" We journalists make it a point to know very little about an extremely wide variety of topics; this is how we stay objective."--Dave Barry

Check out Episode 9 of the Podcast to hear discussions about Church leader rumors and dating by Haleakala, Maven, and Tally M!

Question #78537 posted on 08/01/2014 3:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear Concorde,

You said in a recent question that you used to be a book reviewer. I was just wondering, how did you get into that? Did you start with a blog or something?

-Just Curious

A:

Dear JC, 

Yes, I started with a blog. Actually, I was a freelance writer. I've been freelancing articles, book chapters and other assorted online texts for people since I was 16. I had a decent web premise, a nice body of clientele and an impressive portfolio. When I got my first job at BYU I discovered that my coworker was one of the top book bloggers in Utah. She regularly coordinated book signings with authors and agents, received free books and enjoyed all of the perks of being a well known book blogger. We became good friends and when she stumbled across one of my more prominent freelanced articles she invited me to review books with her. 

I ended up being a big hit on her blog and when she was finishing up her degree she left the site largely to me for a length of time. During that time I received lots of books, hung out with Shannon Hale and Veronica Roth and mostly just moonlighted as a book reviewer. I used a pseudonym, as many book reviewers do, so eventually when my friend came back to her site it was easy for me to step aside, hang up the mantle and focus on the million other things that started cropping up. I had enjoyed it, but in the end, despite all of the perks, the community and work weren't what I was passionate about. 

I will say this though: it takes a TON of work to actually get free books from publishers. You must have a sizeable audience, a decent presence and some sway on several major websites (think Goodreads or Amazon) and you basically have to pester publishers politely (never get whiny!) and take what they first start sending you. I have plenty of absolutely awful ARC's cluttering my shelves that I had to read and review anyway, before I started getting nice things, like an ARC of Insurgent

-Concorde


0 Comments
Posted on 08/01/2014 1:10 p.m. New Comment on: #78526 Where could I obtain whole vanilla beans in Salt Lake City? -You
Question #78521 posted on 08/01/2014 1:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I recently read Lost in Shangri-La by Mitchell Zuckoff. It's a non-fiction book about a plane that crashes in New Guinea; a place where the natives had never seen a white person before, supposedly (we later find out this isn't the case). It is said that the women of the tribes, when a member of their family or something died, they would have some of their fingers chopped off in order to respect their dead ancestors. Some of the women were even down to having only thumbs. How, in their culture, did chopping off of one's fingers, respect dead relatives?

-Christmas Cactus

A:

Dear Christmas Cactus,

Although this practice has largely declined, it was indeed common among the Dani Tribe of New Guinea. Self-harm and self-mutilation as acts of mourning are actually prevalent in many traditional societies. This website says that the practice comes from the tribe's religious beliefs. Apparently they believe that the spirits of the recently dead need to be appeased and driven away by intense mourning, so intense that it results in the amputation of their female relatives' fingers. I don't mean to judge their culture, but that seems insane to me in so many ways.

-El-ahrairah


0 Comments
Question #78527 posted on 08/01/2014 9:42 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm one of those women that happens to grind her teeth at night, and as a result, wears a mouth guard (nerd alert!). The mouth guards discontinues the grinding down/chipping of my teeth, which is good, however, it doesn't stop me from doing the grinding motion and squeezing my jaw together tightly. Thus, my jaw continues to be super sore and causes headaches. How do I stop my stressful dreams and grinding/locking my jaw?

Also, what is the best hygienic way to keep my mouth guard clean? Do I soak it in mouthwash (like they do with denchers in the movies) or do brush it with tooth paste? Rinse it? Alka Seltzer?


Wind Up Chattering Teeth

A:

Dear Chattering,

I'm so sorry about all the trouble you've been having. I have had some of the same problems you've been having, so I hope I can help based on personal experience (and that of a friend). 

First, I have a friend that had night terrors/bad dreams/whatever you want to call them every night, and it really affected her quality of sleep. She went to the counseling services at BYU, and it helped a whole lot. Most colleges offer free counselling services, so please take advantage of them. If you're not in school, you can still get referred to a psychologist by a doctor.  

Second, I get bad headaches from TMJ too. I can totally empathize. Your headaches can be lessened depending on what kind of retainer you've already got. I went to a dentist that specialized in TMJ, and he made me a splint that set my jaw joint in the correct position at night, and stopped the headaches from that. If you've got the standard soft TMJ retainer that doesn't set your jaw, it might be worth it to look into getting a splint.

Lastly, the cleaning products you use on your retainer(s) all depends on the type of plastic  they are made out of because some cleaners/antiseptics can make the plastic brittle and break faster. The best thing to do is to call your dentist and ask what products will be safe to use on your retainer.

I wish you all the best! If you want to chat, I'm just an email away!

-Squirrel


0 Comments
Posted on 08/01/2014 7:21 a.m. New Comment on: #78507 Tumblr hate (the app that allows you to block posts you dislike) worked on my computer ...
Question #78328 posted on 08/01/2014 12:36 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

On Board Question #78218, Sheebs said: "Additionally, cleanses are a myth - they don't cleanse anything." Could you expound on this? Maybe Sheeb knows more? Thanks.

-Ky

A:

Dear human,

I would love to expound. Your question hits on one of my great passions in life. If I had the time, resources, and intellectual authority to lead a crusade against cleanses, detoxes, and other fad diets then I would do it in a heartbeat. Not only are fad diets not useful, but I would argue that they have the potential to be very damaging. 

If you want to get into the invalidness of cleansing/detox itself, here is an article. I would reiterate it and add additional research but I am really busy and already kept this question way too long. 

I will take time, however, to make clear why I answered so passionately in the first place. My main problem is not that the purported benefits of detox are scientifically unsound. My big beef (no pun intended) with it is that all types of fad diets demonize certain kinds of foods, creating an unhealthy relationship with eating. When a food seems forbidden, it becomes a magnet for emotional eating because of the sense of guilt people have for desiring/consuming it. And then this problem contributes to the weird moral value our culture has surrounding food, which makes these unhealthy eating relationships contagious. Like a disease.

-Sheebs (who is still not over big beef... pretty sure I'm secretly a pun genius)


0 Comments
Question #78519 posted on 08/01/2014 12:06 a.m.
Q:

Heyo 100 Hour Board! I'm looking for some advice. (Gasp! That's never happened before!)

I'm 20 years old and I have a sister who is 13 (she's the baby of the family). I'm home for the summer off of my first year of college, and since I've been back I've noticed that my sister is a lot more closed off than usual and spending a lot of time locked up in her room. I wasn't too concerned at first, because I thought she was just going through the whole moody teenager phase-- which is fine, and I did that whole schtick too. But I was in a very horrible, emotionally dark place when I was her age and I just held out hope that she was better off than I was.

However, I started to get a feeling that she *wasn't* really doing all that great, so with some super-sleuthing I found an Instagram account she made a few weeks ago-- full of profanities and references to sex and drugs and alcohol, rants about how she hates going to church, how she hates herself and hates her family and wants to move somewhere far away.

Needless to say, I was a little shocked. It was like looking into a mirror back at my own angry, tiny, teenaged self. I always think back and wish I had had someone who could've pulled me out of that funk sooner, and saved me a ton of hurt down the road.

Now I want to reach out to my sister and help her, but our family has always skirted around 'touchy-feely' subjects and I don't know how I could bring this all up without sounding self-righteous. Another part of me thinks she'll just have to go through this, and the only thing I can do is be an example, love her, and pray for her because she has to choose the right path herself. But since it's my baby sister, and we've always gotten along so well, I just want to pull her back by the collar and tell her that she's just digging herself into a hole full of pain and remorse.

Sorry this got so long, but I'm just feeling really sad and worried. I was wondering if anyone (amongst writers and readers alike) had some words of comfort/advice? Any suggestions as to what I should do? Am I freaking out too much/too little? My sister is sleeping fifteen feet away and has never felt farther.

-Sis

A:

Dear fantastic, wonderful, amazing human,

Embrace the touchy-feely! I know that's easier said than done, but it is so incredibly powerful that I want to encourage you to try. Although you are right that your sister does ultimately have to choose the right path for herself, I also believe that none of us should have to walk life's rockiest paths alone. Hating herself, her family, and the faith she has grown up with are somewhat common teenager problems, but the commonness has nothing to do with how much she individually is hurting.

You

Before I talk about your sister, I want to focus on you for a second. I want you to know that I feel sad that you didn't have a person there to help you when you were going through your own difficult stage. I hope you know it shouldn't have been that way and that you should have been able to feel that you could go to your mother or father or aunt or older sibling and be received with compassion, respect, and love. I'm sorry that you were alone when you shouldn't have been.

I also think you are really amazing. You are aware of your sister and you care about her and you want to be for her what no one was for you. I respect that so much. She is seriously so lucky to have you. 

Her

The biggest gift you can give your sister is the gift of being someone that she feels safe with and who truly loves her. At least in the beginning, refrain from advice-giving and lecturing. Chances are she knows what the right choices are. Start out by listening.

Be honest and open. Never say anything that you don't actually mean to her. This will help her feel like she can be honest, too.

Show that you care in ways that aren't related to the problem or talking about the problem. Let her know you think about her and remind her of that fact every so often. Take her out for froyo. Go on a hike together. Write her a note.

Trust her first. Put yourself out there and let her know a few things about you and give her the chance to judge you. If you model being real about hard things that you have shame about, then she is more likely to feel like that's an okay thing to do with you because you won't judge her. 

Thank her for whatever she shares with you and let her know that you consider her confidences sacred. 

Share your own feelings not only with your words but with your face and the tone of your voice. Be raw and vulnerable and show the emotions that you have. Tell her you are worried about her, that you care about her and show it. It is hard to resist someone who you is emotionally involved in what you are saying to the point where they are willing to hurt and cry with you.

Express your desire to be the kind of person that she feels she can trust with anything. Tell her that you want a really close relationship.

Let her know that there is no limit to how many times she needs to talk to you and that she is never a burden. Ask her how things are really going on a regular basis.

Good Luck!

I know that's not a comprehensive list but you know your sister better than I do. And Heavenly Father knows her better than either of us and if you pray to know how to reach her, He will show you. I hope that things go well. If you ever want to send me an email at sheebs@theboard.byu.edu, I would love to hear from you. 

-Sheebs


0 Comments
Thursday, July 31, 2014
Question #78528 posted on 07/31/2014 9:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

1) In the hot, arid climates of the Middle Eastern deserts, Bedouin people are constantly sipping on hot tea. Like hot right off the fire!!! Burn your mouth tea!! Why don't they drink ice tea or something cooler when it's so dang hot outside? Does drinking something hot actually cool you down? Is there a strange bodily phenomenon involved? Enlighten me. If not, what's their motivation?
2) LASTLY, but most IMPORTANTLY, about how much $$$$ (on average) do I save from abstaining from coffee & alcohol on a weekly, monthly, yearly basis, and lifetime compared to other adults in the 21-35 yr old range??? I once had a non-LDS Irish roommie that told me I was saving "loads" of money because I didn't go drinking every weekend like she did. (Apparently drinks are expensive). And those fancy coffees too.

-Kool-Aid Man Smashing through a Brick Wall (part 2)

P.S. Oh-yeaaaaah

A:

Dear Mr. Kool-Aid Man, 

We would appreciate it is you would stop crashing through our brick walls. As incentive for future kindly treatment of these walls, I will answer your questions. 

1. While the Googles provided me naught with information concerning this tea which the Bedouins are drinking, and their specific motivations, I did discover that there is research which shows drinking hot tea (and other hot drinks) in hot weather will cool you down. It turns out there are nerves on your tongue and in your mouth which say to your brain, as you drink this very hot tea,"Man is it burning up in here, or is it just me!?" Your brain decides it needs to do something about this wretched state of affairs, and works harder at cooling you off, and causes you to sweat more. In short, the cooling mechanisms the hot drink turns on in the brain, counteract, and overpower, the actual heat of the drink. 

2. According to the Huffington Post, the average American consumes 18.5 gallons of coffee, and 20.8 gallons of beer, along with 2.3 gallons of wine. The average cost of a pound of coffee, as of June 2014, is $4.67; a bottle of beer (473.2 ml): 1.342; a bottle of wine (33.8 oz) : 12.08. After some rough calculations, it seems that the average American spends about $5.08 on coffee beans every year. However, this doesn't include all drinking coffee from Starbucks other coffee shops. It also doesn't include the cost of a coffee maker, coffee creamer, and other coffee drinker necessities. This same average person spends about $223.31 per year on beer and other malt drinks, and $105.24 on wine every year. This doesn't include other types of drinks, such as mix drinks, which one might order at a bar (which also tend to be significantly more expensive).

This is all on average, and it is likely there are many people who spend significantly more on their alcohol and coffee. If one drinks more wine then beer, or some other form of spirit, than they likely spend significantly more on alcohol per year. I can't really provide numbers based on age groups, because I couldn't find any good numbers which broke up alcohol and coffee consumption by age, but I expect the numbers go up significantly. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger (who would be willing to buy the coffee beans simply for the smell) 


0 Comments
Question #78523 posted on 07/31/2014 9:30 p.m.
Q:

Dearest 100 Hour Board,

This may be a stereotype, and may seem racist (though I'm not) but I'm honestly really curious. I'm sitting here listening to Work It by Missy Elliot. One of the lines says:

If you a fly gal get your nails done
Get a pedicure, get your hair did

I'm wondering why the rapper/ghetto community seem to say that their hair has been "did" instead of "done". How come in said song, she says to get your nails "done"--correct--but then she says get your hair "did" in the next line--incorrect? Can only hair be "did"? Why say "did" when talking about hair but not about nails? (This isn't the only song where I've heard about hair getting did). Will you enlighten me?

Best,
Scarlet Flamingo

A:

Dear Flamingo,

'Cuz that's just the way hood people is.

More seriously, it's just part of ebonics and also very cultural. It's really is just what people say. This is stereotyping a lot, but the segment of the population that says things like "I got my hair did" is not one that is overly concerned with proper grammar, and when one wants to fit in with their community, one speaks similarly to everyone else, which results in incorrect phrases being perpetuated. Having grown up in a very underprivileged, under-educated community, I heard this and other such vernacular all the time. People who spoke correctly were made fun of for breaking the unspoken cultural rules. Also, a lot of people know it's bad grammar and still say it anyway. It's kind of like mainstream slang now. 

Other things that can be did: nails, eyebrows, bellybutton...basically any cosmetic procedure can be referred to as being "did." Sometimes the correct grammar will be used, and the next sentence it will be completely wrong. There's not really a lot of rhyme or reason to it. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #78526 posted on 07/31/2014 7:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Where could I obtain whole vanilla beans in Salt Lake City?

-You

A:

Dear You,

I'm sure you can find them at Whole Foods, and you can probably find them at almost any grocery store in the spices section in a glass jar. However, you'll only get one or two beans and you'll pay about $10, which is ridiculously expensive for vanilla beans. This is where the internet is your friend. You can get vanilla beans for much cheaper on Amazon or other online retailers. You'll pay more overall, but the price per bean is much less.

--Maven


1 Comment
Question #78525 posted on 07/31/2014 4:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I was told in my Temple Prep class that I can get a discount on my temple clothing/garments (not just garments, but the other temple clothing) if I am going to the temple for the first time. How and where do I go to do that? How much should I expect to spend?

-Still Small Voice

A:

Dear voice,

My wife answers this sort of question for a living! You are both right and not right; here's what she has to say:

Your Temple Prep instructor is right... partially.

All members of the Church purchasing temple clothing get a 50% discount, but only for white clothes and ceremonial clothes. Although I can't find a source on this, I believe it was President Hinckley who lowered the price on garments many years ago. And white shirts for men are also full price, because they are already listed at a reduced price.

The discount only applies to first time purchases, and that includes someone purchasing clothing on your behalf, so you can't have someone buy the clothes for you and then call back in a few years and purchase the clothes on your own and still get a discount.

You have two options for purchasing your temple clothes. You can either go to a local distribution center (make sure you have your signed recommend with you) or you can call Church Distribution. You can go to store.lds.org, sign in, and browse the items available, but you can not get the discount online. If you are going to be calling in then the best thing to do is actually add items to your online cart and then call to finish your order. The agent who answers will verify that the items are correct in your cart and you can ask any questions you might have (most of the questions I get are about the measurement for the robe and garments) and then the agent will apply the discount and take your payment over the phone.

The total you will spend depends on a lot of factors. There are multiple options for nearly each article of clothing you will purchase, and of course multiple prices based on those options. If you purchase just the bare minimum, most basic, least expensive options (which include 3 sets of the least expensive garments) for a sister the lowest price could potentially be ~$75.00 (plus tax). The lowest price for a brother would be ~$65.00 (plus $15.75, if you need a new white shirt).

To be honest I would plan to spend around $125, just because you will probably not pick the least expensive options (especially if you are a sister, because the nicer fabrics in the ceremonial clothing are more expensive). Garments range in price from $2.50 to $5.00 per piece, depending on fabric and cuts/styles, and you'll probably want more than three pairs.

If you are uncertain about garments you could end up spending a lot of money just trying to find something that works for you. And please remember that once the bags the garments come in are open they can in no way shape or form be returned; it is a health violation. So, if you buy multiple sets of the same garments only open one bag at a time.

If you have any questions I would really suggest just calling Church Distribution. As someone who answers calls like yours for a living I can tell you we really don't mind. In fact, some of the best calls I take are helping people with their first time temple clothing orders, and you might even get to talk to me!

-yayfulgirl c/o yayfulness


0 Comments
Posted on 07/31/2014 1:24 p.m. New Comment on: #78491 In Matthew 16:19 (and many other places in the Scriptures) we are told that "whatever you ...
Question #78491 posted on 07/31/2014 12:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

In Matthew 16:19 (and many other places in the Scriptures) we are told that "whatever you bind on earth, shall be bound in heaven." This relates to powers of the priesthood and so forth, ex: sealing a marriage and family for all time and eternity.

So were couples and families in ancient Israel (times of OT/NT) ever sealed in the temple? We know the priesthood keys were there, but is there any evidence (biblical or extrabilical) in which people are reported to have been sealed together? My Stake Pres said yes, of course, (based on what we know with modern revelation), but I want to know if there are any documented cases in antiquity of families/couples being sealed? If so, did they go to the temple to be sealed? Do we know anything about that?

Why don't we hear cases of say, Mary and Joseph, going to the Jerusalem temple to be sealed? Or of Abraham and Sarah being sealed in the mountains? And other famous biblical couples? Did they not have to be sealed? I thought the church was the same yesterday, today, and forever? (I understand that the technicalities are not the same -- but shouldn't the ordinances be the same?)

Were ancient Jewish temples used for sealing at all? Or more just endowments?

--Sage

A:

Dear Donna,

My apologies for this going over—midterms happened.

I've done a fair amount of searching, and I haven't been able to find any document cases of couples being sealed, even in the temple. There's a number of reasons why these records don't exist: they could have been omitted following the recording of the scriptures; they could have not been included in the first place; or there are indicators that it did happen, but the accounts are vague enough for it to not be clear. 

However, this is with my limited knowledge of Old Testament history and theology, so if anyone knows better, I'd be happy to learn I was wrong!

-Tally M.


1 Comment
Question #78516 posted on 07/31/2014 3:42 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My questions relates to sex/physical affection within a marital relationship. I have been married to my spouse for several years and within the last year or so there has been a lack of a physical relationship. I try to look my best and to be kind/loving, to initiate affection and have tried several times to communicate that the lack thereof if very hard for me. I struggle with my self-esteem and feelings of worth within my marriage. Any ideas on what else to do? Should marriage counseling be considered?

-No direction

A:

Dear direction,

Physical intimacy is a very important part of a healthy relationship and marriage and I can't imagine how difficult it must be to not have received any physical attention from your spouse for a long length of time. If you have tried to communicate your concerns with your spouse clearly and he or she is still unable or unwilling to engage in physical affection, I would suggest marriage counseling. A cessation of physical intimacy in a relationship is often an indicator of underlying problems that your spouse may be unable or unwilling to communicate to you, and the aid of a licensed marriage counselor may help you both open up and communicate better. This is a far more common issue than you might think and an LDS marriage counselor can do a lot of good for your relationship.

I wish you all the best. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #78515 posted on 07/31/2014 3:30 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is there a way to ask a question to the board that will "stay invisible?" I want to ask a question concerning someone I know, but they are an avid 100 hour board reader and I'm sure that they could spot a question from me concerning them. If there is no such thing, and don't be offended that I ask, but is there something similar to the 100 hour board where I could ask said question?

-Looking for anonymity

A:

Dear looking,

If you wanted to, you could always email a writer (or multiple writers) and ask them the question in private. I've been on both the giving and the receiving end of that, and it never seemed weird. Other than that, though, there really isn't much we can do. Sorry!

-yayfulness

A:

Dear human,

I just want to add a second witness to what yayfulness said. We definitely would not mind you emailing us in private. In fact, we love getting emails! Don't be afraid that you're bothering us or that we aren't interested in hearing from you.

-Sheebs


0 Comments
Wednesday, July 30, 2014
Question #78503 posted on 07/30/2014 11:24 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why do you assume you are so dear to me? (See default salutation above.)

-The Inquisitor

A:

Dear Inquisitor,

I... I thought we had something!

-Concorde

A:

Dear inquisitor,

Because I believe in common courtesy.

Jerkface.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Posted on 07/30/2014 11:19 p.m. New Comment on: #78504 I just finished watching the Veronica Mars series and movie and I really enjoyed it. I ...
Question #78514 posted on 07/30/2014 11 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are distinguishing differences between BSD and Linux? What are some things, featurewise and architecturewise, that make one not the other?

-QUestioner

A:

Dear Querier,

To the average user, there is not a lot of difference between BSD and Linux. BSD is slightly more similar to UNIX, but both are UNIX based. The major differences, though, are more in the way that Linux and BSD are maintained and distributed (the GNU General Public License versus the BSD License). This blog post was the best overview I could find of what differences there are between BSD and Linux and would recommend reading it if you are curious beyond the average user.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #78512 posted on 07/30/2014 9:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are the requirements (age range, height, language skills, etc.) to work as a princess or one of the other leading ladies (Alice, Wendy Darling, Minnie Mouse etc.) in Disneyland Tokyo and Tokyo sea?

Thanks,
potential princess?

A:

Dear Potential Princess,

Disneyland Tokyo and Tokyo Sea all require female face actors to be between 150 and 170 cm, which is between roughly 4'10" and 5'7"-ish. Shorter and younger characters like Wendy Darling, Tink and Alice must be no taller than 5'2" and most other characters must be between 5'4" and 5'7". Generally the average age is about 21 or 22, with 18 as a minimum requirement. Language skills are not mentioned in casting calls, but I imagine English fluency is required first and foremost. The most important thing, of course, is that you bear a close resemblance to the character you wish to portray. Disney can afford to be very, very picky. Before the audition even happens, those auditioning are measured. Most costumes are between a size two and four so you must also fit the costume.

Obviously dance skills, acting skills and an overall close resemblance to the character are also necessary. 

-Concorde

P.s. The night after I answered this question I dreamed that I was hired to work as Pluto at some Disney parade festival thing. It was a very stressful dream.


0 Comments
Question #78466 posted on 07/30/2014 8:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Concealcoth gave an "answer" to my question, but did not address the core of my question! I had asked for the meaning behind the word "bloody" in Board Question #78399, and while she answered my other questions, this big, core question went unanswered. She linked me to something, but the link didn't go anywhere so I have no idea if that answered it or not. :( I want to know the meaning behind the word, "bloody." Is is related to the Atonement at all, like my British roommate told me? (I see that there is a comment waiting for approval so hopefully it will shed light on the core question!!).

She also advised me not to tell people that the word is extremely offensive and irreverent when they tell a joke... because apparently their joke is more important than my feelings and it might ruin their jokes. But by all means they can continue to make my skin crawl and upset me spiritually as long as they heard it from Harry Potter. (So by this logic, when I'm in a foreign country and someone uses the "F" bomb in their jokes, I should just take it because they don't know what it means and I wouldn't want to ruin their joke? So they can continue to repeat it over and over until I can find a quiet place to tell them? Come on, Concealcoth! Just because you don't put "bloody" up there next to the "F" bomb doesn't mean that it shouldn't be! Living in the UK, it is quite offensive, and as a result it is extremely painful to hear in the USA). I mean, obviously, I would be nice about it.... I would pull them aside afterwards. And I wouldn't make them feel bad about it, but you gotta tell people otherwise they will continue to use it. I shouldn't tell people when they first "learn" it? but the problem is.... they don't ever "learn" what the word means otherwise they wouldn't be using it so freely. I agree about being nice about it and informing them after their punchline away from an audience, but you can't just let ignorance continue and let offensive and irrelevant, sacrilegious language (about the Atonement no less) into your surrounding. But I hope that is not what you were insinuating, and your nonchalant attitude was overly read in the text! I'll give you a benefit of a doubt though. :)

Also, on the topic of offensive language, especially in regards to the UK... I have another question. I lived with an older 70 year old British lady when I lived in the UK for many years. She would refer to black people -- as "coloured" people. She is the sweetest lady and didn't seem racists in the slightest so I was wondering if "coloured" people is an appropriate term in England for black people? Obviously, she can't say "African American" because we are in the UK (not the USA) so is "coloured" appropriate or is that just a show of her age? (For instance, older people in the USA sometimes use derogatory terms because in their heyday that word was appropriate, even though it is considered offensive in more modern times). Is it okay to use that term? Or is she not the best example because she is older and doesn't use a more appropriate term?

-Polyglot

A:

Dear human,

According to the Wikipedia, there are several theories regarding the origins of the word "bloody", so it's impossible to say definitively where it comes from.

That said, I also associate it with the suffering of Christ as well and I don't like it when people use it. 

-Sheebs

A:

Dear Polyglot, 

I'm sorry you didn't like my answer. Thanks for alerting us to the broken link, though. You're a peach!

"Black" is the appropriate term for dark-skinned people in England. "Coloured" is outdated, as in the United States, though not offensive to most people. 

–Concealocanth

A:

Dear Polysemy,

Due to another recent Board question, I feel that I can proclaim myself the Board expert on swearing (or, at least, I read this book which includes the etymology of "bloody"). "Bloody" does not originate with reference to the Atonement or, as another legend has purported, as a corruption of the oath "by God's blood." It either came about from the literal adjective bloody meaning "covered in blood" or in reference to a group of rabble-rousers in the latter half of the 17th century that referred to themselves as "Bloods." Prior to 20th century bloody was considered a far worse word than it is today, though it was not uncommon. I would speculate that the reason it likely persisted to be as taboo as it is stems from it being used almost exclusively by the lower class during this time. George Bernard Shaw helped push the revolution, so to speak, of the word in 1914 when he included it in his play Pygmalion. Reports indicate that while audiences were inaudibly shocked by the word for the first few seconds after it was spoken in the play, they would then laugh for several minutes. This popularized the use of the word bloody to the point where "pygmalion" itself became an oath used similarly to "bloody."

As far as the term "colored," I can't myself state what is or is not acceptable in England, but in the United States it has fallen out of use. It is, however, used in the acronym NAACP, and a statement on this was given in 2008 by Carla Sims, communications direction for the NAACP, who essentially said that the term was outdated but not typically offensive.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


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Question #78438 posted on 07/30/2014 8:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Does the Church acquire via purchasing all the prophets' (GA's) childhood, adulthood homesteads/houses? And like their childhood school notebooks, toys, typewriters, journals, objects for which they are famous for, etc.? How does the Church decide on what's worthy of a buy? What do they do with them? And who is responsible for purchasing these locations and items? (I want this job!)

For instance, did they buy Hinckley's childhood home? Could I visit there if I wanted? Take a tour?

What is the most random and interesting item that the Church has purchased, which belonged to a GA/Prophet?

-Mr. Monopoly

A:

Dear Mr. Monopoly, 

The Church has a purchasing department that would make these approved purchases, if very many of them were made. Beyond a few key buildings (Joseph Smith home, etc) and items, the church really doesn't purchase that much, especially for things pertaining to modern day leaders. They don't want people visiting these places or objects like they are shrines. Most items are now donated and end up archived in storage, or on display at places like the Bean Museum, as with President Packer's animal carvings. 

To my knowledge, the church does not own President Hinckley's childhood home. In fact, the house appears to have been sold pretty recently, according to this Salt Lake Trib article. I'm sure you could visit if you wanted, but I don't really think it's a great idea to knock on the door of a private residence and ask for a tour of their house. Despite the history of the home, it might come off as a little weird, especially since I'm sure nothing looks the same anymore. 

As for the most random or interesting item the Church has purchased, I can't really say. I'm not privy to the Church's purchasing records, unfortunately. 

-Concorde


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Question #78510 posted on 07/30/2014 7:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Does Brandon Sanderson teach any classes this fall? Or is he just a winter teacher?

-Longing Writer

A:

Dear Writer,

According to the class schedule, Mr. Sanderson will not be teaching any classes this fall. He will resume teaching Winter semester.

- Haleakalā

A:

Dear Longing Writer,

Just to further clarify, he only teaches during Winter semester. He never teaches during Fall semester.

--Maven


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Question #78282 posted on 07/30/2014 5:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've been trying to find the scientific name for the Potawatomi plum. Different websites have suggested Prunus americana, Prunus angustifolia, Prunus rivularis, and Prunus munsoniana (which is usually treated as a synonym of Prunus rivularis). However, these online sources are all either very old (books from the late 1800s and early 1900s, digitized by Google Books) or not reliable at all (people's blogs), so I don't trust them. Everyone agrees that the pioneers brought the Potawatomi plum with them when they crossed the plains, but BONAP doesn't show any Prunus species that are native to the Eastern US and are naturalized in Utah. On the other hand, the eponymous Potawatomi tribe was indigenous to Michigan, and the Saints didn't have a major presence that far north before the exodus—so where did they get the name Potawatomi plum? As you can see, the nomenclature for this plum is a mess. Can you find me an authoritative source (it doesn't have to be on the internet) that can give the correct scientific name for what Utahns call a Potawatomi plum?

—Legume Lover

A:

Dear L.L. Bean,

Excellent. Looks like we have a mystery on our hands. Let me introduce you to the IPNI: International Plant Name Index. 

Don't be wary of old sources. On the contrary to pretty much all other sciences, botany takes old descriptions as king. The first name a plant gets is its name, unless new genetic or morphological information emerges that necessitates lumping and splitting of species and other taxonomic levels.

You would have to compare specimens being sold as the Potawatomi plum to type specimens owned by institutions. Barring that, you can make some guesses based on the history of the names. Having flipped through some entries on IPNI, I've noticed that P. rivularis and P. munsoniana are described as native to Texas/the South in 1848, and aren't candidates if the history you've been told is true. My best guess is that the Potawatomi plum is  a variant of P. americana. Unfortunately, without access to specimens, I can't really shed any more light on the subject. The name remains shrouded in mystery. 

If you haven't already, I would recommend looking in The Plums of New York (1911). 

–Concealocanth


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