"Now I'm not only a Mormon cliché; I'm also a puppy." - Claudio

Apr 14 12:45PM Heartbleed, The Board, & You
The Board was affected with the Heartbleed vulnerability. I patched our systems on April 8 and updated our encryption certificates on April 9. I'm not going to force you to change your password, but if you are concerned about the security/privacy of your Board account you should.
-Curious Physics Minor

Question #77356 posted on 04/23/2014 9:42 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Did you ever have the birthday party for the Board mentioned in Board Question #77223? How did it go?

-Happy Birthday!

A:

Dear Happy,

The Board's birthday party was an amazing success. 

_DSC0215.jpeg

Just take a look at that poster. I seriously would not stop talking about it. I was way impressed with my art skills. Everyone loved it so much they wanted to have their picture taken by it. 

_DSC0217.JPG_DSC0226.JPG_DSC0218.JPG_DSC0222.JPG_DSC0221.JPG_DSC0219.JPG

And you can't have a birthday party without a birthday (cup)cake!

_DSC0228.jpg.jpg

Sorry this went wayyyy over. I was supposed to flip Sheebs' head around but then finals week hit me like a truck and I'm not on campus now so I don't have access to Photoshop. 

Happy belated birthday, Board!

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #77373 posted on 04/23/2014 7 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've decided to 'test' myself to see if I may have a gluten intolerance. In order to do this, I'm going to try to go gluten free for three weeks. The problem is, I have no idea where or how to get started! It seems like everything I eat has gluten in it. I loooooove bread of any kind, and definitely rely on it for almost any meal.

Can you help me? Do any of you have any great gluten free meals or snacks that you love? How can I ensure that I can be successful? Any tips or advice would be greatly appreciated!

-Gluten-free Gina :)

A:

Dear Gina,

I've never tried eating gluten-free, but one of the women I visit teach and her daughter have celiac disease. When I cook for her family, she said the best website to use for finding gluten-free ingredients is GF Overflow. You can search for "BBQ Sauce" or "Flours" and it will pull up a list of brands and specific products that are gluten-free. This makes it a lot easier to shop, since you can buy things that are already gluten-free without going to a lot of trouble. You'd probably be interested to know that gluten-free breads do exist, it's just a matter of figuring out which grocery stores sell those specific brands.

Other than that, just search for "gluten-free recipes," browse through some websites, and choose your favorite recipes to try out. Some of them look really delicious. Pinterest is another good way to find gluten-free recipes and snacks.

One thing I might suggest to help you in your experiment is to have someone else do it with you. A support system is always a big help when you're trying to change your lifestyle. I know that may not be possible, but if you can find a partner, I think you'll find that you'll have a lot more motivation for staying on track.

Good luck!

--Maven


0 Comments
Question #77376 posted on 04/23/2014 4:18 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I was reading a book and came across a phrase that I've never heard. The Google wasn't helpful, so I come to you: what is "Old Stink"? Does it even mean anything? Some prison, maybe? If it helps, the book is set in England in 1950, and here is context: "The place was locked as tight as Old Stink" and, two hundred pages later, "in the name of Old Stink" (as an interjection).

-spice cake

A:

Dear Spice Cake,

For a second there I thought you were going to ask us about horcruxes.

-Sheebs

A:

Dear Spice Cake,

Personally I believe if you can google a phrase and the only hit is from the "The Sweetness At the Bottom of the Pie" by Alan Bradley, which is set in England in 1950 (so presumably the book to which Spice Cake is referring), I would make the assumption that the author made up the expression for his book. Perhaps he was just trying to come up with a phrase that sounded old English-y.

"Why did the universe conspire against me like this?"
Hobo

A:

Dear Sheebs,

Stop mocking me.

-Lord Voldemort


0 Comments
Question #77375 posted on 04/23/2014 3:42 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

We have lived at Wymount Terrace (south) for about three years now. For as long as we have lived here we have noticed that there is a loud beep (if you are sitting by the front door on the bottom level) every night at about 11:30pm. Last week my wife was outside around this time and noticed a guy with a metal stick-magnet-sonic-screwdriver-thingy come up to the stair well and put it up to the side of the fire extinguisher box. Any idea as to what this could be? I think it is a fire alarm test to make sure they are working, but if so why cant they do that remotely? Why every night?

-BeepBeep

A:

Dear Vashta Nerada,

Lucky for you, one of my good friends is one of those guys. He might've even been the one you saw!

Every night, they walk around the on-campus housing to make sure things are safe. Freshman housing is the most important for them to check, since those buildings have doors that are supposed to lock the entire building. The buttons are placed throughout the areas to make sure that the rovers (the people checking) visit every part of the area. The metal stick thing, which they actually call a pipe, is used to create an electronic record of when and where the buttons are checked.

Basically, they're just making sure you're safe, and the buttons make sure that they're doing their job.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #77374 posted on 04/23/2014 3 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is that Matt Meese (Captain Literally, on Studio C) staring in the hotels.com commercials (see here, here, and here, for example) as Captain Obvious?

—Damasta

A:

Dear Damasta,

While he's very popular within the BYU sphere, I don't think Matt Meese has reached this level of fame yet. The New York Times reports that Captain Obvious is played by Brandon Moynihan

Who knows? Maybe one day the Studio C cast will be this famous. Stay tuned!

- Haleakalā


0 Comments
Tuesday, April 22, 2014
Question #77372 posted on 04/22/2014 8:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How are you supposed to know when or when not to give people your address on Facebook when they ask for it for their wedding announcement? Let me just be clear, I'm talking about when Facebook friends you may not know too well invite you to their "wedding address group." This practice is obviously the way things are done pretty much these days, but I can't help but hate it (despite seeing its convenience) because it puts the people in a very awkward situation.. how do we know when to join the group and post our addresses for them to send out an invite? How well should one know someone before asking for something like this? I don't want to come off as rude by not giving my address and then not seeming interested in their life.. but at the same time, I get a lot of requests from people I really don't know that well (just went to high school together or something) and in that case, I neither care to go to their wedding nor do I want them to waste a costly invite on me when I'm may not even know them that well. Plus sometimes even when I AM interested in getting the invite but not necessarily interested in going (because the person intrigues me, has a good style and thus likely will have a cute announcement, etc.) then I don't want to ask for an invite and then have them weirded out by me asking since we barely know each other in the first place. UGH! Help fellow Facebook users? What's the etiquette of this entire situation?

-Miss the good old days

A:

Dear friend,

You ask for an invite if you are planning to go to the reception. Yes, it can be fun to get people's invitations regardless, but wedding invitations are expensive, dang it! It seems inconsiderate to request one simply to see what the announcement looks like.

Additionally, you shouldn't give out your address unsolicited. If a couple chooses to only ask a few of their friends for addresses, it may be because their budget doesn't allow for more announcements than that. 

The one exception is if you are close friends with someone and can't make it to their reception. Asking for an invitation can be a way of showing your interest in their lives despite your inability to attend. I would include a caveat though, such as, "I won't be able to make the reception, but if you have an extra invitation, send it my way! Here's my address."

Peace,

-Stego Lily 


0 Comments
Posted on 04/22/2014 8:17 p.m. New Comment on: #77364 What are your favorite Easter traditions? Is there anything that your family does that helps you ...
Question #77362 posted on 04/22/2014 8:14 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How much did you weigh when you were born?

-Diaper Sniper

A:

Dear Reader,

Five-and-a-half pounds. I was born four weeks early.

- Haleakalā

A:

Dear friend,

8 pounds even.

Peace,

-Stego Lily

A:

Dear sniper of diapers,

Seven pounds, eleven ounces.

-Sheebs

A:

Dear You,

I was 6 lbs, 4 ounces.

-Squirrel


0 Comments
Question #77369 posted on 04/22/2014 6:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have heard about a bakery in SLC called Les Madeleines that apparently makes this delicious thing called a Kouing Aman. Have you ever had one of these? If so, can you tell me why it's so expensive?!?

On a related note, what are your go-to places for baked goods?

-au chocolat

A:

Dear Cinnamon,

I think one of the reasons it's so expensive is because it takes forever to bake (I don't know how close this recipe is to the one at Les Madeleines because I'm not brave enough to try it, but it looks like something where I'd rather pay a lot to eat it rather than make it myself), it tastes like flaky, caramelized heaven, and, most importantly, people are willing to pay lots of money for desserts.

Have I also mentioned how amazing they are? Seriously, they're so good.

Les Madeleines also has really good key lime pie and lemon tarts.

For other baked goods, I love Mrs. Backers. I like everything, but am particularly fond of their cupcakes, fruit tarts, chocolate chip cookies and, when they have them, lemon squared. I could also eat a million butter dream cookies from Normandie Cafe without a second thought. They are amazing.

-Marguerite St. Just


0 Comments
Question #77368 posted on 04/22/2014 5:24 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do the writers know who the editors are? I'm assuming at least some, if not all, of the editors are current writers. But those writers who aren't editors--do they know the editors' identities? Also, do "probies" know who the editors are?

-Marlsven

A:

Dear Marlfox,

It's a complete secret. Some of the editors don't even know that they're editors.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Marlsven,

It's not a secret internally. As an editor, I sign internal emails from the editor account with either my name or 'nym. Probies do know who the editors are (or could certainly find out if they needed to and didn't). We tend not to publish to the whole world Because Reasons, but within the Board people know.

-Editor

A:

Dear Marlsven,

I did not realize that a specific someone was an editor until a few days ago, so yes, it does happen. However, that was mainly due to my inattention and forgetfulness, since looking back I realized I had been told and simply forgot. But it's not like it's a secret, had I asked any writer they would have told me (or had I even looked again at who signed the emails I had received!). 

-Ozymandias


0 Comments
Question #77367 posted on 04/22/2014 5:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So lately I've been planning to write a novel having to do with maple syrup production. In my research I've learned that the biggest output of maple sap comes just around the spring thaw, when temperatures rise above the freezing point during the day. This means that syrup producers have only a few weeks during the year when they can tap, which means that their product for the entire year depends on those few weeks. So this begs the question: Would it be possible to increase sap output by "tricking" the trees by housing them in an artificial environment in which you manipulate the temperature? I am guessing that the answer is no or somebody would have done it already, but why not? Thanks!

- Beeners

A:

Dear Cilantro,

Just because the weeks in the spring are the best for sap production doesn't mean they are the only weeks for sap production. There's also the fall cooling down that performs the same thing -- cold nights and warm days make sap output.

More importantly, though, I can't imagine creating an artificial environment would be worth the time and expense. You're talking about heating and cooling down the area the size on an actual forest, which feels crazy. Maple trees need a lot of space, and it's preferred that they grow in a natural ecosystem with cycling soil conditions -- and therefore includes all sorts of bugs, other plants and animals. Not only that, but it requires tapping three or four trees for an entire year's worth of sap-producing time to create a single gallon of syrup; that's how much the stuff boils down. That would require a lot of trees in your giant artificial environment (unless this is some futuristic society where they have the technology to make heating and cooling giant forests a relatively easy task; if so, I'm pleased that the future still knows the value of maple syrup. Though, I must admit, now that I'm thinking about it, the idea of an entire forest kept under strict cycling conditions by a private entity with the intent to profit is sort of awesome.)

Another issue would be tricking the trees into speeding up their growing and maple producing processes. Plants do things ridiculously slowly. They have reactions to cooling temperatures -- like shedding leaves and drawing excess water -- I'm not sure that's a cycle you can easily speed up. You'd also run into the problem of tapping being hard on trees, it damages the portion of the tree that was tapped and the tree needs time to recover, so there would be downtime just for that. Would you still want to cool the whole structure while they're in their recovery period? Would it even help? I don't know. 

Just for fun, though, a high yield forest with 400 trees per acre will probably only have 100 maple trees per acre. This isn't a bad thing; as I mentioned, forests should maintain a variety of vegetation. 100 trees would get you about 40 gallons of syrup, or about 40 gallons per acre. Let's say we can up the maple trees per acre to 300 without horribly affecting the sugar content/taste of the syrup, and now we're getting 120 gallons per acre, or about $8,000 retail. You need to determine whether or not consistently, evenly heating and cooling an entire acre of forest is going to cost less than $8,000. To be safe, though, it should cost less than $6,000 since we're considering throwing in the production cost.

I'm also thinking that maple trees in a controlled, sped-up environment are unlikely to produce higher quality syrup, and the cost of temperature-controlling an entire forest would make them so expensive that they would not even be competitive with local artisan product.

Modern maple syrup producers use series of tubes leading from each tree to maximize the amount of sap they can get out with the minimal amount of travel time, which may be about as good as it's going to get.

-Marguerite St. Just


0 Comments
Question #77310 posted on 04/22/2014 3:48 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've got a problem. I'm usually very enthusiastic about the gospel, and very sensitive to the Spirit. I love general conference, devotionals, church, etc. Lately, however, I just don't feel... much of anything about the gospel. I understand that one's enthusiasm comes and goes. I know that doing the little things can feel mundane sometimes, or whatever.

I also know that that's not my problem. It's not that I feel bored with the gospel, I simply don't care about it. I don't care about my calling, I don't care about praying or reading the scriptures, I didn't care about conference last weekend, I don't care about going to church. In fact, it's almost as though I have some inner anxiety about the church, and I don't understand it. It's not a spiritual thing. I don't have any doubts about the gospel's truthfulness whatsoever. I just don't care, which is kind of scaring me. My apathy makes it extremely hard to make myself do the things I know I need to be doing.

These feelings are not like me at all. I've felt this way once before, about a year ago. After a few months the feelings went away and I was as 'into' the gospel as I usually am. Back then I thought this just happened because I wasn't being righteous or obedient enough, but I don't think that's the problem this time. I've tried so hard to do everything I'm supposed to, and it seems like these feelings have just come out of nowhere, and I can't deal with them. I feel miserable all the time, and I just want everyone to leave me alone. The weird thing is, my attitude towards school and work hasn't changed. The only thing I'm having these weird hopeless feelings for is in regards to the church, and I just don't get it.

Basically, I'm asking you for some ideas of what could be wrong with me, and what I can do to fix it. I've considered that maybe it has to do with depression or anxiety, but I honestly have no idea. I just know that I don't want to feel this way anymore.

I understand that you can't know with certainty what's going on, but I would really appreciate any ideas or advice you may have.

-Lana

A:

Dear Lana,

It sounds to me like Satan has got you down. Sometimes he is just really good at that--at getting you not to care. For many this begins the path of falling away--they simply stop caring and stop doing and eventually stop believing. You have made it clear that you don't like what is happening to you, and you miss the passion you have held for the gospel. So my advice will be equally as clear: force yourself to care. The very fact that you want to care about the gospel again shows that you can have that desire, and desire is where we all begin. So work at it. Flex your exhausted spiritual muscles and recommit yourself to the gospel. Pray that the Lord will aid you in your quest, and to strengthen your desire. You may not care to pray right now, but do it anyway. Do it now! As you are reading this answer. It is really easy and it will help. Then, go and do (don't sit and stew). Once you have asked for help, act by throwing yourself back into the gospel. Do service, read the scriptures, pray, and above all seek to invite the Holy Ghost into your life. It may also be a good idea to talk to your bishop about how you are feeling and see if he has other strategies that you might try, and while you're at it, you could ask for a priesthood blessing to help you to find the drive to continue to be an active participant in the gospel and the Church. Don't give up though. Acting in the gospel is just as important as believing in it.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger (who believes that you can do hard things.) 

A:

Dear Lana,

I think the fact that you are doing your best to be obedient and that you are scared about not caring are signs that you actually care very deeply. If you really didn't care, you wouldn't be asking this question. As wonderful as the feelings that often come with living the gospel are, commitment is a greater indicator of how much you care. You are not deficient.

Everyone's life is different and what I say may not be relevant to you at all, but I really resonated with the story you've related in your question.

In the past year, I have at times been troubled by an absence of good feelings about God and the gospel. At first, it was very disconcerting. In the long run, however, it has made me aware that my pattern of worship tends to be me trying to be as obedient as possible to avoid making mistakes or failing to do enough. The problem is that it distracts me from my relationship with God. For example, when reading the scriptures, I have a tendency to measure how well I am doing by how much I think I should read instead of how I feel when I read. And when I pray, sometimes I say the things I think I should instead of the things I want to say. When I resist this tendency by relaxing my arbitrary standard of "good enough" and focusing instead on my relationship with God, I feel less drained and the gospel is more meaningful to me. 

I don't know if your experience is similar to mine, but I shared it anyways because it seems like you are also really focused on obedience. I'm sure there are any number of reasons why you could be experiencing these feelings, though. Have you tried talking to your bishop? He has a spiritual stewardship over you and can receive inspiration to help you. You may also want to consider getting a blessing.

Best wishes.

-Sheebs


0 Comments
Question #77364 posted on 04/22/2014 3:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are your favorite Easter traditions? Is there anything that your family does that helps you feel the Spirit of Easter? On a related note, do you celebrate Lent, or Good Friday? How and why? I want Easter to be special and sacred, but I'm not sure how, since most of the Easter symbols I grew up with seem very pagan (and sugary!). I didn't grow up observing Lent or Good Friday. I feel a little like I'm in a cultural no man's land.

~kill 'da wabbit

ps This is slightly unrelated, but if you wanted to address the lack of LDS tradition surrounding Holy Week, that'd be cool. Or is it just me?



A:

Dear wabbit,

Besides the basic Easter-themed family home evening the week before Easter, my family has the Twelve Days of Easter (Easter symbols & scriptures contained in 12 plastic Easter eggs). I don't know if you can call it a tradition since we just barely started last year, but I hope it becomes one. You can find a lot of examples of this online; basically, you use twelve plastic Easter eggs and fill each one with a small symbol and a scripture reference. The symbol represents something related to the scripture, and the scriptures go chronologically through the ministry of Jesus Christ, focusing on the Atonement and Crucifixion and ending with an empty egg to represent the empty tomb. The symbols are small things like a small red cloth, rocks or pebbles, a small nail, etc. The idea is that you open one egg on each of the twelve days leading up to Easter, and I've found it to be a nice way to look forward to Easter and focus on Christ.

Some other things I sometimes do to make Easter special are look for pictures of the resurrected Christ and choose my favorite to post in my room or on my computer; watch the religious Easter videos the Church makes (anyone else a huge fan of the "Because of Him" video?); make Easter cards for the girls I visit teach with my testimony written inside; plan a time to simply sit outside and be grateful for God's gifts and ponder how all things testify of Jesus Christ.

I don't celebrate Lent or Good Friday, but I'd like to. I'm just so busy at that time each winter semester I haven't really gotten into it. I don't know if there's just a lack of LDS tradition surrounding Holy Week. Other countries, such as those in Europe and Latin America, put greater focus on religous tradition, and other places have greater populations of Catholics, so maybe you're just not seeing it so much around here because of that. We also focus in our church on the resurrected Christ and not so much about the crucifixion, so maybe that's another reason why not many LDS people celebrate Good Friday. From what I've heard, it can vary from family to family.

-Owlet


1 Comment
Posted on 04/22/2014 2:15 p.m. New Comment on: #77355 Do you know of a place where groups can study besides the Library? It's a real ...
Question #77363 posted on 04/22/2014 12:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Board,

When I eat a pear, sometimes my mouth starts to feel all chalky. Why does this happen?

- bismark

A:

Dear North Dakota,

When I first read your question I thought to myself, "Oh, werf is probably allergic to pears," and then I realized, when I eat fresh pears my mouth gets chalky tasting too! Then I thought, "I can't be allergic to pears! I love pears!" But then I remembered, gingers are immune to all allergens (oh the perks of not having a soul of one's own--keeps the body healthy). I tried searching the Google, and it didn't have much information, neither did my other usual sources, so here are my ideas. It could have something to do with how ripe the pear is. When pears aren't ripe they have a kind of powdery texture to them that could be causing the chalky feeling in your mouth. I also have a suspicion that it may be the skin of the pear, which is oddly smooth and contains a unique flavor. I have noticed that I don't have that chalky flavor when I eat canned pears, which are usually skinless. 

If anyone else has any ideas, please comment below.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger ("Pears are not apples. Although they grow on trees (like apples), have a core with seeds surrounded by lots of fruity goodness (like apples) and come in the same colours and textures as apples (like apples), they are in fact not at all apples. Pears probably derive their name from the feature that most distinguishes them from apples: their 'pear'-shapedness.") 


0 Comments
Question #77359 posted on 04/22/2014 12:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How can I find out which schools are legitimately accredited for Diagnostic Medical Sonography? My Google searches bring up lots of results, both online and traditional schools, and they all SAY they are accredited but I have a hard time knowing which ones actually are (or who is even responsible for being accredited??). I'm in Florida, can you help me find schools that will allow me to become a certified medical sonographer? I'm good with online or traditional!

-Confused about where to begin

A:

Dear Confused,

If you go this this website (which is powered by the people that handle accreditation of allied health education programs), and in the "Profession Name" field, select Diagnostic Medical Sonography, and then in the "State" field, put Florida, it will give you a list of accredited colleges and universities in your state for that program.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger (who would like to add the word "accreditation" to her list of silly-sounding words.)


0 Comments
Posted on 04/22/2014 10:48 a.m. New Comment on: #77175 So, a friend of mine mentioned to me that there is an abandoned building (which he ...
Posted on 04/22/2014 10:48 a.m. New Comment on: #77355 Do you know of a place where groups can study besides the Library? It's a real ...
Posted on 04/22/2014 10:48 a.m. New Comment on: #77353 I'm thinking of trying out for some community theater this summer. The company is doing 2 ...
Posted on 04/22/2014 10:48 a.m. New Comment on: #77353 I'm thinking of trying out for some community theater this summer. The company is doing 2 ...
Posted on 04/22/2014 10:47 a.m. New Comment on: #77328 I want to get a PhD, but may end up in a career outside academia (perhaps ...
Posted on 04/22/2014 10:47 a.m. New Comment on: #77328 I want to get a PhD, but may end up in a career outside academia (perhaps ...
Posted on 04/22/2014 10:46 a.m. New Comment on: #77334 I live in a state other than Utah, but for the sake of this question we ...
Question #77360 posted on 04/22/2014 1:06 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Any word yet on who the speaker will be for BYU's August commencement?

-Holding out for Pres. Uchtdorf

A:

Dear Holding,

Unfortunately, according to the Graduation Office, this information isn't released until 3-4 weeks before graduation. You can find out who is speaking here when it's closer to the date. 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Monday, April 21, 2014
Question #77344 posted on 04/21/2014 8:43 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What's the story behind Roosevelt creating the illusion that piranhas are super vicious? Board Question #76443

Merry-go-Lamb

A:

Dear Vashta Nerada,

So Roosevelt was a big traveler and loved adventure. In 1913 he traveled to South America on an expedition. The expedition ended disastrously after Roosevelt took sick and had his illness exacerbated by the bullet that was still in his body after his assassination attempt. As a result, Roosevelt returned home in 1914 where he wrote a book called Through the Brazilian Wilderness. The following is an excerpt from this book:

They are the most ferocious fish in the world. Even the most formidable fish, the sharks or the barracudas, usually attack things smaller than themselves. But the piranhas habitually attack things much larger than themselves. They will snap a finger off a hand incautiously trailed in the water; they mutilate swimmers—in every river town in Paraguay there are men who have been thus mutilated; they will rend and devour alive any wounded man or beast; for blood in the water excites them to madness. They will tear wounded wild fowl to pieces; and bite off the tails of big fish as they grow exhausted when fighting after being hooked.

But the piranha is a short, deep-bodied fish, with a blunt face and a heavily undershot or projecting lower jaw which gapes widely. The razor-edged teeth are wedge-shaped like a shark’s, and the jaw muscles possess great power. The rabid, furious snaps drive the teeth through flesh and bone. The head with its short muzzle, staring malignant eyes, and gaping, cruelly armed jaws, is the embodiment of evil ferocity; and the actions of the fish exactly match its looks.

I never witnessed an exhibition of such impotent, savage fury as was shown by the piranhas as they flapped on deck. When fresh from the water and thrown on the boards they uttered an extraordinary squealing sound. As they flapped about they bit with vicious eagerness at whatever presented itself. One of them flapped into a cloth and seized it with a bulldog grip. Another grasped one of its fellows; another snapped at a piece of wood, and left the teeth-marks deep therein. They are the pests of the waters, and it is necessary to be exceedingly cautious about either swimming or wading where they are found.

If cattle are driven into, or of their own accord enter, the water, they are commonly not molested; but if by chance some unusually big or ferocious specimen of these fearsome fishes does bite an animal—taking off part of an ear, or perhaps of a teat from the udder of a cow—the blood brings up every member of the ravenous throng which is anywhere near, and unless the attacked animal can immediately make its escape from the water it is devoured alive.

However, it should be noted that besides oral accounts, Roosevelt’s only real encounter with piranhas was after witnessing the locals dam up the river, starve a school of piranhas and then shove a cow in there with them. It’s no wonder that the starving fish tore up the cow! And his description of the out-of-water piranha is fairly indicative of most fish-y reactions- gaping mouths, flailing around, etc. Also, Roosevelt’s writing is hardly unbiased journalistic reporting. His liberal use of extreme adjectives was enough to cement the idea that piranhas were crazed creatures that are impossible to escape while swarming.

-Concorde c/o Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #77343 posted on 04/21/2014 8:43 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How is it that stress can cause your hair to turn gray or white?

-The Mango

A:

Dear The Mango, 

Looking at the research, it sounds more like the whole idea of hair turning gray due to stress is confirmation bias. People often cite that all of the recent US presidents have gone into office without gray hair and out with it. However, this doesn't take into account things like age (Obama entered at age 47 and is now 52, of course he has gray hair), and account for the fact that, on average, hair starts turning gray at age 35, and that for some it can start as early as high school. 

Given that, stress often causes hair to fall out, and when you have less hair on your head the gray ones may become more prominent. So in a nutshell, no, stress doesn't make hair turn gray. If you want to know more read the sources below.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger (insert witty comment here!)

  1. Sitek, Aneta, Elzbieta Zadzinska, and Iwona Rosset. "Effects of Psychological Stress on Skin and Hair Pigmentation in Polish Adolescents." Anthropological Review 75.1 (2012): 1-17. Print. 
  2. http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/aging/aging-process/stress-gray-hair.htm
  3. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/fact-or-fiction-stress-causes-gray-hair/

0 Comments
Question #77358 posted on 04/21/2014 8:43 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I work in the Cougareat and therefore get a 50% discount card on all on campus food places. I also have the meal plan Dining Dollars. I found at the Cannon Center that because of my Meal Plan, most meals only cost $5.00 there. What I am wondering is can I get the meal discounted down to $5.00 and then use my 50% card to make it $2.50? The only problem is that they seem to use the 50% card before you pay, which gives half off of it's original price, which is like $9.25. This would mean that it would be like $4.60ish, but then I wouldn't get the discount from my meal plan to $5.00. Does that make sense?
-The Hungry Penny Pincher

A:

Dear Minimum Wage,

So the half off cards only take half off of a meal up to $8, after that they will only take off $4 from your bill. They are valid at the Cannon Center, but I called over there and they informed me that you cannot apply your 50% off card to your Dining Dollar meals; you can use them without with meal plan, but not together.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger (who gives much thanks to Yayfulness and the lady at the Commons at the Cannon Center for their help.) 


0 Comments
Question #77324 posted on 04/21/2014 8:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So this exists. Would you be willing to take a break from finals and make a custom 100 Hour Board 2048 game for me? I greatly appreciated the doge version yay mentioned in Board Question #77026. I'm imagining something like "get two Laser Jocks together to finally make Katya the Patron Saint and win the game," but whatever you're in the mood for really. Pictures appreciated!

-Princess Kate (who really doesn't need another thing distracting her from finals but...)

A:

Dear princesa,

I have a new favorite distraction.

I decided to create multiple versions, since there are so many significant past and present writers out there. So, the results are...

Enjoy, and happy finals week!

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #77329 posted on 04/21/2014 8:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

With Let it Go from Frozen getting so popular, one of the local radio DJs pointed out how show tunes and similar songs are really picking up a lot more attention in the main-stream media. The fact that Idina's version is played on the radio significantly more than Demi Levato's version shows that this really is more of a move toward the Broadway style of music, not just a particular song. Otherwise, the pop version would have at least equal air time (kind of like remixes and originals).

What are other songs that have gained similar popularity despite being intended as songs for a show or movie? One example is The Golden Bangkok from Chess. My dad says it played on the radio a lot when he was in high school. But it's very definitely part of the plot of the show Chess. I think Dancing Through Life and Defying Gravity from Wicked both got some added attention, but I was also very involved with theater people when the show came out, so that is probably a skewed perspective.

What are other examples? Why do you think this trend is picking up now?

Thanks!

~Smurf Blue Snuggie

A:

Dear Peppermint,

The song you're thinking of from Chess is "One Night in Bangkok". "Golden Bangkok" is the instrumental they play at the start of the second act. And Chess is a fantastic musical and the latest version has Josh Groban and Idina Menzel (and other people who I love, but others may not have heard of). Everyone should love it.

I don't believe this is a new trend. I know there were songs played on the radio from some of the older musicals, such as "Some Enchanted Evening" and "Bali Ha'" from South Pacific, "Stranger in Paradise" from Kismet, "The Impossible Dream" from Man of La Mancha, "Try to Remember" from The Fantasticks (which is the longest running musical in the world), for example. More recently (well, it's a relative term), I know of "I Will Always Love You" from The Bodyguard, "Nine to Five" from Nine to Five, "Can You Feel the Love Tonight" from Lion King, "Falling Slowly" from Once, and "Seasons of Love" from Rent. I'm sure the list could be much longer and I'm missing some very obvious songs.

Or, we could flip that and mention that Mamma Mia! is composed entirely of popular ABBA songs.

I think these are songs which actually played on the radio when that type of music was popular. In other words, I don't see this as a trend which is just now picking up. We maybe went through some years when there weren't as many songs from movies or musicals in the mainstream, but I believe there have always been some.

-Marguerite St. Just (and Tally for reminding me of "Seasons of Love," which I'd blocked from memory)


0 Comments
Question #77334 posted on 04/21/2014 8:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I live in a state other than Utah, but for the sake of this question we can just assume that I live in Utah because I probably will soon.

I always keep my wallet, and therefore my driver's license, in my backpack, which I throw in my trunk while driving. If I get pulled over, will I get in trouble for keeping my license in the trunk where it's not easily accessible? I know that we aren't supposed to get out of the car when a cop pulls us over, so how would I get my license? Should I keep it up front with me?

-new driver

A:

Dear New Driver,

Well, I've looked around for a while and now I'm about to do that thing I hate doing:

"If anyone knows, please submit a comment."

Although I haven't been able to find an official source, my suggestion is to keep the license with you in the front of the car. If you've been pulled over you're probably already in trouble, and I feel like you might want to keep the police officer happy by not complicating things.

- Haleakalā


1 Comment
Question #77342 posted on 04/21/2014 8:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

If I take a class at another university and opt for pass/fail grading instead of a letter grade, with it still count toward my core requirements?

-Future BYU Alumni

A:

Dear Future Alumni, 

I called the Admissions Office and a sweet girl named Emily told me that it is very dependent on what class you take and where you take it from. You should call the Transfer Evaluation Office at (801) 422-8522 when you know those two details. 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #77244 posted on 04/21/2014 8:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

It's been several years since I was at BYU. I'm now enjoying my chosen profession and even manage a team of ten. While I have been a manager for a couple years, managing people is still a challenge and I am experiencing many new things for the first time.

I have two employees that aren't measuring up. I've had several brief conversations with them about the topic......and while things have generally improved, the employees still have their ups & downs. Some days are good, some are not.

Quite frankly, I could probably find one person to do their jobs better, pay less overall, and have less drama in my life.

In conversations with my higher level managers, they seem very supportive of either firing them or giving them a chance to see how they perform on a new team doing something different. Ultimately, it is there choice on this one.....but my comments will weigh heavily on their decisions.

Realizing this isn't some kind of summer job and these employees have families, responsibilities, etc. I feel kind of guilty and am constantly asking myself the questions below.


> Did I fail them as a manager? Could they have improved?

> While it's "just business", I cannot stop thinking what would the savior do? Would he ever fire anyone? What if they were trying to improve, but really weren't doing so.

> My employer is a very "at will" type of employment. There is no 90 day improvement plan or anything, you can be fired at any time. While I have told them I have been disappointed in their performance at times....I still think they may feel this is coming out of left field. Particularly as I have a way of saying things, while true, in the most rosy and positive way possible. Plus, one of my employees seems like such an optimist....I almost don't think they understood what I was telling them.

> It's hard for me to let them go because they haven't had one major screw up. Rather it's lots of little things, any one of which wouldn't be enough to do it.

> How do I sleep knowing they have families, some of which even have medical conditions. This is their source of income.

> Is it selfish for me to feel that my team will likely be more successful without them? Perhaps even that I will be more successful personally.

> How do I break it to my other employees without them worrying about their jobs. Because they are doing just fine. Some of my long term employees will get it....but I have some new people. Plus, I should not really speak in detail about their former colleagues performance to explain it.


While I know the board does not have all the answers, perhaps there is something someone can share to make me feel better about the whole situation.

-Not Thrilled to now be "The Man"

A:

Dear Man,

I think the best thing you can do for everyone is to have a meeting with them individually and be perfectly upfront about the situation. First, it will give them a chance to make amends and change their behavior. Second, if they feel like they cannot perform it will give them time to begin looking for new jobs. Finally, it will also set you in the right in case you do need to fire them at a later point. Give them a month or so and specific targets/goals for improvement. If they cannot measure up, you will probably need to fire them.

Currently there are still many capable people who are unemployed because of the slow economy. It may help to think of the situation from the perspective of someone who is still unemployed. How is it fair that the people on your team have jobs they are not fulfilling when others would love to have their jobs and would work hard?

In response to "would the Savior fire people?" the answer is yes. He would always give a chance for repentance and He would never be cruel, but I believe the Lord holds us to the responsibility of our tasks. Those who accept responsibilities (think here, covenants) and fail to carry them out are subject to justice. There is always a second chance if we are truly penitent, but if we still do not live up to the agreements we have made we will not receive all of the blessings.

Of course, having a job is very different from church covenants. I would error totally and completely on the side of mercy: give them a chance, watch for improvement, search for every reason why you should keep them. But if they continue to not meet the demands of the job, you need to find somebody else to take their place for the good of the team, for future members of the team, and even for the good of those who are under-performing.

-Ozymandias


0 Comments
Question #77336 posted on 04/21/2014 2:48 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Does Motion Computing physically manufacture their rugged commercial tablets themselves, or are they more like Apple, being all engineers who design the things and then paying someone like Foxconn to actually manufacture them?

-Frank

A:

Dear Frank,

I tried contacting Motion Computing through their website, but they haven't gotten back to me yet. I'll post a comment if they do, or perhaps one of our readers will help us out.

-Owlet


0 Comments
Question #77328 posted on 04/21/2014 2:48 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I want to get a PhD, but may end up in a career outside academia (perhaps in the foreign service). Can someone with a PhD but unattached to a university publish in academic journals? What is the process like? I know that certain past scholars have done some of their most important academic work during periods while not attached to an academic institution, such as Einstein, Darwin, John Stuart Mill, and Nietzsche, but I was wondering if academic publishing by PhDs not working at universities is a feasible prospect in the 21st century. Thanks!

-Too many aspirations

A:

Dear Aspirations,

As far as I understand, it is theoretically possible but the actual practicality varies by field from "basically impossible" to "very impractical." Occasionally you do hear stories of even undergraduate students being published as the primary author in some journals, so it shows there are not any hard requirements.

I say "theoretically possible" because most modern research is inaccessible to someone outside of academia. First, unless you hold a Ph.D. most research that is "publishable" will be far beyond your capabilities. Next, unless you are in a position where you are exposed to other research that is currently taking place in the field it is unlikely you will be able to make valuable contributions (build off of, but not overlap, somebody else's work). A university is the ideal location for this. Additionally, modern research takes hundreds of hours and lots of money in research funding. If you are not associated with a university, it is unlikely you will ever have the time or the funding. Plus, any major journal will be skeptical if you are not associated with a university and I've heard that the process of publication in top journals can become political. If you aren't employed by a university I think your chances of being published fall dramatically.

So while, yes, it is theoretically possible it is not feasible. I write this with a slant towards the "hard sciences," but I would be surprised if other fields differed dramatically. If your aspiration is to be published, there are many opportunities to do research and possibly be published while at BYU as an undergraduate. Consider talking to your department or professors about opportunities!

-Ozymandias


2 Comments
Question #77357 posted on 04/21/2014 2:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am a very shy girl in her 20s. Sometimes I think people who don't know me perceive me as stuck-up because they always have to say hi to me first or smile first before I reciprocate. It's not that I don't like these people, it's just that if I don't know someone well, I never take the initiative with them because I don't want them to think I'm weird or something. Yes, I'm very self-conscious and worry about what others think of me--I'm working on that. But how can I become approachable? Like, with people who I've never talked to before, or with people who I have only once? Furthermore, it's said all the time that women who are confident are attractive. I'm not confident, but I want to fake my confidence. How can I go about that?

Thank ya,

Claire16

A:

Dear Claire,

Okay, so some of the things I am about to tell you are going to be very hard to implement into your life, and some will be very easy, so bear with me, and remember that the things that bear (seemingly) the greatest risks, also produce the greatest rewards. 

First, ways to appear confident and approachable!

  • Good posture! Having good posture helps you look so much more confident. Not only does it lift your entire body to a beautiful upright position, but it makes others think that you are comfortable and confident in yourself. It also has the added benefit of being very good for your health and making your entire appearance better. Everyone looks more confident and attractive when they stand up straight. 
  • Smile more. You don't even have to be smiling directly at people, just focus on keeping a friendly smile on your face. Last semester I made a significant effort to focus on keeping the corners of my mouth up rather than down in order to make people more comfortable approaching me at work. I think it works very well. So focus on keeping a happy and friendly aura on your face with a smile
  • Look sideways after you make eye contact with people, rather than looking down or up. Looking down gives the impression that you are less than them and not worthy of approach, looking up makes it look like you are better or above them, but if you look sideways you are giving the impression that you are equals. It is a very subtle bit of body language, but it does have an impact. Also, I have been told that you should look up when you are flirting with someone because it makes you appear more aloof and flirtatious.
  • When you are sitting or standing or talking to someone, open up your body. Closing your body off by hunching your shoulders, folding your arms, crossing your legs, or ducking your head all exude timidity. So don't duck into yourself. Seek to open up your body language: fold your arms less, particularly when you are sitting down, instead put your arms on both arms rests--open up your body! And try to take up a little more space: not a lot more, that is arrogant, just a little bit. You are worth the space your body takes up, so show it.

Now the hard stuff. Just because you are doing these things to make you more approachable or confident appearing, doesn't mean more people will approach you. Humans, as a rule, are absorbed in themselves. We are all constantly concerned with how our actions might appear to other people, and we fail to realize that everyone else is focusing so much on themselves that you become more of a blip on their radar. Now this isn't true for everyone, and it isn't said to tell you that you don't matter to others, because you do. However, someone you don't know or only know a little, won't just jump in and start talking to you--they don't have incentive to approach you. So what do you have to do? You need to approach them.

The best advice I can give you, as someone who has been there is expand your comfort zone by getting out of your comfort zone. It's hard, it's scary, and it will be fraught with worry, but if you force yourself to do little things that scare you, you will come to overcome your fears and find faith in yourself and, very likely, in others. Take small steps at first; experiment: start smiling and making eye contact with people you pass by that you recognize but don't know well. Once you find yourself become comfortable with that start waving and/or greeting them; ask them about their day. Do this to strangers too. Set goals, and say to yourself, "Self, we are going to smile at 10 people today, and at least three of them must be cute boys!" or "Self, go have a conversation with that girl from our ward that we barely talk to, she seems really nice." Expand your comfort zone by getting out of your comfort zone. 

Finally, I would add that your biggest ally in overcoming yourself and the comfort zone you have built around you is, and always will be, the Lord. He is your proponent as you seek to improve yourself and your interactions with others. He is on your side, and if you ask him for his help, he will be there for you. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger (who would, in addition, recommend that you watch Brenè Brown's TED Talk, "The Power of Vulnerability.") 


0 Comments
Question #77331 posted on 04/21/2014 1 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

LDS families are usually pretty big, so sometimes find a form transportation could be a problem. Most of the LDS families today have full-size SUVs or minivans and in some cases, large fifteen-seater vans. However, back in 1950s and 1960s when SUVs and minivans didn't exist and station wagons dominated the family vehicle market, how did big families arrange their transportations if they want to travel together? By big family I mean a family that has more than five children. Most station wagons could only accommodate five people and some models have those jump seats in the trunks and those seats are designed only for young children.

-I Love My Volvo 960 Wagon

A:

Dear Rosemary,

First, full-size station wagons existed in the 1950s. From the history section of the Station wagon Wikipedia article, we learn that "in 1935, General Motors introduced a steel-bodied eight-seat Suburban wagon."

Second, and most importantly, seat belts were an optional feature in cars through most of the 1950s and car seats for small children didn't start being a law until much later, so you could cram as many people in a car as you wanted. Kids could either squish or stand or sit on each other's laps and that was all fine and accepted.

-Marguerite St. Just


0 Comments
Question #77353 posted on 04/21/2014 1 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm thinking of trying out for some community theater this summer. The company is doing 2 shows ("Fiddler on the Roof" and "Pirates of Penzance") and you're supposed to prepare 16 bars of a musical number "in the style of the show". Does that mean prepare a song from the show? The 2 are pretty different, stylistically but you can audition for both at the same time. Anyone have any experience with this? Also, what do you wear to such an audition?

Thanks in advance for any advice/help!

-The 100 Hour Board is my hero!

A:

Dear Damsel/knight in distress,

So I talked to my dear roommate, The Mountainous Brunette, and she gave these recommendations. First, look nice, dress at least in business casual attire, probably Sunday dress though—you don't want them to dismiss you simply based on the clothes you are wearing. As for song, you shouldn't prepare one from either of the shows; doing that may give them the idea that you A) are trying out for a specific part, and/or B) have prepared the song the way you would perform it, and you aren't flexible to change. 

The following are musicals we thought of that might provide good songs for your audition:

  • Fiddler on the RoofThe Scarlet Pimpernel, or something by Rodgers and Hammerstein
  • Pirates of PenzanceMy Fair Lady, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
  • Both: Camelot or Oliver

She also recommends that if you have a specific part in mind that you pick a song that would showcase your ability to play that part. If any readers have recommendations for other pieces to audition with, please feel free to comment.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger and The Mountainous Brunette (the latter of whom feels that her 'nym is grossly inaccurate, but will put up with it nonetheless.)


2 Comments
Question #77355 posted on 04/21/2014 10:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do you know of a place where groups can study besides the Library? It's a real pain only having a study room for 2 hours.

-I-Know-All

A:

Dear All-Knowing Reader,

Try using different people in your group to sign up for the same room. So if you want to reserve a group study room from noon to 5, you could reserve the room from 12-2, someone else in your study group could reserve the room from 2-4 and a third person could reserve the room from 4-5. If you can't find a room that's available for that long, try switching rooms every couple hours. It's kind of nice to be able to get up and stretch your legs anyway.

- Haleakalā

A:

Dear Why are you asking me then,

So while there are reserve only rooms in the library, there are also open access study rooms in the Learning Commons area on the third floor of the library. These are first come first serve, and you can use them for as long as you want. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger (who also recommends studying outside in the beautiful sunshine.)


2 Comments