-Its!

Grapes. Grapes are good.

I shut the fridge, giving up and deciding to not eat anything. Trying to prove a point isn't enough motivation to avoid eating them. There's a knock at the door. "Come in," I yell as it opens. It's Concorde, dragging me out for some sort of adventure. Perfect. I can't eat Cheez-Its if I'm not home. The shenanigans manage to distract me, and when I finally get home, I'm too exhausted to do anything more than scribble a brief note in my journal before falling asleep.

"One Cheez-It."

-Tally M.

A:

Dear friend,

It's easy. Try not to like them as much. Think about it. Focus. Consider the Cheez-It. It's not actually that tasty. Meditate on how it would be perfect to eat just one. Or none. Cheez is but an earthly tether. Let go your earthly tether. Enter the void. Empty and become wind. 

–Concealocanth

A:

Dear smashing,

My preferred method usually involves giving the box of snack food to my wife and telling her to slap my wrist if I reach for it.

-yayfulness


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Question #79141 posted on 09/17/2014 11:06 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Link between exam success and dress?

I heard a rumor that one's attire has a correlation with one's success in school. This supposedly being that when you dress more formal, you feel more confident and therefore do better on exams than when you are in your scrubby clothes.

Now I am a bit skeptical of this declaration... and am convinced this was propaganda for teenagers in HS to dress a bit better.

I mean, I can understand the logic behind it... but to be frank, I think it's more important to feel comfortable while taking an exam (and that dress does not necessary indicate your confidence level). I am almost certain that I would perform better in my sweats and sneakers than in a dress and high heels.

If I was in formal attire (sure I'd feel more confident what the boy behind me thinks of my appearance), but I would be too busy thinking how much my feet pinch in those heels or how cold I am in that dress or how tight my pants are, etc.

So are there scientific studies? And regardless of stats, do you think it's more important to be comfortable than looking your best during exam time? Would you rather take your exams in sweats or your church clothes?

-Liquid Paper

A:

Dear Doctor,

There don't seem to be any studies that are specific to exams and dressing up, but there was a study done that determined that the clothes you wear do have an effect on how well you work.

I actually prefer dressing up. I've always dressed nicer in public, partly due to my parents instilling in me the belief that I can't wear sweatpants to school. I also would call my style "comfortably classy" which means I'm nearly as comfortable as I would be in sweatpants. I feel more confident when I think I look good, so that would increase my confidence that I'd do well on the test.

-Tally M.


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Question #79145 posted on 09/17/2014 3 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why do carnivores love the taste of bone marrow soooo much?

-ENFP

A:

Dear Dinosaur in Victorian London,

There's a Psychology Today article that discusses this, and long story short: evolution.

-Tally M.


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Question #79144 posted on 09/17/2014 2:54 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I was driving home on the freeway today, from American Fork to Santaquin. The whole time, a guy on a scooter was behind me. Is it legal for scooters to be driven on Utah freeways? I didn't think so--I didn't think they drove fast enough--but then again I was in the slow lane.

-granola girl

A:

Dear Eleven,

Scooters are classified as motorcycles, and therefore allowed to be on the freeway.

-Tally M.


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