A perfect summer day is when the sun is shining, the breeze is blowing, the birds are singing, and the lawn mower is broken. - James Dent
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
Question #82573 posted on 05/26/2015 11:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do you think the Church should look into building universities outside of the United States?

I've thought for a long time that members in South/Central America, Europe, or East Asia would really benefit from a place where LDS youth can meet each other, participate in a scholarly community, and get a solid education that will help them go places in life. BYU has a lot of international students, which is great, but there are so many others who will never have the resources or the visa to travel here to study.

However, I'm not the prophet. I have no idea whether this scheme has already been considered or what kinds of difficulties it would present. So, here are my questions:

- What obstacles would there be to the Church owning and running universities in other countries?
- Do you think Church leaders have thought about this? Do you think they're actively working towards it? Why or why not?
- What's your own opinion? Do you think it would work? If you could choose the location, where would you put a BYU—International?

-Thusly

A:

Dear Consequently,

Back in the October 1999 General Conference, President Hinckley gave a talk called "Why We Do Some of the Things We Do," which I consider to be one of the most interesting talks he's given. It's purpose is to address why the Church does some things that don't seem very "churchy," like dealing in real estate and owning businesses. The first part of the talk examined BYU and other church universities. Some excerpts:

People ask why we sponsor such a large and costly institution that is basically concerned with secular education. The question is appropriate. This sponsorship has a doctrinal root...

It is apparent that we are obligated not only to learn of ecclesiastical matters but also of secular matters. There is a tradition in the Church that deals with these things...

How fortunate are those who have the opportunity to attend. I almost become angry when I hear of complaining among the students or the faculty. I am grateful to be able to say that with very few exceptions those who come to learn and those who teach are appreciative and mindful of the great blessing that is theirs...

We shall continue to support BYU and its Hawaii campus. We shall continue to support Ricks College. We are not likely to build other university campuses. We wish that we might build enough to accommodate all who desire to attend. But this is out of the question. They are so terribly expensive. But we shall keep these as flagships testifying to the great and earnest commitment of this Church to education, both ecclesiastical and secular, and while doing so prove to the world that excellent secular learning can be gained in an environment of religious faith.

Backing up these institutions will be our other schools, our institutes of religion, scattered far and wide, and the great seminary system of the Church.

It is hoped that through these our youth, wherever they may be, may experience some of the good to be had at BYU.

So, there's the rub: expenses. Tithing money is incredibly sacred, and so the leadership of the church goes to great lengths to make sure that it's used in the way the Lord intends (which is why I find it incredibly significant that the Church is willing to provide thousands of iPads to missionaries when they only receive a 2% discount on said devices). Though more universities would be wonderful, it seems like right now the tithing money is needed elsewhere.

But, this does show that the topic is on the minds of the First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve. And, it's also important to note that revelation isn't static; if times and needs change, the prophet could very well be inspired to build a new Church school somewhere else.

(I'll also note here that, while it wasn't a university, the Church did have an international school for a long time: El Centro Escolar Benemérito de las Américas in Mexico City. Until it was converted into the Mexico City MTC in 2013, it was a private Church High School, with the Honor Code and everything.) 

If they were to make a new international school, I think the Church would want it to serve as many members as possible. That would make Latin America or Europe the most likely choices in my mind, although I don't think it would be too far-fetched to see one in the Philippines or Africa, either.

The times are changing. The work is being hastened. Who knows what we'll see next?

-Frère Rubik


0 Corrections
Question #82571 posted on 05/26/2015 8:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear cool people,

Which is the BEST drinking fountain on campus?
To be more specific, which drinking fountain has the following attributes:
1. good water pressure (not so weak that you have to lick the spout, but not so strong that it splashes you)
2. good temperature (definitively colder than room temperature, but not so cold that it hurts your teeth)
3. good taste (aka no taste)

-waterdrinker27

A:

Dear soulmate,

I have literally been planning to answer this question for months. It was a big motivation for joining the Board. Please ask it again in the fall when I'm back on campus (and hopefully still with the Board), and I will make you a grand spreadsheet. 

Yours,
-Auto Surf

A:

Dear water,

The fountain in the hallway to the Madsen recital hall, inside the HFAC.

-Zedability


0 Corrections
Question #82570 posted on 05/26/2015 8:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

A Facebook friend recently posted about how much she's against circumcision for babies, linking to an article that talked about how most men in the US are circumcised as babies and that the US is one of the few countries that does this. I think of circumcision as such a biblical thing that it really shocked me. Why is this still a thing? And is it really as wide spread as all that? Do any of the board parents have an opinion?

-my name here

A:

Dear lowercase,

As in, why is circumcision still a thing? 

Well, there's a couple of reasons. Before getting into that, though, I think it's worth mentioning that circumcision is a bit more prevalent than that article would lead one to believe. This paper from 2007 estimates that one-third of the earth's male population is circumcised. The same paper notes that circumcision is most prevalent in Africa and the Middle East, though there are statistically significant populations of circumcised men in developed nations such as Australia, Canada, and the United States as well.

Why is it still so widespread? Religion, mostly. Circumcision is still a requirement for all male members of the Jewish faith, and it's an almost universal practice in Islam as well (source: Wikipedia). There's some evidence that circumcision can help prevent the spread of STD's, but not enough (in my opinion) to be conclusive.

For more opinions on the pros and cons, here's an article from the Deseret News. Personally, since I'm not very close to fatherhood yet, I haven't given it much thought, and I don't think I will for the time being.

-Frère Rubik


0 Corrections
Question #82569 posted on 05/26/2015 7:40 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've experienced something strange lately that I'll try to explain. First, a bit of background. I think that I have some social anxiety issues. I don't talk a lot in groups, but am better one on one (sometimes, anyway). I shy away from RS and church activities, but DO go to my Sunday meetings. I have issues when going past a certain point on the freeway because it's too stressful/scary. I don't/can't make small talk, which probably leads others to believe I'm a snob when I'm just shy. Lastly, I don't often share my real, deep feelings and ideas with a lot of people.

Now to this issue that happened a couple times and I thought it was odd or coincidental, but it recently happened again and I wonder if it is related to anxiety or something else. First, my friend was practicing foot zoning and energy healing on me that she's been studying. She was getting into some possible issues I have that might relate to my past. I started to shiver like I was freezing. It felt similar to the way that I felt when, after someone smashed into my car years ago, my body went into shock, even though I wasn't otherwise hurt.

Another time I was to start regularly meeting with a couple of people, one of which I felt, by the way we'd interacted in the past, that said person might have issues with me. I was worried about these meetings not only because one of the people might not like me, but also because I struggle having conversations in these type of situations and was concerned with the awkwardness that seemed inevitable. I prayed for help, and that first meeting was going really well -- I enjoyed it in fact, but then at the end of our meeting that went well, I started to feel that shivering again, despite the fact that I had a jacket on and was actually sweaty.

The most recent situation: I was talking with a friend, who I'm not terribly close to, but I felt like I should share with her a certain personal experience that I had. As we were talking, and she was giving her insight to me, I again started the shivering, even though I didn't think I was cold.

So, I'm wondering if this shivering sensation that I feel in situations where perhaps I am feeling vulnerable, if it is coincidence or if there is a connection to anxiety? If you do find/know of a connection to anxiety or something similar, how do I stop this response in my body to these situations?

Thanks,
Me

A:

Dear Me,

I have experienced this as well. Not so much in a cold-shivery way, but in the sense that my body will shudder. I've also dealt with different types of anxiety, and I've never connected them before but it would make sense. The times I can remember involuntarily shuddering were always when I was sharing something really personal. Or sometimes it's not that I've shared something but that I just feel more open or exposed than I'm used to.

This article explains a little bit about how shaking relates to social anxiety. It has to do with the "fight or flight" response that comes from the anxiety reacting to a perceived threat. It would make sense to have this response in situations where you're feeling vulnerable. I know some of the times it's happened to me, the "threat" presented is that the person I'm talking with won't accept me. The weird thing is that it can happen with all levels of relationships; I've had the shuddering sensation talking with my mom, a semi-stranger, and my therapist. I thought it would happen more with people I don't know very well, but I think because of anxiety it can happen with anyone. 

For treatment, the website recommends meditation and psychological therapy. I've done both at different times, and I think they can do wonders. With both options, however, right after I feel really heavy and really drained. It's only after I push past that weight that I can see how much they help me. For meditation, I've found some great videos on YouTube or books that walk you through. For therapy, BYU has a free counseling program in the basement of the Wilk. You have to fill out quite a bit of paperwork before you can make an appointment, so be sure to plan in advance if this is an option you want to pursue. 

You didn't ask this, but I just want to add that it's helped me to know that I'm not alone in dealing with anxiety, and you definitely aren't either. People don't talk about it enough, but it's a common challenge and a powerful refining fire. You got this. We got this. 

Much love,
Auto Surf 


0 Corrections
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How do the payment terms on graduate school loans generally work? If you're continuously enrolled in a graduate program, is the start date of those payments deferred? What if you took a year off to do research?

What if I got married sometime in the middle of a graduate program: at what point does my FAFSA need to change to reflect that? Would that end up being disadvantageous to me fiscally?

I know this is a question to take to my prospective school's financial aid office, but I've never dealt with tuition fees or loans and it causes me a lot of stress.

---Portia

A:

Dear Portia,

Unfortunately, none of us are experts on this, and 'twould be a shame if we gave you the wrong advice. (...That sounded a little menacing. Please don't take it that way.) The FAFSA general questions and contact page can be found here, and I highly recommend getting in touch with your school's financial aid office. I also get a lot of stress sending people emails or talking to people that can decide my future, but from my experience the workers at financial aid office know how stressed out students are and are generally very helpful and kind. Explain your situation and they will help you. Make sure to write down all your questions beforehand, take some deep breaths, and go for it! You got this! 

-Auto Surf


0 Corrections
Question #82559 posted on 05/26/2015 4:34 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I got a positive pregnancy test today! (Hooray!) Aside from feeling disbelieving, emotional, tender, and very serious, I've been trying to figure out what the heck I need to do to prepare in the next eight or so months, if the pregnancy test is correct.

So here it is: what would you do to prepare if you found out that you or your spouse is having a baby in eight months?

More philosophically, what are the kind of things you'd want to make sure are in the world (maybe letters to your not-yet-born child) before your child gets there? Would you be working to make the world a more lovely place (with drawings, baby room set-up, writings, acts of service), set up an intensive scripture-reading schedule to up your spiritual knowledge, become an expert on the workings of midwives or hospitals, etc.?

Some things my spouse and I have thought of:
-writing some picture books we'd talked about making for our kids (sort of Debra Frasier, On the Day You Were Born-esque)
-making a Sunday reverent book (classic, with felt)
-going to a birthing/prenatal class

Another example: My sister is pregnant, and she's asked those family members who are willing to walk 100 miles to walk 100 miles before her baby is born, so the baby knows she's welcomed and thought about. And so we know it too, maybe.

I'd love to hear your thoughts, parents and not-yet parents! Keep in mind I have an eight-to-five job and a commute pretty much up until the baby comes, so the activities will probably need to fit in that time frame. (For example, I might be less able to travel to all of the continents. Though, who knows! Things happen, people. Things happen.) And a modest, college student-y kind of budget.

Thanks for your time!

-Marilynne R.

A:

Dear Marilynne,

Congratulations! 

I'd like to start off this answer with a disclaimer that I am not a parent, expecting, or even anything close, but I do have four siblings with children (and another sibling who's expecting!) and I've learned a little from them. Also, the internet is great. Now, on to the good stuff. 

I would start by watching this video and reading the accompanying article, and maybe even watching it frequently in the next 8 months. It's more about what happens after pregnancy, but I feel like that's pretty pertinent, too. I think things are always harder when you don't have clear expectations, and so this video and other articles or books like it can be very helpful. Along with this idea, I would suggest just doing a lot of research on hospitals/midwives, feeding, sleep schedules, etc. You're probably going to get a ton of advice, and so it would be nice to have done the research and be able to decide what feels best for you, your husband, and your baby. (For example, two of my sisters are all about the epidural, but one made it to a 5 naturally.) 

As far as during the pregnancy, go for the crafts and quiet books as much as you can. Once the baby comes, you'll have a lot less time and energy, and the reverent book and similar activities can be life savers in church. I really like the idea of having a journal/memory book of the baby's firsts for them to look back on when they're older, or even just journal entries from you. I think that is a great way of showing them that they were awaited and welcomed. 

More than anything, though, prioritize your own education of pregnancy. It would be nice to have a cute baby room or picture books of their first, but most important is making sure you and your baby will be safe and healthy. I think a birthing/prenatal class would be great for that, as well as checking out some books about nutrition and such. Good luck, and happy pregnancy! 

-Auto Surf


0 Corrections
Question #82561 posted on 05/26/2015 3:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Two siblings in a family with seven children got 36's on the ACT. Another two of the kids got 35's. A fifth sibling got a 34. I don't happen to know the last two scores, but they were strictly above 30 and strictly below 35. (One of these two took it multiple times, achieving a 35 on each section individually but never reaching a composite score of 35.) Both of the 36's and at least one of the 35's were on the first try without any preparation. (I have insufficient information about the other four). What are the chances of this score spread for a random family with seven kids? And what are the chances of such a family's median ACT score being a 35? If you incorporate the information about the lack of preparation and first tries, how does it change things?

-One of the Seven (who may be a bit overly excited about werf's youngest sibling's 36)

A:

Dear you,

I think the chances of these type of scores coming within the same family is substantially greater than the chances if you simply grabbed a random group of 7 people, because eugenics/genetics, yo. Odds are both of your parents are pretty smart and they passed on smart genes to all their kids.

As a similar example, there aren't 7 kids in my family, but of the 4 who are old enough to have taken the ACT, we have three 36s and a 35 as our final scores (though everyone took it more than once, I believe) (I won't tell you which one of us is the not-36, but it rhymes with Banne, Bertainly).

If you incorporate lack of prep, odds go down, but probably not by a ton. The ACT and SAT are learnable tests, to an extent, but I think it's probably substantially harder to learn your way from a 35 to a 36 than to learn your way from a 25 to a 30 just because it's such a razor's edge at those high cutoffs and the difference is really like one point. Even though my siblings and I took it multiple times, I don't think anyone changed more than 2 points. 

Sounds like you come from a super bright family! Use your powers for good!

~Anne, Certainly


0 Corrections
Question #82537 posted on 05/26/2015 12:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

In the spirit of Ether 12:27, what are some weaknesses you've had in the past that have now become strengths? How did you work and turn your weakness into a strength? How has it blessed your life and the lives of others?

-Sophwerf

A:

Dear Doctor,

The first thing I wanted to mention is that in that verse, weakness is singular, which gives it an entirely different meaning. In this sense, then, weakness actually refers to our inability to become perfected without Christ. We can't do it alone, which should humble us, and give us the opportunity to find strength in Christ. 

In terms of your actual question, though, I've had a lot more trouble finding an answer than I thought I would. So, my example is actually something I'm currently focusing on. I'm not that good at being humble, but my hope is that as I work on that, I'll be more open to other people and better see how I can serve and help people.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Sophwerf,

I'm not sure if I could count any of my past weaknesses as strengths just yet, but there are many ways in which I know I've grown over the past few years.

I have improved my people skills significantly. I have gained greater control over my emotions. I have grown hugely in the love and empathy that I possess for others. My ability to trust in God has increased significantly. I have learned to pray more sincerely. My priorities are more in line with God's will than they ever used to be. 

I have changed for the better in all of these respects, but only because God has been involved in the details of my life and has provided me with opportunity after opportunity to learn and grow. I believe He does this for all of us. All we have to do is have a sincere desire to change and take advantage of each chance we have to be better than we were before. If we are willing to do that, God will change us.

A recent weaknesss I have overcome is the fear of being myself. After years of worrying too much about what people thought of me, I finally hit a wall and realized that my life couldn't go where I wanted it to go if I kept letting fear keep me from being myself. I knew that in order to make a difference for good in the world I needed to stop basing my actions in fear.

So, I started making a conscious effort to live my life without fear and, over the past few months, it has made a huge difference. I don't worry so much about looking stupid anymore or about saying the wrong thing. I just accept that I'm going to say and do some stupid things, and that's okay. It's better than not saying or doing anything at all.

When I was at work one day, I found myself pondering my life and how I wanted it to be. I wrote some thoughts down on a paper and stuck it in a Book of Mormon. I guess somebody I work with found the paper and liked it because they took it out and stuck it in a place where everybody could see it. In case anybody else out there could benefit from it, here it is what I wrote:

We are able to live free, the way we are supposed to when we...

  • Keep the commandments (love God)
  • Never allow fear to inhibit us—fear should never be a factor in the decisions we make
  • Realize our incredible worth and love ourselves enough to push ourselves and leave our comfort zones
  • Extend love to all who surround us
  • Maintain a positive disposition and a sense of adventure and excitement for life

Coming to realize that this is the way I want to live my life and taking steps in that direction is probably one of the most important ways I have grown recently.

How have all these changes blessed myself and others? They have made all the difference in the world! To change for the better is the purpose of life. Sometimes we focus so intently on changing the things that surround us that we forget that true happiness comes from the changes we make within ourselves. I think the biggest blessing I have received as I have tried to improve myself has been joy. Joy, and a feeling of fulfillment and purpose. As far as others are concerned, I think I have developed qualities that make me a better, kinder, and more understanding friend, and I sure hope that friendship has helped at least a few people.

I could talk forever about the importance of change and how beautiful change makes life. Isn't life an amazing thing? When I sit down and start to think about it, I end up in a state of total awe just thinking about what a miracle it all is.

Love,

Vienna


0 Corrections
Question #82548 posted on 05/26/2015 11:41 a.m.
Q:

Dear Auto Surf and Frère Rubik,

How long have y'all been reading The Board? How were you introduced to it? What made you want to become a writer?

-Wrinkled Rhubarb Shoelace

A:

Dear Rhubes,

I've been reading since January 2013, but more seriously for about a year and a half. My sister-in-law (though at the time only a potential sister-in-law) casually mentioned it as one of her favorite parts of BYU. It sounded cool and I browsed it occasionally for some time. I don't remember what got me to look at it more seriously, but I was definitely hooked after the night that I found Board Question #75766. I think that was also the night I introduced the Board to Sophwerf, and his obsession fueled mine. That summer there were a couple nights that I stayed up until later than I'm embarrassed to admit reading about prank wars and dating advice. Ah, the good times. 

There were a lot of reasons that applying seemed right. For one, I really like to research and learn about new things, but I won't do it unless I have to. The same goes for writing. Unless I have some sort of obligation, I'll avoid those pastimes and forget how awesome they are. I started finding a lot of questions where the writers talked about their love for writing, learning, and connecting with people (even through an anonymous forum), and I shared a lot of those feelings. I seemed to share the Why of the writers, even if I wasn't as experienced in the What.

Probably one of the biggest reasons, or biggest pushes really, had to do with not going on a mission. For a long time I had defined myself as a future missionary. My plans were made and my papers were almost done when I got a different answer. Even though I trusted in God's plan, it was very hard. I felt unwanted, unworthy, and even broken at times. Right around this time I got in contact with other people in similar situations, or with similar feelings of heartache, and I was able to have some of the most enlightening and uplifting conversations of my life. I grew to better appreciate the power of words. I also was able to help others feel validated* and wanted, and very not-broken, through some of the experiences I had had. I wanted more opportunities to do the same thing on a regular basis. Following a gut feeling more than anything, I applied on the same day I tried to figure out how to apply, which also was right before finals. (NOTE: Applying at the same time as finals, apartment move outs, family visits, new job training, and with two weeks before you leave the country makes life really exciting.) And even though I haven't yet answered a lot of questions that bring that same kind of connection, I feel like I'm in a good place and like helping with all the random questions that we get. I've really enjoyed these two weeks of writing, even though the other writers still intimidate me a bit with their timeliness and wit (incluyendote a ti, Frère). They're pretty incredible and I hope to join their ranks soon. 

Anyway, thanks for the question! It was nice to be able to better organize some of my thoughts on this. 

-Auto Surf

*This reminds me of a TED talk about stories being validated, but I felt like it was too much of a tangent to put in the main body. 

A:

Dear Rhubarb

One fateful day toward the end of freshman year (Winter semester 2012), I was reading this nifty little "BYU Traditions" book that I received during New Student Orientation. I think now that I was probably trying to see how many things I had done over the course of the year. Anyway, on one of the pages there was a tiny little blurb about the 100 Hour Board. My curiosity was piqued, so I looked it up. I don't think I looked around too much, but I knew I wanted to ask a question. Filled with a fair amount of pre-mission angst, I asked Board Question #64630. To be honest, I wasn't exactly happy with C.P.M.'s answer, but looking back on it now, I don't hold it against him. It's sound advice, even if it's not really what I wanted to hear.

A couple of months later, I left for Florida, and over the course of two years I completely forgot about the Board. And I mean completely. One day after I got back, I was looking through some old things and found the old BYU Traditions book. I stumbled across the same blurb about the Board and looked it up again, completely unaware that I'd done all of this before. This time, I started looking around the archives and found all sorts of witty writing, so the Board became part of my daily routine (this was back in July of 2014). 

I wanted to start writing basically as soon as I started reading regularly; it seemed like it would be really fun. I started looking around the archives for the mythical answer to the "How do I become a writer for the Board?" question. I found it fairly early, but then I also found the Prospective Writer page, which sternly warned against applying to be a writer after having only read for a week, which was essentially my situation. Besides that warning, I also figured that it might not be too wise to attempt such a thing in my first semester back after my mission. So, I decided that I wasn't even going to think about applying until December. If I was still reading the Board regularly and wanting to write, I'd apply. If not, I'd just let sleeping dogs lie.

The semester went alright, so in January I was considering applying again. Always cautious, I decided that I'd hold off on applying until I had more of a feel for what my schedule would be like. I'm glad I did, as somehow a seemingly innocent 15 credit hour semester turned into literally the most busy time of my life, barring none. I was swamped as I'd never been swamped before, and my homework drove out all thoughts of writing for the Board in the near future.

As the semester wore on, I started adjusting, and things seemed to ease up a little. I kept following the Board very closely. I was super excited for the St. Patrick's Day scavenger hunt and reunion week. I was also convinced that I'd deduced one of the writers' identities, so I started emailing other writers looking to confirm my theory. (NOTE: Board Writers are sworn to protect each other's identities, so the only way you'll ever find out someone's real name is if you ask them yourself.) A couple of these writers suggested I consider applying, which I did. Like I said, I'd wanted to write ever since I started reading, and it seemed like it would be a good way for me to help people on a regular basis. But, when I compared myself to the other writers, it seemed like they were all really wise and knowledgeable and I was...less so. I was also afraid of what being accepted could potentially do to my ego. (That's a weird thought, isn't it? I was afraid that becoming an anonymous writer for an obscure question and answer board was going to inflate my ego.)

Anyway, after some deliberation, I decided that I wasn't going to figure out if this was something I wanted to do by just sitting and doing nothing. So, I asked for an application right before finals and filled it out as best as I could. And now I'm here, writing as a probie.

-Frère Rubik


0 Corrections
Question #82563 posted on 05/26/2015 10:56 a.m.
Q:

Dear Anne, Certainly and The Soulful Ginger (and anybody else who applies),

Can you tell me a little about your ballroom experience? I'm an aspiring young ballroom dancer just getting into the program here at BYU and I'd like any advice I can get, or even just to hear your thoughts. I'm not majoring in it or anything, but I'm considering a minor and I'd like to audition for team next fall. I've taken a few classes (180, 280, and 184) and have several planned for next semester. Which classes have you taken? Which have been your favorite, and why? Which have been the hardest? Have you ever auditioned for team? Do you prefer Standard or Latin? Any tips for improving technique? Anything else you want to share?

-Grateful and Growing

A:

Dear Dancer, 

Excepting my last semester, I took at least one (sometimes three) ballroom classes per semester that I attended BYU. The highest level class I took was Gold 1 Ballroom and Gold American (Dance 380). I also took Bronze and Silver Latin, and I would have done Gold 1 as well, but it always conflicted with other classes in my schedule. Personally, I prefer Standard to Latin, partially because I am better at it, and partially because I like the elegant feel of it more than I do the rhythmic feel of Latin dances. 

The best class I took in my ballroom career was Dance 382: Gold 1 Ballroom. The nice thing about gold level classes is that they are audition only (except for Dance 380), which means that overall the quality of dance partner is better, which makes the overall dancing experience better. In this class in particular, I found many good partners that really challenged me to improve. I also felt I could ask the teacher detailed questions and get very detailed and personal answers to them. In this class I learned a lot about what made me a good dancer, and what made me a bad dancer. That being said, Dance 382 was probably the hardest dance class I ever took. The teacher expected a lot out of us as students, and like I said the quality of partners was higher, so it was a struggle to try and match that standard. Some of the routines are hard to learn, and the technique is significantly more difficult than in lower level classes. The only other class I  struggled with as much was Silver Latin (Dance 285), but only the first time I took it with Brent Keck. That class was really hard though for a lot of different reasons, first and foremost of which being that Brent demands a lot of his students, and in that capacity can become rather disparaging. 

I auditioned for team several times in my early dance career. I never made it, but it was always a positive experience. Everyone I know who is on team loves it.

If you really want to improve as a dancer there are three things you should do: ask questions, practice lots, and get a private coach. The first two are absolutely essential, the third is dependent on how dedicated you are to becoming a good dancer, particularly relative to the other students in the BYU ballroom program. It is a competitive atmosphere and if you want to do well in team and get into higher level classes, you need to get a partner and a private coach or you won't be able to compete. If you don't want to spend the money and time on coaches and competitions, but you still want to become moderately good, then simply put time and effort into dance. Go to your classes, ask teachers questions on how you can personally improve, get a partner early on in the semester and practice with them regularly, and for goodness sake, keep your shoulders down.

If you have any more questions, feel free to email me at the.soulful.ginger@theboard.byu.edu

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Corrections
Question #82562 posted on 05/26/2015 10:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have you had any experiences that made you realize your expectations of what people in general enjoy were out-of-step with what people in general actually enjoy? For example, have you ever expected a restaurant/movie/company/ad campaign to fail, and it turns out to be an overwhelming success (or vice versa)? In those cases, what do you think caused your belief about society to not reflect reality?

-Baffled by People

A:

Dear Waffled,

I didn't think anyone would actually watch Fifty Shades of Grey, and I was almost as baffled that people who didn't want other people to watch it posted silly things about boycotting it. 

You fools, thought I, don't you realize that by reposting stupid Matt Walsh drivel on Facebook you are in fact giving this thing you "dislike" free advertising?

But they didn't realize it, and I shook my head sadly and proceeded to wonder why anybody acknowledged the Kardashians. If we just ignore them, they'll go away, right?

But what Ardilla didn't realize was that by posting stupid anti-celebrity drivel on his favourite website he was in fact giving this thing he "disliked" free advertising.

Sigh.

--Ardilla Feroz 


0 Corrections
Question #82556 posted on 05/26/2015 10:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My neighbor, a tall, somewhat awesome yet awkward, friend of mine has found dating a constant struggle (he's a physics major so we cut him a lot of slack). Recently, he has starting using Tinder. I agree with this, as he is more apt to open up to strange women through a medium, than he is in person. However, several of our friends are vehemently opposed to it. Should I be encouraging/supporting him? Have any of you writer had good/bad experiences or advice that you'd like to share?

Thanks!

-Matrim Cauthon

A:

Dear Captain Jack,

I think it's a perfectly fine way to try and meet people. I haven't had any success, but that's partly because I'm super picky. And partly because I've been kind of half-hearted whenever I've tried it. But to be honest, we're all playing Tinder in our heads when we meet people whether we're conscious of it or not. Tinder just puts that out in the open.

From my experiences, if your impression is that he's a tool, even if it's only from one picture, don't swipe right. Because then he will ask you for a NCMO and insist that it's not actually a NCMO.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Wade,

I can't tell if this question is about me or not...

-M.O.D.A.Q.


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Question #82557 posted on 05/26/2015 10:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are your favorite types of questions to answer?

-Matrim Cauthon

A:

Dear Doctor,

The ones where I recently had an experience relating to something the question is asking. Although I may not realize all the repercussions of how I handled the situation yet, it's still good for me to put my thoughts down. And I like to hope that the struggles I've gone through can benefit someone else.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Matrim,

The questions that help me to reflect on my life and grow personally are my favorite questions to answer. Writing out my thoughts and sharing my experiences helps me to see the hand of God in my life and gives me a sense of peace.

I mean, seriously, if you are bad at journal writing and want to force yourself to improve, just apply to be Board writer.

Best. Journal. Ever.

Love,

Vienna 

A:

Dear Matrim,

I can't say I have too much experience in this, but so far the most interesting questions for me have been the ones I know nothing about when I start. I like learning new things.

-Frère Rubik


0 Corrections
Question #82564 posted on 05/26/2015 10:13 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What will replace the Widtsoe building?

-Whoa. They are tearing it down!!

A:

Dear Whoa,

Well the Life Science Building replaced the Widstoe in terms of space for those classes and labs. In terms of physical space, it doesn't look like there are necessarily plans to fill it yet. The next building project for BYU campus is the engineering building, and that one is going to be south of the Clyde. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Corrections
Question #82566 posted on 05/26/2015 9:24 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My family is planning a trip to Disneyland for Christmas. My brother lives many states away and we haven't seen him for two years and he and his wife really want to go to Anaheim. I love Disneyland and have been there several tines, with the latest being five years ago. The problem is that my job of two years will absolutely not allow me any time off in December because it gets extremely busy. So essentially I have the choice of quitting my job--which I think is okay, but it pays pretty well--or to be home alone at Christmas time by myself while my whole family (married siblings' spouses included) are at the Happiest Place on Earth. I've tried to reason with my parents to go some other time but they're set on December because that's when far-away brother will be coming out. I've told everyone I won't be able to go and they tell me to call in sick for a few days and then to fly out and be with them for three days. I know I would get in trouble at work for that. They're not very considerate. What would you do if you were in my position?

-Tim on a Kruse

A:

Dear Tim,

Sorry, but part of being a grown-up is having responsibilities that you can't just run away from anytime you want to do something fun. I don't mean to sound pessimistic, but you'll probably have to get used to it. It'll be happening for the rest of your life.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Dear Tim,

I agree with Heidi. As annoying as it will be to miss the trip, it would be even more annoying to have to find a new job, right?

If it helps at all, my family only started going on really cool vacations after I left for my mission. And then they would send me beautiful pictures of Hawaii and e-mail me stories of all the fun things they were doing with a line at the end that said something like, "but don't get distracted!"

Well, I wasn't even tempted to get distracted before the pictures of Hawaii started coming in... 

Also, Zed says that her dad refused to take her to Disneyland her whole life and then took the rest of the family there right after dropping her off at BYU her freshman year.

So I guess it's just a rough life for all of us, my friend.

I feel for you, and hope that you are able to have a great holiday, regardless!

Love,

Vienna


0 Corrections
Monday, May 25, 2015
Question #82558 posted on 05/25/2015 6:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear M.O.D.A.Q.,

Why is it always Wade? I'm not Wade.

-not Wade

A:

Dear Bob,

See Board Question #79871.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Corrections
Question #82553 posted on 05/25/2015 3:51 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

These are probably dumb questions, but I've never done this before, so I need help...

I want to buy 2 tickets to the BYU vs. Michigan football game on September 26. According to the BYU tickets website (http://www.byutickets.com/football), tickets for BYU fans are already sold out, even though they're not available to the public yet (Boo!). So I assume I can't buy them through BYU on June 1 like I'd planned.

Ideally, I would like decent seats at a fair price, and I would like to sit with other BYU fans if possible. I'd also prefer a sideline over endzone and preferably not so high up that I have to bring binoculars. So here are my questions:

Would I be better off (get a better deal and/or better seats) buying random tickets now through something like StubHub or waiting until individual game tickets become available to the public through the Michigan website (that's not til July 10)? If the former, what site would you recommend? I don't want to get ripped off.

What section(s) are BYU fans sitting in at that game? If I can't sit with other BYU fans, that's not a huge deal (because I'm also a Michigan fan, but will be cheering for BYU), but I also don't want to get stuck in the student section or something... I've never been to the Big House before, so I don't know what the arrangement is, and Google's not helping.

It scares me a little bit to wait til July to start planning my trip... I'm scared I won't get tickets at all or that they'd only have nosebleed seats left. I'm also not comfortable waiting until game day and hitting up the scalpers. That would stress me out way too much. I need a solid plan ASAP.

Thanks for your help!

-Go Blue! (Cougars & Wolverines)

A:

Dear Go,

These two sites show some great available seats on the visitors' sidelines (sections 1-4,42-44). I'm not sure how well respected the visitors' vs Michigan sideline designation is, but it's a good place to start. If it's anything like BYU, I think sections 25-33 could be reserved for students, but don't quote me on that. As far as pricing goes, I really don't have a lot of experience with buying college football tickets, but it looks like you can get some almost-end-zone-but-still-corner seats for under $90 on StubHub, and stay in the middle-ish of the end zone for around $160. Based on principle, waiting to buy tickets until July makes it more likely that you would pay more/get a nosebleed seat. On that note, I recommend bringing binoculars anyway. The ESPN cameras have fantastic zooming capabilities, so if you want anything like what you see at home on TV, bring the binocs. 

Summary: I would not wait until July or September to buy tickets. If you buy now/soon and decide to be happy with what you get, your planning and your trip will be much less stressful. If some amazing opportunity happens to come up later, I feel like selling the not-as-good tickets wouldn't be too hard. In any case, just choose to have an excellent time, and make sure you cheer for the right blue! 

-Auto Surf


0 Corrections
Question #82549 posted on 05/25/2015 3:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why do most sedan's not have a back windshield wiper? I wish mine had one!

-Nabisco

A:

Dear Nabi,

Apparently, this is a pretty popular question. 

In summary, they are not really necessary because of the way the car is designed. The idea is that as you're driving forward through the rain or snow, the design of the window and the trunk creates a vortex that guides the airflow so that not much will stick on the rear window. 

Personally, having driven a similar car, I would prefer to have one, too. 

-Auto Surf


0 Corrections
Question #82536 posted on 05/25/2015 1:14 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Imagine two scenarios:

In the first, I binge on Sunday an exceed a healthy caloric intake by 1400 calories but the rest of the week I meet but do not exceed a healthy caloric intake.

In the second, I exceed a healthy caloric intake by 200 calories every day that week.

Is one worse than the other? If so, why?

―Damasta

A:

Dear Damasta,

I was going to pull a Gandhi and not answer until I had tried this myself, but alas, 100 hours is not enough to do this experiment (even with a few extra hours). My apologies.

If you mean worse by which one would make you gain more weight, it would be the second. You don't gain weight through single events, but more through habit (which is why you don't loose a ton of weight if you forget to eat one day). However, this article states: 

"If you overindulge every once in a while as part of a celebration, a holiday or a vacation, these episodes probably aren’t signs of an eating disorder. But if you overeat compulsively on a regular basis at least once a week for three or more months in a row, you may have a condition called binge eating disorder.
Binge eating disorder, or BED, has emotional, psychological and physical sources. This condition can do serious harm to your body and mind, affecting your weight, your internal organs, your mood and your self-esteem. People with BED often battle depression, anxiety or substance abuse along with their eating disorder. The myth that people who overeat compulsively are weak-willed or lazy is false — eating disorder specialists know that this compulsion is a serious psychiatric illness that demands intensive treatment."

I'm not sure planning to overeat by 1400 calories counts as binge eating, but it doesn't sound like a safe practice in general. 

To sum it up: The first scenario can potentially affect your weight, digestive system, mood and self-esteem; the second can make you gain weight. Depending on the person, the answer as to which is worse might vary, but I would say the first.

-Auto Surf


0 Corrections
Question #82555 posted on 05/25/2015 12:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

This is my first question ever, and I'd like to put your collective research skills to work for my own personal use (Mwahahaha).

Where is the best make-out spot on BYU campus?

My measurements of "best", listed by priority, include:

- Private (A place where yo won't be disturbed)
- Romantic feel/beautiful scenery
- Open (not shut in a broom closet or anything)
- Impressive (taking her to a place she never even knew existed)

I'd like to hear your thoughts. If your definition of best is different than mine, I would also like to hear that. Thanks!

-Matrim Cauthon

A:

Dear Matrim,

I know of a couple. The first is between the ESC and the MARB. There's this little walled enclosure with benches in between the two buildings. The advantage is that it's in the middle of campus and is pretty easy to access from anywhere, but it can also get kind of loud, sometimes people are in there, and the walls are kind of low, so you have to sit on the ground for full coverage. So it's not the best for impressing people, but if you really just need to make out it's pretty great. Here's a Google Map for you:

Screen Shot 2015-05-21 at 1.42.40 PM.png

My husband has also informed me that there are a few places on the path south of campus and the paths west of campus, but they're really only good during late summer, when the bushes have had time to grow back from their early-spring trim. Those would meet your requirements of romantic, open, and impressive, though, so I'd suggest taking some time to explore those.

-Zedability

A:

Dear Matrim,

My roommate suggested the stairwells of the SWKT. They are largely unexplored and unknown, making them both private and impressive. Beware/enjoy the acoustics of the potential echo.

I was going to suggest one more idea, but with the Widstoe building being demolished the spot is no longer accessible. I'm afraid now that this answer sounds much more serious than I intended it to be.

-Auto Surf


0 Corrections
Question #82535 posted on 05/25/2015 9:32 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm getting married this summer to a man from Ukraine. The wedding will be in America since he'll be moving here. He learned basic English in school and is currently doing a lot right now to study English and prepare to come here, but one of his main concerns is being able to communicate with my family and friends during all the wedding celebrations. I offered to do "role plays" with him to get him ready for different scenarios in English (we talk over Skype every day), but I haven't been able to come up with very many. Could you help me out? Here's basically the layout of our activities:

-He'll arrive a few days before the wedding and meet / spend time with my family a bit
-The wedding day will include the sealing, a luncheon, and a reception
-A week later we'll have a reception in my home town

What do you think? What are some topics of conversations, phrases, and so forth that I can prep him for? Thank you in advance for your help, I really appreciate it!

-Nevesta

A:

Dear Nevesta,

I talked to Mico (a former writer married to a man from Russia), who was able to give me a few ideas. The most important thing she said was to practice small talk, particularly the sorts of things that your family and friends would be likely to ask him about. This would include things like his family, a quick overview of his life story, how the two of you met, etc. Because people will be people, I'd also recommend practicing how he'd respond to questions about the current political situation in Ukraine. If the sealing will be in English, he should also definitely learn the sort of religious terms that will be used in the temple.

Mostly, though, just practice small talk and he should be fine. Best of luck, and congratulations!

-yayfulness


0 Corrections