"To me, that's what the gospel is about: helping everyone come unto Christ, from the Simpsons fan to the stay-at-home-mom to the homosexual." - Portia
Question #80787 posted on 01/27/2015 1:38 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So, I get distracted easily studying at home, but I HATE staying on campus late, especially when it gets so cold in the evenings. My solution, is to hide behind the couch - it cuts down on most of the distractions at home.

My roommates can't see me when I'm studying there though. They know I like to study there, but even when I was there most of the day and they saw me when I wasn't, they easily forgot.

My question is, do I need to let my roommates know that I'm in the living room if they can't see me?

-zz

A:

Dear Professor John Smith,

I was going to suggest letting them know that you're there beforehand, but since you've already mentioned that, I would say that you probably don't have to. I'm more curious as to how your apartment is laid out so that you can do this.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #80672 posted on 01/27/2015 1:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I feel like I used to know the answer to this, but I'm having trouble finding the answer again: Where did the name Oot (the nickname of Patrick Rothfuss' firstborn) come from? And for bonus points, what about Cutie Snoo?

-The 'Nym of the Wind

A:

Dear Kvothe,

With much abandon, I searched Pat's blog for you. I enjoyed fun stories he tells about his kids his life. I came across a letter he once wrote to Oot, the first picture of Cutie Snoo, and Oot commenting that in order for his father to write a story “[He]’d pull a feather out of a turkey. Then dip it in some ink and write on some paper.”

Through all of this, Rothfuss never explains where the names for Oot or Cutie Snoo come from. The first time he calls names Oot, his son is still in-utero. His only comment on the name is the following:

By the way, Oot is the baby’s in-utero name. I figured we couldn’t just call it “it” until it was born, so I gave him a temporary name. It’s pronounced like “boot” without the “b.” Just so we’re clear. (June 12, 2009

As for Cutie Snoo, Rothfuss simply notes beneath a picture of the baby "Codename: Cutie Snoo." 

With no explanation, and little information, I bemoaned my failure. Then a thought occurred to me: I can email Patrick Rothfuss; I can email my favorite writer in the world! I can get the answer from him personally!!!

So I sent a missive. And immediately I received a reply! It said:

Hello there,

This is Pat Rothfuss. Well, it's sort of Pat Rothfuss. It's me typing it. But I'm not writing it just for you.

Well.... I am writing it just for you. But not *only* just for you. I'm writing it for you in particular, and everyone who e-mails me in general.

Okay. Let me start over....

This is an auto-responder message to let you know that your e-mail has made its way safely to my e-mail account. It's also to let you know that I appreciate you taking the time to drop me a line.

I always want you to know that I do read all the messages that people send me. I may not read them in a timely fashion, but I do read them.

Here's the bad news. I'm increasingly overwhelmed these days. And that means that I don't respond to e-mail much any more. Maybe one in ten. And as time goes on, it's probably going to be even less than that.

It breaks my heart a little, and I wish it weren't so. But it's the only way I can be a working writer, a good father, and a functional human being.

If you'd like more details about how this came to be, I wrote a blog about hitting my 10,000th piece of e-mail over here.

Lastly, because it might be a month or two (or more) before I even read your e-mail, feel free to contact one of the following addresses if your message is about something pressing.

Want to help with Worldbuilders?  Questions@Worldbuilders.org.

Want to set up an interview or invite Pat to your convention? Events@PatRothfuss.com

Need help with something from our online store? PaperbackContest@gmail.com

(Didn't know we had an online store? We do. The Tinker's Packs.)

Thank for being understanding,

pat

Clearly, this was a little disheartening. Nonetheless, I waited, hopelessly, for a few weeks, and there has yet to be a reply. And as much as I would like to wait and not let this post until he gets back to me, the powers that be require this question to post. 

And so dear reader, you and I both, shall wait until that lovely day in which Rothfuss responds to your question and my missive. Until then the best speculation I have for where the name "Oot" came from is that he got it from Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, which is, apparently, sometimes shortened to OoT. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Question #80783 posted on 01/27/2015 10:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How often have you heard these phrases and rolled your eyes?

Thank you for your service. We appreciate you. We love you.

Well, they are true!

-The Minions

A:

Dear Minions,

Aww, thanks. We appreciate you too.

highfive.jpg

(source)

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80789 posted on 01/27/2015 10:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've searched Google and haven't ben able to find a conclusive answer, so sorry if I missed something and this is an easy question to answer.

Is it easy to change the dates for an international flight? I am booking a trip to the UK this summer, but might need to change my ticket in April if I decide to stay longer. Do any of you have experience with this? Does it cost a lot? Can you change it easily?

-UK or bust

A:

Dear UK,

The reason you've been unable to find a conclusive answer is probably that policies about changing tickets will vary from airline to airline. Your best bet is to call the company your ticket is with, and find out what their rules are.

Best of luck on your trip!

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80764 posted on 01/27/2015 10:20 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I bought a couples of pairs of new blue jeans! I am quite pleased with their style!

I have a somewhat odd question to ask, but I was hoping you can answer... the tags say that my jeans may turn other clothing blue, and that I should wash them on their own because they will bleed. I don't have enough $ to do separate loads just for them.... So I'm curious if it's possible for me to stick them in my dishwasher (with no soap or dishes, of course), and if that would help get rid of the dye (I don't pay for water... just laundry services). Would this help get a lot of the exccess dye out so I can wash them with other darks? If so, what setting should I put them on in the dishwasher? Low? Thoughts?

I do know it's not ideal, but it doesn't seem unreasonable (just odd).

Thanks

-Vogue Villain

A:

Dear Vogue,

My mom soaks things that she knows will bleed dye in hot water with a cup or two of white vinegar in a big tub for about an hour, then washes them along with everything else. It always seems to work. Good luck!

-Squirrel

A:

Dear Vogue Villain, 

While it sounds like something I would attempt, I think the scalding-hot water of a dishwasher would leach a really large amount of the indigo out of your pants, inasmuch that they would look pretty awful when you were done with them. That's why you wash darks on cold or cooler settings.

--Ardilla Feroz wore some jeans one time so that makes him an authority on this subject, basically.

A:

Dear you,

You can also buy dye-absorber washing packs in the laundry aisle at your grocery store. Might be worth trying out.

~Anne, Certainly


0 Comments
Question #80758 posted on 01/27/2015 9:50 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is your favorite xkcd comic?

-614

A:

Dear TARDIS,

It's really hard to tell which one would be my favorite, since I like different ones at different times, but considering one of my current jobs, it's this one now:

compiling.png

I really have entirely too much free time on occasion.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Woodpecker,

673

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear 614,

My indisputable favorite is the Chin-Up Bar

chin_up_bar (1).jpg

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  

A:

Dear 2x307,

After hours of searching and deliberation, I've decided that the answer depends on what I'm using it for.

For my favorite joke: 552

For my favorite hovertext: 1026

For my favorite serious advice: 828

For my favorite real-world application: 936

Also, random fact: Even though I love XKCD, I have never actually read through the comic's full archives. This is so that, no matter what, there is always the possibility that I may run into another one that I've never seen before. (My parents bought box sets of Calvin and Hobbes and The Far Side, and I did the same thing.)

-yayfulness

A:

Dear friend to the woodpeckers,

I like this one a lot, mostly because it correctly portrays cats as the laser-wielding, cold-blooded killers they truly are.  

But seriously. 14.7 billion deaths in America annually. Your cat is murder incarnate. 

--Ardilla Feroz

P.S. But cute murder, darn them.

A:

Dear 614,

My favorite is probably 877:

beauty.png

It's really hard to choose a favorite, but I like this comic because I feel like the "science takes the beauty out of the world" misconception is fairly common. I believed it myself at one point. Now, because of majoring in science, I've found so much wonder and beauty in the world that I never would have seen otherwise. This explains why I'm a scientist, and how being a scientist is actually fulfilling for me on a deeper level.

383 gets honorable mention for actually teaching a well-timed life lesson when I first saw it.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80760 posted on 01/27/2015 9:50 a.m.
Q:

Dear Everyone especially Tally M.,

How amazing is Tally M.? Will you share something you admire about Tally M.? What's your favorite Tally M. answer?

-Minion #21

A:

Dear Minion,

Tally M is one of my favorite people and closest friends, not just on the Board. Let me tell you why...

  • Tally M watches Netflix documentaries about murder and kidnapping with me, despite being far more gentle than me. 
  • Tally M also watches Phineas and Ferb with me. 
  • Tally M once wrestled a mountain goat. 
  • Tally M and I pretty much never go a day without talking. 
  • Tally M once went on a date with the guy who does the voiceovers at the BYU football games. 
  • Tally M served as the president of one club and one Y-serve group. 
  • Tally M donates blood on the regular.
  • Tally M wears really fun hats. And I don't mean fun in a patronizing way, but they're actually cute and I'm jealous because I could never pull them off. 
  • Tally M sleeps on the bottom bunk. 
  • Tally M goes on adventures with me and allows me to climb on the roofs of abandoned buildings and reminds me not to kill myself. 
  • Tally M once ate a piece of candy we found in a plastic egg in the woods. 
  • Tally M invites me to lots of movie nights, and continually invites me even though I can never go. 
  • Tally M can swim 3 miles straight without stopping. 
  • Tally M was recently inducted into my secret society with Mo. 
  • Tally M and I once ate bread and cheese and donuts until we got sick. 
  • Tally M once third-wheeled on a semi-date that was really awkward with my now-boyfriend. 
  • Tally M got ice cream as a reward for doing that. 
  • Tally M likes Doctor Who. 
  • Tally M once corrected me on how to properly write "Doctor Who." (Hint: It's not Dr. Who).
  • Tally M speaks some random, obscure language. I'm not sure why, but it's cool. 
  • Tally M is friends with her father on Facebook. 
  • Tally M successfully cloned her father's dead dog in 1983, but was too modest to tell anyone. 
  • Tally M was 2 years old in 1983. 
  • Tally M is actually over thirty years old. 
  • Tally M went to Humor U with me. 
  • Tally M would probably say that I actually went to Humor U with her. 
  • Tally M has 13 siblings. 
  • Tally M has lived in 48 different countries. 
  • Tally M has named three US states. 
  • Tally M's great great great great great grandfather signed the US Constitution. 
  • Tally M is a drone pilot for the US Air Force. 
  • Tally M was nominated for Secretary of State but was too busy solving world hunger in Nepal to take the position.

In all seriousness, I adore Tally. Like I said, she's a very close friend of mine and one of my favorite people. She gets really excited and sometimes yells my alias in crowded hallways instead of using my real name but I love her not in spite of those things, but because of those things. She supports her friends and wants them to feel loved and appreciated and one reason I removed myself from the defend-Tally-after-people-were-being-rude is because I wanted to defend her so much that I knew I was going to say really mean, angry things that I would then regret. It breaks my heart (and ya'll know I have thick skin) to see people being cruel or rude or insensitive to Tally. I sincerely desire that those readers who did such things understand that Tally is a real human being and she's not as aggressively tough as I am. She's also a really short human being, but she has emotions and she's a beloved child of God, just like you. Please, please don't sink to a lower level and hurt her for absolutely no reason other than that you don't like her answers or that she bothers you or something silly like that. There is no excuse to try and bring others down. Ever.  

-Concorde 

A:

Dear #21,

She was one of the few first writers I recognized when I started seriously reading the Board a year and a half ago. Ever since, she's continued to just be...solid. She's nice and upbeat and passionate, but I really like her consistent dependability.

Also, she and Stego Lily wrote an epic answer to my question.

-El-ahrairah

A:
Dear Aaron Mitchell,
  • She was first in her class at Princeton
  • She has an IQ of 187
  • It's been suggested that Stephen Hawking stole his Brief History of Time from her fourth grade paper

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear minion,

Tally is dedicated and knows how to get things done, and is also a really kind person. She's awesome!

-Squirrel

A:

Dear Minion #21,

Before Tally was a Board writer, she got my mission information from yayfulness and would write me letters and emails, even though she had never met me before. She did this simply because I jokingly made the suggestion to her that she should write to me, never expecting her to take me seriously. She wrote more faithfully than most of the friends I've known for years and brightened my day on numerous occasions. When I came back to the Board, everything was different, but I knew someone. I always thought that highlighted a very compassionate and loyal side of her. I seriously appreciated it so much.

-Zedability

A:

Dear Quasar Heartbeat,

I appreciate that Tally gives you her undivided attention when you're speaking to her. It makes you feel really good inside. Also, she's a really sharp dresser.

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Dear Silence,

It's really hard to tell absolutely how amazing I am. On ten point scales, I consistently rank at least an eleven, with forays into digits as high as forty-two. If a thousand people were asked if they'd rather meet me or someone like, say, Emma Watson, they will almost always choose Emma Watson, but that's only because we look similar and they don't realize that they're pointing to Emma Watson instead of me.

I admire lots of things about myself, most notably my loyalty and desire for constant attention. As Michael Scott says, "Do I need to be liked? Absolutely not. I like to be liked. I enjoy being liked. I have to be liked. But it's not like this, compulsive, need, to be liked. Like my need to be praised." 

I've already elaborated on my favorite answers, which I think gives you a response for your last question.

In all seriousness, my cowriters are great, and I appreciate their support of me, as well as the support of readers like you. Thank you!

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #80772 posted on 01/27/2015 9:50 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Yo, so why are there blonde parades in Eastern Europe? What's the message they are trying to convey? How do you become a part of it? Are you not allowed to join in on the parade if you don't have golden locks? Why did it start? What are your thoughts on it? Would you jump in on it? (are any of you blonde... I'm suspecting someone who starts with a T might).

-Vogue Villain

A:

Dear Vogue Villain,

The first "blonde parade" I came across in my googling was the "Go Blonde Festival," first held in Latvia in 2009.  Its tagline, "The biggest blonde festival in the world," is a little bit misleading, because I am pretty sure it is also the only blonde festival in the world.  At least, the only one that I could find.

According to these websites, the blonde parades began in an attempt to "cheer-up" the Latvian nation, which was in the middle of an economic crisis.  The event was also meant to raise money to support children's safety and playgrounds for disabled children across Latvia.

I would assume you could sign up to participate in the parade on the official Go Blonde website, but sadly I can't read Latvian, and the google translate feature only gets you so far, so I am not sure exactly where on the website that information is located.

Though you have to appear blonde to join the parade, I saw several pictures of people who looked to be wearing wigs, so I guess you could say the blonde parade is also for the blonde at heart!

My thoughts on all of this?  Genius.  We too should stop arguing about things like economics, politics and the national debt, and instead throw elaborate parades to celebrate our hair color.  Life is too short, guys.

I am blonde.  Would I jump in on this parade?  If I ever happen to be in Latvia during the time that it is held, why not?  Otherwise, no.  Sorry Latvia, but if I were to randomly fall into the amount of money required to vacation somewhere far away, I would choose Hawaii instead.

-Vienna

A:

Dear Rose,

If you're referring to me, I'm not blonde. My dark brunette roommate disagrees, since she thinks my hair is too light to be brunette. 

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Villain,

The Soulful Ginger is, in fact, a redhead. Who would've thought?

-Owlet


0 Comments
Question #80757 posted on 01/27/2015 9:50 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm a poor college student, but I'm one that wants to start eating healthier. I just don't have time to go every week to get fresh produce, so I'm looking for alternatives. I would love to make smoothies, but our blender is basically kaput, so that's out. What are some good solutions for making eating frozen fruit a habit? Or, what are some other good ways to get enough produce without shopping every week?

-On a health kick

A:

Dear Kick,

Let me tell you, frozen vegetables are the greatest thing. You can get bags of mixed veggies and just dump them into your stir fry at night. They don't require cutting, they don't go bad, and they are usually cheaper than fresh vegetables. It's awesome.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  

A:

Dear Health,

Canned stuff is great, especially black beans, corn, and olives. Some produce can stay good for months outside of the fridge, like squash, onions, apples, and potatoes.

Ultimately, however, I've found that nothing comes without sacrifice - when I really want to eat healthy, I have to be willing to make the time for it. There really is no other way around it. I know it's tough, but life is a balancing act, and you have to prioritize the things that are most important to you.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book


0 Comments
Question #80763 posted on 01/27/2015 9:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Just curious... do you guys interpret the Bible as literal all the time? Or do you see it more as a story to deliver a moral message? I like to think I'm a strong believer in the Bible, but I think a lot of the stories are exaggerated or taken from other cultures' myths or propaganda by the biblical writers... but I do believe the messages were inspired. Is that wrong of me to do so? (For example, the sheer numbers in the death of battles seems too high, Joshua didn't kill everyone, etc).

-Sage

A:

Dear Wade,

I don't think having a literal interpretation of the Bible is necessary for being a Christian. In fact, I would prefer if Christians didn't have a literal interpretation of the Bible. I mean, what's more important: that there exist pyramids made with bricks containing straw as described in the Bible, or that the Lord fulfilled his promise to his children by delivering them? There are a lot of problems with interpreting the Bible literally. None of these problems are fundamental to believing in the divinity of God and Christ until you imagine the Bible as a literal transcription of words directly from God meant to be taking without symbolism. Think about how the Bible was written: it was never someone writing things as they happened. Most of the Gospels were likely written by students of the eponymous disciples recording stories told by the disciples decades after the life of Jesus. Because of this, the Gospels create a contradictory picture of the life of Jesus but that doesn't mean that Jesus wasn't a real person.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Sage,

I find that there is value in doing both. I don't read the Bible for history, I read it for the Gospel and for the stories, and stories can be truthful in their own right. So I will sometimes interpret them literally. Other times, I will take those self-same stories and only look at the moral, or hidden, messages. Both can be good, and I think the Bible should be read with both in mind. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger

A:

Dear Sage,

In all honesty, I find that because whether or not it's literal or figurative doesn't actually affect the lessons I can learn and apply to my personal life, questions of whether a specific event actually happened tends to get shelved in the "things to ask after I die" category of my brain. I enjoy hearing other people's perspectives on these things, but I've just never been preoccupied with it and don't have much of an opinion either way.

I do agree in general with the idea that there are probably some things in the Bible that are the results of corruption over time or the natural bias of the writers, although the message is inspired by God. I don't think God handed down every single word as absolute truth. For a great example, take Deuteronomy 14:11-18, where Moses seems to state that bats are a type of bird, whereas we know they're mammals. What's more likely: that science is wrong and God has divinely decreed that bats are a type of bird, or that Moses did not need additional light and knowledge in the realm of biological classification systems in order to be a divinely inspired prophet?

So yeah, I definitely think things on that scale are inaccurate throughout the Bible. Questions about bigger events, like I said, can wait until I can actually know the answer instead of speculating.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80790 posted on 01/27/2015 9:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why were there a 1000 dogs buried in Ashkelon?

-Bones & Butterfly

A:

Dear Bones,

This was interesting to research.  I love random things from the past that nobody completely understands. 

Unfortunately, that is basically your answer: nobody completely understands why there is a giant graveyard containing fossils of 1000 dogs at Ashkelon.  There are a lot of theories, and while none of them can be definitely proved, there are some theories that we can disprove.  Perhaps one day the process of elimination will lead us to the truth.

For now, there is significant evidence that the dogs were not sacrificed.  They all appear to have died naturally, and there were even fossils found of an unusually old dog with arthritis that had clearly been well taken care of. Additionally, the dogs were not casually placed in the graves, but carefully laid down and arranged in a natural position. 

There is also no evidence of mass disease, and it seems that the dogs died over a span of time, rather than all at once.

In my opinion, the reason that the dogs were buried is simple, and it's the same reason that people still bury dogs today: People love their dogs.

It seems the people of Ashkelon were just a lot more systematic about the way they buried them.  Plus, maybe they had a ruler that really, really, loved dogs.

-Vienna


0 Comments
Question #80794 posted on 01/27/2015 9:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What exactly happens to pills once they've passed their expiration date? I'm assuming they do not expire in the same way that, say, milk expires, so does it have to do more with their effectiveness? At what point is it time to bid farewell to my ibuprofen stash and buy a replacement?

-cheapskate

A:

Dear Cheapskate,

These websites offer some great insight on this subject.  In a nutshell, what they say is this:

While pills do lose their potency over time, most (about 88%) are still effective after their date of expiration. Some can even be effective up to ten years past their expiration date.

If you are just taking some ibuprofen to get rid of minor pain, you should be fine to take pills that are slightly expired. I used to have a bottle of ibuprofen at work that was about a year past the expiration date, but it seemed to work well, regardless.

But remember, if the medication you are taking is important to your overall health, you should always play it safe and only use medicine that has not expired.

-Vienna


0 Comments
Question #80750 posted on 01/27/2015 9:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am applying for a TA job next year and feel really qualified for it in all respects but one: faculty references! I need to have two.

I have one professor that I know enough that I would feel good asking if I could list her as a reference. But, the rest of my classes have all been bigger and so I don't know the professors well.

I have one other teacher who had a smaller class that I got an A in, but I haven't really talked to her much and I'm not great about commenting in class. Would it be okay to ask to list her as a reference or would that be weird?

Have you known all of the professors really well that you have asked to list as references?

-Future TA, hopefully

A:

Dear Future TA,

Once I emailed someone and asked her if I could use her as a reference. She very politely wrote back: 

"If you could send me a pic so I could remember you, that would really help. I never forget faces, but names are another story."

So no, I haven't known very well everyone I've listed as a reference. No, it's not ideal. But if you have to have two references and one of them is less than stellar, it's better than not applying. You'll miss 100% of the shots you never take. 

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Dear Future TA,

When I applied for grad school, one of the people (who knew me really well, which is why I picked him as a reference) dropped off the face of the earth at the last minute, so I had to scramble to find someone--ANYONE--to write me a last minute recommendation for several schools. I selected a professor who had taught two of the classes for my minor. He was a really nice guy, and even though I was super quiet in those classes, I had gotten As in both of them, so I figured he could at least testify to my academic competence. He agreed to write the letter, which was admittedly pretty standard since he didn't know me very well, and the day was saved. I'm now in grad school, so obviously it didn't kill my chances. 

Having ALL of your references seem like standard "I don't know this person well but they're cool I guess" letters is not going to work in your favor. Ideally all of your references can speak to specific strengths and talents that they have seen in you that are relevant to whatever they're recommending you for. But, I suspect that more people than not end up in the middle ground you and I experienced, where some letters are strong and others are just kind of meh. Just remember: a meh letter is better than no letter. 

-Divya


0 Comments
Question #80793 posted on 01/27/2015 3:02 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Who would win in a dance-off between El-ahrairah and Rick Astley?

-Or are they the same person?...

A:

Dear you,

Let me just put it this way: when it comes to a dance-off, El-ahrairah's never gonna let you down.

~Anne, Certainly

A:

Dear observant,

I El-ahrairahed Rick Astley long before anyone rickrolled me.

Should never have revealed I was a ginger,

-El-ahrairah


0 Comments
Question #80791 posted on 01/27/2015 2:08 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What's the current reputation of Enclave Village?

-Apartment Hunter

A:

Dear you,

Last I heard two or so years ago it was on the pricier side of things but the management was nice to you and the apartments were pretty good for student living. Consider stopping by yourself and talking to people there about their experiences.

Happy hunting,

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Comments
Monday, January 26, 2015
Question #80785 posted on 01/26/2015 10:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Board Question #80678 got me wondering what are the husbands supposed to do with photos like these - pleasure themselves with them? Is it in the Law of Chatity to masturbate once you're married - as long as your spouse is involved in some way?

-not saying

A:

Dear not saying,

In general, the Church seems to stay out of the bedroom as much as possible these days. That said, I don't think the pictures would be for masturbation. Rather, I imagine they'd be used to build anticipation for the first night, or the first couple nights, while seeing your spouse naked is still a new thing.

Not having done that myself, and not feeling comfortable asking the world at large to offer up their experiences, that's all I can really tell you.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #80786 posted on 01/26/2015 10:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How did we get the idiom for "turning tricks"?

-Mumbo Jumbo

A:

Dear Mumbo Jumbo,

I found an article on Stack Exchange that listed a few different etymologies. One suggestion was a historical French phrase that described a particular manner of having sex; another came from the American slang of "trick" being a robbery and "turn" for performing a service.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80788 posted on 01/26/2015 9:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Please order the following from worst quality likely to best quality likely for an answer to something objective and fairly difficult, like, say, a 400-level physics question:
* Yahoo! Answers
* The 100 Hour Board
* Wikipedia Reference Desk
* Physics Stack Exchange
* Quora

-Lou

A:

Dear Ferrigno,

This is just my opinion, but (from best to worst since I wrote it that way and now I'm too lazy to change it):

  1. Wikipedia reference desk
  2. Physics Stack Exchange
  3. The 100 Hour Board* or Quora
  4. The Library
  5. Asking a stranger
  6. Shouting it into the sky and expecting and then receiving the answer through a fortune cookie
  7. Yahoo! Answers
  8. A 400-level physics textbook

*Depending on how well I understood the class and how long it's been since I've taken it.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #80731 posted on 01/26/2015 8:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I need some gift ideas for my 15-year-old nephew's birthday coming up in a few weeks. He is having major surgery about a week before his birthday, and he'll likely be bedridden and in physical therapy for quite awhile, so I'm thinking I want to get something fun for him to do while he lays on the couch, but he's not much of a reader or into games like word searches or Sudoku or anything like that. He's really quiet, but has a great sense of humor and is probably the funniest kid I've ever met. He's really quirky and loves games (board games, card games, computer games, etc.), ducks, and food.

I'm really poor right now, so I'm aiming for about $10-$15 max. I got him the "Sitting Ducks" card game for Christmas. Any suggestions for other gifts he might like?

-Drucilda

A:

Dear Drucilda, 

You're very thoughtful to get your nephew a gift while he will be stuck inside! Here are a few things I that may interest him: 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #80784 posted on 01/26/2015 7:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Engagement rings. Society would have me believe that my fiance needs to buy one of the most expensive pieces of jewelry I'll likely ever own when we're both students.

Obviously, this is not super realistic. What I think I'd like to do is choose a pretty white gold setting that I like and then, instead of dropping four figures on a diamond, just buy a 35$ CZ stone instead. If it does start bothering me over time (blah blah it's softer, refraction properties, color imperfections, etc. I'm aware of these but don't find them to be a convincing reason to drop money on a diamond RIGHT NOW.) I can eventually replace it with an actual rock once we're not so broke.

Here's my problem: will jewelers do this? How would I go about buying just a setting? How would I (or my potential fiance, I guess) go about finding someone who would mount my imposter-stone?

-Not DeBeers

A:

Dear Not DeBeers,

As yayfulness mentions below, choosing to get a cubic zirconium isn't too unusual and most jewelers would probably be able to do it for you. However, I highly recommend going to Custom Ring Design on 9th, across from the Creamery. You can design your own setting and it might even be more economical than just going to a typical jewelry store. M and I got his grandma's ring re-set there and they are awesome. Seriously, I could not recommend them more highly. We just got engaged today and not only is the ring gorgeous, but it was also a fraction of the cost it would have been to go anywhere else.

You could probably buy just a setting and get a cubic zirconium mounted anywhere, but seriously, go to Custom Ring Design. Also, if you go, email me. They have an awesome referral program and I'd love to tell them I sent you. (I'd send you even if they didn't have the program, because I seriously love my ring and their service, but I might as well get the benefits of it.)

-Zedability

A:

Dear asdf,

I haven't exactly taken a poll of my married friends, but I know it's not unusual to get a ring with cubic zirconium and then replace it with a real diamond sometime later. My wife and I went that route (there's no way we could have afforded the ring we chose and a real diamond); we decided that we'll get a diamond to celebrate an anniversary at some future time when money is more abundant.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #80781 posted on 01/26/2015 6:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Bored,

Why am I asking this question? Do I actually want an answer?

Judge a man by his questions rather than by his answers.

-Voltaire

A:

Dear Voltaire, 

Why am I answering this question? Do I actually want to answer it? 

-Concorde

A:

Dear M. Arouet,

I do not agree with what you have asked, but I'll defend to the death your right to ask it.

-Inverse Insomniac

A:

Dear you,

1) You're bored.

2) Depends on how long you anticipate being bored for.

~Anne, Certainly


0 Comments
Question #80767 posted on 01/26/2015 5:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How do you eat a "Nature's Valley Crunchy, Oats & Honey" granola bar without making a horrendous mess in class, the car, church, work, etc? Let me in on this secret! Or is it impossible? Pics? Step by step instructions?

-The Ironic Chef

A:

Dear Ironic Chef,

Nature Valley granola bars are my breakfast almost every day. Here's how I deal with their messiness:

0126151712.jpg

1. Get an Apple Crisp granola bar. There are plenty of good Nature Valley flavors, but this is far and away the best.

0126151712a.jpg

2. Without opening the wrapper, break the bar in half. If you don't like putting large pieces of food in your mouth (my wife thinks I'm weird), break it into thirds.

0126151713.jpg

3. Tear open one corner of the package and extract the pieces. It's best to hold the package the way you'd hold a cup; if you set it down like I did to take the picture, crumbs will fall out more easily.

So far, this method has served me well.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Ironic,

I don't. I just revel in the crumbs and fling them onto anyone who happens to pass by while shouting "Mazel tov!" 

-Concorde

A:

Dear Chef,

I open the package, put the granola bars in a baggie, then break them up. I just pick out the pieces, and eat.

-Squirrel

A:

Dear Ironic Chef,

Feed them to a civet cat a la kopi luwak and enjoy when they're finished... processing. You'll just have to imagine the pictures.

--Ardilla Gourmand


0 Comments
Posted on 01/26/2015 4:12 p.m. New Comment on: #80775 If I became a temple worker, would I be able to request not doing certain tasks? ...
Question #80779 posted on 01/26/2015 4:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is there a term for when the so-called "author" of a book is a pseudonym + fictional person, often inserted as a character into the book? I'm thinking of "Pittacus Lore" in I Am Number Four and "Lemony Snicket" from A Series of Unfortunate Events.

Wikipedia has an article about "self-insertion," but that doesn't sound like the same thing.

-MittIsNot Poor

A:

Dear No He Isn't,

I honestly think that self-insertion is the term you're looking for; I certainly couldn't find anything better. However, Wikipedia has another article stub called "Author surrogate" that might also be what you're looking for.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80778 posted on 01/26/2015 2:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear The Soulful Ginger and Owlet,

When Grace overeats, what is she?

-Graceful

A:

Dear Graceful,

Ooh, how about this one: What kind of bow cannot be tied?

.....

A rainbow!

That was the only one I actually read. We weren't supposed to open too many of the pages because the book was delicate. So I only saved you that gem. Hope you liked it!

-Owlet

A:

Dear Graceful,

Is she, is she really though? After having eaten all that, I doubt it. Unless she was eating another person named Grace, then she might be Grace-full. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Question #80743 posted on 01/26/2015 2:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have wavy hair that's just past tailbone length (unstraightened). It's thick enough that I break a hair tie a week just by putting my hair up in a ponytail. I don't use heat on my hair: I never blow dry it, never straighten it, and never curl it. Because brushing makes it tangle significantly more than normal, I rarely, if ever, brush it. Since I only wash my hair about once every four days, I would prefer to not use hairspray or gel (I don't own any). I also won't spend more than five minutes a day doing my hair. My hair has never been dyed, and it's this long because I can't be bothered to cut it (but the ends are neither ragged nor split). Despite my relative lack of attention to my hair, doing what I'm doing results in my hair being the first thing people notice and compliment me on. I usually do simple braids: single braid, side braid, or two braids. Other than that, I pretty much have it down or in a ponytail. What other hairstyles do you think I should try?

-Chestnut Mane

A:

Dear Chestnut Mane,

The only other hairstyles I can even think of are buns and curling/straightening. Your hair sounds like it's too long for curling or straightening to be time efficient, so that's out. You could try just twisting it around your ponytail into a bun, but with that much hair it might end up too big. Honestly, I don't think there's much more variety you can go for without either cutting your hair or being willing to spend significantly more time on it.

On the plus side, if I had hair like yours, I'd totally just leave it down all the time.

-Zedability the lazy hairstylist


0 Comments
Question #80753 posted on 01/26/2015 2:20 p.m.
Q:

100 Hour Board

I am thinking of majoring in PR, with a global business minor. Can you give me some examples of the different job outlooks through this field? & provide examples of internships or other minors other people have done through public relations?


-Lola

A:

Dear Lola,

It doesn't look like any of us have much knowledge or expertise about this field. However, I do know that basically any company that employs more than a few people is going to have some need for someone with PR/business expertise, especially companies that do business globally or who are trying to expand into international markets. Your best bet is probably to decide what type of company you want to work for – you could work for an oil company, a clothing company, a health products company...the sky is really the limit! Then, just select a decent number of companies in that field and begin emailing or calling them. Tell them your major and that you would like to inquire about internship opportunities. There are so many different things you can do with this that something will definitely come up if you ask enough people.

Sorry we couldn't be more helpful!

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80755 posted on 01/26/2015 2:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm on a semester break for financial reasons so it's my first time home in a long time. It's just my parents and I at home now and they both work so I'm all alone at home during the week. There are places I would like to go, but I don't have a car and all of the friends I used to have in the area have moved away. My ward boundaries changed after I left for college, so I don't know anyone there and there is no one my age.

I love being home. I love my family. I love the weather and the familiar sights. I love the relief of not paying rent or tuition for a bit. But I feel so... stagnant. I came back home to work, but finding a job has been hard because I don't have a car to get around. I just sit at home all day, every day doing chores, making food, and watching netflix. Sometimes I'd just like to put on some makeup and leave the house, but then I realize I have nowhere to go. I have all kinds of hobbies but no one to do them with and now way to fund them. And if you couldn't already tell, I'm starting to get a little lonely and very bored.

How can I get a life with no money, no mobility, and no connections?

- Orchid

A:

Dear Orchid,

I thought of a few ideas of things you could do:

  • Go running or biking
  • Learn a skill online (Khan Academy, a programming language, etc.)
  • Ask the Elders' Quorum or Relief Society President to let you know about any service opportunities
  • Make sure you're doing your home and visiting teaching
  • If you're coming back to BYU, consider signing up for the honors program when you get back and get a head start on the Great Works list
  • Consider making money online through services like Mechanical Turk or fiverr (Board Question #66520 talks about this a bit)

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80770 posted on 01/26/2015 2:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I got married in September and I still have my wedding dress. I'm not particularly fond of overly large clothing items just hanging in my small apartment, so I've tried selling it to another bride to no avail. I've recently remembered someone who used wedding dresses to make outfits for infants who die prematurely so that they can be put to rest in something nice. Unfortunately, this organization, Little Angel Gowns, is a little ways away from Idaho/Utah and I'm kind of lazy in getting to the post office. Can you help me find other worthwhile organizations (hopefully near by Provo/Salt Lake/Rexburg) that take in wedding dresses for a good cause?

-Shrinky Dink

A:

Dear Shrinky Dink,

I was able to find a couple of options in Utah. One is Utah Angel Gowns, which sounds very similar to the organization you describe. The foundation Brides Against Breast Cancer is coming to Utah on February 21 and you could donate to them there. Alternatively, there is an organization called Adorned in Grace, which uses wedding gowns to help victims of sex trafficking. It's located in Portland, OR, which is a little further away, but it's another option for you to consider.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80775 posted on 01/26/2015 2:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

If I became a temple worker, would I be able to request not doing certain tasks? It wouldn't be out of personal preference, but rather anxiety reasons. Would it be a big deal, or would it be a reason to not be accepted as a worker in the first place?

-sister m

A:

Dear sister m,

Many of the temple workers I know do the same specific thing every week. In addition to being a temple worker in the endowment, there are also positions such as organizing baptistry clothes, checking in the little ordinance cards at various locations, and more. I'm sure it's up to the discretion of the temple president and matron, but my guess is that you'd be able to find a way to assist that doesn't trigger your anxiety.

-Zedability


1 Comment
Question #80777 posted on 01/26/2015 2:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I asked question 80510 several days ago. I know some questions don't get answered within 100 hours, I know you're a free service, you're all busy, but it's been almost 500. Did it get forgotten? Do I have to resubmit? I'm really hoping for an awesome answer, and I can be patient and wait for it, I just dont want a "oh man we forgot to answer this question... search, ponder & pray and it'll all work out" kind of answer, especially not after waiting this long. Not that I've seen you guys do that, but still.

-Maistro

A:

Dear Maistro,

Sorry, sorry, sorry for holding that question over. The good news is that it has been answered and it hopefully blew your mind with its amazingness. 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #80734 posted on 01/26/2015 1:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What's your favorite thing about BYU? Provo? Utah?

-The Inquisitor

A:

Dear Inquisitor,

BYU- My favorite things are my student job and spring and summer terms. I love the campus a lot, especially during that time. I also like how many things are going on at BYU on any given day. And they're safe, normal things. Not crazy parties, or tons of crime.

Provo- Provo is a really well planned and cared for city. I feel like it's a community and it's safe and welcoming and has a lot to offer. I love Provo, so so much and I honestly get a bit upset when people bash it. If you think Provo is bad, go live where I grew up and you'll quickly sing a different tune. 

Utah- I love Utah because it's an excellently run state. I like how it's easy to navigate around and there's lots to see and do. It's a spectacularly beautiful, home-y state with quick access to nature. I don't want to spend the rest of my life here, but I'm excited to spend the next two years here.

-Concorde 

A:

Dear Inqy,

BYU - I've gotten a genuinely good education here. (Heck, I get to be in a class taught by B Sands himself, amirite?)

Provo - Two words: GOOGLE FIBER. It keeps me regular.

Utah - The variety of the great outdoors and actual seasons.

-Inverse Insomniac

A:

Dear Marsh,

I rag on BYU, Provo, and Utah all the time, when in reality there is so much I love about this place. I love BYU for my classes and my major. If I had gone to the university I was originally planning to attend, I likely would never have wound up studying what I am. I love the things I learn in my classes, I love my professors, and I love that we can bring in Gospel insights on occasion. I also love all the library, and its huge collection of books. I also love the friends I have made here at BYU. I would not have found them anywhere else (really though).

The things I love about Provo and Utah are really the same. I love all of the outdoor recreation that is immediately available to me. There are places to hike, rock climb, mountain bike, etc. all over the place, and there are varying degrees of difficulty in all of those. I also think Utah and Provo are absolutely beautiful in the summer and fall, and that makes me happy. 

Oh, I also have a baby niece who lives here in Utah. I really love that. She's so cute!

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  

A:

Dear Hercules,

You know you're in a good place when you look around you and think "these are my kind of nerds." That's how I chose my major, that's how I got into the Board, and that's how I feel at BYU.

So yeah, my favorite thing about BYU is that it's nerdy/geeky. (Maybe this is the same for other campuses; I guess I wouldn't know.) I really feel like people here have to come up with wholesome, creative ways to have fun. I love that other students and professors understand my Halloween costumes. Last year, the person at the Cougareat put my name down as "Empress Venture" for my order! People compliment me on my Tardis necklace and my Camp Half-Blood shirt and my Hermione's bag. It's awesome.

My other favorite thing about BYU is that it's really friendly. Random people offer to carry my books, ask me if I'm okay when I fall on the stairs, and strike up conversations with me when I'm walking home, 

Provo...I don't know. BYU is my favorite thing about Provo. I don't get around much.

My favorite thing about Utah is all the temples. The Logan one is my favorite. I like that I can walk to the temple.

-Owlet


0 Comments
Question #80762 posted on 01/26/2015 1:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What apartments here at BYU (Provo) have really good internet? Who has the best internet in your opinion? This is important. The apartment can be a piece of crap for all I care as long as the internet works very well.

Thanks :)

-Kyle

A:

Dear Kyle,

If you really want high-quality Internet, my suggestion would be to sign up for a really cheap apartment that doesn't provide Internet, and then pay for your own. This way, you can control the quality. Most student housing has pretty run-of-the-mill Internet, as far as I can tell.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80733 posted on 01/26/2015 1:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How do mixed race people decide which race to claim? For example, my friend whose mom is Chinese and who's dad is white calls herself Asian. My friend who's dad is Peruvian and who's mom is white calls herself white. Obama is half white, I think, but is always referred to add black. Do people just say that they're whatever they look more like? Is it situational? Something else?

Moi

P.S. I hope this question doesn't sound racist, I'm really just curious.

A:

Dear Moi,

There's no rule or even unspoken policy. It's up to each person; a lot of people will say what they're most proud of or attached to. As one student said, "It depends on the day, and it depends on the options." Many people say what they look least like since it's not apparent. People can generally tell that I'm at least part white, so I usually say "I'm half-[minority]", and then the white half is assumed. (I've been asked if I'm part Native American, Hispanic, or Asian. It's kind of fun to see what people guess. Or, as one article puts it, we "enjoy confounding people.") When I'm filling out forms that only let me choose one, I put the one I'm more familiar with—in my case, white.

-Owlet

A:

Dear Toi,

I had a mission companion who was half black. She always said either "black" or "half black" when people asked, because she definitely didn't look white and so that was really the part that people were interested in hearing about whenever they asked her.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80742 posted on 01/26/2015 12:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I recently asked question 80623 regarding charity and celebrities. After reading your responses, I realized that maybe I framed the question wrong. Unlike Insomniac, I think that there are a lot of famous people out there who do a lot of good because they are good people, not because it will make them look good.

Shemar Moore from Criminal minds is one example. His mom was diagnosed with MS a while back, and he has hosted or participated in a handful of charity events for that. And Paul Walker, before he died, was part of Reach Out Worldwide, providing much needed healthcare and food in very non-glamorous locations and for no pay. Probably more disputable is Taylor Swift, who seems to be doing something nice every time I turn on my computer. Even if it does boost her public image, if someone was only in it for the money, you'd think they'd tell their manager to take a hike after so many good deeds.

The question I really meant to ask, though, was, what about us? I know there are definitely acts of service and charity that we shouldn't broadcast, but to what extent should we use our influence to inspire other people to serve and be charitable too?

-80623

A:

Dear you,

To the extent that we are capable of so doing while respecting other people's agency. 

I think the main point from my previous answer holds; that we should do all the good we can and encourage all the good we can for the right reasons (e.g. not so everyone will see how many people you're inspiring to do good and admire you for it). 

At the same time, I think it's also possible to be overly pushy. Don't use your influence to force people; we know that in general people are not supposed to be compelled in all things. However, if we can serve as a good example, I think that in itself is a good work when done wisely in compliance with the guidance of the Spirit.

~Anne, Certainly


0 Comments
Question #80713 posted on 01/26/2015 9:56 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are some of the tender mercies you have experienced from God?

-My name is beautiful

A:

Dear Beautiful,

Lately I have been especially grateful for the people in my life: for old friends, new friends, mission companions, cousins, siblings, parents, grandparents, and even the stranger that stopped to say something nice to me today.  Many, if not most, of the tender mercies I have experienced in life have been brought about both by the love of God and the love of others, and for that I am grateful.

I have also been grateful lately for the tender mercy of gaining perspective.  I have felt blessed with a lot of perspective lately about why I have had to go through some of the trials I've had recently.  Now I realize that even my trials were, in a sense, merciful.  I think that God works a lot more miracles in our lives than we know, so whenever I pick up on one, or actually realize that He has taught me something, I think of it as a tender mercy. It's like a small little peek into the plan that He has for me and a reminder that He is there.

-Vienna

A:

Dear Beautiful,

My debit card came in the mail. The dinner I made was actually edible. I have a couple of the best friends in the world, both of whom I met kind of by chance. When I wrecked my bike, a kind woman gave me a pretty nice and free blanket. Chocolate milk. I got a super-soft pillow for Christmas. I was able to wake up early today for the first time in weeks. I have a super kind and generous bishop. I finished my lab 2 hours earlier than I thought I would. Some things you wouldn't think of as cuttable actually cut quite nicely. I walked through the Talmage just as they were giving away free pizza. The TA showed me this much more efficient way of writing code for my homework. My internet is now working.

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear Beautiful,

Sometimes I write down my prayers. This week I was reading one I wrote down last September, and I realized that much of what I asked for has been given to me. It was lovely to be shown so clearly that Heavenly Father listens to (err...reads) my prayers. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 

A:

Dear Doctor,

I have a different way of understanding tender mercies than I'm sure most people do, but regardless, I'd have to say the readers and fellow writers that have stepped up for me recently. Negative backlash is always difficult to deal with, but it's especially nice to know that other people care.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Santo Guacalajara,

I was incredibly amped to find a kind of fruit I had been questing after for years in my first mission area. Sure, you can call it a coincidence, but to me it was a kind gesture that God knows us and even cares what we like. I don't know why, but it's pretty neat.

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Comments
Posted on 01/26/2015 9:02 a.m. New Comment on: #80771 So what's the skinny on Scientology in Russia breeding foxes/wolves to be more people friendly? Why ...
Question #80759 posted on 01/26/2015 8:02 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
Is there anywhere on campus where I can get hot water for a thermos? When I'm on campus for many many hours, all I want is some hot chocolate or tea (herbal of course!)

-Just because it's 50 degrees outside, doesn't mean my heart should be.

A:

Dear Carebear,

Sorry to disappoint, but I don't know of any hot water dispensers on campus. (That's not to say there aren't any, just that I haven't found any.) There are, however, microwaves all over the place; I think there's one in every building. There are a couple of ways to do this. You can do what a friend of mine does: carry a mug around with you all day to heat up water in. That seems a little risky to me - I would break the mug within the first couple of hours - but whatever floats your boat, man.

My dad taught me a trick when I was a kid, however, that has always worked great. You'd think that sticking a cheap plastic water bottle in the microwave would melt it, right? Well, let me tell you a secret. It only melts if there's empty air in the water bottle. If you fill it up and squeeze all the air out before you seal it and put it in, the plastic will only get as hot as the water, which usually isn't hot enough to melt it. (Unless you like your tea scalding, in which case I don't know how to help you.)

Give it a shot. See if it works. If not, maybe you could start a water heater petition. I'd sign. Not that anyone would listen, but I'd sign.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book


0 Comments
Question #80773 posted on 01/26/2015 2:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have any of you trimmed a llamas's toenails before? Stories/pics?

-Pills & Pillows

A:

Dear Pillows,

No, but one of our professors is studying llama gut biota and makes them throw up on a regular basis....

-None.


0 Comments
Question #80771 posted on 01/26/2015 2:08 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So what's the skinny on Scientology in Russia breeding foxes/wolves to be more people friendly? Why do they care? What's Scientology have to do with animal breeding? Is it part of their belief system somehow?

-Tom on a Cruise

A:

Dear Tom,

Sorry, I tried googling various combinations of "scientologists," "breed," "dogs," "Russia," and the like, but found nothing. Could you please submit another question with the source of your information? We'd love to help!

-El-ahrairah


1 Comment
Sunday, January 25, 2015
Question #80769 posted on 01/25/2015 10:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Here's a question I'm very fortunate to be able to ask...but still makes me feel bad.

My spouse ended up in the hospital having a big and painful surgery unexpectedly this week. We have been overwhelmed by the love of our friends who have done so much to help with meals, transportation, visits, and even finances.

But when I say overwhelmed, I mean it. So many people are trying to serve us that I've ended up turning a lot of them down (because we only need dinner so many times a day). Some of them we've turned down more than once, and it makes me feel guilty. I don't want them to think we don't appreciate it, or that we prefer some friends over others, because that's definitely not it. It's generally just a "someone else got here first in offering [service]" so we went with it.

What is a great way to show our friends how much we love and appreciate them, even if all they were able to do is offer help?

-luckiest

A:

Dear lucky,

I think you can thank them the same way you'd thank the people that were able to serve you. Send them thank-you cards, visit them and thank them in-person, make them cookies, and offer to serve them when they need it. Just be sincere, and they'll be able to tell you mean it.

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear Fortuna,

I agree with El-ahrairah. I think it would be wise at this time to write down the names of those who have offered to help so that when you have more time, you can write them nice notes. I looked up some thank-you ideas on Pinterest, but as much as I like crafting, I prefer a sincere, personalized note than a candy bar with a printable. I truly think that your friends will feel appreciated if you write to them exactly what you've told us—that you felt bad to turn them down, but you are so grateful for their offer. When you put something down on paper, it definitely doesn't sound like you're brushing them off or that you prefer others.

-Owlet


0 Comments
Question #80752 posted on 01/25/2015 8:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear Tally M.,

Thanks for all you do: your stories have helped me through some hard times of my own. I think you're awesome. Keep being awesome!

What are some of your answers for the Board you've put the most time into answering, that you're most proud of, or that you just generally really enjoy?

-Tim the Monkey

A:

Dear Ten,

I can't express how grateful I am for you guys. I don't know what people intended in the harsh criticisms they posted, but the repercussions have been overwhelmingly positive and have made my week that much brighter.

So, I looked browsed through my 1000+ answers and found a notable 28.

My favorite research answers:

Board Question #73459: Tracking down a theoretically impossible paper to find. I had to backtrack citations until I found it. This was one of my first real research opportunities on the Board, and it validated my research skills.

Board Question #73794: Calculating flatulence. A couple of my base numbers were off, but it was still really fun to do the math.

Board Question #76532: Figuring how much time it took individuals to cross the plains. I really just like accomplishing large tasks, and this was certainly a large one.

Board Question #78196: Prophets in antiquity. I definitely found it interesting to look at different aspects of the Old Testament I'd never considered before, and it was kind of fun to go to the religion section of the library and do book research.

Board Question #80451: I was just impressed with myself in being able to figure out who ran the Twitter account.

My favorite creative efforts:

Board Question #73631: Writing a synopsis of The Name of the Wind in the style of the book's prologue. 

Board Question #75387: Describing how Concorde dumped crickets on President Packer.

Board Question #73839: Stego and I create a movie script for the Board.

Board Question #76207: Comparison of Board application to library security guard application.

Board Question #77208: Finding all of the languages "Let it Go" was translated into and describing the translation meaning.

Board Question #76735: An in-depth analysis of The Princess and the Pauper.

Board Question #76951: A scriptural retelling of something that happened freshman year.

Board Question #78703: Rewriting "When Will My Life Begin" for the Board.

Board Question #79413: Eating only one Cheez-It. It turned out better than I expected.

My favorite religion/advice answers:

Board Question #72906: Description of baptismal covenants. I've actually used this as a starting spot for talks on similar subjects.

Board Question #76752: Analysis of whether I thought women should be ordained to the priesthood.

Board Question #77628: What to do about going on a mission with a boyfriend. Funny story, it actually was my roommate. So, I guess that's why it makes the list.

Board Question #80395: It's okay that you're unhappy while you're single. 

Board Question #74406: Yes, it's my intention to keep all of the commandments.

Board Question #75320: What's my core happiness?

Board Question #75768: There's not necessarily someone better.

Board Question #80461: Why do we have trials?

Board Question #80627: Failure is okay.

Board Question #79486: Fear and faith.

My favorite get-togethers:

Board Question #74310: Stego and I tried to figure out which potato chips tasted better.

Board Question #89809: Pepperoni Pizza Cake!

Honorable mentions:

Board Question #73752: Generating hashtags for each decade.

Board Question #75074: Figuring out whether men or women tend to ask questions about roommate problems to the Board.

Some of my advice answers I've actually continued to go back and reread to comfort myself about things I'm having problems with, which is the biggest reason why some of them make the list—not because I love how they've helped other people, but because of how they've helped me.

Anyways, thanks again for your support. It's been a crazy year and a half since I've become an official part of this community, and although it's had its ups and downs, I've enjoyed the ride.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Random Citizen,

We love you for appreciating Tally M. the way she deserves!

That's all.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book


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Question #80768 posted on 01/25/2015 5:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Any medical "horror" stories among you?

When I had to get shots back in junior high, I tried prepping myself for the needles (I had to get a couple different shots), calming myself down before the nurses came in with them. I was feeling better, then they came in and I made the mistake of looking. And they were carrying this cart full of needles. Which immediately caused my anxiety to rise. I asked them if I could take a minute to calm myself down again. "Nope," came the cheerful reply. My anxiety rose higher, and I literaly felt like a cornered animal. I backed towards the other side of the room with my mind empty of everything except panic. And then they grabbed me, and stuck me with one of the needles, and suddenly I was in the middle of a dream, evidently while my eyes were open, because after a few moments the dream fell off in circles to reveal the room, which confused me for a bit until I could remember where I was. Then I had to lie down for a while before I could even go to the car. According to my mom, my eyes rolled up, my face went pale, and my lips lost their color.

So, what's the worst experience you've had concerning the medical side of life?

–The Questioness, who now has a great phobia of needles

A:

Dear Questioness,

The first time I went to donate blood, I happened to get a brand new nurse. She still should have known what she was doing, but somehow things went wrong. If it helps, my veins are really small and difficult to get to. Anyway, she stabs the completely wrong vein and the next thing I know she's yelling and I'm gushing this waterfall of blood over the side of the gurney and everyone in this high school gym is just LOSING it. It should also be mentioned that I am an incredibly squeamish person. I hate it, but blood makes me very, very faint. I have no idea why, and I'm working on it (which is why I donate blood so often), but it's pretty bad. So I look down and I see this needle still lodged in my arm and blood everywhere and I just completely swoon back onto the gurney. I wake up a minute later, surrounded by nurses with an ambulance on the way. Nothing actually happened in the end—I remained where I was for like an hour with my arm straight up in the air, heavily compressed and bandaged while the nurse bawled her eyes out and I mostly tried not to hyperventilate/think about what had just happened. And then they had to specially clean the gym because of the biowaste and it was SO much fun.

Tl;Dr: I donated blood to the floor. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #80766 posted on 01/25/2015 5:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have always had problems with anxiety. I think this is related to it:

When I think too in-depth about certain workings of the body, I tend to get lightheaded.
Basically, I'm fine with what happens in a cell. But when you go bigger than that, say to organs transferring things, but more often associated with say, the heart pumping blood through and what happens with the lungs, I have a tendency to get lightheaded, and if I don't leave/change the topic, I'll end up weak and having to lie down for a while to recover. I don't have a problem with learning about these things, In fact, I have an interest in them, and I'm not squeamish.
I know that it's more often triggered by audio (if I read about it, I'm less likely to get lightheaded than if I hear someone describing it or if I watch a video about it), and that if I haven't had anything to eat and/or drink in a while, that also increases it happening.
I'm trying to figure out if there's a name/term for this. I've told my doctor about this and he just gives me this rep about how it's the body trying to get you down so it can get blood to the head and stuff. And I know this, but it doesn't explain why this happens to me in these types of scenarios.

-The Questioness, fairly frustrated.

PS I am aware you aren't doctors. I'm just trying to find more information.

A:

Dear Questioness,

Thanks for mentioning our usual disclaimer that we aren't doctors. That saves me from having to mention that here.

Something you might want to look at is dysautonomia. A type of dysautonomia is vasovagal syncope, which basically means that one faints, or feels faint, due to a certain stimuli. Anxiety and sensitivity to sound or other stimuli isn't a cause of dysautonomia, but can often come with it as a side effect. Normally, treatments include drinking plenty of fluids with electrolytes and eating salt along with your diet. Compression socks are also generally recommended because they help to keep the blood from pooling in your lower extremities. Also, if you're worried, take your blood pressure while sitting, then standing. If it's a huge difference, think about having a tilt-table test, but normally that isn't recommended unless you often feel dizzy or faint when standing up. I'm sorry I couldn't give you a better answer, but I hope that gets you at least somewhere. Good luck!

-Squirrel


0 Comments
Question #80761 posted on 01/25/2015 3:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are the biggest differences between a Bank and a Credit Union, and what are the advantages and disadvantages of each? With online banking and direct deposit, why w/should the average consumer choose to use one over the other?

-99%

A:

Dear Wallstreet,

You ask a very good question. On the surface, banks and credit unions seem very much the same. After all, if I go to Utah Community Credit Union, won't they take care of my money just as well as Wells Fargo? Do they really doing anything differently? On the surface, not really, but fundamentally, the two are very different.

A Bank, at its core, is a business that uses the money you give it to hold in order to create profits by investing that money, or loaning it out. By depositing money in a bank, you are essentially loaning them your money, and they pay you back in interest for that loan. Because banks are businesses, they are seeking to turn over a large profit, and they usually do depending on the market, interest rates etc. Banks also tend to be national or international businesses. 

Credit unions do not work like that. When you are depositing your money in a credit union, you are essentially buying stock in that company. Rather than being a customer, as you are at a bank, you are a owner (which is why you might say you are a member of this or that credit union). Any profits a credit union makes allows them to offer better rates on loans and savings. At the end of the year, any further revenues are distributed to the membership. Credit unions usually operate at a local level.

Because credit unions are small and local, it can be hard to get your money if you are not near said credit union. Traveling and using ATMs can mean major fees, whereas if you are using a bank, you will likely find an ATM anywhere you go. Also, depending on the credit union, news trends or services may take longer to be implemented. However, given the nature of a credit union, you are more likely to make money on your savings account. 

There are more costs and benefits to both, but it really depends on what you are looking for. Banks provide a lot more convenience and flexibility, while credit unions will do more with your money, and probably give you a higher return in the long-run at the cost of flexibility. 

You can get more information about the differences and advantages/disadvantages of the two, here.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Question #80744 posted on 01/25/2015 2:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Like most people, I have a phone charger. I've noticed that when my phone is charging it is silent. When the phone has finished charging and is at 100%, or when there's nothing connected to it, the charger emits a soft, high-pitched noise.

Why?

-Verizon

A:

Dear Verizon,

According to this forum, "there is a switching power supply inside that steps the voltage down. They typically operate in the kHz range, and certainly can make a very light hum. This should only be evident by holding you ear up to it or something. If it's any louder, that could be the result of arcing, and I would have it replaced."

I actually got quite a few Google hits while searching for this answer, and it seems like a common problem, especially in older or cheaper phone chargers. If it bothers you, you could always call your phone company and see if they'll replace it. It looks like quite a few people were able to get theirs replaced.

-Zedability


0 Comments
Question #80751 posted on 01/25/2015 2:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is there a place on campus to take your laptop to have it checked out for viruses, etc? I have antiviruse software, but it seems like I have a lot of programs running in the background and I don't know if they are supposed to be there or not. Is there a good IT resource available to students?
-My Name Here

A:

Dear I hate viruses,

There's a computer repair center on the third floor of the Wilk, above the rest of the Bookstore. They cleaned my fan once. Unlike a lot of other student services, however, it's not free, and I don't know that they're the best deal around.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Dear cygnet,

The IT Student Association holds a PC cleanup service activity every year. It looks like last year's was in April, so they may be holding it in winter semester this year. I heard that they were planning it for February, but I don't want to speak as a representative for ITSA. I would contact them in a few weeks and ask if that's still the plan.

-Owlet


0 Comments
Question #80736 posted on 01/25/2015 2:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Suppose BYU had a dating symposium in honor of Valentines Day in which professors gave presentations about dating in relation to subjects they teach or study. i.e. "What are the Odds? Statistical Dating", "Solving Relationship Issues with the Prophesies of Isiah", or "Complex Mathematical Analysis: Defining the Relationship". What subjects do you think would be the most helpful, insightful, realistic, or hilarious? Are there any professors you would really like to see present?

-Freshwerf

A:

Dear Freshwerf,

Just so you know, this is an awesome question.

I liked it when we talked about the chemistry of love in my marriage prep class. It would be cool for a chemistry/neuroscience/life sciences professor to talk about the brain on love. I also love your "statistical dating" idea. I think it would be cool to have someone talk about the "secretary problem," which we get asked a lot about here on the Board (the question of "When do I settle?").

-Owlet

A:

Dear freshling,

My days of officially studying economics and/or dating are long gone, but I would love to see an econ professor (maybe Kearl) talk about the economics of dating, especially the economics of dating at BYU.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Freshwerf,

Frenchthe language of love.

Also, my probability theory professor literally uses dating examples all the time. A week ago our quiz question was, "Given that Susie accepted my invitation to go on a second date, what is the probability that the first date went well?"

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear Wade,

Here's a sampling of the possible lectures:

  • Quantum Uncertainty and Relationships (Physics)
  • Are You Talking Too Much About Your Mission? (International and Area Studies)
  • Tipping To Impress Your Date (Finance)

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear you,

Well, I would tell them to do "Bull Market: Tips for Dating from Wall Street," (COPYRIGHT ANNE CERTAINLY, 2015) but they can't do that because it's totally already going to be my book of relationship advice (containing chapters like Diversify Your Portfolio, Focus on Well-Performing Assets, Remember the Sunk-Cost Fallacy, and Don't Invest in Penny Stocks).

~Anne, Certainly

A:

Dear Freshwerf, 

I find that relationships share some startling similarities to civil conflict. Therefore, I would invite either Prof. Mecham or Prof. Gubler from the Political Science department to discuss security dilemmas in the context of dating relationships.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


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