Write to be understood, speak to be heard, read to grow.
Question #78825 posted on 08/21/2014 10:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What ward is Victoria Place in? (The on on 600 North) And what time and place do they meet?

-Shelley

A:

Dear Shelley, 

Victoria Place is zoned for the Provo YSA 6th Ward, which is in the Provo YSA 1st Stake. They meet at the chapel located at 393 E 600 N. Sacrament starts at 11:30 AM.

Shout out to the Church's version of Google Maps for the help.

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #78820 posted on 08/21/2014 6:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What was the worst blind date that you have ever been on?

-Needs glasses

A:

Dear myopia,

I think that my friends that want to set me up with their other friends must really not know me or their other friends. Every blind date I've had (and I've had a few) has paired me with someone whose personality goes with mine like toothpaste and orange juice. The night is filled with the awkwardness of sharing absolutely no common interests outside of breathing and sleeping. Admittedly while these dates have been less than productive they're far from my worst date experiences.

My tip for blind dates is to double. A good wing-couple can help stave off the awkwardness of incompatibility.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Ten,

I used to think it was this one, and in terms of the actual date, it probably beats the story I'm about to tell. But it was who I went with that shocked me more.

It was a double date with my roommate, with a guy who had gotten her number while she and I were on a walk. My date, who my roommate's date had set me up with, was telling me about how he works/worked for BYU, and I started estimating how old he was, putting him at late twenties to early thirties. Then on our way home, I asked him how he'd gotten into the BYU thing, and he mentioned that he was a part of Moosebutter. I start doing the math, and when I did a little digging when we got home, I realized he was closer to my dad's age than he was my age.

To be honest, it wasn't a horrible date, but going on a date with a guy that old definitely freaked me out.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear friends,

Some time ago, a roommate set me up with a guy she knew that would be "perfect for [me] in SO many ways!!!". I was intrigued enough to do the whole blind date thing, and impressed that he had enough pluck to ask out a girl he'd never seen. 

If I had to describe him in two words, I would pick "monosyllabic" and also "unibrow." I really, really tried to get a real conversation going, but it was very difficult. I'm sure he is a very nice man, but it made me a little freaked out about what, exactly my roommate thought about me that he should be "perfect" for me. From what little I gathered, my date and I had nothing in common. 

Tonight, I urge everyone everywhere to deeply consider in front of a mirror whether or not they possess a unibrow. If so, slay it promptly.

–Concealocanth


0 Comments
Question #78818 posted on 08/21/2014 6:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board Time Travelers,

I learned what Passover and Channukah were as a lad because there were episodes featuring these holidays on Rugrat episodes. Recently, I tried to locate these episodes online (for free), but have been unsuccessful. Can you let me know where I can watch Nickelodeon's Rugrats online, specifically the episodes highlighting Jewish traditions?

--Brady Bunch Butt Munch

P.S. Were the creators/writers of Rugrats Jewish?

A:

Dear Wade,

It looks like you aren't the only one that learned about Jewish holidays from Rugrats. There's a whole Wikipedia article just on Judaism in the show! Arlene Klasky, one of the co-creators, is Jewish and insisted on Jewish themes being included in the show, particularly the interfaith marriage between Tommy's parents as Klasky's mother was Jewish while her father was not. In fact, Tommy's maternal grandparents (both voiced by Jewish voice actors) are based on Klasky's great aunts and uncles.

The only legal way I've found to watch Rugrats (including the Chanukah and Passover episodes) online is through Amazon. The episodes are free with a Prime account which, if you've never had before, you can try free for thirty days.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Posted on 08/21/2014 10:33 a.m. New Comment on: #78738 I recently read that Church presidents have privately allowed (endorsed?) decaf coffee as ok? Are there ...
Posted on 08/21/2014 10:12 a.m. New Comment on: #78772 Dear Board de Cien Horas When someone places office furniture in the hallway of a campus ...
Posted on 08/21/2014 10:12 a.m. New Comment on: #78793 What are good classes to take to prepare for the LSAT (other than test prep courses)? ...
Posted on 08/21/2014 10:12 a.m. New Comment on: #78772 Dear Board de Cien Horas When someone places office furniture in the hallway of a campus ...
Wednesday, August 20, 2014
Question #78793 posted on 08/20/2014 11:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are good classes to take to prepare for the LSAT (other than test prep courses)? I've heard philosophy classes are good. Deductive reasoning, maybe?

-Derelict Hansom Moving

A:

Dear you,

Well, I took the LSAT last June (and coincidentally had my first day of law school orientation today), so if you'd like to email me at anne (dot) certainly (at) theboard.byu.edu to discuss prepping at greater length, I'm definitely willing to do that.

That being said, you may be interested in this handout published by the Pre-Law section of the Pre-professional Advisement Center. I want to take this chance to put in a huge plug for the Pre-Law advisor, Kris Tina Carlson. She is amazing: she knows her stuff and is very available to help students with whatever it is they need help with. The class on that handout that is probably most likely to be helpful to you on the LSAT is Phil 205: Deductive Logic. I took that class with Professer Carter (his textbook is sitting on the bookshelf behind me) and did find it to be useful in learning some basic logic. From what I've heard, going further along the formal logic courses (e.g. taking 305) is probably a diminishing returns option, though if you felt like it you certainly could.

So, I'm with the Pre-Law office: if you want to take a class for this, take 205. It wasn't a difficult class, but it was helpful. I'd recommend taking it; I think it's helpful to have an idea of basic logic notation to help with your sketches for the games section. If you don't want to take a formal prep course, don't feel like you have to. They're expensive and you can succeed without one (I didn't take one). Every LSAT is released after it is administered and at this point there are literally dozens of LSATs that you can purchase and take on your own. My study pattern alternated between doing individual sections of released tests and doing full tests with time restrictions. That way, when you go in to take the test there's really nothing new there.

~Anne, Certainly


1 Comment
Question #78788 posted on 08/20/2014 11:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've gotten an apartment at Heritage Halls but I'm worried that with my current salary I will struggle to pay rent along with other costs such as food and textbooks. I make around about $11 per hour, but I'm afraid that that might not be enough. I am currently ineligible for scholarships and I will need to pay for tuition next semester.

I was also wondering if it's possible to cancel my contract (and hopefully get the money back from my pre-payments) and seek housing elsewhere.

-Short on cash

A:

Dear you,

I wouldn't be surprised if you could successfully cancel your contract (though of course we can't tell you for sure) because from what I understand there's typically a pretty high demand for on-campus housing (particularly in Heritage). If you really want to do this, you should contact the folks over at On Campus Housing for more details. There is definitely housing off-campus available for cheaper than you can live in Heritage, and some people enjoy living off campus as freshmen. That being said, if you're considering doing this, you may want to peruse the archives for past opinions and advice we've given regarding on/off campus living as a first year student.

However, if the only thing that's driving you away from living on campus is the pricing, I'd also invite you to consider whether it might be appropriate to take out a student loan. The prophets have counseled us to live within our means but have also made it clear that education is an area in which loan-taking may be appropriate and necessary. 

Good luck! The financing of higher education can be stressful (I was working on my semester budget tonight and it nearly brought me to tears) but BYU students are very fortunate to benefit from a highly subsidized education, which means that even if we do take out loans we are likely to do so in amounts far more reasonable than those of other students in our generation.

~Anne, Certainly (who also says that BYU is awesome. Don't let the stress make you forget that YOU ARE GOING TO HAVE A BLAST!)


0 Comments
Question #78803 posted on 08/20/2014 9 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

One of the ways to motivate yourself to work out or eat less is to reward yourself.

This is not working for me.

We don't have enough money to buy something special. Anyways, I found a website that can get you money if you lose weight: https://www.healthywage.com/.

Is it legit? I feel like something of this nature would help me.

Are there other things like this?


-More than a start chart

A:

Dear Motivate,

Healthy Wage is more of a betting/competition website than a "pay by the pound" type thing. For the most part it is straight up gambling (though groups can also sign-up and turn it into a weight loss competition). You decide how much you want to lose, how much you want to wager, and how long you bet you will take to achieve this goal. The higher your goal and the larger the bet - the bigger the payout! The website can make money off of your wager just as easily as you can if you don't reach the goal. For all intents and purposes, it looks pretty legitimate. According to their website, and this Huffington Post article, they make money, not only from people losing their bets, but from funding from corporations and government entities for providing a creative, and effective weight-loss program. Also, the reviews I can find for it all look pretty positive, and not like a bunch of people just got scammed.  

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Question #78805 posted on 08/20/2014 8:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Are wearing push-up bras equivalent to lying? Would it be breaking the honor code to wear one?

-Lacy

A:

Dear Lacy,

Hi, my name is Concorde and I'm a dirty liar.

-Concorde

A:

Dear Lacy,

Since when is it wrong (or against the Honor Code) to feel confident, pretty, and good about yourself?

Exactly.

--Maven

A:

Dear Lacy,

I was thinking about the logic that says things that change our appearance are making us liars, and I started to wonder if even wearing clothes is lying because it's not showing our true selves. But then, not wearing any clothes is definitely against the Honor Code, so...dilemma.

But seriously, each person has their own spectrum for what is considered appropriate when it comes to altering your appearance to make yourself look better. Some girls always wear make-up when they leave the house, others condemn cosmetic surgery, others use hair extensions, others never get piercings, others wear false lashes or non-prescription glasses or shape-wear or high heels or spray tans. Some of these I like, some of these make me wrinkle my nose because they seem "fake," but I think it's a stretch to call any of them equivalent to lying. So no, things like that are not against the Honor Code. (However, you might want to consider whether it makes your clothing too revealing or form-fitting; that is specifically called out in the dress and grooming standards.)

-Owlet


0 Comments
Question #78810 posted on 08/20/2014 7:54 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have any of you not ever had a nightmare?

-Just woke up from an incident involving my roommate and a knife

A:

Dear Knife,

Presuming your nightmare wasn't a prophecy and you're still alive after 100 Hours, we are pleased to inform you that we have all had a nightmare at least once in our lives. 

As far as we assume, most everyone has had at least one nightmare, but not everyone remembers them. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #78794 posted on 08/20/2014 7:48 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What do "business people" do? How is it different from what lawyers do? Is an MBA less academic than a JD, or equally so?

-Devilish Hands Manacled

A:

Dear Manacled Hands,

When I think of the quintessential business person, I think of a company representative, who works with people in their own company, and in other companies, to make the most money off a product or service. Usually, this quintessential business person is also dressed to the nines and has a charismatic, determined personality. I also usually think of lawyers as being charismatic and determined people who dress to the nines. However, lawyers deal with the law and not with the buying or selling of goods and services. 

Having never gotten a JD or an MBA, I subjectively expect that an JD is significantly more academic. Not only does it take a year longer to get, but (according to hearsay) it is usually a significantly harder and more rigorous program which focuses on the book study such as court cases, law, precedent, etc. This of course is significantly biased. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Question #78772 posted on 08/20/2014 7:48 p.m.
Q:

Dear Board de Cien Horas

When someone places office furniture in the hallway of a campus building with a note saying "Surplus," who comes and takes these items away? I am a newer faculty member and have wondered what happens to this stuff. Do they just sell it all in the monthly surplus sale or do they hang onto some of the better items? Specifically I want to get a filing cabinet (the short squat type with only 2 drawers) for my office and I was wondering if BYU has one I could just request.

Gracias and por favor.

-Vladhagen James Mattingly, BS, BA, MS, PhD, DDS, MD, JD. (Okay, only some of those).

A:

Dear Vladhagen, 

BYU conducts surplus sales every so often. You can find when they are scheduled here. I expect the items that you are running into end up there.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


2 Comments
Question #78814 posted on 08/20/2014 7:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why do some girls like to wear thongs? Isn't it just like a wedgie (ouch!)? How can that be comfortable? What's the point? Mind as well go without nothing, right?

-Vogue Villain

A:

Dear Vogue, 

The biggest reason girls wear thongs or other skimpy underwear is because there aren't any panty lines (also I absolutely hate the word panties) if you're wearing tighter jeans or a tight dress or skirt. Also, it's a feeling that you get used to, and depending on the type you get, it doesn't necessarily have to be giving you a wedgie. Cotton or lace thongs are worn more comfortably and properly fitting thongs should not really even give you a wedgie. It's really all just personal preference and some girls just prefer the look of smaller underwear.  

However, as Anne pointed out, wearing thongs all the time actually increases your risk for yeast infections, and no one is daring enough to wear a thong during their period, so I'm sure that thong-wearing girls also break it up with less skimpy underwear from time to time. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #78813 posted on 08/20/2014 4:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am EXTREMELY aggravated with Walmart! Okay, so, for the past few months I've been ordering clothes from Walmart.com. The receipt (and online) say you can return your items to Walmart.com or that "returns are easy!" in store. YEAH RIGHT.

Okay, yeah, well, the first times I returned items in store WERE easy. They'd scan the receipt and give me my money back--along with any tax I paid. BUT NOW, I guess that Walmart.com made it harder for the customer service representatives at the Walmart stores to return things. Now they don't give you tax back! Ridiculous!

Well, I'll go further into detail. The Walmart customer representatives in South Jordan know what's up and they know how to give me the tax back that I paid online. They're cool and educated.

But the Walmart associates in American Fork told me that they no longer give tax back on purchases made online. What???!!! He also said that all of online is trying to make anything bought from online tax free. Okay, so what does that have to do with me not getting my tax back?? Complete and utter crap. Sorry. Anyways, I tried to explain to them that the one in South Jordan knew how to do it and that since items ordered from online are cheaper than in-store, when they scan the receipt, they DO NOT change the price that shows up on the computer because that price INCLUDES tax. The American Fork people didn't want to listen to me and told me he can't give me tax and blah blah. A different person from that store told me that some tax is different state by state and that maybe the items I got from online were from a state outside of Utah (yeah, duh) so the tax will be different. Okaaaaay. But that doesn't mean that that if I was charged $10 in taxes I should get $0 back for Utah...

Then the stores in Springville and Payson are just as bad as American Fork. I was trying to return a few items and it took the guy in Springville an HOUR AND A HALF to give me a Walmart gift card, EVEN THOUGH I had my receipt and had all the clothes in their original packaging with the needed bar codes and such, of which the money should've been returned to my credit card. I tried telling him, too, that the people in South Jordan know how to do it and you don't change the price that shows up on the computer and stuff. But he wouldn't budge. He said, I probably shouldn't even be giving you tax back (because he wanted to give me the price I paid for the items, excluding tax. For the tax he recommended I call Walmart.com and tell them that Walmart didn't give me back tax but that they did return the items. This is all so complicated.).

I don't drive up to the South Jordan area very often and as I write this I vow to never order from Walmart.com again. But I still have shipments coming my way. What can I do to have Walmart.com educate their American Fork, Springville, and Payson locations on how to properly return items ordered online? Yes, I've spoken to the customer representative supervisors and they're just as clueless as the people "helping" me. And, if all of this were resolved, I would rather return in-store than ship it back, because I receive money back instantly.

-needed to vent. sorry 'bout that

A:

Dear Doctor.

Calm down. Basically, you can't do anything. You've already talked to the people it'd be helpful to talk to.

To be completely honest, I'd be more careful about what you're ordering online, since you seem to be returning things an awful lot.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #78724 posted on 08/20/2014 2:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Let's say there is a single parent with a child who is 4-5 years old. Would, on average, the child fare better to have his parent marry someone else with a kid (who is roughly the same age as child in question) or if his parent married someone without kids? I know a lot of factors are involved, but does research show that young children of divorce do better when their parents marry someone who has kids too or someone who doesn't?

-Susan Bones

A:

Dear Hufflepuff,

I looked high and low for any type of supporting research but I couldn't find anything. It's hard to find conclusive evidence for something like this because there are so many variables that contribute and influence the outcome. I did find some data about the child's age being a factor in acceptance of the new stepparent if you're interested in reading that. 

I would think that with that particular child being so young it wouldn't really matter either way. A new blended family would be a transition for a child, no matter if there are other children involved or not. One of my favorite developmental websites has a page about stepsibling relationships that you way want to look over. 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #78808 posted on 08/20/2014 11:18 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I don't mean this to be disrespectful at all but if I come across that way, I apologize. I'm just curious as to why the color of the gay community is purple. Purple used to be a symbol of royalty, so is it now "their color" because some of them are drag queens?

-don't hate me

A:

Dear Wade,

I didn't find anything conclusive but I have a theory. In 1856 Sir William Henry Perkin discovered a purple-colored dye which lead to some changes in fashion resulting in the 1890s being coined "the Mauve decade" (although its other nickname, "the Gay Nineties," was not related to homosexuality). One person who, according to various sources, took particular liking to the fashion trend was playwright Oscar Wilde. In the latter half of the 20th century Wilde became a gay icon, which coincides with the early use of purple as a gay pride symbol in the "Purple hand" and purple rhino. It's just my speculation but I would guess that Wilde's fondness of purple clothing could have had some influence on the choice of purple.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #78767 posted on 08/20/2014 11:12 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I need some advice. My husband will be gone for a month in the fall. My mom wants my child and I to fly to her place and spend time with her. Normally this would be no big deal. But my mom is currently enabling an older sibling to the point that I can't stand it any longer. This sibling makes double what my husband does and yet they have one car and my mom drives my sister and her kids everywhere everyday. She has them over for dinner all the time and I do not doubt there is more going on that I do not know (note: I receive no assistance from family nor do I want any). I feel like my mom's relationship with me is hanging by a thread and she doesn't care. In addition I have no desire to "go on a vacation" that consists of driving my sister all over town. I really don't want to go but I don't know how to tell her (or should I just suck it up?). What would you do?

-My Name Here

A:

Dear human,

If I was you, I wouldn't go. I also have some troubled family relationships and if I visit certain family members, I am careful about my boundaries. And one of my boundaries is basically, "If I really don't feel like seeing you, I won't."

That might sound harsh to some, but I don't feel bad doing this because (A) they are capable of taking care of themselves and (B) I am not obligated to try to be emotionally close to people who hurt me, even if they are my mother/brother/uncle/whatever. If people make me feel crappy, I reserve the right to interact with them on my own terms, not theirs.

-Sheebs


0 Comments
Question #78784 posted on 08/20/2014 10:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What has been the biggest surprise of your life? And if it wasn't recent, what has been the biggest surprise of your recent (let's say the past 3 years) life?

-lalala (I'm on a roll!)

A:

Dear roll,

The biggest surprise of my recent life is probably that I'm not on a mission right now. For various reasons, it doesn't look like it's happening in the near future, despite my "preparation": wanting to go on a mission since I was ten; reading Preach My Gospel, The Power of an Everyday Missionary, and other resources; taking mission prep. in singles wards and for credit at BYU; enjoying and gaining experience in teaching-related ward callings, volunteer participation, and jobs; being comfortable leaving the country and/or learning a new language; thinking "Would this skirt still work if I were a missionary?" when I go shopping; saving up money; and being, quite frankly, talented at learning and teaching. It's something that I always planned on and talked about for many years, but it's not actually happening at the time I thought it would. I'm cool with that; there are a lot of other great things I'm doing, and all that preparation just makes me a better teacher and disciple overall. But it's definitely a surprise, and multiple friends and family members have expressed surprise at that decision as well.

-Owlet

A:

Dear la,

Being able to go through the temple as a female in her early 20s.

-A writer

A:

Dear repeated A in C major,

I'll include a few: what my mission call was, who I'm dating right now, and what my current job is.

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear friend,

It's a toss-up between actually getting a job in my field and marrying that goofy kid from dinner group.

Peace,

-Stego Lily


0 Comments
Question #78687 posted on 08/20/2014 10:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board Marauders,

What would be a cool design for a Board Marauder t-shirt?

-Up to know good

A:

Dear up,

Maurauders part 2.jpg

Marauders part 1.jpg

One of these would be the front, one would be the back. Take your pick as to which is which.

-The Marauders


0 Comments
Question #78777 posted on 08/20/2014 7:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Approximately how fast would a typical car have to be going in order for the "centrifugal" force on the tires to equal the force caused be the internal pressure?

Or, in other words, say that I have a car with a 1/4" hole in each of the tires. How fast do I need to drive before I can't tell that I have flat tires, because of the forces acting on the rubber in the tires?

Thanks!

-Fredjikrang

A:

Dear Fjord,

If I were an engineer, this would be a really difficult question to answer. This is because as a tire rotates faster centrifugal forces cause the tire to expand in diameter and decrease in width. Also, the contact between the tire and the road causes some issues because the tire is deformed while in contact with the road and additionally when it leaves the area of contact it makes a wave in the tire as it tries to return to its normal diameter. Not to mention the increase in temperature of the air inside your tire as you go faster...

But I'm not an engineer; I'm a physicist. Let's ignore all that.

Let's imagine your car is in a friction-less vacuum and that the tires remain perfectly circular without any kind of deformity. Never mind how your car is going to move forward. What we want to do is figure out how fast your tires have to rotate so that the centrifugal force pushes against the tires with enough force to simulate a typical tire pressure. Let's say we have a minivan and we want a reasonable 32 psi. The centrifugal force pushing the tires outwards in this case is an inertial force (as opposed to a centrifugal force that results from a 3rd-law reaction to a centripetal force) and thus will be proportional to the mass of the tire. The inertia is opposing the centripetal acceleration so this is pretty easy to calculate once we get some data on a good example tire.

Michelin's website recommends these tires for our hypothetical 2001 Honda Odyssey (Did I not mention we were using that? Well, we are.) which according to the specs are 27" tall, weigh 23.3 pounds, and are 215mm wide. Let's make the assumption that it is an infinitely thin, perfectly cylindrical cylinder (because, again, I am a physicist). Now we just solve a few equations and we get our answer.

It comes out to be about 130 mph which teaches us that physicists make a lot of assumptions.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #78750 posted on 08/20/2014 7:48 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

A Facebook friend just shared Matt Walsh's article on Robin William's death. This article made me very angry. What do you think of this article?

-Needing a reality check

A:

Dear Wanda,

I can't stand Matt Walsh and I am most certainly not going to be able to stomach his article on this issue for a host of reasons. Yayfulness shared the "What Is Matt Walsh Wrong About Today?" blog which is a favorite of mine and this is also a good response to that particular Matt Walsh post.

On a more pragmatic level, I would recommend hiding updates from themattwalshblog.com on Facebook. I went a step further and installed the SiteBlock extension on Chrome and blacklisted Matt Walsh's blog along with other websites that irritate me like Thought Catalog or Buzzfeed (though Buzzfeed is for different reasons).

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Needing,

Depression and other mental illnesses are not choices. They are diseases and like other diseases bring pain and suffering. Matt Walsh claims that he has dealt with depression but from what he said I cannot believe that. Let me share my perspective.

I deal with a condition known as "double depression" which is depression coupled with a similar illness known as dysthymia (there is, unfortunately, no 5th amendment mental illness right). I have dealt with it for a long time and for the first several years I thought that this was a spiritual issue. Don't get me wrong; there are spiritual cases of depression. I just don't believe that clinical depression is a "spiritual issue" as Matt Walsh tweeted, and as I've occasionally heard preached at church. If it were, then it surely would have gone away or at least gotten better with repentance, faith, and so on. It didn't. The classic answers of "reading my scriptures, praying, and going to church" have had far less impact on my depression than medication, counseling, and other physical things. We know that the spiritual and the physical are connected, but my issue is not with my spirit—it's with my body.

Matt Walsh said suicide is a choice. While that is technically correct, signing a two-year contact with the Cavaliers is also a choice. It is a decision that one makes but there is so much that goes into it before that. It's not a simple "I'll wear this t-shirt today" decision.

I find it interesting that we say someone "lost a battle with cancer" but we never say someone "lost a battle with depression." They are both illnesses that can kill you.

-a writer

A:

Dear human,

My opinion seems to differ from most of the other writers. I don't mean to offend anyone with this response, and I hope the fact that I believe that all suicides should be viewed with compassion comes through in what I say.

I don't agree with everything Matt Walsh says but I think that he added a needed dimension to an important discussion that was already happening everywhere on the internet. I am glad he came out and said that suicide was a choice. Because I agree that yes, ultimately the act of killing oneself is a choice.

Did he say that people who commit suicide will go to hell? No.

Did he say that God does not have compassion on the immense suffering of people who commit suicide? No.

Did he say that people who commit suicide are weak and cowardly? No.

Did he call suicide a heinous and disgusting sin? No.

What he said was that suicide is a choice made by individuals who are in complex and difficult situations. It did kind of seem like people were reacting like this: suicide means depression which means chemicals. Therefore blaming is necessarily wrong and also judgmental. But, as Matt Walsh pointed out, suicide is not an inevitable thing, and it is a bad way to escape suffering because life is so precious. I think that's something that needed to be said. I don't think his post was meant to be "ROBIN WILLIAMS IS A TERRIBLE PERSON FOR DOING WHAT HE DID." 

My own personal opinion is that even though suicide is a choice, a lot of things that lead up to it are not. I think it is impossible for us to clearly separate which factors are in or out of a person's control. But clearly anyone who commits suicide - no matter whether they are "to blame", or not - is suffering deeply. My personal opinion is that the Lord responds with compassion to suicide, even though choice is involved. 

-Sheebs

A:

Dear Check,

I find it to be very callous to use a recent death to promote your own personal views and ideas.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger

A:

Dear Matt Walsh could really use a reality check too,

Something about that article bugged me on a very fundamental level, but I couldn't put a finger on it until I read some comments on two responses on the blog "What Is Matt Walsh Wrong About Today?" I still don't feel fully capable of articulating what I mean, so I'll let the comments do that themselves.

As someone who used to struggle with depression, whenever I heard anything that said things like “it’s just a choice, you have to choose joy”, it would make me feel all the more like I should commit suicide because clearly everyone ELSE who is depressed can just choose joy, and since I seem unable to do that, I am especially broken and unworthy of taking up space because I’m so weak and pathetic, and me ending my life is a BLESSING to those around me so they don’t have to put up with someone who can’t just “choose” to be happy. This is how depressed people think. It’s not logical, but it is dangerous.

...

I don’t believe that suicide is ever something we want to do… sometimes it feels like our only choice, because rather than facing every day with such pain we feel it would easier for us and for others to get it over with, so that we could cause no more grief to them… What would be done would be done. Of course this logic is incredibly flawed… but when you believe all you do is cause misery the idea is that they’ll be able to live a better life after you’re gone.

...

The problem with hoping people will reach out for help is that sometimes, we don’t want it. I’ve had the absolute **** kicked out of me by depression so many times, I’ve lost count. I’ve taken my meds and done my therapy and done everything right and it still comes and kicks my *** AND THERE’S NOTHING I CAN DO TO STOP IT. That’s the nature of this awful, terrible beast. And there are times where I just want that to be over. People talk about suicide being a selfish act, and I’m not saying that it isn’t, but at what point is it selfish to want or me to continue to hold on when the life I live is filled with pain and sorrow and struggle?

Suicidal people also generally TOTALLY BELIEVE they are doing the right thing by their friends and family. They believe they are a burden, they are a problem, etc. It sounds cliche, but as someone who has been there, it’s as real as the green grass and the blue sky sometimes. When I feel this way I’m not being weak, I’m not seeking attention (in fact I’ll usually go to great lengths to hide it), I’m not being dramatic just for fun… Whatever it is is out of my control, and I HATE that.

These comments come from post the first and post the second. I'd add my own feelings, but it would be redundant. Instead I will just say that as someone who has struggled with at times severe and dangerous depression, I can agree wholeheartedly with what I've quoted here.

I wouldn't say this normally, because normally I don't think it's a fair comparison, but today I feel like Matt Walsh is playing the role of Westboro Baptist Church, using someone else's tragedy to further his agenda and line his pockets with ad revenue. I think the best thing we can do is simply ignore him. The suicide of Robin Williams is a tragedy. The other less-well-known but no less painful suicides that happen every day are also tragedies. Anything that detracts from the tragedy and fails to provide a real solution is irrelevant.

-yayfulness


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Question #78809 posted on 08/20/2014 7 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

At what point in a (romantic) relationship should one disclose mental illness?

Under what conditions, if any, do you think mental/emotional difficulties would render someone unfit for a committed relationship?

-Someone

A:

Dear Doctor,

I kind of sort of dated a guy two years ago that struggled with a couple of different mental illnesses, primarily manifest in anxiety and depression. It actually came up about a month into our friendship, when we were talking about the Mission Prep class, and he mentioned not being able to serve a mission. For us, it was at a point where he knew he could trust me, and I knew him as more than just a mental illness. With my ex, Spencer, he found out about a month into our friendship as well, when I opened up with some of the stuff that I deal with in a bit of a mini-breakdown I had. That one went okay, but mostly because I kind of hit him with it and we weren't super good friends at that point (though the conversation helped push us into that territory).

I think that it's best to disclose it when you feel like you trust each other and know each other fairly well. Sometimes it just comes up because of circumstances, say an emotional breakdown, and you have to, or you feel like you have to, explain. Regardless, it'll probably come up fairly naturally.

As for problems in relationships, I think that yes, they do have the potential to make someone unable to participate in a committed relationship. At the beginning of last summer, this happened with one of my friends. His emotional state made him incapable of pursuing a romantic relationship, regardless of his desire to do so. However, this isn't to say that they are automatically unqualified for such a relationship. It just means that at that current point in time they're unable to do so. (Case in point, my friend is now happily married.) Often times, it's easier to stay in a relationship when something emotionally difficult happens than it is to get into a relationship while that thing is happening.

I wish you the best of luck, and if you have anything you'd like to discuss with someone who's been through similar stuff, feel free to e-mail me.

-Tally M.


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Question #78804 posted on 08/20/2014 3 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Where did you serve your mission? What language?

How do you say "Good morning" or "Good afternoon" or "Good evening" in that language?

Danke!

A:

Dear Bitte,

I served somewhere in the Eastern Hemisphere, speaking Mandarin Chinese.

Rather then attempt to write those translations so that you can pronounce them correctly, just go here and click on the speaker in the lower right. But I will vouch for those translations.

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear Ghost Rider,

I served in southeastern Idaho speaking a regional dialect of English, though I assure you it is wildly different from any English you've ever heard. To say "good morning," "good afternoon," or "good evening" you say "good potato," "good potato," or "good potato," respectively.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Danke,

I haven't served a mission yet, but I did learn some Quichua when I was in South America for a couple months. "Good" is alyi (AL-yee), "morning" is tutamanda (TOO-tah MAHN-dah, literally "from night"), "afternoon" is chishi (CHEE-shee), and night is tuta (TOO-tah). Alyi pundzha (POON-jah, meaning "day") is a common greeting, although linguistically "good morning/afternoon/night/day" carried over into Quichua from Spanish and the form isn't really traditional, although it is frequently used now.

-Owlet


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