"I'm too embarrassed to admit to having eaten there; I'll just tell everyone I was doing NCMO instead. I have my pride, after all." -Hobbes' friend
Question #80354 posted on 12/20/2014 10:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why does Indian food taste like soap? According to the Wikipedia page , cilantro/coriander leaves are supposed to make things taste like soap to those that are sensitive to it, but I put extra cilantro in salsa and I love it. What else could be making Indian food taste like soap?

- Me

A:

Dear Lizard Person,

Coriander seed (not leaves), asafetida, and a number of other spices common in Indian cooking have a bitter taste to them; perhaps one of these is responsible for the soapiness you detect. Alternatively, maybe when fresh cilantro leaves are cooked in Indian food the dish develops the flavor you find so disagreeable.

Honestly, it's very difficult for me to answer your question unless you give me some specifics. Perhaps if you name the specific dish, I can figure out what ingredients might be at work here. Wait! The Oracle Staff in the corner of the Board Lair is glowing. It's saying... well, you're not going to like this, but it's clearly saying someone you thought was a friend... a close friend... a significant other, even, put soap in your Indian food when you were outside taking a phone call so they wouldn't have to pay the small fortune it requires to take you out to eat at Bombay House again. I know this is hard for you to take in, and you probably don't believe me right now, but one morning not many weeks hence you'll awake from a deep slumber and realize the Oracle Staff never lies. 

--Ardilla Feroz, guardian of the Staff

P.S. The Oracle Staff also informs me the window of your apartment was left unlocked before you left Provo for the holidays, and suggests you obtain renter's insurance to cover your next round of burglarized possessions if you're planning on making this a habit.


0 Comments
Posted on 12/20/2014 10:12 p.m. New Comment on: #80244 I used to follow a blog by a woman named Melissa. She is LDS, had at ...
Question #80352 posted on 12/20/2014 5:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I was driving to work this morning, south on 700 E in SLC, when everyone just stopped. I couldn't see anything obstructing the roadway, and then I looked to the far right lane, where a school bus was picking up a student and had its flashing stop sign out.

Traffic stopped in all four lanes, not just the lanes behind and adjacent to the school bus. This was a pick-up, so there was no risk of a student crossing the street and getting hit. Having traffic stopped in all four lanes seems like a bigger hazard than just the lanes closest to the bus.

Is it Utah law for ALL lanes of traffic to stop when a school bus has its stop sign out, or were these drivers just being over-cautious?


-Three lanes over

A:

Dear driver,

Short answer: yes.

Utah law states that traffic in all lanes must stop while the sign is displayed. The only exception is if the bus is stopped on a divided highway with a median and four or more lanes; in that case you only need to stop if you're on the same side of the median as the bus.

You can see the relevant laws for each state here. I read through about a dozen states' laws at random, and it looks like they're all more or less the same.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #80351 posted on 12/20/2014 4:14 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Not to be...annoying, or anything, but I asked question #80218 a while ago, and it's still waiting for a response. It's of course not the end of the world, but it has been like 300 hours. I also understand if you guys are all busy with finals or other holiday-esque commitments. But, could I get an answer someday?

-You guys are great

A:

Dear You, 

Maybe someday.

-The Magic Conch Shell. 


0 Comments
Question #80330 posted on 12/20/2014 1:14 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My son was born in April and he is so great! I love watching him grow and learn everyday. I always hear people say, "Oh, you'll miss him being little!" But the thing is, I don't. I'm so glad my baby is eating solids and sleeping through the night and sitting up and crawling and I can't wait for him to learn to walk and talk and feed himself. I'm nervous about having another baby because I don't want to have to go back to getting up every couple of hours for feedings and dealing with blowouts and colic. Basically, I don't want the inconvenience. I know these feelings are a sign that I'm SO not ready for a baby (again, my son was born just 8 months ago), but will I ever get to the point where I'll want another (and maybe another after that)? Do you know anyone who's had these thoughts/feelings and gotten over them?

Bonus question: How selfish do I sound right now?

-Baby Mama

A:

Dear Mama,

I don't think you sound selfish; I mean, I think you sound normal, and I guess normal people are selfish, but I'm not going to judge it as so. I think you're all right. I don't have a baby, but my mom talked about the whole wanting/not wanting a second child in Board Question #78425, and this is what she said:

The excitement and learning experience associated with your first child is a unique experience. I have found that the love I have developed for my first child ENHANCED my ability to love additional children, and so on. Also, in my experience, my oldest child, a girl, was like a little mother to her siblings, and I greatly admired her for this. All of my children have been very unique and I have found things I appreciate in all of them. Each of them holds their own special place in my heart. Final words: Some children are more difficult than others to form a bond with, because of our and/or their personality, but motherhood seems to drive us to overcome all challenges related to our children. The rewards are worth it!

My marriage and family teacher said his friend was worried about the same thingspecifically, they wondered how they could have enough love to take care of another child when it felt like their current one was taking all of it up. Another friend responded, "You'll have enough love for another baby because they come with extra love."

I also enjoyed reading this guest blog post where a mother notes that she wished she knew, while she was caring for her first child, that it actually got easier with each subsequent child. She writes about how she was so busy and tired with the first, how could she ever have time and energy for another? However, there's a big learning curve with babies, and you're not only rearing a baby right now but you're learning for the very first time what it's like. It will be easier in the future because you've had a similar experience before and you're aware of some patterns. (Of course, every bundle of joy comes with its own special surprises too.) In her words:

I seem to remember that you are feeling pretty overwhelmed at this stage with one kid and I remember that you feel even more overwhelmed wondering how you are ever going to succeed in having more than one kid if you are ALREADY overwhelmed with one.  Don't worry.  Capacity grows with experience.  It really does. 

Like you said, it's not really time for you to be having another baby right now, so that's fine. When you are feeling ready, or when you're still not sure but you're getting promptings about growing your family, know that it's going to be okay. You've learned so much, and it will really, really be worth it.

-Owlet


0 Comments
Question #80201 posted on 12/20/2014 1:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Babies put everything in their mouths, even stuff that they shouldn't, and that probably doesn't taste great. At what point in human development do little kids develop the "oh, this is gross, I probably shouldn't put it in my mouth" sense and stop feeling the need to taste everything?

-kebbo

A:

Dear kebbo,

You and I have have incredible ways to get information about our surroundings. We can feel textures with our hands, see the smallest details with our eyes, and even pinpoint where a specific smell is originating. There are hundreds of ways that we are able to use our senses and previous experiences to process new and reoccurring situations. Babies, however, do not have the same talents that you and I do. At least, not yet. 

Young children have limited motor skills. Sure, they can roll around and do other simple things, but they can't do a lot. Finger movements (also known as fine motor skills) are incredibly limited. Most children can hear sounds, but they can't pick out individual instruments like you and I can. Because of their limited life experience and their lack of development, they use a process that is easy for them to decide if something is good or bad: They eat it. Something's colorful? They don't know what it is so they're going to eat it. Something is shiny? They don't know what it is so they're going to eat it. Something pokey? They don't know what it is so they're going to eat it. 

Picture your favorite book. You and I both know that Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is clearly meant to be read. An 8-month-old baby does not. So what does the baby do? HE/SHE EATS IT. "Baby!" you say. "Why would you eat my favorite book!?" The baby, who says nothing, obviously thinks "Well, it is big, it is colorful on the outside, and it moves when I touch it. I didn't know what it was, so I ate it. While it wasn't exactly good, it wasn't bad either. I'm going to eat some more of it until I know if it is good or bad... Okay, it's not as bad as that dirt but it's not as good as Cheerios either so I don't think I'll eat this again." This process repeats itself until motor skills become more refined and there is a better way for the child to get information about our world. 

During the first year of life, this is how babies get most of their information. By the age of 2, they should be using their hands a lot more to explore, but it's considered "normal" to still put things in their mouths. By 3, this process should be rare, if it occurs at all. 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #80244 posted on 12/20/2014 1:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I used to follow a blog by a woman named Melissa. She is LDS, had at least 2 or 3 kids, dark hair, and I recall her talking often about being afraid of ghosts in her house and other funny things. She seemed to have a strange last name that might have started with an R. And...that's all I can remember. I have searched everywhere for the name of the blog or the website and I can't find it. Does ANYBODY happen to know what I'm talking about?

-This is driving me NUTS!!

A:

Dear NUTS,

Zed and I both looked for the blog you described but neither of us could find it.

Readers, please leave a comment below if you know the name of the blog!

-Ms.O'Malley


1 Comment
Question #80291 posted on 12/20/2014 1:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm working full time at a very demanding job (not just 8-5) to support my husband through school. When I get home and we talk about our days, I'll find that in between school things he has had time to watch several movies, play video games, and has plenty of news stories he read online to tell me about. He gets good grades in a fairly challenging major (mechanical engineering) and all but I can't help but be resentful that he spent a good chunk of his day doing lazy college student things, while I've been working. My attitude might be completely different if I came home to a clean house or a hot meal every once in a while. Is that so unreasonable? Also, I'm beginning to think I'm all about traditional gender roles now because this set up stinks. My inner closeted feminist is crying.

-My Name Here

A:

Dear MNH,

The best advice I have for you is that you talk to your husband about it; communication is key. You also might find these questions helpful.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger


0 Comments
Question #80300 posted on 12/20/2014 1:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have a huge problem. I have asthma, and have always been irritated by breathing in really cold air. A couple of years ago I got really sick (for three months) and since then, If the apartment is too cold I have a lot of trouble waking up. After a long fight, I convinced my roommates during the fall not to turn the thermostat below 70, but now that it's gotten colder and my apartment has very poor insulation, that's just a little too cold (I wouldn't be asking for it to be higher than 75). I'll usually turn the heater up when I wake up, but the heater sometimes takes an hour or two to realize that the thermostat was moved, and it's hard to do things wrapped up in blankets or shivering. I've tried taking potassium and magnesium, which has helped, but how else can I convince my body to function when it's cold? I wash my dishes in the morning too, so long sleeves aren't very helpful either.

-Miss Frazzled

ps. yes, I am poor and would love to save money, but I also need to take care of my health, and I am still trying to compromise without making myself sick. Also, I would just try to talk to them but last time I tried that it bothered them so much that they complained to management.

A:

Dear Miss. Frizzle,

My best suggestions for you are:

  1. Get a heating pad sleep with it. I would suggest a heated blanket, but they are a bit less economical.
  2. Get a personal space heater.
  3. Sleep in lots of layers, or maybe get a second comforter for your bed. 
  4. Make sure you wear socks when you go to bed. 
  5. Stay up later than all of your roommates and turn up the heater after they have all gone to bed*.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger

*This option will likely cause future fights in your apartment.  


0 Comments
Question #80336 posted on 12/20/2014 1:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hairy Boars,

When most high school students enter their junior year, they are inundated with college mailings. How do colleges know when and where to send students mailings? What sort of information do schools have on the students/households at whom they fire the missives?

-El Scorcho (ay caramba)

A:

Dear El Scorcho,

I am pretty sure the colleges that sent me mail got all of my information from the PSAT and ACT people.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Question #80345 posted on 12/20/2014 1:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Bored,

What's for dinner?

-Hungry Hippo

A:

Dear Hungry Mungry,

Probably leftovers. Again. Tomorrow is grocery night.

-Starving Insomniac

A:

Dear Hungry,

Peanut butter. It's all I have left.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Dear Hungry,

I had some pretty awesome quasi-Mexican food.

-Zedability

A:

Dear marble muncher,

If I am feeling desperate enough, I'll go dig out the plain greek yogurt and Limburger cheese I abandoned buried in a pile of leaves somewhere on campus. If it's even there anymore.
Guys, Limburger is nasty. At least by itself. 

--Ardilla Feroz

P.S. It ended up being leftover chocolate chip pancakes with gravy. Apparently, this is my life.

A:

Dear chomp,

Leftover tortilla soup from work. If you eat it with enough rice and Parmesan cheese, it's actually not nasty.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Tantalus,

Cream-cheese-stuffed jalepeno peppers wrapped in bacon; chicken masala; steamed zucchini, green beans, and carrots; roasted potatoes; pasta salad; croissant rolls; pineapple, raspberry, and blackberry fruit salad; red jello with mandarin oranges and whipped cream; homemade chocolates; chocolate cake with ice cream.

Today was a good day.

-Owlet

A:

Dear you,

I'm thinking mashed potatoes with meatballs and IKEA sauce.

~Anne, Certainly


0 Comments
Question #80350 posted on 12/20/2014 12:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My cousin went to BYU back in the 1980s or so, and she related an experience to me the other night that gave me pause. According to her, one afternoon/evening in 1985 or 86 she was sitting in the Lee Library when smoke came billowing out of the stairwell on the 1st floor. She said the first 2 or 3 floors were evacuated and firemen/trucks were called to the scene. She thought the building was on fire, but it turned out that someone lit off some kind of smoke bomb.

I have two questions. Number one, is this a true story (she has a way of embellishing sometimes) and if so, what are the details? Number two, wouldn't something like that be easily detected by security cameras, etc? Every time you hear about a crime on tv there is always security camera footage. It's not that I don't believe her, but I've learned over the years to keep a container of salt nearby.

Sincerely,

Salty Sarah

A:

Dear Salty Sarah,

Actually, this is probably a true story. In the eighties a smoke bomb went off in the library, and that isn't even the worse thing that has happened there. In 1992, two pipe bombs were placed in the library and the only reason they didn't go off is because they guy who placed them in the library called in about them. Besides that a smoke bomb went off, I don't have many details. These things are able to happen simply because no security system is perfect, and the library, and BYU in general, does not have many security cameras. 

-A Librarian


0 Comments
Question #80306 posted on 12/20/2014 11:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is the cheapest way to go snowboarding or skiing just once? I've never done either but would like to go with a friend of mine (he has either never gone or has only been a few times). Unfortunately that means we both lack gear and one or both of us would likely need some guidance on how to not kill ourselves on the way down. Do I borrow gear from friends (is that rude? what if I break something?)? Are there sweet deals for beginners somewhere? What price range am I looking at?

Thanks,
princess peach

A:

Dear Princess Peach,

Cross-country skiing is a good place to start learning how to stay up on skis because there aren't as many things you have to navigate around. Last year at the Aspen Grove family camp, cross-country skiing on Friday nights was about $6 for students. That included the equipment rentals and everything else.  The cross-country skiing is closed this year, but you can check again in January of 2015 to see if there's been enough snow to open, and if prices or dates have changed. 

-Squirrel


0 Comments
Question #80346 posted on 12/20/2014 5:50 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Bored,

What was your GPA this semester?

-Four Point Oh, not

A:

Dear Nosey,

Grades don't come out until the end of December, but I think it's safe to say our grade point averages are similar.

--Ardilla Feroz 

A:

Dear hilarious.,

My Great Pancake Aperture was 8.9 this semester. It's up from 7.0 last semester, so I'm pretty happy about my improvement. Thanks for asking! No one thinks to really care about these sorts of things anymore.

-Sarcastic Insomniac

A:

Dear Pointy,

I didn't take classes this semester. I'm trying to figure out if that makes it a 0, infinity, or undefined variable.

I've decided I just get to pick my GPA. So, this semester, I got a 4.0 in Random Piano Playing, Discovering New Blogs, and Eating Chocolate.

Neener neener.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80342 posted on 12/20/2014 12:08 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do any of you know how to speak dog? I'd like to be able to chat with my dog sometimes, when there is no one else around to talk to.

-Miss Frazzled, who does love to talk to people to.

A:

Dear artichoke dip,

Easy. There's plenty of online resources for dog body language. Alternatively, speak verbally to your dog and ascribe him greater intelligence and humanity than he probably possesses, but rest assured it's greater than your average cat.

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Dear Miss Frazzled,

No, but I can speak whale.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Friday, December 19, 2014
Question #80341 posted on 12/19/2014 10:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

A few years ago I asked Board Question #68460. The answers were really helpful. However, since that time my husband has become more and more embittered against the church. He now frequently tries to convince me that there is no God, that if there is a God he is heartless and cruel, and that anyone who believes any religion is "unenlightened and probably crazy." I don't know what to do. I could live civilly and lovingly with someone I disagree with about religion, but the constant proselytizing of atheism and insults toward everyone who shares my beliefs (including me) is wearing on me. Do you have any advice or thoughts?

Aside from the religion issue, which he now presses more and more frequently we are happy and we have a beautiful baby daughter.

-Heartbroken

A:

Dear Heartbroken,

I'm really sorry to hear about the difficulty you and your husband are going through. It sounds like you've taken the high road by choosing to love him and prioritize your relationship, even though you disagree. Since he hasn't done this, though, I can definitely understand why it would be wearing on you.

I'm sure you and your husband have already had many conversations about this, but it might help to phrase things very directly to help him see that his attitude towards your disagreement is unfair and not in line with your attitude about it. You might say something like, "What is more important to you, me becoming an atheist or us having a happy relationship? I've chosen to love you and try to have a good relationship even though we disagree, and I'd be okay with us believing seperate things. I'm willing to let you believe what you want. But I feel as if you care more about convincing me I'm wrong than you do about the effect this is having on me. It's really wearing on me and it's breaking my heart." Try to bring it up in a non-confrontational context (ie, not in the middle of having a discussion about religion) and in an atmosphere that's conducive to having a serious, thoughtful conversation. Help him see that you're not trying to argue with him or accuse him excessively; you want his help and cooperation to improve this aspect of your relationship.

Regardless of how your husband reacts or whether his behavior improves, know that the Lord is mindful of you and wants to support both you and your husband through this trial. The covenants you made at marriage are still in effect for you, as long as you live faithfully, and the Lord can counsel you in how to best support your marriage, and to what point He expects you to endure this trial. If you haven't already, ask your bishop or home teachers for a blessing, and continue to read your scriptures, pray, attend the temple, and feel close to the Spirit.

Philippians 4:6-7 reads, "Be careful for nothing; but in every thing by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God. And the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus." I can testify that even in circumstances where we don't even understand how peace could be possible, through the Atonement, the Lord is able to provide us with a deep sense of personal peace even when a situation doesn't seem to be improving.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80256 posted on 12/19/2014 9:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What makes someone a good person? Makes someone a bad one?

-Murph

A:

Dear Maroon,

Perspective, time, and if they've eaten or slept that day.

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Dear Murph,

In my opinion, a good person is someone who is humble enough to continue trying to be a better person, day after day. A bad person is someone who thinks they are good enough and doesn't try to keep improving or make amends for the mistakes they do make.

-Zedability

A:

Dear Murph,

The power of love.

-Huey Lewis and the News


0 Comments
Question #80339 posted on 12/19/2014 7:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm pretty sure I've been reading the Board longer than most of the current writers have even known about it. For instance, I once got "kidnapped" by the Hobbes Death Squad. I'm certain there are a few of you who have been around longer (Yellow, CPM... but that's about it), but I'm curious how many!

What year and month(ish) did you start reading the Board?

-Old Fart

A:

Dear Old Guy,

I first heard about the Board around October 2011 and created my account soon thereafter.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Grandpa,

I started reading the Board during the Summer semester of 2011.

-Squirrel

A:

Dear,

I believe it was during the summer of 2011 for me as well. The funny thing is, from what I recollect, I somehow discovered it via the random question page, and kept refreshing it for new questions rather than checking the home page. I never really knew who the "current" writers were until I applied. In my head all the writers past and present occupy the same time-space.

-Owlet

A:

Dear you,

Feeling old over here; created my Board account on January 12, 2009.

~Anne, Certainly

A:

Dear Limburger,

While my account wasn't created until October of 2007, I first came across the Board sometime in January 2007, some six months before any mention of Hobbes's infamous Death Squad.  

I tempered my gloating by looking up CPM and Yellow's first recorded instances on the Board, and shut my trap pretty quickly. 

--Ardilla Feroz, who had a stranger mention he looked "older" in a conversation an hour ago. Opinas tú, recent RM. Opinas tú. Little did you realize I just wanted to find out the name of the girl with whom you were sitting. I have to thank you, though. Without the logo on your t-shirt I doubt my facebook stalking writer research powers would have been enough to figure it out. Now I just have to decide whether I feel victorious or completely disgusted with myself. 

P.S. You should tell me more about your "kidnapping!" That sounds exciting. Send a messenger pigeon to ardilla(dot)feroz(at) theboard(dot)byu(dot)edu.

A:

Dear Old Fart,

I believe I discovered it sometimes during Fall 2011. My account was created on December 30, 2011.

-Zedability

A:

Dear Fold Art,

I'm just a young'un around here. I created my account on 22 August 2014. I started actually reading the Board probably like 3 days before I made my account. I found the Board originally about a year ago, but I didn't "read" it then. I just saw it and thought it was cool.

-Inverse Insomniac

Dear Ardilla,

How the heck did you know about the Board in 2007? I don't think you're older than me, and back then I still could eat Cocoa Puffs for breakfast for a week in a row and not feel sick.

-I.I.


0 Comments
Posted on 12/19/2014 6:26 p.m. New Comment on: #80254 A couple years back I was in Bro. Goodman's marriage prep. class and he mentioned a ...
Question #80321 posted on 12/19/2014 2:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What makes a strong female character?

-The Inquisitor

A:

Dear Inquisitor,

  • Side shoulder raises
  • Front shoulder raises
  • Upright rows
  • Biceps curls
  • One-arm triceps curls
  • Alternated dumbbell presses
Remember, strength training requires "your muscles to exert a force against some form of resistance" and should be performed "2-3 x a week for 20 minutes" for best results.

Merry Christmas!

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear Inquisitor,

Strong female characters make themselves, of course.

>Meta Knight


0 Comments
Posted on 12/19/2014 1:55 p.m. New Comment on: #80333 I will be honest, I know next to nothing about Doctor Who, my three sisters however ...
Question #80333 posted on 12/19/2014 3:56 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
I will be honest, I know next to nothing about Doctor Who, my three sisters however are absolute addicts. As usually they were discussing it and someone mentioned that whenever they travel to the U.S. in the series, they always go to Utah or Washington.... Why do you think that is? Don't get me wrong, Utah is great but why out of all the beautiful and famous parts of the U.S.A. would they pick Utah? Please enlighten me!

-Dr. Who???

A:

Dear Master,

I'm a little bit confused as to your question, and it started a bit of a conversation via flagettes on this question which I would show you, but there's some identity-sensitive information in there.

If you're talking about promotional stuff, like the Doctor Who world tour, then no, they don't go to Utah, but rather places like NYC where there's simply more people.

If you're talking about filming, then it actually makes sense, since Southern Utah is a hotspot for filming in general. It was probably the most affordable, most ideal spot for what they were shooting, and so they went with it. Being out of the way is probably also important, considering how big the show is.

I hope that answered it!

-Tally M.


1 Comment
Question #80297 posted on 12/19/2014 12:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What texture should bread pudding be?

I've only had it once before my roommate recently made it, and it was more like an egg casserole than the dense, cake-ish dessert I thought I remembered it being.

My roommate is trying to improve her cooking skills and has asked for my help (since I'm pretty good at most types of dishes), but I don't know what to tell her for this recipie she's tried--or if my suggestions would even be correct!

-not a bread pudding fan

A:

Dear Not a fan, 

The top layer of it should be somewhat crispy, and the rest of it should be creamy with "pudding" soaked bread.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Question #80305 posted on 12/19/2014 12:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

A friend and neighbor of mine recently lost her dad in a tragic accident. Several of the neighbors have decided to do a 12 Days of Christmas for her. Each family is taking one day and giving her a small gift (a movie, gingerbread house kit, etc.). I have been given the last day on Christmas Eve. I'd really like it to be something related to the Savior, but I'm not sure what.

Do you have any ideas for a $10-15 gift I could give her? I'm looking for something that will last from year to year and will be a meaningful reminder of both the Savior and her dad. She is a member of the church so anything related to temples would also be appropriate.

Thanks!
Skitch

A:

Dear Skitch,

Did you know the dad well, or the family? Do you know people who know him well? If so, get a bunch of stories together of memories of the father, maybe some pictures and a talk about grief and put it together in a book for the family. I can tell you from experience that will be better than anything else you can give them. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Question #80320 posted on 12/19/2014 12:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear Soulful Ginger,

What is different about a person after they have had their soul, er... acquired by another?

-The Inquisitor

A:

Dear Marsh, 

I wouldn't know, I simply acquire souls, I don't lose them.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Question #80326 posted on 12/19/2014 12:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am trying to get digital copies of family history stories so that I can share the stories on Ancestry and Family Search. Usually, I scan or type the stories up myself. My aunt just gave me some books filled with family history stories. Some of these books are over fifty years old, and the binding is really old and delicate. If I scan each of the 300 pages, the binding will definitely fall apart. How can I scan these pages without damaging the binding?

-Lisette

A:

Dear Little Lis,

I don't have much experience with archiving things, but when we started trying to digitize my grandparents' huge collections of slides, we would project them onto a white screen and take a photo of them, and they turned out pretty well. I imagine a digital camera would work similarly for your project. You know how sometimes you take pictures of the pages in your textbook so that you don't have to carry it up to campus? Same principle, right? 

If you're around Provo, Tally recommends that you go to the family history part of the BYU library. It's a really cool place, and they have equipment to help you with just about anything you want to do.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book


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