"We are more afraid of excellence than of failure." -Marianne Williamson, A Return To Love: Reflections on the Principles of A Course in Miracles

Alumni week has officially begun! Hear from your favorite alumni writers from April 20-27.

While we appreciate factual corrections, consider posting on the Board Comment Board, brought to the readers by popular request.

Question #89507 posted on 04/27/2017 5:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I feel like this question has to have been asked before but I can't find it. I'm a single female in my late twenties and sometimes I feel incredibly horny. Like I want to make out (or more) with the first attractive man that I see. As an active member of the church I realize meaningless sex is off the table, and though a NCMO sounds appealing in theory I doubt it would actually feel all that fulfilling. Even when I'm in a relationship making out never feels like enough. When I'm feeling this overwhelmed I usually end up looking at porn. So what do I do when I feel these urges? Am I just unusually horny or do all single people feel this way sometimes?

-Embarrassed

A:

Dear Embarrassed,

As the person below me says, your libido is definitely not unusual!  And not unusual for active LDS single members, either.

My recommendation would be that when you feel your libido is unusually high, to do something high-energy that you like doing.  Exercise is awesome! Running is often recommended, maybe you have access to a swimming pool and love doing laps, or maybe you could try picking up vinyasa yoga (gives you time for some soul-connection as well as exercise).  Dance could be a good choice, as well, because it could give you a chance to feel connected to your body like yoga does with a little more movement, and could give you a way to express some of the frustration you're feeling.  

I don't want to tell you to wall off your libido, because then when you do get married, you could have a hard time reconnecting to it.  But it sounds like you're in a place where you're feeling embarrassment and shame around your libido, which could be potentially unhealthy for you as well!  You could also search out to see if there are any LDS-aware sex therapists near you that you could go talk to.  If you're in Utah, there are many sex therapists that are LDS and understand the value your faith holds for you, as well as the beliefs you likely hold.  A therapist specifically trained for these kinds of issues could be very helpful here--they'll have ideas for healthy ways for you to manage your libido as an active single member of the LDS faith.

-Yog in Neverland

A:

Dear embarrassed,

You are absolutely not alone. There's a whole spectrum of different levels of libido. Lots of girls and guys don't really care. And lots do. A LOT. You aren't anomalous, you're part of the human condition.

-Right there with ya


0 Corrections
Question #89435 posted on 04/27/2017 1:10 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Board babies?

-It is Alumni Week after all

A:

Dear why yes indeed,

Twist (formerly Kid Insomniac) is two and a half years old, which is nuts. He's super articulate and a polite, funny, wild kiddo.

Here he is climbing a ladder as Buzz Lightyear:

IMG_4232.JPG

Driving a school bus (his wildest dreams come true thanks to the Magic School Bus):

IMG_4249.JPG

Dead asleep on the chair:

IMG_4122.JPG

Driving up our phone bills with incessant calls to his buddies:

IMG_4256.JPG

 

And Seafarer is now 7 months old! He's mastered sitting up and smiling and is currently working on becoming a science activist:

IMG_4265.JPG

...and a Champion of the Pokémon League!

IMG_4113.JPG

IMG_4125.JPG

Basically he's adorable and smiley and the most well-mannered baby you'll ever meet.

IMG_4225.JPG

 

Thanks for asking! I love to share.

-Inverse Insomniac

A:

Coming

So as not to overwhelm everyone with a cuteness overload, I'll restrain myself to showing just one picture:

Kids.jpg

-Humble Master

P.S. Okay, and one video of my 2- and 4-year-olds reacting to the new Star Wars trailer.

A:

Hello Kitty,

It's me, M.O.D.A.Q.! You may be surprised to learn that yes, in fact, I had a kid.

A kidney stone. My first!

I know it's probably bad form to say that your children were accidents but this one definitely was a surprise. I fell into a lot of pain one day a few weeks ago and called a friend to take me to urgent care. They suspected it was a stone and tried to X-Ray me but I ended up throwing up from the pain and almost passing out. They gave me some drugs and my friend then took me to the ER. After several hours of waiting and an ultrasound (in which I asked the tech, "Boy or girl?") the doctor told me it was a big 'un. I went home with more drugs and passed the rock the next day. To anticipate your big questions: Is is a boy? Is it a girl? Is it gender non-conforming? I don't know! Name? Maximus. Picture? Well here you go:

For some reason my phone doesn't do a good job taking pictures of objects this size

On a more serious note, I am currently expecting my ninth nephew! I still have no nieces.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear listener, 

Here's Cadet Keen in her Easter dress, hopefully rotated in the correct orientation 

20170416_103449.jpg

Here's the Cadet when she sliced her finger open pretty deep on a green bean can and handled the ER like a champ. She was happy as long as I held the gauze on for her

20170427_013250.jpg

Lastly, here she is playing with Canine Keen in the backyard on a perfect Spring evening 

20170410_193210.jpg

 

We've decided that we're going to keep her. 

- Commander Keen 

A:

Dear after all that we've been through,

Baby's first bath!

snek-bath.JPG

He's had an eventful year. He particularly did not enjoy our cross-country road trip. He expressed his displeasure by mauling several paper cups (every time I gave him water, really). I think he ultimately approved of the move though because we now live in a suitably humid climate. He remains the perfect, cuddly child, although he hasn't learned to sleep through the night yet and never will due to being nocturnal. He only poops and eats once per week and never makes noise other than that time he was having a real party tapping his temperature probe against the side of the cage while my husband and I were trying to sleep.

-Concealocanth

A:

Hi there,

Mrs. The Skipper and I just got to bring Baby The Skipper home from the hospital about a week ago after a short stay in the NICU (most expensive babysitters ever, but as qualified as they come). We think she is just the cutest! However, because of technical difficulties and an overabundance of digital caution you are just going to have to take my word for it.

Parentfully,

The Skipper

A:

Dear Susan,

I have one of these! Actually, last alumni week I had just found out that I was pregnant with this little guy. Seriously, his daddy and I think he's the cutest! We were blessed in that he never had that alien look to him even as a newborn. (Disclaimer: several of these pictures are sideways  I have no computer for the next little while, thus no way to fix them.)

IMG_5734.JPG

After a pretty exciting labor and delivery at a pace that was nearly unheard of, our Little Puff was born about two weeks early, much to my relief. We actually went home after only about 12 hours at the hospital; I'm thinking that next baby I'm going to stay at least overnight, though, because that was hard. 

Here is Little Puff in his coat at three weeks:

IMG_2276.JPG

This is him in his cute little blessing suit at nearly 2 months:

IMG_5735.JPG

And here he is posing for the cover of a harlequin romance novel (never mind the spitup all over his pants):IMG_4048.JPG

And, finally, here's Little Puff after getting his 4-month shots. 

IMG_5697.JPG

 

I love this little guy more than I thought possible!

-Az

A:

Dear It ~

Um, yes please. Except they're not babies anymore. But I'll take any opportunity to show off a little.

IMG_0929.jpg

Homer-0100.jpg

~ Dragon Lady (and Yellow)

A:

Dear it's what now?

From left to right, Baby Trending, Baby Pending and Baby Ascending. All old enough to take offense at being called babies.

IMG_5232_2.JPG

And for fun, here's a picture of an impromptu bring your daughters to work day I did last week. This is Babies Pending and Trending helping me look at parasite-infected neutrophils under a microscope (they actually did a pretty good job counting them). Shamelessly pushing them toward science/biology!

IMG_5308.JPG

- Rating Pending (who is willing to let any of the kids swap out their pseudonyms if they come up with something else that is thematically appropriate and works. Baby Pretending, Baby Attending (like if they become a doctor?) etc. Baby Ending might get vetoed however as there's a number of strong, negative implications there.)

A:

Dear It is,

Mavenboy & Mavengirl all dressed up for Easter:

Mavenkids.jpg

And, coming this fall, Mavenbaby #3! No pictures yet. You'll have to ask again next year.

--Maven

A:

Hello Alumni Week.

You want a baby? Well, okay.

--High Quality

 

A:

Dear all,

Look who joined us last month!

 DSC_0440.jpg

 2017-04-10 12.57.10.jpg

Boy-ahrairah was due a week or so ago, but he actually came a month early; I guess he didn't want to risk missing Alumni Week!

-Owlet & El-ahrairah

A:

Dear baby hunger,

Here are G.I.R.L and Boy-o. They are pals.

couch.jpg

G.I.R.L. is three and a half. She loves Daniel Tiger, swings, and going to the grocery store. She does not like spontaneous speech, which is why she's in speech therapy. It is fun times trying to get her to tell us why she's upset.

 8PUDvZKFZ0cVjJyfK6I0S8GioCt6nJqyqv2tlVDByKUpX92IB.jpg

Boy-o is coming up on being 7 months old. He has two little teeth and is crawling up a storm. He enjoys spitting up on people, the carpet, and everything we own. 


photo 1.JPG

Mostly they are good kids, and we like them, but sweet jeepery Moses are we tired.

-Genuine Article 

A:

Dear it is indeed,

I give you my three dudes at NHMU dino fest.  They are now 7, 2, and 6.

.jpg

- steen

A:

Dear babies,
 

DSC_0067.jpg


You thought they would look like muppets with big fiery eyes, didn't you?

With love,

Waldorf and Sauron 

A:

Dear reader,

Always!

Here's Girl with a Mustache last summer (3 yrs old):

Screenshot_20170420-233645.png

 

And, introducing Boy with a Mustache (9 months old):

11259-MMS-1492748928000-attachment1-Screenshot_20170420-232815.png

 

They are great and I like them. Here's another picture.

11258-MMS-1492748924000-attachment1-Screenshot_20170420-232804.png

 

-The Man with a Mustache

A:

Dear you,

Dr. Occam and I are still current writers, but here's Baby Z:

IMG_2370.JPG

-Zedability 


0 Corrections
Question #89503 posted on 04/27/2017 12:08 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Hello, friends! If this hasn't already been asked, could we get a life update from the writers from days of yore?

-old timer

A:

Dear old,

It's been asked already. So...NO, search the archives! Bwahahahaaaaaaaaaaaa...

-Man, trolling readers still feels good


0 Corrections
Question #89502 posted on 04/27/2017 12:04 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Halloween pictures?

-Brian, Brian cryin'

A:

Dear Brian, Brian Cryin',

Yes, absolutely Halloween pictures. They'll just have to be of my kids though since I don't quite have time right now to edit out faces. 

IMG_1275.JPG

October 2016. Pretty straightforward, yes? Not pictured: me as General Organa and my husband as Han Solo.


IMG_9405.JPG

Bonus: October 2015. Kiki and Tombo. Aren't they adorable? Not pictured: me as Flutterbat. I killed it. I had fangs and everything.

-Sky Bones 

A:

Dear BBC,

I present to you: Bojack and Princess Carolyn.

You're seeing my full face here, but I think the face paint obscures me well enough. Those aren't my real eyebrows. Or whiskers. But that is my real hair.

IMG_3053.jpg IMG_3061.jpg

And a princess cat and skeleton knight. I just now realized that my daughter and I were both "princess cats" in a way:

IMG_3032.jpg

These are just the most recent. My favorite family costume, I think, was when our son was seven months old. He and Sauron were astronauts, and I was Hal 9000.

Thanks for asking,

Waldorf (and Bojack) 

A:

Dear Doctor,

We aren't as cute as Sky Bones' kids, but Spectre and I were also Kiki and Tombo this year.

 Kiki_LI.jpg

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Brian ~

Pokemon fever hit our house this year. Yellow and I went as Pokemon trainers (hat, backpack, sweater) and the kids went as their favorite pokemon. (Though, to be fair, Yellow 2.0 didn't really have a favorite. His just seemed appropriate because, Halloween. Also, he was supposed to be a garbage truck, but his costume failed miserably, so I had to make this one last minute.) 

Dragon Baby went as an Eevee.

IMG_0176.jpg

Niffler Baby chose a Butterfree.

IMG_0200.jpg

And Yellow 2.0 was perfectly satisfied as a Ghastly.

IMG_0186.jpg

~ Dragon Lady (and Yellow)

A:

Dear cryin',

Last year El-ahrairah and I went as Meg and Hercules from Disney's Hercules:

 Halloween2016_editeds.jpg

As I was three months pregnant at the time, we told people that our baby was representing as Pain and/or Panic. (The joke would have been better if we had been expecting twins...alas.)

-Owlet

A:

Dear Mort,

For a variety of reasons I can't include an actual picture, but my fifth grade team dressed up as Wizard of Oz characters and I was an eight months pregnant Dorothy. 

-Az

A:

Dear Halloween

Enjoy this sideways picture of my 2yo as Han Solo. I cannot for the life of me get it to go right-side up, but I think it's still cute.

IMG_0505.JPG

And here is young Han with Cleopatra, Spider-Man, and Superman.

 IMG_0529.JPG

-Humble Master

A:

Dear BBC,

I have probably said this somewhere before, but I never would have thought that family Halloween costumes would be a thing for us, let alone an increasingly elaborate thing. This year we were A League of Their Own. On the outskirts of town there's this fantastic little baseball diamond next to some cattle pastures so, naturally, we did a photo shoot. (Side note: If you can manage it, I recommend living in a town with quaint outskirts.)

league of their own 1.jpg

"And there's Marla Hooch! What a hitter!"

ALTO Ellia.jpg

"Pretty Dotty Henson . . ." 

IMG_0989 (1).JPG

"And there's her kid sister, Kit! What an arm!"

IMG_0973.JPG

"Stillwell. Angel. Have another chocolate bar."

 

 halloween harry potter.jpg

Our thing is that, if the kids dress up as what WE want them to be (for parties, pictures etc.), the kids can be whatever they want for trick-or-treating. So we have a Hermione, a Crookshanks, and, (surprising everyone because we were sure she'd be Ginny or another Hermione, Rita Skeeter). I was a bed-sheet turbaned Professor Quirrell. Good times were had by all. 

- Rating Pending (who has some other pretty great "There's no crying in baseball!" pictures, but can't show them because . . . as more time goes by the weirder the anonymity thing of the Board feels. But let's just go with it.)

A:

Hello,

Here is my sideways dog dressed as a pumpkin cannibal:

 2016-10-27 19.37.11.jpg

Marzipan

A:

Dear Bryan,

Here's my adorable son:

IMG_0876.jpg

~Professor Kirke


0 Corrections
Wednesday, April 26, 2017
Question #89483 posted on 04/26/2017 11:39 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board Artists,

I need to commission a very specific piece of artwork, Because Reasons.

Could one (or many!) of you please draw me a guy named Jacques riding a moose while eating a hamburger?

You can use any style, any medium, and any level of quality. My city planning studio class (although most of the class doesn't know it yet) looks forward to seeing what you make!

-yayfulness

A:

Dear happynessness,

jacques.png

-Inverse Insomniac

PS - Why I put some Kirby Crackle in the bottom left I cannot tell you, but it just felt right for some reason.

A:

Dear yayfulness,

JacquesBaby.jpg

-El-ahrairah & Owlet

A:

Dear yay,

 20170425_122759.jpg

-Cognoscente

A:

Dear yayfulness,

jacques and moose_1.jpg

Earnestly,
Waldorf and Sauron 

A:

Dear yayfulness,

What, like, just for exposure? Art ain't free, pal.

- D.A.R.E.

A:

Dear yayfulness,

The man? Jacques Ibert, French composer of the mid-twentieth century.

The burger? One of the burgers of Bob's Burgers, the most delicious in all of cartoon history.

The moose? Franz S. Moose, distinguished and respected by all moosekind.

Together, these three companions traveled the width and breadth of southwestern Nova Scotia, as depicted in the award-winning miniseries Moosibergur.

We present to you tonight a screenshot from that miniseries, which has sadly been lost to the annals of history:

IbertMooseBurger.png

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear yayfulness,

Your question phrasing "could you draw me" reads closer to "Could you draw a picture of me? I'm a guy named Jacques riding a moose while eating a hamburger" than a sentence construction of, for example, "Could you draw for me a picture of a hypothetical man named Jacques riding a moose while eating a hamburger."

Don't kill me,

The Messenger

A:

Dear yayfulness,

My wife is the artistic one, so she took this on:

liberte.png

~Professor Kirke


0 Corrections
Question #89501 posted on 04/26/2017 9:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How do international sellers (like those in China) make money from US customers, ESPECIALLY when the products they're selling are extremely cheap? For example, I bought an ipod case from eBay from a seller in China for only $2. That included shipping. Surely just shipping the item internationally would cost more than $2. I don't think this seller is planning on me buying a whole lot of ipod cases from them in the future, so how do these sellers make money when their product is priced so low, and when shipping costs are so high?

-The little gamut.

A:

Dear gamut,

Yayfulgirl works for a company that specializes in online sales through eBay. She tells me that in all likelihood, the international sellers you're referring to are selling the items as loss leaders - the more items you sell, the more your listings are prioritized by eBay's internal processes, so they sell a ton of small items at a loss in order to boost the prominence of their big-ticket item listings. Also, the extremely high volume of shipping from China to the United States makes the cost of moving a small object much lower than you might expect. In any case, it's a widespread strategy, so it must work well enough to keep them in business.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear lil',

In additions to the Yays' wisdoms, cost of living and resource exploitation probably factor in. Cost of living might be much less than in the States, meaning people don't need to get paid as much to survive. Resources, including materials, machinery, and the workers themselves, likely don't have as many regulations or protections on their use, so it's cheaper to use them. 

But I don't know the actual facts, so I'll keep the hypothetical qualifiers in there. 

Take care,

-AS


0 Corrections
Question #89494 posted on 04/26/2017 8:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Hello current and former writers! If you could talk to yourself from a year in the past, what would you say to yourself? What advice would you give? If you could talk to yourself from a year in the future, what would you say? What questions would you ask?

-M.O.D.A.Q.

P.S. Do not give yourself the ability to tell your past self how to communicate with another yourself a year prior to your past self. I fell down that rabbit hole last evening and it kept me up all night.

A:

Dear Doctor,

Advice for last year me: go to the doctor sooner rather than later. Both when you get mono and when the depression starts.

Questions for next year me: are you treating yourself better?

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Mo,

It might be something like:

Dear baby Auto,

A year ago: You're about to go to the hospital for the first time. It will be scary but it will be good. And, it's pretty cool you were able to wait until the summer to go because then you can spend a month doing nothing but puzzles and life goes on okay. But remember that there's more to life than that. It's scary but it will be good. Eventually. 

Six months ago: Yeah, Auto, this is what happens when you get surface-level treatment: you get surface-level results. And I know a mission still sounds like the cure, but it's not. You still need to figure out some things where you are before you can journey on. 

Six weeks ago: You should probably start exercising, so that all this energy doesn't make you a bit of a freak around people. (oops)  Good thing you can't afford to run away from embarrassment right now, because repentance/improvement is super real and it'll be fine eventually. Just, maybe, add some yoga or something into your routine. And maybe get a routine. (oops)

Questions for next year: Did you find your island? Have you been on it this whole time? Are you home? 

Take care,

-Auto

Take care,

-Auto Surf

A:

Dear Fred,

Advice for last-year me: don't be disappointed when you find out you're having a boy. He's better than any girl you ever dreamed of having! 

Questions for next-year me: was worrying about your husband's situation worth it? 

-Az

A:

Dear friend,

Advice for last-year me: You have vocal nodes and you are in denial about it. You probably should have gone to the doctor two months ago. Make the friggin' appointment. Also, here is the name and number of a therapist that you will click with. Call the clinic now instead of waiting until January so you can get help before your anxiety gets out of control. Also, when school gets out, you need to either encourage your husband to take the train to work or you need to buy a second car, because being trapped at home all day every day all summer is going to trash your mental health.

Questions for next-year me: should I move choir to after school or keep it before school? Is going off my medication a good or bad idea? Can you give me any investment tips or lottery numbers?

Peace,

-Stego Lily

A:

Dear M.O.D.A.Q,

"Lay off the fruit snacks, fatty," for both past and future.

No Dice

A:

Dear Mo,

Past Self: 

Dear Me,

Well, you got through the hardest part of your year, and things are going to look up from here on out (well, up through a year, at least). Summer is going to be... boring, but fine. The highlights will be where you get to do things with that one friend (she really is the best). Don't worry too much about what you've done to yourself with organizing your Fall schedule. It will be hard, but you can handle it. There will be lots of things that will be unexpected, but that's okay. You learn things from them, though mainly in retrospect.

Future Self:

Hey, how's it going? Just wanting to confirm something really fast: am I still alive, or did the first year of ACME straight-up kill me?

Uh-huh...wait, what? How is that even an answer? How do you not know?... oh... yeah, um, I'm not sure either in that case.

Okay, moving on, then. Anything going on relationship-wise? 

*Sigh* And just when I thought I couldn't be any more committed to my textbooks.

Well, good talk Future Me. Hope everything goes well for you.

~Anathema

A:

Dear M,

Past self: Don't go to China. Bad things will happen.  

Future self: Are you happy? What are you doing for the fall? Do you have plans to visit other countries? 

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear Mo,

Advice for my past self: Drop everything and schedule a trip to San Luis Obispo NOW to find housing. You will thank me next fall when you don't have to live out of a hotel for your first month of school. Also, you will be tempted to buy a certain specific computer. No matter what else you do, do not buy it. It will give you nothing but headaches. And finally, get your act together and thank everyone who gave you a letter of recommendation immediately! Other than that, though, don't stress out too much. Your life is finally on the right track again.

Questions for my future self: So, did you get the housing internship with the county? And how is your thesis project going? Please tell me all of the things about the thesis that did not go smoothly so that I can avoid them.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear M.O.D.A.Q.,

I'd tell my past self about Brexit (lever up financially and short the pound!), the OPEC agreement (buy oil futures in mid-November!), Trump's election (neither of us is sure if any foreign betting markets are legally accessible in the US, but it would be worth finding out!), and Leicester City's win (ditto Trump comment). I'd also say your son is growing up to be super cool and his medical issues don't end up being significant to date. (Although you already pretty much knew this, maybe you can convince the wife more effectively.) 

I'd probably ask future self about similar concerns. Also, will there be hurricanes or other major catastrophes in my area? Will anything especially bad happen at the refinery that we could prevent by taking action now?

I honestly don't think I'd really want to talk about most personal decisions or their results: for the last year I don't have any major regrets, and I wouldn't want to accidentally mess with how well things have turned out.

~Professor Kirke

A:

Dear M.O.D.A.Q.,

Advice for last-year me: Save every penny you can; life circumstances change faster than you could imagine, and you will never be prepared. Also don't worry about being kind to the awful coworkers who treat you terribly.

Question for future me: What can I do in this new job to keep my head above water? Have you found any tips for managing all our sicknesses, and can I start using them now? 

-Ace

A:

Hello self-Kitty,

As I've been pondering this question I've planned out a long conversation with my past self (hereafter referred to as L). I'll share the highlights. Firstly I would have a frank conversation with L about fiscal responsibility and what constitutes smart spending decisions. I would also share with L some practical tips that would save us a bit of money and also increase our overall enjoyment. I would probably give L my completed senior thesis to save him a bit of hassle and potentially help him accomplish a bit more as he finishes up at BYU. Then the bulk of our conversation would be preparing L for beginning grad school, giving him advice and some suggestions that I think would help make the transition easier and let him be more successful and find a better research fit sooner. We'd probably also talk about mental illness and health and I'd give him some advice in that regard as well. I'd probably also tell him about how I recently had a realization about a girl I liked and while he wouldn't be able to ask her out because she's not in the same country as him at the moment, it would at least give him more time to think about it and consider if and how he might want to pursue a relationship with her. And then of course I would give him a printout of the 2017 March Madness bracket and some other ways for him to make some dinero.

My future self, who we'll call N, I'm sure would have plenty to say to me but mainly I'd ask him if and how I've learned to manage my depression and also if and how I started dating anyone (and whom).

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear M.O.D.A.Q. ~

Past self: I know your 33rd birthday is coming up. I know you're looking forward to it, because two threes sounds like the ideal age, considering how threes follow you around so much. Clearly it's going to be your best year ever. And in many ways, it will be awesome. Don't mourn your friend moving too much. You'll keep your friendship, despite the distance. She doesn't drift away like all your other best friends have done. Unfortunately, there will be some of your hardest times this year, too. You are going to hit a period of darkness with no rhyme or reason. I promise, it will end. There will be light again. And that light will last. I know you won't believe it, but it's true. I promise. Just hang on a few months. Also, when you suspect hormones are involved, and your period is simultaneously out of whack, I would highly recommend going to the gynecologist sooner. She can help. Also, focus on yourself this year. You need it; you deserve it. I promise, it will make you a better wife, mother, and person. (Sorry, I can't promise your housekeeping skills will increase.) Do the things that you need to be sane, happy, and fulfilled. Yellow will fill in the gaps. 

Future self: What advice would you give me? How do you feel about the number of children that you have? (How many children do you have?) Do you regret any of the decisions I'm making right now? Any advice on how to build confidence in our kids? Does Yellow 2.0 ever grow out of his terrible twos? Please tell me that he skips the threenager stage. Please? Any amazing parenting tips you've learned that you'd like to pass my way?

~ Dragon Lady

A:

Dear me, past and present,

Don't bother with the chocolate shake at Culver's—get the raspberry. It's amazing.

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear Past Soulful,

You should really wait another three weeks before buying that ticket to Italy. I know a $300 ticket from Boston sounds like a great deal, but a $400 ticket from Salt Lake is even better. Also, don't ask Jonathan out. I know you really want to, but it would be much better to just become friends with him then consider asking him out. And when it is time to renew your housing contract, just spend the money and get your own place. You really shouldn't be doing this roommate thing anymore. 

Also, you really ought to run more and eat fewer cookies. 

Sincerely,
Present Soulful

Dear Future Soulful,

Are you dating anyone yet or are we still #perpetuallysingle? Should I just quit my job now or stick it out until other things fall into place? 

Also, how's North Korea's nuclear program doing these days? Did Le Pen win the French election leading to France's departure from the EU? Is the EU even still a thing? And just how good is The Last Jedi? Will is be anywhere as good as Rogue One?

Do you know the release date for The Doors of Stone yet?

Sincerely,
Present Soulful


0 Corrections
Question #89498 posted on 04/26/2017 8:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board Alumni,

Roll call?

-Lady Hermione

A:

Dear Lady Hermione,

Here and procrastinating as usual!

-yayfulness

A:

Dear L.H.,

"NOT HERE!" I yell in class for the tenth time in a row, desperate for a validating laugh that I will never hear.

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear Doctor,

Here!

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Lady,

Present! At least for today!

- Eirene

A:

Dear Kvothe, 

Hello.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 

A:

Dear Lady,

I'm here (but not) to stay.

-Genuine Article 

A:

Hello Lady,

 

-The Man with a Mustache

A:

Dear friend,

Sup!

Peace,

-Stego Lily

A:

Dear Lady Hermione, 

Mostly lurking and then jumping in at random...which I guess was my MO when I was a writer, too. 

-Petra 

A:

Dear Lady

Present.

-Humble Master

A:

Dear Susan,

Yo.

-Az

A:

Dear Hermione, 

Here!

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear LH,

Me!

-Divya

A:

Dear Lady ~

It's kind of amazing how far down I am in this list when this question is only 5 hours old. Huh.

Anyway, present and accounted for, ma'am!

~ Dragon Lady

A:

Dear Lady Hermione,

Here!

-Owlet

A:

Dearest,

I am! I am!

-Never(Yog)land

A:

Hi Germiona,

I'm here.

-Concealocanth

A:

Here!

Der Berliner

A:

Dear Lady Hermion,

Howdy!

I sure hope this helps. Please don't hate me. 

- Brutus

A:

Dear Hermione,

*waves*

- Katya

A:

Dear Hermione,

*makes finger pistols, clicks tongue and winks*

Yo.

- Rating Pending (who was neither the last, nor the first, but as usually is comfortably in the middle)

A:

Dear LH, 

Guess who's back, back again? (Hint: it is not the Real Slim Shady)

-Watts

A:

Dear Lady Hermione,

Today is April 24, the fifth day of alumni week, and I have only recommended therapy once so far. That has to be some kind of record for me. Still, I'm around.

- The Black Sheep

A:

Dear Lady Hermione,

It's good to be back on a temporary basis. I keep forgetting how stressful it sometimes is to finish up an answer within 100 hours!

--Maven

A:

Dear lady,

I'm here, I guess. Whatever.

-Cognoscente.

A:

Dear Anise,

Are any of us truly anywhere?

Hugs,

-MSJ

A:

Dear Lady Hermione,

I'm here-ish.  We were out of town last week and I have a super busy week this week plus I've had a sick kiddo, so... not the best timing.  But I am here! 

- Lavish

A:

Dear Levios-AH,

That is all.

Horatio

A:

Dear Minister,

Hi!

-Inverse Insomniac

A:

Dear person,

I'm passively here, as usual, to farm more thumbs up than CK with low-effort answers.

--Gimgimno

A:

-Uffish Thought, and possibly songs of inexperience and the rest

A:

Present!

-The Skipper

A:

Howdy!

~Professor Kirke

A:

Dear Gryffindor:

Haven't missed one yet. 

Kirke didn't even give me anything to respond to with a leftie feminist hot take. Work with me here!

---Portia


0 Corrections
Question #89499 posted on 04/26/2017 8:16 p.m.
Q:

Dear friends,

I'm an aspiring amateur chef. Could you please share one or more recipes you like? Thanks!

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear Trickster,

I'm trying to learn how to learn how to cook more things, too! Here's a family recipe for some really easy but really tasty pasta (which I call Pepper Spray pasta because the first time I tried to make it for myself I accidentally made homemade pepper spray and had all of my roommates coughing for half an hour):

Ingredients:

1 lb. Asparagus
1 lb. Penne Pasta
~5 Garlic Cloves
1 tsp. Red Pepper Flakes
2-3 Dashes of the Hot Sauce of Your Choice (optional)
1/4 cup Olive Oil
1 tbsp. Butter
1/4 tsp Salt
1/4 tsp Pepper (or maybe it's just 1/4 tsp Salt and Pepper? I'm reading this off of one of Mère Rubik's recipe index cards and she's has her own sort of shorthand that's a bit hard to decipher)
Parmesan Cheese (the kind that's shredded and you get in a bag, not the powdery stuff that some people claim is 90% sawdust)

Instructions:

1. Mince the garlic and chop up the asparagus into sections about an inch to an inch and a half long. Also maybe rinse of the asparagus. Probably rinse off the asparagus? I definitely remember rinsing asparagus the last time I made this, but again, the recipe isn't super detailed. In any case it's very therapeutic so you should probably just do it.

(PROTIP: To get the garlic out of its outer skin, crush the cloves with the flat of your knife. Works like a charm.)

(Also you probably already knew this if you've cooked asparagus before but you'll need to chop off the bottoms of the asparagus and throw them out because they'll be too tough to eat. It's pretty easy to feel around with your knife to tell where it transitions from tough to normal. Other places say it's pretty easy to just break the tough part off with your bare hands. Either way, it's a sad indictment of our violent society, so do whatever feels most natural.)

2. Cook the pasta like normal. Like it says on the bag. It's not high-maintenance. It's not asking for anything special. Just nine minutes in boiling water (possibly with a bit of salt) until it gets tender.

3. Add the garlic, red pepper flakes, olive oil, butter, salt, and pepper (and hot sauce, if you swing that way) to a pan and put it on medium-ish heat. Then add the asparagus and let it cook, stirring it around every once and a while to make sure it gets evenly cooked. You want to cook it all until the asparagus is "tender-crisp," which is a word Mère uses to mean "what you expect well-cooked asparagus to taste/feel like." If you've never eaten asparagus before, you're free from prejudice and therefore can decide for yourself when to stop cooking it.

(Side note: Mère Rubik doesn't use a separate pan to cook the sauce; once the pasta is done cooking, she throws it into a colander and then makes the sauce directly in the still-hot pasta pot. That's all fine and dandy, since she's an old pro and knows her oven/stove really well, but when I tried to do it, the garlic burned almost immediately, as did the red pepper flakes, which is what made the "pepper spray" I mentioned earlier. Do whatever feels most prudent.)

4. Once the sauce/asparagus is done, add it to the pasta (either by dumping it out of the pan into the pot or by scooping it up from the bottom of the pot over the noodles, depending on how you chose to make the sauce above). Stir things around to ensure even coating. While it's still hot/warm, dump about half of a bag of Parmesan cheese over it and stir that around as well.

That's it! It makes for a simple pasta with a little bit of kick, which is super tasty. We usually eat it with some nice baguettes/french bread and then have strawberries and ice cream for dessert.

Good luck!

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear EA,

Avocado Mac and Cheese. It is so delicious. You are welcome.

Ingredients:

  • 10 ounces dry elbow macaroni
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 avocados, peeled and pitted
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 cups shredded Pepper Jack cheese
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Fresh avocado chunks, for garnish, if desired
Steps:
1. Cook the pasta al dente
2. While that's happening, make the avo sauce by blending the garlic, avocados, lime juice, and cilantro.
3. Make the cheese sauce by putting the butter in a small saucepan and heating it over medium heat. When butter is melted, whisk in flour to create a paste. Whisk in milk until smooth. Stir with a wooden spoon until the sauce starts to thicken. Add in Pepper Jack cheese and stir until cheese is melted and sauce is creamy.
4. Put the cooked macaroni into a bowl, and stir in the avocado sauce until it's completely coated. Then stir in the cheese sauce until that's coated. 
5. Serve hot
 
-Ace

 

A:

Dear Doctor,

Black Bean Burgers

These are something we have probably once a month or so. They're easy to make, you can freeze the extras, and they're delicious.

  • 2 cans seasoned black beans (unseasoned is fine, too)
  • 1 cup garlic and herb bread crumbs
  • 1 egg
  • seasonings to taste
Smash black beans relatively thoroughly (there can still be visible bean pieces) in a bowl. Mix in egg and bread crumbs. Add any other seasonings you'd like. Form into patty shapes and place on cooking-spray-sprayed cookie sheet. These won't shrink when cooked, so only make them as big as the buns you're using. Bake for about eight minutes at 350 degrees, then take them out and flip them and bake for another eight minutes or so.

Other recipes I like:

Cinnamon Roll Pancakes

Cream Cheese and Herb Stuffed Chicken

One Minute Peanut Butter Cake

90 Second Nutella Cake

Pear and Cheddar Breakfast Quesadillas

Goat Cheese, Turkey, and Egg Cups (these are surprisingly good)

Ham and Swiss Sliders (great party food that we've had at multiple Board parties)

BBQ Ranch Chicken Sandwiches

Chicken Taco Salad

Pastasanga (Baked Ziti, but we prefer calling it this)

-Tally M.

A:

Dear El,

Ramen noodles:

Bring 2 cups of water to a boil

Carefully drop in Ramen noodles. Cook for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally (except you know that's not going to happen because you'll be back in your living room, watching netflix)

Take off heat and add in flavoring packet. 

Enjoy!

A:

Dear El-ahrairah,

Today's theme is, apparently, chicken. I've made all of these recipes multiple times and I love them all.

Enjoy!

--Maven

A:

Dear El,

My wife and I keep a list of our favorite recipes that we've tried. Here are the last five we've added.

Pork Chops with Roasted Pears and Butternut Squash with Honey-Vanilla Sauce

2 Bosc pears (peeled, seeded, and quartered)
2 cups butternut squash, cubed
1 medium onion, sliced
4 Tbsp. olive oil
Salt and pepper
1/3 cup honey
2 Tbsp. butter, melted
2 tsp. sage
1 tsp. vanilla
4 pork chops
Bleu cheese crumbles

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet with foil.

Toss pears, squash, and onion with 2 Tbsp. of oil; season with salt and pepper. Transfer to baking sheet and roast until crisp-tender, about 15 minutes.

Whisk together honey, butter, sage, and vanilla. Season with salt and pepper.

Heat remaining oil in a saute pan. Season chops with salt and pepper, and brown both sides. Transfer them to the baking sheet.

Roast everything until pork is cooked through, about 10 minutes. Garnish chops with bleu cheese crumbles. Serve with rice.
 

Balsamic Butter Penne with Asparagus

Optional: Add cubed chicken cooked with garlic and salt

1 bunch asparagus
1 Tbsp olive oil
2 tsp salt
1/2 cup plus 2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
1/2 tsp brown sugar
1 pound penne
4 Tbsp butter, cut into pieces
1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese, plus more for serving

Heat the oven to 400 degrees.

Cook the pasta according to package directions.

Snap the tough ends off the asparagus and discard them. Cut the spears into 1-inch pieces. Put the asparagus on a baking sheet and toss with the oil and 1/4 teaspoon of the salt. Roast until tender, about 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, put the vinegar in a small saucepan. Simmer until 3 tablespoons remain. Stir in the brown sugar. Remove from the heat.

Drain the pasta and toss with the butter, vinegar, asparagus, Parmesan, and the remaining salt. Serve with additional Parmesan.
 

Chicken Tikka Masala

2 Tbsp butter
1 onion, finely chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 Tbsp ground cumin
1 tsp salt
1 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground turmeric
1 (14 ounce) can tomato sauce
1 cup heavy whipping cream
2 tsp paprika
1 heaping Tbsp white sugar
1 Tbsp vegetable oil
Chicken breasts, cut into bite-size pieces
1 tsp curry powder

Heat butter in a large skillet over medium heat and cook and stir onion until translucent, about 5 minutes. Stir in garlic; cook and stir just until fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir cumin, salt, ginger, cayenne pepper, cinnamon, and turmeric into the onion mixture; fry until fragrant, about 2 minutes.

Stir tomato sauce into the onion and spice mixture, bring to a boil, and reduce heat to low. Simmer sauce for 10 minutes, then mix in cream, paprika, and sugar. Bring sauce back to a simmer and cook, stirring often, until sauce is thickened, 10 to 15 minutes.

Heat vegetable oil in a separate skillet over medium heat. Stir chicken into the hot oil, sprinkle with curry powder, and sear chicken until lightly browned but still pink inside, about 3 minutes; stir often.

Transfer chicken and any pan juices into the sauce. Simmer chicken in sauce until no longer pink, about 30 minutes; adjust salt and sugar to taste.
 

Spicy Shrimp Spaghetti

1 bunch fresh basil
Long pasta
1 lemon
1/4 cup panko breadcrumbs
3 cloves garlic
2 Tbsp tomato paste
1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
10 ounces shrimp

Chop basil. Season shrimp with salt. Quarter and de-seed lemon.

Start cooking pasta.

In a large pan, heat 2 Tbps olive oil on medium-high heat. Add breadcrumbs and toast, stirring occasionally (2-4 minutes or until golden brown). Transfer to plate and season with salt immediately.

Add crushed garlic and a little olive oil to pan and cook for a few minutes. Add tomato paste and red pepper flakes (to taste), and cook 1-2 minutes or until paste is dark red.

Add seasoned shrimp, and cook until shrimp are opaque and cooked through.

Add cooked pasta, basil, juice from 2 lemon wedges, and 1/2 a cup of the pasta cooking water. Cook for 2-3 minutes, adding more pasta water to reach desired consistency.

Top with breadcrumbs and more basil. Garnish with remaining lemon wedges.
 

Butternut Squash Macaroni and Cheese

1 butternut squash, cut in half lengthwise and seeded
1/2 box elbow macaroni (about 2.5 cups dry)
1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons evaporated milk
1/4 cup chicken or vegetable broth
1 oz.  cream cheese
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese
1 tablespoon butter
1/2 cup onions, sliced thinly
1 apple, chopped or grated
4 strips bacon, cooked and crumbled

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with foil.

Lightly coat squash halves with oil on both sides. Place squash, flesh side down, on prepared baking sheet. Add 1 cup water to baking sheet. Bake squash until tender, about 45 minutes. Scoop flesh from squash and puree until you have 1 cup.

Heat butter in a skillet over low heat. When melted, add onions and let caramelize for at least 30 minutes for the best flavor. Keep heat on low/low-medium.

Cook the pasta according to package directions. Drain and return to pan over low heat. Add butternut squash, chicken broth, evaporated milk, and cream cheese. When combined, add in salt.

Add onions and apples to the pasta. Stir to combine, and add a tablespoon more broth or milk if needed.

Just before serving, mix in cheese and stir until melted. Top each serving with bacon.

NOTE: Because there's very little butter, it can "dry out" quickly, especially once off the heat. Add a tablespoon of water, milk, or broth if you need to get it back to its original creaminess.
 
Best,
 
The Man with a Mustache
A:

Dear moi,

Jalapeno White Mac n Cheese

  1. Melt 4 tablespoons butter in a pot. 
  2. Mix in 4 tablespoons flour. 
  3. Slowly mix in milk until it's as creamy as you want it. 
  4. Mix in 8 ounces of white cheddar. 
  5. Shred half or a whole jalapeno. If you're worried about this, know that half will just give it enough flavor to be interesting without making it spicy. If you have it, mix in some diced ham as well.
  6. OR mix in 1/8 tsp cayenne pepper and 1/4 tsp nutmeg. I tried this the first time and it was alright, but I liked step 5 better.
  7. Add to a whole box of cooked shell pasta. 
  8. Eat. Or be eaten. It's a cruel world.

Burger tip: If you want to make burgers without a grill, don't use the stove—use the broiler.

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear El,

Here's the best recipe I've made lately.

  1. Take some frozen chicken.
  2. Stick it in a crock pot.
  3. Add a can of black and/or pinto beans.
  4. Pour in a ton of salsa.
  5. Season with garlic powder, onion powder, and pepper.
  6. Cook it for a few hours.
  7. Also cook some rice.
  8. Put it all on a tortilla.
  9. Be satisfied that you (yayfulness) have cooked something without destroying it.
  10. Eat!

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Rabbit Stew,

Four quick and easy ideas:

1) For the best, creamiest scrambled eggs take a pot (a POT not a frying man) and, before turning on any heat whatsoever, crack however many eggs into you would like into it. Add a hunk of butter, like a tablespoon for every two eggs or so, but really just a hunk of butter (it can be cold if you don't have it at room temperature). Now put it on a medium high heat and start stirring with a wooden spoon, spatula, whatever. And keep stirring. Don't stop stirring. When the eggs start to thicken (4-5 minutes), start taking the pot off the heat and stir some more, then put it back on for another 20 seconds. When it looks still slightly undercooked, take it off the heat. Stir a bit longer. The residual heat of the pot and the other eggs will cook everything. Add salt and pepper. That's it. No milk, no cheese. Just absurdly creamy eggs.

2) Homemade pita is ridiculously easy and fun to make. I've used the New York Times recipe four times now and it works every time to get good-tasting bread with nice big pockets. Far better than the dry, crumbly pita you get in stores. The best part is having a super hot cast iron skillet or just a cookie sheet in a blazing (475-500 degree) oven, tossing your rolled flatbread in and watching them puff up in the 2 minutes before you flip them. They also freeze well, so we have a couple bags in our freezer at any given time. 

3) Less a recipe and more like a suggestion to make your desserts fancier. Replace the vanilla in your cakes, frostings, etc. with the equivalent amount of almond extract (which you can get right next to the vanilla at the grocery store). You can also add additional almond extract to a vanilla containing recipe but be careful you don't throw off the liquid too much. That's it. You've just radically changed/improved your dessert effortlessly. This works really well with buttercream (i.e. normal) cake frosting. I've also had a lot of luck with artificial rum flavoring into buttercream frosting. Suddenly everything tastes different from the standard sugar-flour-egg cake combination in a very delicious way. Give it a shot.

4) Cook your bacon in the oven. More consistent and crispy every time. 

- Rating Pending (who is going to fit one more easy suggestion in at the end here: baked potato bar, but use cottage cheese and peas instead of, or along with, sour cream and shredded cheese. Use your oven-cooked crispy bacon to crumble on top too. Good stuff.)

A:

Dear,

Blue Apron's Shakshuka from a few months back was great. I've made it a few times, now. Don't worry about the pea shoots. They're not essential. 

Although it's not a fancy meal, this song here taught me to dramatically improve my breakfasts. (I have further improved on his recipe by adding a slice of muenster, and by using toasted English muffins instead of bread.) It's from 19:25 to 22:15. The rest may be worth watching too--I have enjoyed at least 3 of Alex Horne's songs--but I haven't watched the whole thing, and I won't swear there aren't swears.

And from a full decade ago (shock!) two that remain close to my heart. Happy cooking!

-Uffish Thought


0 Corrections
Question #89500 posted on 04/26/2017 8:15 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Finals is killing my brain. Can you share with me a movie you feel like everyone should watch sometime in their life?

-dead poets society

A:

Dear Farewell Mr. Bunting,

A Town Called Panic.

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear yes,

Expiration Date. It's a great quirky independent movie that not enough people know about.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Dear Bope,

While You Were Sleeping. Good quotable lines, and sweetest, pre-hype Sandra Bullock role. 

Good luck and don't die during finals. Das not gud

-Auto Surf

A:

Dear Nuwanda,

Belle - Inspired by a true story, a mixed-race woman raised in an aristocratic family in 1780s England struggles to find her place in society while her uncle, the Lord Chief Justice, must make an important ruling on a case involving slavery. The film came out in 2013, but it was a bit of a sleeper and it's well worth your time if you like costume dramas or films about social issues.

- Katya

A:

Dear DPS,

A Beautiful Mind. For maximum effect you have to watch it without knowing anything about it beforehand, because it is SO GOOD, and not knowing anything about the ending until you see it makes it THAT MUCH BETTER.

-Alta

A:

Dear poet,

I very rarely encounter a movie that I'm willing to re-watch multiple times because I love it so much. The three that come to mind for me right now are as follows:

The Prestige

I consider the movie to be a better overall story than the somewhat odd and disappointing novel of the same name that was the source of the movie's overall plot. Phenomenal story telling and directing by Christopher Nolan (Dark Knight, Memento, Inception, etc.). I won't say too much to avoid spoilers in case you haven't seen it, but there is no detail out of place in this movie. The deeper you look, the more you find that the movie has been explaining itself to you the entire time.

Gattaca

I love this movie for reasons I don't understand. It's a great underdog story coupled with a futuristic plot coupled with a commentary on the ethics of genetic engineering of humans. I get a hankering for this movie every few years and I never get sick of it.

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

A beautiful Chinese film about a (too) optimistic master fighter who only wants peace. Do yourself a favor and watch it with subtitles instead of dubbing (apply to all foreign films) to get the beauty and quality of the language itself along with the excellent story.

Best,

The Man with a Mustache

A:

Dear dps,

How has nobody said The Sandlot yet.  The Sandlot is the only correct answer to this question.

No Dice

A:

Dear society,

Power Rangers is all you need in life right now.

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear Poet,

Harold and Maude. Do yourself a favor and don't read the plot beforehand, or Google it, or do anything but rent it on Amazon to watch.

If you've already seen that, I'd recommend Samsara, but mostly so you can end up in an hour-long fight with your friends who you watch it with over whether a movie with NO WORDS was too heavy-handed and judgmental.  Not that I've done that or anything.

-Yog in Neverland

A:

Dear you,

I watched Phoenix for a German class, and it is fantastic. It's not your typical Holocaust film, but it does a very good job of exploring the issue with how we often have unrealistic or unhealthy expectations for survivors of trauma. It also does a good job of confronting the issue of how the friends and even relatives of Jewish people in Europe could have betrayed them. It's also subtle, beautifully paced, and full of good music.

-Zedability

A:

Dear friend,

Life is Beautiful and Labyrinth. For vastly different reasons.

-Van Goff who is DONE WITH FINALS AHAHAHA FIGHT ME HUMAN DEVELOPMENT YOU'RE DONE! DONE!

A:

Dear Dead Poets Society,

My Neighbor Totoro.

-Sky Bones 

A:

Dear Perdita X,

I love the movie Little Big Soldier. Netflix used to have it at one point, but I'm not sure if it's still available. Watch it in Chinese; its better that way. there are probably others, but I'm too tired to think. 

-Azriel


0 Corrections
Question #89386 posted on 04/26/2017 8:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

If any of you went on Mandarin-speaking missions or have friends who did, that would be especially helpful.

I'm leaving on a mission to Taiwan at the end of May, and I'm wondering how best to prepare before entering the MTC. Specifically, I want to know how to prepare to learn Mandarin. I think I should try to learn pronunciations and Pinyin, but do any of you have more specific advice or resources?

-Light Yagami

A:

Dear Gami,

I emailed a friend who is currently serving in Taiwan, and here's what he said: 

"Mandarin is hard. But if you can learn to read pinyin before, you'll already be steps ahead! Don't worry about the language. The MTC does a great job preparing you (as long as you work hard), and the Taiwan missions right now have some of the most amazing language learning materials I've ever seen. I've been here about a year, but before I left I used an online chart with all the different (57 maybe?) sounds in Chinese, tones included. There were audio clips attached that you could practice along with. Also, have fun with it. When you're practicing the sounds and tones out loud in your apartment or wherever, yell them out. Louder the better."

And I just want to echo what Ardilla says below: culture is key to language mastery. Don't forget to work on both of them. 

Also, as you're learning and working and serving, don't forget to be where you are. There will be plenty of time to worry about plenty of things, but only limited time to be wherever you are. 

Take care,

-Auto Surf

A:

Dear xuesheng,

Everyone here has pretty well addressed the language aspect, but don't forget language is always accompanied by history and culture. Take a little time--even just an hour or two--to find out about Taiwan while you still have such ready access to things such as Wikipedia and CultureGrams. I think you will be a better-informed and better-prepared missionary for it.

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Dear Constable Visit,

As it so happens, I did not serve a mission, but I know Mandarin and Taiwan. 

The BYU bookstore sells a Chinese language study edition of The Book of Mormon. I believe I got mine for something around $30. That in add to this audio recording (although incomplete) will get you started with at least Book of Mormon language. As for learning proper pronunciation and day-to-day vocabulary, Chinese Link  is a decent resource. (FYI Taiwan uses traditional characters and a different pinyin system.)

The majority of the population practices a blend of Taoism, Confusionism, and Buddhism. Basically Ancestor worship is a big deal! From my experience with the Taiwanese saints, most of them initially found interest in the Church because of our teachings in caring for our dead/eternal families. 

You should also know that there's a pretty large Philippine population there. Taiwan can be pretty prejudiced towards them and they are often seen as second-class. Most of them work as maids or nannies. We had a Phillipino sister in my branch, though, and she was seriously the kindest, most generous person! I don't rember if her husband was dead or a non-member, but either way it couldn't have been easy for her to come to church alone with her three kids. 

Also you should know that "Mormon" sounds like 魔門 which translates as "evil gate" or "evil door," so you should also be prepared for explains that we are not, in fact, devil worshippers and the BoM is not about worshipping the devil. 

I seriously love Taiwan so much! Best wishes to you on your assigned mission there; I don't believe you will find a more loving people anywhere in the world!

-Az

(P.S. Have fun with the traffic "laws" there and be careful on the streets. If you imagine yourself to be playing a live version of Mario Kart it's a little less scary. Kind of.)


0 Corrections
Question #89491 posted on 04/26/2017 4:35 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is it time for the Jedi to end?

-No, no, (*inhales*), no.

A:

Dear no,

You'd better believe it. As an institution, the Jedi have completely failed.

Just look at the Jedi of the Prequel Trilogy. They may have originated as a mystical sect, but they functioned as a state-sanctioned paramilitary organization. They were tasked with handling diplomatic negotiations on behalf of the state. Once war broke out, they acted as front-line generals and special forces operatives. They literally kidnapped children for indoctrination. In the real world, we call that a war crime and we call the people who do that terrorists.

Even though they paid lip service to the Force, their real guidance was a massive body of dogma. My preferred analogy is with the Pharisees of the New Testament - they were so focused on the law that they had completely lost sight of the entity that created their philosophy in the first place. They prohibited contact with family members or the formation of relationships outside of their organization. In the real world, we call that a cult.

That's not to say that the individual Jedi were bad or evil. They were raised and trapped in a self-perpetuating structure that blinded them to its own flaws, and the Prequel Trilogy is (or at least should be) the story of how that structure finally collapsed under its own weight. The story of Anakin Skywalker is (or at least should be) a case study in how the Jedi structure could destroy a life and fail those it was supposed to protect.

The Jedi and the Sith could not bring balance to the Force because the Jedi and the Sith were the imbalance in the Force.

By the time of the Original Trilogy, of course, the Jedi Order was all but erased from both existence and memory. Luke Skywalker received a few hours' training from Obi-Wan in A New Hope. Yoda gave him at best a week or two's training in The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi. Perhaps there was more that we didn't see in the films, but it seems clear that the newly established Jedi were heirs to a fragmented and largely forgotten philosophy. And from the story of The Force Awakens, it seems equally clear that however the new Jedi were organized, their order collapsed almost immediately.

I'm sure The Last Jedi will fill in a lot of these gaps, but based purely on what we already know, it seems clear to me that the Jedi have failed. If balance is to be restored to the Force, it will have to be done through the creation of something new and different.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear No

My 4yo is very concerned about which Jedi is going to end. He's asked me a good two dozen times since I showed him the trailer.

-Humble Master

A:

Dear no,

I'm just going to point out that we are 8 movies into this thing, so probably. But I imagine earth's many Jedi will forge on nonetheless. 

~Professor Kirke

A:

Dear No No,

Umm yes? Absolutely? 

Here's the thing, the Light Side and the Dark Side both have to exist. You have to have opposing forces for there to be balance. The Sith continually destroy themselves because they have never learned the temperance, peace, or patience of the Light Side. The Jedi always end up destroyed by removing themselves from emotions, connections, and passion, instead building to a point of overwhelming pride and arrogance.

True balance in the Force has to come from both sides. You have to find the happy medium, or else it will inevitably fail. 

-Watts

A:

Dear Nooo,

The Jedi are the worst.

The prequel trilogy is all about revealing the good guys as the bad guys all along, on every level. The Republic turns into the Empire, the Clones become Stormtroopers, Palpatine is unmasked as Sidious, Anakin becomes Vader, Jar Jar becomes a tool of Palpatine, etc.

The Jedi Order are villains on equal footing with Palpatine.

Qui-Gon Jinn is willing to cross any ethical boundary to manipulate, lie, cheat, and steal, to recruit a powerful new child soldier. He puts a child in a pod race — a deadly blood sport — to get free engine repairs. He relies on quantitative midichlorian lab results rather than ethical values or the will of the Force to justify his selection of Anakin. Jinn essentially condones slavery, not just making Anakin a slave of the Jedi Order, but also abandoning Shmi and eagerly accepting Jar Jar's "life debt."

Remember how Palpatine tells Anakin that the Jedi Council were plotting to overthrow the republic? He's 100% telling the truth.

The Jedi send Anakin to spy on Palpatine and then literally walk into his office to carry out a coup. Mace Windu never intended to make an arrest; he's there as an assassin. Windu claims he's there with the authority of the Senate; Palpatine says "I am the Senate." And Windu knows knows Palpatine is right, admitting to Anakin that Palpatine "has control of the courts and the Senate" so he is "too dangerous to be left alive." Palpatine fights back in self defense, and Anakin offers to help Windu actually make an arrest. Windu refuses and tries to murder Palpatine, who lies defenseless on the floor.

Anakin, of course, disarms Windu to defend Palpatine. This was absolutely the right thing to do — legally, ethically, morally. And then Palpatine throws Windu out the window, which seems a bit out of line but, honestly, are we supposed to believe that will kill a Jedi? (George Lucas and Samuel L. Jackson both think he survived.)

With the Jedi Order revealed as traitors — which they demonstrably are by any standard — Order 66 is set into motion to eliminate the Jedi Order to prevent greater casualties. If Palpatine was too dangerous to leave alive because he had the support of the courts and the Senate, then the Jedi were doubly so, as they were willing to disregard the courts and Senate entirely. They attempted to assassinate the chancellor of the Republic with neither a warrant nor a trial.

What about the younglings? If Darth Vader actually killed them (which can be disputed) remember that these were actually trained and armed superhuman child soldiers, brainwashed by the Jedi. Leaving them alive would be incredibly dangerous; one young padawan alone killed six clone troopers singlehandedly. The Jedi dragged these children into the war in the first place; they were as responsible as Vader for the death of the younglings.

Sure, Palpatine pulled a few strings and crossed some lines to get into office, and he's an evil Sith, yadda yadda. But he transforms the republic through the legislative process and the consent of the governed systems ("I will make it legal"). And the most obviously illegal parts of the plan to start the civil war were carried out by former Jedi — Sifo Dyas orders a clone army, Count Dooku (who left the Jedi Order and Republic because of their corruption) leads the secessionist movement. Some of the worst dudes in the galaxy are Jedi alumni, just trying to do best they can with the woefully inadequate system of values given to them by the Jedi Order. If Anakin had enrolled in a high school ethics course instead of battling robots every day with Obi-Wan Kenobi, do you think he still would have ended up as Darth Vader?

As Palpatine says, "All who gain power are afraid to lose it. Even the Jedi." The Jedi erect a facade of stoicism and selflessness, but they serve neither law nor democracy. Their only goal is to consolidate the power of the Jedi Order, and they will trample over anything that stands in their way.

Luke has apparently spent some time studying the history of the Jedi Order. He did not like what he discovered.

Love,

Sauron (and Waldorf)

A:

Dear People,

YEEESH. One trailer and suddenly everybody's turned into Revenge of the Sith Anakin Skywalker, to which I respond: "WELL THEN YOU ARE LOST!"

Also, I have the high ground, so don't try it. And you know what I mean by "it." Don't try it.

Here's a theory that literally just jumped into my head: suppose that actually the good Jedi/evil Sith paradigm we've grown accustomed to over seven movies actually isn't flawed. No, I don't think that this is necessarily good (I mean, Jedi cut themselves off from all emotion, and that's not very healthy), but let's suppose that the series remains consistent in this way. Why would Luke say that it's time for the Jedi to be done-so, then?

Well, consider Yoda's timeless maxim that fear is the path to the Dark Side by way of anger, hate, and suffering. When Ben done went and burned down the Jedi temple, I'd reckon that Luke may have jumped straight into the "anger" part of that process, and things may have just gone downhill from there. Perhaps when Rey arrives he agrees to train her out of some nagging sense of responsibility but is increasingly bitter about the hand he's been dealt by the Force. Perhaps something happens to push him past the tipping point and fully into the Dark Side of the Force and the rest of the sequel trilogy is about Rey and Kylo Ren teaming up to stop him (because, even though we don't know Snoke's power level, evil Luke would be a force to be reckoned with).

"But Luke would never turn evil!" you protest, to which I say "Hmmm? HMMMMMMM?"

I rest my case.

-Frère Rubik actually isn't super convinced that his theory is correct but does think that it's kind of neat-o


0 Corrections
Posted on 04/26/2017 4:35 p.m. New Correction on: #89496 I've been feeling like I really need to drop added sugar from my diet. Now, I ...
Question #89432 posted on 04/26/2017 4:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Can we see another cool church-related map? Maybe meeting-house density or member density?

-Yayfulfan

A:

Dear Yayfulfan,

First the bad news: This question (actually, this reunion week in general) comes at the worst possible time for me to really dig into any major projects, since it lands square in the middle of several projects that I am getting graded on and/or paid for. Unfortunately, I can't spare the hours that it would take to put together the sort of map that you're hoping for. This is disappointing, since I'd been looking forward to the thought ever since I got accepted to grad school and regained access to ArcGIS.

But there is good news!

Good news, part one: My beloved Board child and fellow GIS user Inverse Insomniac is going to make the map you asked for!

Good news, part two: I still check my Board email (yayfulness(at)theboard.byu.edu) on a regular basis. My most spectacular mapping projects took a lot longer than 100 hours to complete, so if you email me around the beginning of 2018 with a request, odds are good that I'll have something publishable by the time alumni week rolls around. (Or email me now! You'll just have to wait a year for your answer and thoroughly break Optimistic's record.)

Good news, part three: Since I can't do much else for you, here's a picture of my cat looking like a doofus to at least partly make up for it.

cat for board.jpg

Seriously, though, I'm sorry that I can't give you what you asked for. Hopefully next year things will work out a bit better for both of us.

Regretfully,

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Phandalin,

Here's a map that compares LDS membership to membership in all religions in Utah. As you can see, San Juan, Grand, and Summit counties have the lowest proportion of Mormons in the state, but also have the lowest levels of religious adherence in general. Duschesne, Sanpete, Beaver, Wayne, and Garfield counties have a relatively high ratio of Mormons to all religious people, while Tooele county has a relatively low ratio of Mormons to all religious people. This didn't quite turn out to be as interesting as I expected. I'll have to do some further digging into LDS-related data for next year. It's kind of frustrating because the Church doesn't release location data for meetinghouses or ward boundaries or anything, so you have to find other sources.

Utah_Religion.png

-Inverse Insomniac


0 Corrections
Question #89496 posted on 04/26/2017 1:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've been feeling like I really need to drop added sugar from my diet. Now, I know some of you would probably advise me not to, either because it seems like such a drastic, unsustainable step or because our bodies do pretty much the same thing with natural sugars as they do with added sugars, so cutting out just one of the two may not help much.

I also know the evidence for sugar addiction is scattered and inconclusive: this study found that rats can (under certain conditions) become sugar dependent but offers no evidence for human addiction, and this review of the literature concludes that there's little scientific support for the theory at all.

Nonetheless (and I realize how dangerous it is to sweep aside Science with a "nonetheless" and replace it with my personal experience), I really do think I may be addicted to sugar. Or to eating, maybe. I can't control myself around sweet things. Once I've thought about donuts, for example, I can't get them out of my head until I've eaten one. I feel agitated if I go too long without something sweet. I'm especially susceptible to baked goods, and if I find myself in the presence of twelve cookies, I will often binge on all twelve. I also think that the presence of sugar in food is a big reason that I tend to overeat.

Trouble is, I've tried to go off sugar before and have always cracked within about a month. So at long last, here is my question. Do you have any recommendations? For those of you who have successfully cut out sugar for a time, what can I do to keep it up? For those of you who think a long-term abstention from sugar will do more harm than good, what other ways of maintaining a healthy diet would you recommend for someone who's never been able to control herself around sugar?

-a reader who doesn't want to die of obesity-related diseases at age 55

A:

Dear reader,

I see no downsides to this plan, except inconvenience.* I see a lot of potential positives in cutting out artificially-added sugars. I say go for it. 

My typical diet advice is to make vegetables literally half of your diet. Not whole grains, not juice, not corn, not potatoes--the whole green stuff (or purple or orange or red or yellow or whatever). Ain't nobody telling you to eat fewer veggies. Roast 'em, braise 'em, eat 'em raw, or however you can stomach 'em.

It will be hard because vegetables are gross. Your body will quickly adapt. Your palate will eventually adapt. Younger-me would never believe older-me, but I actually enjoy Brussels sprouts and squash and all that gross stuff now, because I got used to them from dedicated practice. But it did take practice, and dating a health-nut for two years gave me practice. Force yourself to learn better cooking techniques and they will taste better (the veggies will taste better, not the health-nut-girlfriend). Don't be afraid of using olive oil. Everything tastes better with hummus. 

In the half-vegetable-diet plan, the other half of your diet would be split between protein sources and carbohydrate sources. Complex carbs are better than simple carbs (e.g. whole grain is better than flour). For your proteins, a general rule is that the fewer legs the animal has, the healthier it is (i.e. fish is better than poultry which is better than pork or beef or cheese). Veggie proteins like tofu are gross, but if that's your thing, go for it. Except nuts. Those things are delicious. Dessert is fruit. Not fruit juice. Fruit.

Don't worry too much about the amount of fat you eat. Protein is almost always accompanied by fat, so you'll get enough fat from your protein sources like meats and nuts. You'll also get fat calories from the olive oil you use to make your vegetables taste edible. And I doubt you can eat too much fat if your main food group is vegetables. 

No soda. No juice. No sports drinks. No vitamin drinks. No artificially-sweetened drinks. They taste like liquid candy and you're trying to get out of the habit of candy. 

Once you drop the habit of eating all that sugar, you will likely be able to eat a moderate amount of birthday cake or ice cream or candy on special occasions without spinning out into a sugar death spiral. Because you'll be out of the habit of eating all that sugar. And that's good to achieve moderation, because what is life without ice cream on your birthday?

Good luck!

--Pilgrim

*Certain medical conditions may lead you to have trouble with hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. It's probably wise to continue using small hard candies or juice in your diet if you have medical conditions that make you susceptible to hypoglycemia. Talk to your doctor before following the advice of online strangers. Etc. Etc. 

A:

Dear reader,

I feel you. Everything, from the mental preoccupation to the binging to the failed attempts at sustainable sugar abstinence. Never has a bag of Mint Milanos entered my house without me finishing them the same day. It's bad. 

I recently ran across a totally unscientific, self-help youtube guru named Lydia the Lifestyle Coach. In my desperation to stop this sugar nonsense, I watched a few videos. Her ideas aren't necessarily original, but she does have a good way of explaining them, with Sunday school-style object lessons. She does one about the "addictiveness" of sugar that I think can be helpful. Our own perceived helplessness in the face of the sucrose siren may be a cognitive distortion impeding our body's natural tendency toward moderation. She also discusses binging (and the antidote: not restricting) in an oversimplified but useful way. I found this illustration of body set point theory to be pretty approachable, too.

Like you, I have a real hard time with moderating sugar, but outright abstention doesn't seem to be the answer either. I suspect that, in a world in which sugar is a love language and a social staple, moderation may be the only sustainable way to reduce sugar intake. So it's hard, and it won't be a linear path toward progress, but you're not alone. 

Here are some things that have been working okay for me. But not perfect, and I have to be okay with not perfect:

  • The obvious one is keeping sugar out of the house. (Whenever my husband wants ice cream, I ask him to get the gross kinds that only he likes)
  • Ask others to stop offering you sugar. They often forget, but it does help a little.
  • Give yourself permission to be a social sugar-eater (like a social drinker, minus the inebriating effects). I accept sugar when it's given as a gift, at a party, or in another context where it might be rude for me to decline. Surprisingly, I've recently been able to politely say no to sugar at some parties, when within my rule system it would be totally okay for me to indulge. Saying no when it's optional is new for me.
  • Set up consequences for yourself. I've never been able to make outright abstention last, though I have had decent results with a self-imposed punishment system, e.g. every time I eat sugar nonsocially I have to donate $5 to the NRA, or I have to eat a banana. Both of which I really, really don't like. I suspect this is not sustainable, but may be effective for short-term intake reduction, which can help to get you out of the habit. 
  • Figure out which time of day you eat the most sugar and set yourself up for success during these times. For me, it's afternoons and after the kids go to bed, and I make use of replacement snacks. Right now, it's baby carrots and herbal tea. I eat so, so many baby carrots. I also will use sugar-free mints or tic tacs sometimes when the cravings for sugar are really bad, and that's been genuinely helpful.
  • Realize that stumbles will happen, and don't let one stumble bring the whole house down. I read some statistic in school about addicts relapsing an average of seven times before going sober. It's okay to fail and get back up again.

In sweet solidarity,

Waldorf (and Sauron)

A:

Dear reader,

Now, I'm one of those people that discourages people from swearing off added sugars completely (for the reasons you mentioned, but also because it's so delicious), but this time I'll content myself with explaining why I usually do so, and why it's still okay to try to reduce or remove added sugars from your diet.

The USDA advises Americans to reduce the amount of added sugars in their diet. Many people seem to think because of this that added sugars are inherently different from natural sugars, which is wrong. The reason that added sugars are so maligned is because it's really hard to get the right balance of calories and micronutrients if more than around 10% of your calories come from added sugars. So, as long as you're cutting out added sugar because you're trying to maintain a healthy caloric intake (and as long as you don't go around calling so-called refined sugar a poison, etc.), avoiding added sugar is a great idea. Go for it!

-The Entomophagist

A:

Dear reader,

Bless you. This can be so difficult. (And I'm very impressed that you've made it as long as a month before. That's hard work!)

I've been trying to cut down on sugar for about 2 1/2 years. In my case, it's because sugar is one of my migraine triggers and as my migraines have gotten worse over the last few years, I've had to get more serious about cutting sugar out of my diet. Other writers have given you some good info regarding nutrition, so I'm going to tackle this from the perspective of my own experiences with motivational mind games.

First, I would actually suggest not cutting sugar out of your diet entirely, just trying to focus on cutting back. The reason for this is that I've found that if I tell myself I can never have sugar again, I tend to think about it a lot and I have to use a lot of willpower to stick with it. But if I am merely cutting back on sugar, then it doesn't bother me as much and I don't think about it as much. From that perspective, you might try going 7 days without sugar, then going 8 days, then going 9 days, and seeing if you can add a day each time. (Or if you have trouble going a full 7 days, you could certainly start much lower. No shame!) And when it comes to rewarding yourself for making it a certain amount of time, I'd also suggest splurging for one very fancy treat (like a chocolate truffle) instead of something like Oreos, where you might end up eating the whole sleeve or box.

You might think that you should try to go as long as possible without eating sugar, but I'd actually recommend against that, because if (or when) you "cheat," you might feel like a failure and end up giving up or binging on a lot of sugar. If, on the other hand, you choose to eat a piece of pie because you have made it 11 days without eating any sugar, then you may feel more in control of the situation which will, in turn, motivate you to stop at just one piece and gear up for trying to make it 12 days without sugar. (Also, if you're on day 11 of a 12-day sugar fast, it will probably be easier to power through to the 12th day than it would be if you were on day 11 of an indefinite sugar fast.)

The other nice thing about spacing out the days is that a 12-day sugar fast isn't that different from an 11-day sugar fast, so you don't feel like you're suddenly radically changing your lifestyle, but over time you'll get used to eating less and less sugar, so that eventually you're eating sugar only once a month or so. And if you do end up cheating, just start over again and try to work your way back up without being critical of yourself.

Other tricks you might try if you feel like binging are to make yourself do something in between each cookie (or whatever), such as drinking a full glass of water or eating a serving of vegetables or chewing gum for an hour. Again, if you tell your body you can have sugar "later" instead of "never," you may have more success in cutting back or distracting yourself from wanting sugar.

Like I said, I've been working on this for about 2 1/2 years, with a recent decision to cut out sugar almost entirely. (I think I've had the equivalent of 1/2 a Twinkie in the last three months, for perspective.) At this point, it's actually not too hard for me to not buy desserts to eat myself, although it can still be challenging when friends or coworkers offer me treats. So, above all, be kind to yourself and recognize that your body was designed to crave sugar, so weaning yourself off of it can be a challenge and you're absolutely not a failure if it takes you a long time to shift your eating habits.

Good luck!

- Katya


1 Correction
Question #89495 posted on 04/26/2017 1:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear Adelaide,

One time I heard you say something like "Well, 7 is the number of completeness." It was a casual comment that led to some other topic of conversation, but I was little blown away by how real it was.

Do you have any other numerology thoughts that aren't that big a deal but maybe are? How did you know about 7? What about the numbers 1, 2, 3, and 12?


-mnhas

A:

Dear Mary,

So I've been searching my brain trying to figure out who you are, but I've come up completely short. I don't ever remember talking about this to anyone specifically, but I vaguely remember talking about it.

Here is a Wikipedia article on Biblical Numerology. Numerology is a pretty big thing, and people can take it with a grain of salt, but I see it a lot throughout the Gospel. For example, the number 3 is a huge deal in the temple. I obviously won't get into specifics, but next time you do a session, pay attention to things in threes, including the words, the clothing, and the actions. Christ was resurrected on the third day. 3 usually represents the Godhead, perfection, or holiness. 

7 is considered to be the number of completeness. God created the world in 7 days, and the Book of Revelation has a ton of them. I believe I learned about this in one of my religion classes, but I don't really remember.

8 means "new life" which is interesting to me because in the LDS church we baptize at age 8 (usually, obviously this isn't always the case).

I'm not really sure about anything else! Also, if you want to tell me who you are because I definitely want to remember this conversation, feel free to email me!

-Adelaide


0 Corrections
Question #89464 posted on 04/26/2017 1:39 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've seen a lot of questions about Econ 110 and occasionally someone will mention that it is easier to take it in Spring/Summer and/or at the SLC center because it is easier there. Is this true and why? Are the teachers more lax because they are graduate student teachers, is the smaller class size beneficial, does the shortened term mean that some material gets skipped, etc? Thanks!!

-my major requires it

A:

Dear Future Econ Student,

Econ 110 is also required for my major. I loved the class and (perhaps just because I loved it so much) was able to pull off an A in Dr. Kearl's class. (This I'm telling you just so you know that YOU CAN DO IT! Even in Provo. Even in Kearl's class.) However, a lot of my peers in my major have struggled with Econ 110 and have ended up taking it at the Salt Lake Center.

I talked to one of them and here are the main two things she said:

- The material covered at the Salt Lake Center is less extensive.

- The tests are easier.

That's just one person's opinion, but hopefully that helps!

I've never heard that Econ 110 is easier to take in the Spring/Summer here in Provo. Perhaps it could be easier if it was the only class you were taking, simply because you would be able to focus more attention on it. But, I wouldn't expect the actual content to change in any way.

Good luck!! You can totally do econ!

-A Writer


0 Corrections
Question #89488 posted on 04/26/2017 12:08 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

From the podcast S-Town, we're introduced to some interesting characters. Tell me, whose side are you on, John's cousins or Tyler? Who is more truthful?

--Mystery is Me--

A:

Dear --Mystery is Me--,

This post gets a big fat SPOILER WARNING. If you don't want to know what happens in the podcast, don't read this answer.

This post also gets a big fat UNSOLICITED RANT WARNING. I will not apologize for this, so be ye warned.

I just hated this podcast. It filled me with pure, unadulterated rage. I don't really care who is right between John's cousins or Tyler. I don't really care if there was ever gold or if phone calls to John's friends were put off on purpose for malicious reasons.

I really related to John B. I don't usually related to anyone, so that was weird. I felt really connected to him. It was hard, therefore, to learn that he killed himself. It was harder to watch him and those he cared about turned into characters with way too many dramatics. It wasn't enough for John to be horribly depressed and lonely and cynical and filled with existential angst. He also had to have mercury poisoning and be dying of not having lived worthy of a country song. It just seemed like people capitalized on him and his community to seem really hip and enlightened so they could get other people who see themselves as hip and enlightened to listen to their version of the story.

- The Black Sheep

A:

Dear A Mystery Is You,

[SPOILER ALERT, because I accidentally just spoiled this for Ardilla and he sent me a flagette with a crying frowny face and it was pretty sad for everyone.]

After all is said and done, I'm pretty neutral. When I was listening to it, I was sympathetic with Tyler, but at the same time his depiction of John B.'s cousins just seemed so exaggerated and cartoonish that it didn't seem like that could be the whole story. I was glad when Brian was able to interview them, because I think it went a long way toward making them seem more human and relatable. 

It's been a couple of weeks since I listened to S-Town, though, so the details are already a bit fuzzy in my head. For instance, I just remembered that Tyler said he left a bunch of equipment and stuff in John's shed that he owned and that was later just sold without him being able to stop it. That's pretty bad on Reta's part. It's a bit tragic, since both parties by the end seem to have cared about John B., but emotions were so high right around the time of his death that a huge wedge was driven between them and both parties did things against the other that they shouldn't have.

Life, am I right?

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear Mystery is Me,

Obligatory SPOILER ALERT. If you plan on listening to S-Town, wait and read this this after you're finished.

I just finished listening to S-Town this week. At first I was totally on Tyler's side. The cousins seemingly showed up out of nowhere and started doing everything they could to secure John's assets, which I found greedy, especially given the circumstances.

But then after hearing from the cousins I thought, hmmm, maybe they're not so bad? They seemed to be taking care of Mary Grace, and they seemed to have at least some proof that things Tyler said belonged to him were on the property prior to John and Tyler's friendship. But I don't know them and I probably don't have the whole story, so who knows their true motivations?

It's hard to take Tyler's handwritten receipts has solid proof that certain things belonged to him. Also, Tyler forging John's signature to sell the cars is super shady. And if he was the only one with access to John's house in the aftermath of the suicide, he had ample opportunity to take things, whether or not they belonged to him.

I feel bad for Tyler. He was in a difficult position as John's closest friend but without any legal documentation to back up his property claims and whatever John may have said about things he wanted to give to Tyler. Tyler had and still has a difficult life, one that I can't understand, so I find it hard to judge him based on the limited information I have.

--Maven


0 Corrections
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Question #89489 posted on 04/25/2017 11:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I know this was asked before, but the first question wasn't really answered well and I want to hear more opinions on the second and third questions.

What (in layman's terms) is in Red Bull, Monster, and 5 hour energy drinks? Do any of you drink any of them? If so, what flavors do you recommend trying first?

Also, what are your perceptions on people who drink them?

-I know they aren't great options for a regular basis, but I'd like to know so I can think about trying one before the occasional work shifts that are super early

A:

Dear I,

It's caffeine. And some other silly stuff about vitamins or herbal extracts which varies by energy drink, but it's mostly caffeine.

I don't drink energy drinks. But I have developed a taste for Diet Coke since it's always stocked in the resident lounge at work. 

My perception of people who drink energy drinks is that they should get more sleep instead.

- Eirene

A:

Dear Iktago farb bilt ksictato btow stase.

In layman's terms, sugar and caffeine. Red Bull advertises taurine, and others say they have ginseng and guarana and other exotic sounding plants. there's a whole lot of them and it's almost entirely marketing. Most ingredients besides water, sugar, and caffeine are too expensive to be put into energy drinks in enough quantity to be effective. Taurine is an important biological acid, but it is not present in high enough concentration in Red Bull (or any other energy drink) to have theraputic qualities.

My initial answer is to agree with Eirene; there have been few times in my life where I have regularly used energy drinks where I couldn't have had sufficient quantities of sleep instead. However, life has its ups and downs and I have had periods where I became the discriminating consumer of energy drinks. 8 hour drives to drill, and 3 AM night security shifts gave me plenty of cause for experimentation. I'll share my experiences, ordered from least consumed to most consumed. Keep in mind this is not a scientific survey, and there are many other factors to my reactions than merely the ingredients in the drink:

Jolt Cola- I don't know why I put this one, I have never actually had one. I think I just wanted to tell the following story: In the winter of my thirteenth year, I set out one night with a few of my friends in search for Jolt Cola to fuel our all-night Duke Nukem LAN party. It was a night we'll never forget involving a haunted house in Taylorsville, nearly getting into fisticuffs with stoners in Copperton, and smashing glass bottles at Liberty Park. We never found Jolt Cola, though, in spite of checking about 40 7-11 stores all along the Wasatch Front. We settled for a gross of Surge from Harmons at 6 AM.

AMP (formerly Mountain Dew AMP)- REALLY cheap. I got 16 oz. cans two for a dollar at a gas station outside of Toquerville. I don't know what's in it, but I started hallucinating. Maybe it was the early morning, maybe it was the snowstorm, but it turned into bat country. Bats seemed to be swarming out of the huge snowflakes, and I swear I was the only person on the road who wasn't spinning out and sliding off the road (even though I was probably the only person on the road).

Power Horse- It's an Austrian drink, I don't think this is available in the states. It is at the low end of caffeine content, with Caffeine (mg) per ounce just above Coca Cola, but I was on edge for six hours and my eyes were twitching for three days after a 12 oz. can of this. Usually Coke and Dr. Pepper make me go to sleep, so there had to be more to it than the caffeine content.

Ubermonster- Most expensive. Terrible taste. It's a malt beverage so while it's sweet, it's not overly sugary. Super caffeinated, but didn't make me jittery or chew the inside of my cheeks. One of my friends has such a caffeine tolerance he downs two of these at a time. I could never get to that point, but he likes them.

Monster- My least favorite taste, but the second-cheapest.

Rip-its- really cheap. The drink of choice for the the soldier, because they are free to the average Joe due to being in the Army supply system. Not very good. It's for the best, though, I think the only place you can buy them is Big Lots.

Rockstar- They're alright. I don't like how the original Rockstars taste. They remind me of dumping baking soda into Kool-Aid. There are many different flavors including horchata. Stay away from the Horchata unless you like chunks of rice protein in an energy drink. Not a pleasant experience.

Juice Monster- I like these much better than regular Monsters. The juice that they are made out of really takes the edge off and nearly eliminates the teeth grinding effect that I usually experience.

Red Bull- Expensive. Made my teeth hurt. I chewed on the inside of my cheeks until I got canker sores. Didn't like them. Still keep drinking them for some reason.

Rockstar Recovery- My favorite. Really smooth, lots of energy without the nervousness. I don't know why this is so, but it's so. They are made from a certain percentage of juice and they are non-carbonated. The juice really helps tone down the energy-drinkness of it and the lack of carbonation makes it a more pleasant drink. When I have to get caffeinated, orange Rockstar Recovery is my choice.

Dr. Smeed


0 Corrections
Question #89457 posted on 04/25/2017 8:55 p.m.
Q:

Dear Dragon Lady et. al,

Will you teach me your favorite Hebrew things?

Dear rest of us,

Will you teach me your favorite language/obscure language things so I can have them all in one place?

Thanks guys,
Auto Surf

A:

Dear Auto Surf ~

Once upon a time I took the coolest Biblical Hebrew class. It was taught by Donald Parry, and was one of those courses with the R after the number so that they can teach whatever they want without having to repeat it every semester. (And so you can keep retaking it with different content.) It was a class dedicated to the Atonement.

First, let me pause to explain a major difference between Hebrew and English. English is a very precise language. You could tell me the difference between joy, excitement, happy, and content. They are similar words with similar meanings, but actually mean different parts of a whole. Hebrew, on the other hand, is a very descriptive language. One word is more of an idea. It encompasses much more than a single English word could. Looking up a word in a Hebrew dictionary means you usually get several definitions, not always obviously related.

Second, the word "atonement" didn't exist in the English language until William Tyndall was translating the Bible into English and realized there wasn't an English word to describe the Hebrew word. So he made one up. Have you heard people say that Atonement means at-one-ment and kind of wanted to punch them in the face, because that's not how etymology works? Well guess what? You're the one who is wrong. That is actually exactly what Atonement means. Sorry. All those Facebook memes were actually right this time.

Ok. Let's resume. So there are actually 3 words in Hebrew that translate to Atonement. This class spent the summer translating all of the instances of those words in the Hebrew Bible, so that we could have a more broad understanding of what those three words actually mean. Unfortunately, I have lost my notes from that class, and can only remember one. Cafar. I specifically remember once instance of that word, one that doesn't really make any sense at first. 

Genesis 6:14 Make thee an ark of gopher wood; rooms shalt thou make in the ark, and shalt pitch it within and without with pitch.

I taught this to my young women and had them read this scripture. They were all so confused. "But this isn't the kind of scripture we read at church..." It was fantastic. 

Cafar is in this scripture twice. Both as the noun and the verb "pitch." Why would the word "pitch" be later translated as "atonement?" It's an interesting thought to ponder.

Go ahead. Ponder it. I'll wait. (Also, I'd love to hear your conclusions. dragonladyofjapan at gmail)

 

 

Here is my conclusion: Noah built the ark out of gopher wood. Inasmuch as was possible, the wood was perfect. It built the absolute best boat it could. Could it float? Maybe temporarily. But pretty quickly it would sink, because there are gaps between the wood. Those gaps had to be sealed in order to make the ark waterproof. By its very design, the wood could not float by itself. It needed pitch to seal it and waterproof it so that it could float and fulfill its mission of saving Noah and his family, as well as all of those animals.

I am the ark. I try my very best to be perfect. Despite my best efforts, I cannot be perfected. I cannot make it back to the Celestial Kingdom. I can survive now on my own, but only temporarily, and not very well. Why? Because I have gaps. By design, I cannot be exalted by myself. My gaps have to be sealed. I need the atonement in order to perfect me so I can fulfill my earthly mission and be saved.

I have always wondered when people say things like, "The Atonement pulled me through a significant heartbreak" or "Thanks to the Atonement, I feel peace even though my mom has cancer." In my head, the Atonement filled the gap between justice and mercy. It was there because I sin, and I needed the Atonement to cover for my sins. But this theory lets me understand the atonement so much more. 

Warning: Gospel according to Dragon Lady commencing.

If the Atonement can cover my gaps, perhaps that is more than just sin. Perhaps it also covers my natural man, the wounds other people inflict, and things I simply have no control over. So when I am suffering a heartbreak, perhaps that is a gap, and when I pray for comfort, maybe, just maybe, it's the Atonement that comes and fills that gap to give me the comfort I need. When I am feeling like a completely imperfect parent and pray for help, could it be possible that the inspiration I receive is given via the Atonement.

This theory has holes (I can poke them myself), but it is a very interesting train of thought for me. I have spent months now working it in to pretty much every gospel topic I talk about. I'm excited to keep learning more and more about the Atonement as I refine this and research it more. I've already requested the list of scripture references again, so I can pick up my Hebrew again and re-translate all of those verses.

 

I have other Hebrew words I'd love to teach you, but Alumni Week is nearing an end, and I still have many answers to finish. Ask again next year, perhaps? I could teach you about the word Repent!

~ Dragon Lady

A:

Dear Auto Surf,

French has a dual set of words for certain units of time. One word is used to describe a single action that occurred a certain amount of time ago. (E.g., four years ago, I moved across the country.) The other word is used to describe an action that occurred over an entire period of time. (E.g., I have been working at my job for four years.) In the first example, you would use the French word "an" for "year." In the second example, you would use the French word "année."

Here are the four word pairs:

  • an/année - year
  • jour/journée - day
  • matin/matinée - morning
  • soir/soirée - evening

In addition, several of the time words referring to duration have been borrowed into English. So a "journey" ("journée") was originally a day's work or a day's amount of travel, a "matinee" is a show that happens in morning (or in the early afternoon), and a "soiree" is a party that happens in the evening.

- Katya

A:

Auto Surf!

Did you know there are no swear words in Japanese? Kind of explains a bit about their style of formalities and politeness, doesn't it? Like the worst thing you can say is something like "you are a fool". It also creeps into Japanese cartoons.

There is an African language, I don't remember which, that has at least 7 words for green, and they are known by all people (not just interior designers or whatever, not used in the manner that we have "marshmallow", "pea pod", "seagull turd", or "Scandinavian sunburn" as colors). 

Toasteroven

A:

Dear Auto,

This is by far my favorite language fact:

The word arctic doesn't mean "cold," it means "bears," or "the place with the bears" (from the Greek arktos meaning "bear"). Better yet, the word antarctic means "not bears." I don't know why I think that's so funny, but I crack up every time I think about it.

-The Man with a Mustache

A:

Dear Electronic Watersports,

So thanks to the Norman (French) invasion of the Anglo-Saxons, today's English has two different terms for a lot of things—one Germanic and one Latinate. Because the Normans were the higher class of society for a while, generally the Latinate word is the loftier or more pretentious-sounding one, while the Germanic word is generally the more common.

Here's a great Wikipedia article with interesting examples. Enjoy!

-Inverse Insomniac

A:

Auto Surf-

"Favorite" is tough, but my best non-English language is Farsi. Which is why I was absolutely tickled at a joke in the final season of 30 Rock, back when that was a thing.

There was a running gag about the new game show "Homonym." You can see a clip here. Then in a later episode, they showed the game show going international, with an Iranian version! You can see that here. It was completely out of left field, but I was surprised and delighted to find a well-crafted joke in Farsi that I could understand. The basic translation:

"The next word: 'faucet/milk/lion.'" (all are pronounced "sheer")
"OK, like the big cat."
"No, it's the other one."
"Dirt on your head!" (a Persian curse, basically wishing for someone's death)

Considering that very often, major American TV shows don't even TRY to correctly identify Middle-Eastern languages, or to connect Arabic/Persian letters properly (it's not hard! I'll do it for you! It will take 30 seconds and I'm not even in practice!), it was a sudden, surprising breath of fresh air to see. But then, 30 Rock almost always went above and beyond like that.

-Foreman

A:

Dear Auto,

This might not be my favorite, but it's representative of a lot of the things that I love about Polish.

First off, it's interesting to me that the basic word for cooking in Polish is "gotować", which means to boil. It's funny because Polish people literally boil everything. I mean everything. It's a funny reminder that languages are totally shaped by the culture they're in. But, even better, Polish has a system of modifying verbs by putting a suffix on the front, and if you say "rozgotować" it means, "to boil something until it falls apart". Which I think might be one of the more Polish words out there.

Also, I should go study instead of getting lost in my Polish grammar books.

Keep it real,
Sherpa Dave


0 Corrections
Question #89486 posted on 04/25/2017 7 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I just saw Frère Rubik mention he's using a mechanical keyboard. Does anyone else? Feelings on the matter?

I converted to a mechanical keyboard at home just about a year ago (using Cherry MX Brown switches) and loved it--had to get one at work too and don't intend to ever go back.

~Professor Kirke

A:

Dear Kirke and friends,

Can someone first explain to me  the readers why/how someone happens upon a mechanical keyboard?

-AS

A:

Dear Auto Surf,

You obtain a mechanical keyboard when a friend of yours decides he's going to transfer to BYU Hawaii. Said friend had purchased a mechanical keyboard on Black Friday for an absolute steal but then later bought a different one because he wanted different switches (them switches are important, yo). He doesn't want to lug two keyboards to Hawaii, so he offers to sell the first keyboard to you for an even bigger steal. You buy the keyboard from him and thank him for giving you such a big discount, to which he responds that he's happy to because he considers it his way of supporting your efforts in the 100 Hour Board.

Basically, this friend is the best, and that's why you decide to write a specific shout-out to him on the Board during alumni week.

So, friend: you know who you are, and you are the super greatest. It is posted on the Board: therefore it is so.

Dear Kirke,

I like it so far! I have this fella, which uses Cherry MX Red switches. I used it last night and this morning to write a research paper for a final, and it felt pretty good. I liked how sensitive to keystrokes it was; quite frequently I looked up at the screen because I was pretty sure I'd missed a key only to find that the keyboard had registered the stroke. I also feel like I can type a little bit faster with it, but as of right now I think that's more of a placebo-effect-like feeling than something real.

I am a little bummed it doesn't have a number pad, and I'm also interested in trying other switch types to see how they're different (I've heard that blues and browns are good if you're just interested in typing and not gaming). But, I don't think I'll make any decisions one way or the other until the end of this summer. I'm planning on doing a lot of writing, and it seemed like a good opportunity to really see how this new keyboard works and feels.

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear Kirke,

I am a mechanical keyboard evangelist. I think anyone who uses a computer professionally should look into them. I own two: a Unicomp Classic for work (manufactured with the original IBM Model M specifications! Buckling spring keys! It's built like a tank and sounds like thunder!) and a Das Keyboard Model S Ultimate (with blue clicky switches and no letters on the keys!) at home, and I love both of them. They are so choice.

It looks like you already know the benefits, so I'll just share my philosophy instead. The way I see, would you spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on a new house, and sleep on an Ikea futon? Would you buy a fancy new sports car and throw some old, bald tires on it? I believe that whenever you consider the merits of spending money on something of quality, it's worth it not to cheap out on the part that you interact with directly–where the rubber meets the road, so to speak. When it comes to a computer, you're not going to be interacting directly with your power supply or RAM. The majority of your experience will come through sight and touch–your monitor and your keyboard. And of those two, your keyboard is the only one that doesn't depend on anything else. So why cheap out with a $15 plastic piece of crap? Spend the money and give yourself a satisfying typing experience.

Also, and I say this as someone who plays a lot of games, no one needs the gaudy ones that light up in a bunch of difference colors or come with a huge host of programmable macro buttons. That's just putting more cheap plastic crap over a solid keyboard. Get something simple, designed to do one thing and do it well. Your fingers will love you for years to come.

 -Cognoscente

A:

Dear Professor

No.

None.

-Humble Master

A:

Dear AS,

Well, once upon a time I was due for a new computer, and I decided to build, so naturally I got on Logical Increments to figure out how to get the most for my buck. (They are aimed at gaming and I'm not so much, so I adjusted processor up and graphics card down from their typical recommendations for my price level). Anyway, I looked at their keyboards section and found there were whole levels of snobbery I had previously been unaware of. Naturally, I was intrigued. Given that I'm using a keyboard for a significant fraction of my waking hours, I ought to make sure I've got the "right" level of quality and ergonomics for such a frequently used tool.

Further research found that many people on the internet are passionate about mechanical keyboards for a variety of reasons: you don't have to push the keys all the way down to actuate them (better ergonomics/you can type more lightly), some claim it improves typing speed, it "feels nice," etc. I have historically liked Lenovo scissor-switch keyboards more than the standard rubber cap cheap-o keyboard, and I was already in to my computer project for about a grand (not including the WQHD screen--also recommended, although in the last year 4K has got so cheap I'd probably just do that at this point), so I figured I'd pick up a mechanical keyboard for $90 or so and see if I liked it. I think it took me a few days to get used to at home, but then one day I sat down at my rubber cap piece of junk at work and realized how hard I had to hit the keys and how bad it felt in comparison. So that's how I converted to mechanical keyboards, and now it's kind of like a little piece of me dies whenever I have use a normal keyboard. 

~Professor Kirke


0 Corrections
Question #89485 posted on 04/25/2017 6:27 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How accurate did your predictions for the past year turn out to be?

What are your predictions for the next year?

-not yayfulness

A:

Dear friend,

Let's have a look-see, shall we?

At least two more prominent pop-culture icons will die and everyone will be shocked: Muhammad Ali and Carrie Fisher, among others. Check!

It will be John Williams and the Queen of England: Wrong, thank goodness!

Paul Ryan will keep being my favorite Republican: Ha ha, no. Nope nope nope.

Barack Obama will become a regular guest on the Ellen Degeneres Show: I...do not remember why I predicted this. Pretty sure it didn't happen.

John Curtis will be reelected as the mayor of Provo: Well, he's announced that he's not running for reelection, but I really hope he ends up running for Chaffetz' House seat (or challenging Orrin Hatch!)

I will probably still be here in Provo, finishing up another year of teaching: Correct!

Hopefully I'll have grown my school choir to twice its current size: My choir is still about the same size, but I added an additional choir, so between the two choirs I have twice as many kids as last year.

Students will continue to confuse me with the science teacher: Nope, because she quit!

So I got close on some, I guess.

Here are my predictions for next year:

  • I will be in the same job, same apartment, and same calling as now.
  • I might maybe be pregnant at that point?

And that's about as far as I want to speculate for now. Predicting the future is hard.

Peace,

-Stego Lily

A:

Dear not ~

Next alumni week I will either be pregnant or have a new wee one. False. I am not pregnant, nor do I have a wee one. Nor do I have plans to change that.

Dragon Baby will be preparing to be baptized. (WHEN DID I GET SO OLD?!) True. Though she's also going through a phase of hating church, so... hopefully this remains true?

Niffler Baby will be talking non-stop about going to Kindergarten and will be asking when I'll buy her new clothes for it and can I please paint her fingernails? Semi true. She's excited about Kindergarten, but not non-stop talking about it. She's currently happy with her clothes, but she does still beg me to paint her fingernails.

Yellow 2.0 will be excited to start some sort of preschool. Joy School, perhaps? I hope he's still as obsessed with cars as he is now. He is starting preschool this year, but doesn't really understand that's happening. But they do a train field trip, so I'm excited for him. He is, in fact, still obsessed with cars.

Based on our track record, Yellow will have a new job. (He's hapy where he is and is not looking for a new job. But that was his status his last two job changes, so...) False. Yellow still has the same job! No one has actively tried to poach him from this one. And he is still happy with this job.

And we will be planning a trip to Nicaragua. I will have a passport again! Semi true. We just got BACK from Nicaragua! And I do have a passport again! But as I'm planning a girls' trip back there in January (hopefully!), I'll say this one is still mostly true.

Most Americans will be complaining about the new president, but all Americans will be grateful the election is finally over. Mostly true. Most Americans are complaining about the president. But sometimes I wish the election wasn't really over, and this is just a bad dream that I can wake up and still have the chance to change.

Bad things will continue to happen. I will have said at least 329 times, "But I thought we lived in America!" Probably true. I haven't counted. And I've become resigned to the fact that the America I live in is a far cry than the America I naively believed I lived in as a child. It hurts.

If you look, amazing people will still be doing great humanitarian things all over, giving me the feel goods. True. Sometimes it's hard to see, because I'm too caught up in the bad things, but people really are doing great humanitarian things all over. I need to look out for those more often.

Apple will be considering opening a Utah office. Sadly, false, so far as I am aware.

There will be a new food craze to replace the current one. (What is the current one anyway. Swig?) I hope it has something to do with high-quality dark chocolate. Maybe? I am out of the loop for food crazes. I can't think of any off hand, though. And Swig is still a thing.

Everyone will still be talking about the amazing no-longer-new Harry Potter movie. Not as true as it should be. Fantastic Beasts was awesome. I really should buy that and watch it again. But I have had a handful of conversations about it in the last month, so it's still got some hype.

We will all be anxious for the new Stormlight Archive book. Yesssss! But not as much as I wish, because it's not coming out until probably November! [big fat tears]

Half of our active writers will be new. Honestly, I have no idea. 

Everyone will talk about the good old days of the Board, and why can't we just be like that now? There is actually a question sort of about this...

Hopefully we'll have finally gotten a sponsor that doesn't turn out to be terrible. I'm so out of touch with the Board right now that I, once again, have no idea.

And I hope we'll now have a webmaster that has time to devote to the Board, so things like the Board on mobile won't be terrible. And maybe an updated app? But that seems to be stretching it. Based on the bugs still on the writer's side of the Board, I'm gonna guess this is false. Also, I know for a fact that the app hasn't been updated in years, and isn't currently on the developer's to do list. So... false.

 

Predictions for next year:

  • I will know for a surety if my family will remain a family of 5 or not.
  • Dragon Baby will be finishing up THIRD GRADE and will finally have enough confidence to do things without me.
  • Niffler Baby will have probably discovered that boys are more fun to tease and play with.
  • Yellow 2.0 will have mellowed in temper and be my sweet, fun boy again. He will still be obsessed with cars, trains, firetrucks, and monsters. Perhaps we'll add dinosaurs to the list?
  • I will have at least two more stamps in my passport.
  • We will be planning another epic family vacation.
  • I will have gone to one of the Harry Potter theme parks.
  • Niffler Baby will have read the first Harry Potter book and loved it. (Please? Oh please?)
  • I will be at least halfway done with at least one more Harry Potter quilt (probably my brother's)
  • I will have earned my Personal Progress medallion.
  • America will not have imploded. I pray.
  • A new political party will begin to emerge to represent those people who feel like the Republican party has left them.
 
~ Dragon Lady
A:

Dear obviously not me,

Here is a verbatim copy of my predictions from last year as found in Board Question #86643, with everything that turned out to be incorrect struck through.

Here are my predictions for the next year.

Hillary Clinton will beat Donald Trump in one of the ugliest and most contentious presidential elections in modern history. As a side effect of Donald Trump, the Republican Party will begin to fracture and realign itself in a three-way battle between populists, economic libertarians, and business interests. As another side effect, Gary Johnson and the Libertarian Party* will receive a substantial share of the former Republican vote, possibly enough to win electoral votes and certainly enough to deny Trump electoral votes.

Politics in the United States will continue its trend of polarization and push further towards some sort of breaking point. It's unlikely that the breaking point itself (widespread disruption of an institution of democratic order) will be reached, in the next year or perhaps ever, but we will almost certainly be much closer to that point in a year's time than we are today.

The war in Syria will continue largely unabated, and the refugee crisis with it. ISIS will continue its slow decline, and will increasingly attempt to target Europe with terrorist attacks with the aim of escalating the war, driving further wedges between Muslims and the West, demoralizing its enemies, and distracting everyone from the fact that they are no longer winning.

The world at large will continue to change gradually and incrementally rather than spectacularly, and hardly anyone will notice except in retrospect.

The 100 Hour Board will hit question #90000 around January 2017, or possibly a bit later (by my back-of-the-envelope calculations, it appears that question frequency has slowed down a bit over the past 15,000 questions).

Yayfulness will start graduate school at Cal Poly and reignite his passion for urban design. He will continue getting overly excited about Star Wars and not bothering to watch movies that are not Star Wars, and he will make a multitude of jokes and puns bad enough that yayfulgirl will probably sprain an eyeball from rolling her eyes.

I thought I was smart.

I was not actually that smart.

So, let's do it again!

In the world at large, I desperately hope suspect that the worldwide tide of nationalism has hit its high-water mark already. Macron will win the French election. Democrats will be set to make significant gains in the House of Representatives here in the US. (Labour is still probably going to be stuck in a freefall in the UK, but you can't win everything everywhere.) Trump won't be impeached, though; he's functioning as a generic albeit highly amateur and unstable Republican, and his base still loves him, and that's enough for the party to prefer to keep him around.

In my personal/academic life, by next alumni week I should be a few months away from graduation. And also I'll go out on a limb and predict that child #1 will have progressed from "concept" to "some sort of physical entity."

I feel like I ought to predict more, but I can't think of anything else that I feel confident enough about to put in writing, so that'll have to do.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Doctor,

I'm going to make predictions because I can.

  • I will be pregnant.
  • I will have a calling in the Primary.
  • I will have actually coded at least two of the app ideas I have stored away.
  • I will probably still be involved with the Board.
And....I don't have any other predictions because I've stopped paying attention.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear not,

My prediction in 2016: Regardless of who wins the general election, I think the Republican party as it has existed is dead. Demography was against it anyway, unless they finally shifted their positions on immigration reform and social issues. We're going to see a major realignment, with disparate elements gravitating to new parties or new names, and the beginning of the next Party System (Sixth or Seventh, depending on how you interpret the 20th century). This may take longer than a single year, but it's coming.

Result: The Republican Party ran the most dysfunctional, incompetent, scorched earth campaign in modern history... to a staggering win. Even though they now control every single branch of government, they're still so hideously dysfunctional and incompetent they can't seem to do anything except lie, waste money, and make us the laughingstock of the world. And at the center of it all is a puerile, evil old man whose already weak cognitive faculties are rapidly deteriorating before our eyes.

I had more here but I got logged out and lost it all while typing it. So I don't have a prediction for this year anymore. Clearly, everything is made up, nothing matters, and the country is full of idiot racists who elected idiot racists. So here's the lesson for all you bright-eyed, optimistic kids who want to "make a difference" and "believe in America": It's all a lie. Wonderful selfless people die in poverty and evil tyrants die of old age, surrounded by luxury. "Right" and "Wrong" apparently don't matter if you have a billion dollars and no conscience. There's no such thing as justice or karma. There's only power, and people willing to wield it at the expense of others–a notion that the old man currently living in the White House might recognize as a reference to Machiavelli or Nietzsche if he weren't functionally illiterate and disinterested in everything except fueling his malignant ego. And now, since, he's ramping up nuclear bellicosity with North Korea, there's a good chance this conversation doesn't matter either. So screw everyone, get yours, get rich, and do whatever you want. We're all going to die soon anyway.

-Cognoscente, honestly shocked at his cynicism. It hasn't been a great year.

 

P.S. The profound sadness and nihilism expressed in this answer in no way reflects the views of the Board, its governing body, BYU, or the Church.

A:

Dear who is this?,

Prediction: "If Trump gets elected, at least one civilization will denounce the U.S. and a horrible dictator will send a request for a declaration of friendship, embarrassing everyone."

Current reality: HAHAHA *sobs*

-Mico

A:

Dear Basil,

I'm for sure not still bitter that my prediction of Lin-Manuel Miranda winning an Oscar didn't come true.

For next year, I predict:

O B S O L E S C E N C E

Hugs,

-MSJ


0 Corrections
Question #89484 posted on 04/25/2017 6:27 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board Alums,

Who are your favorites of the current writers?

-Current Reader

A:

Dear Current ~

I confess, I stopped reading the Board regularly. Because it put so many new posts in my Feedly feed every day that I would get anxiety about catching up, and would instead stop reading altogether. Then eventually would go through binges when I would skim through everything for many hours and end up ignoring my life. So I just cut that out of my feed and will just randomly pop in and read a few posts here and there.

That said, I don't really know any of the newest writers. Thankfully, Zedability still writes, and she has always had a fond place in my heart. She often writes things in a very tactful, loving way, the words that are in my heart, but I've not been able to express adequately. 

~ Dragon Lady

A:

Dear Reader,

SHEEBS AND HALEOAJKDFSUO9302 BECAUSE BLOOD PROBIES. 

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear Doctor,

Somehow when I read this I forgot that I am an alumna. And therefore no one would be saying I was their favorite. Oops. 

Well, by default my favorite current writer is Spectre.

But other than that? Either Ardilla or Frere.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear reader,

About half of the current writers are my contemporaries or people I know in person, and I love every one of them.

As for the writers I haven't met... I exchanged a few emails with Alta after she used some Chilean slang that I hadn't heard in years, and she seems pretty cool. And based purely on the answers I've read, Van Goff is awesome.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear You,

For better or for worse, I don't read The Board that often.  It taught me everything I need to know and find my answers.

So, I have no real opinion on any board writers.  I've moved on.  I'm glad they are still keeping the flame alight... but I'm not following that light anymore.

 

That is all.

Horatio


0 Corrections
Question #89482 posted on 04/25/2017 5:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear steen,

If I'm correct, you teach for the MLS department, yes? I was recently accepted into the program (starting in the fall). Do you have any advice on succeeding in the program and the field in general? Thanks for coming back for alumni week!

-Boboddy

A:

Dear Boboddy,

I taught MMBio 102 for several years, but I don't any more (talk about doxxing myself here).  The program was in flux the last time I had anything to do with it and now that Shauna retired and they hired the new guy I'm not sure what changes they've made.  Hopefully a lot, because the MLS program at BYU has been long overdue for an update.

Generally speaking, the MLS program at BYU is fast and jam packed.  You get a lot of information thrown at you all at once.  Just realize for the next year of your life you're going to have to put a lot of things on the back burner but it will be worth it, you can do anything for a year.  You will take tests every Friday, it will be crazy for the first few weeks but you'll get used to the pace and how to study.

Look over your notes every night and make sure you understand the concepts.  If you revisit something before you go to sleep you will have something like an 80% retention, 50% if you wait until the next day.  There's a source for those numbers...I promise.  I spent most of my undergrad just trying to memorize everything in little fact islands that I could pull out of my head during a test.  This is the wrong way to study.  If you understand the concept or the bodily function or the chemical reaction you won't need to memorize much because you'll be able to walk through it and figure out the answer.

When it comes to selecting an internship site, if you want to make sure you get the particular hospital you want don't try to impress them with the fact you are planning to go to med school or PA school.  You can mention that you are interested in doing so in the future but they fight over students who are going to stay in the area and look like they could work at that same hospital after the internship is finished.  This is good for the hospital because there is a giant shortage of med techs right now and hiring students is cheaper and quicker than having to look for someone. 

In the end, you are going to come away with some really good friends and are basically guaranteed a job when you graduate.  Maybe not the exact shift you want, but a decent paying job right out of college is pretty awesome and most people find what they want in a year or two.  Gotta put in your time on the graveyard shift sometimes.  It's not too bad.  There will be a lot of opportunities for you to find different niches if you put in the effort to find them.  Not many people can stay a bench tech for their entire career (me included).

The lab is a great place to work in medicine, it can be a springboard to a lot of different things.  Good luck with your next few semesters!

- steen


0 Corrections
Question #89454 posted on 04/25/2017 2:39 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Has the rate of inventions (2nd, 3rd,+ venture) made by engineers who have successfully launched their first invention into the market changed over the past two decades?

-Statici

A:

Dear Statistician,

Instead of researching the actual rate of new inventions, I'm going to use data on US patents. Looking at the overall clime of the US in recent years, there has been roughly linear growth in the number of patents granted, though the rate of growth has slowed between 2014 and 2015. This trend isn't exclusive to the US either. According to this source, the rate of patents increased dramatically in Europe and Japan from circa 1980-2000.

 Total-US-Patent-Documents-Published-2015.png

(source)

Getting more specific, this site graphs the grant rate of patents for different areas in technology. There is a considerable divot in patents granted during the recession across all areas, but since then, we see a general trend of growth, albeit slow growth (the rate of growth is close to constant).

Next, I found this nifty website, which conveniently gives the data and different kinds of graphs for different types and indicators of patents (you might have fun playing around with different data sets there).  Out of the types I selected, computer technology has been growing the most, though the rate has been negative from 2014-2015. 

Unfortunately, I wasn't able to find any hard statistics on engineers with multiple patents in the past two decades. But, given the general clime of growth, and that the vast majority of prolific inventors are currently active (up through 2016, at least), I'm going to say that the rate for multiple patents issued to engineers has been increasing. 

~Anathema


0 Corrections
Question #89437 posted on 04/25/2017 2:38 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why is it that sometimes, when you're on an elevator going up, it feels like you're going down (and vice versa)?

-Argile

A:

Dear Arg,

Right at about the turn of the 20th century, we thought we knew and understood everything there was to know and understand about physics. Specifically, about pulleys. You've probably heard of a pulley. It's one of the six "simple machines", hypothetical mathematical objects at the basis of theoretical physics, the other five being the level, the wheel and axle, the inclined plane, the box, and the perpetual motion machine. Until recently the only of these objects that had been created experimentally were the pulley, realized during the Renaissance by Leonardo Da Vinci, and the perpetual motion machine, used by the ancient Egyptians and regarded by most scientists to have been gifted to them by an alien race. As such, almost the entirety of "real-world" physics was thought to be the study of pulleys, the basics of which comprise most introductory physics courses. (Of course, what you're taught is a sort of "idealized" version of the pulley. In reality pulleys are actually frictionless, massless, and behave like simple harmonic oscillators. The maths required to study a "real-world" object is generally regarded as too much and is eschewed lest we scare away potential research servants.)

The foundational breakthrough of "modern" physics, then, was the discovery of the box. No one understands how we were able to finally create a "real-world" box* but research into boxes by many turn-of-the-century physicists led to the development of a new branch of physics, quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanics is, simply put, the study of what happens inside boxes. You've probably heard of some of the more startling consequences of quantum mechanics, such as Schrödinger's cat, the uncertainty principle, and quantized energy levels. Schrödinger's cat is an interesting experiment carried out by Ewrin Schrödinger in 1935. Schrödinger placed a cat inside a box and observed what happened. Of course, when something is in a box you can't observe it, so there was no way to know what happened. Was the cat dead? Was the cat alive? You can't know until you open the box and look. Sometimes the cat was dead and other times it was alive, but until the box was open there was no way to know. According to one interpretation of quantum mechanics, until the box is open the cat is both simultaneously dead and alive, a situation called a "superposition" or "zombism". In another interpretation (and the interpretation I personally believe) when a box is closed, parallel universes corresponding to the cat being dead or alive and their relative probabilities are created and we are unable to know in which one we reside until the box is opened. The uncertainty principle is a mathematical formalism created by Werner Heisenberg to model what goes on inside boxes. As implied by the name, the uncertainty principle shows deterministically that what occurs inside a box is unknowable. Lastly, quantized energy levels refers to how numbers describing properties of boxes occur in discrete intervals. In the example of Schrödinger's cat, while the cat may have been dead or alive or both, there would always be an integral number of cats.

If you're a student of scientific history, that last consequence may surprise you. In his famous notebook Da Vinci records the results of his experiments which consisted of attaching cats and other objects to pulleys. What he found by so doing is that the object he placed on a pulley could then raise them to any height, even a non-integral number. Mathematically, pulleys are continuous functions while boxes are discrete functions. So what happened when we put a box on a pulley? The startling results were discovered by Elisha Graves Otis, inventor of the elevator. Elisha has assumed that attaching a box to a pulley would allow him to raise that box to any height. To his surprise, boxes on pulleys can only be raised to discrete heights, which Elisha recognized could correspond to the discrete floors in a building, which is how he went on to capitalize on his invention. The actual mathematics of these box/pulley combinations (elevators) are extremely complicated but engineers have perfected them so that there is only a slim chance of dying when you ride one. (You may have noticed how many elevators don't have a 13th floor. This is the most dangerous number and it is very difficult to remain alive when a box is attached to this number.)

So, now that you're primed on elevator mechanics**, a branch of quantum mechanics, let's get to the crux of your question. You're probably familiar with general relativity, a theory of magic proposed by German warlock Albert Einstein. Einstein talked about "gravity" which he found to be how much it felt like you were moving up or down. (One of the more interesting results of Einstein's theory is that "artificial" gravity, that is gravity created by magic, is indistinguishable from "real" gravity, gravity which has existed since the beginning of time.) The problem arises when a person steps into an elevator. What wins? Physics or magic? Einstein's theories fail in the extreme cases of quantum mechanics while quantum mechanics are unable to predict how much it feels like you're moving up and down. Much work in science today is in creating a "unified" theory, one which takes both the science of boxes and combines it with the magic of gravity. So ultimately, we don't know the answer to your question but we hope to someday soon.

-Terrible Scientist

*Nor we will ever be able to, a paradox at the heart of quantum mechanics
**I failed to mention this earlier, but it's worth noting: according to one interpretation of quantum mechanics, elevators are essentially portals to nearly identical parallel universes. Fascinating stuff!


0 Corrections
Question #89402 posted on 04/25/2017 2:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have a linguistics question!

I remember learning at some point in college that languages tend to get simpler over time in sort of a linguistic entropy. This fits with my observations. The Classical Greek of Homer is more complex than the Koine Greek of the New Testament; eighteenth century English prose is more complex than just about any prose being written today. (I think this is objectively true rather than just my own lack of familiarity with Homerian Greek or eighteenth century English, even though I don't have concrete evidence to back it up.)

But... how did the original languages get to be so complex to begin with? Is it more of a cycle where language tends to be more complex, then less complex, then more complex again? Or is it a bias in the types of samples that we have? For example, if Homer represents a more formal style because he wrote for the upper classes, whereas the New Testament was written for a more common reader, then the issue isn't change over time as much as different registers existing simultaneously.

I know there are a lot of linguistics major alumni so I am totally fine with this going over hours so that one of them can answer it. :)

-Emiliana

A:

Dear Emily,

I can't speak for other languages, but I am quite familiar with Arabic, and it was definitely a cycle. Arabic is a Semitic language, and shares much affinity with the other Semitic languages. Until the late sixth century, this meant that Arabic wasn't really a uniform language. Arabic was written in a handful of alphabets, it lacked a definite article, prepositions and adverbs were indicated by a wide, inconsistent variety of consonants added to the triliteral roots, to name some differences. When Muhammad was born, Arabic was a complex group of mutually intelligible, yet linguistically quite different village dialects. The Arabic he used to dictate the Qur'an became the lingua franca, and unified these dialects, at least on the Arabian peninsula. Sibaweyih, in the 8th century, wrote a comprehensive grammar on Arabic, which further served to unify it as a monolithic language. As the Islamic empires moved out of the peninsula, however, they began incorporating other languages. Turkish and Persian are the two most notable, as Turkey and Persia became centers of major Islamic empires.

Arabic's current complexity is mostly due to the central idea that Qur'anic Arabic is the pure, perfect language. Sibaweyih used that model to establish the unified, unchangeable grammar rules of Arabic. The reality, though, was as the Qur'an was essentially 7th century marketplace argot and inconsistent in its rules, the grammar rules created to try to tidy everything up made for a morass of complicated verb forms with many contradictions and inconsistencies. Combined with the incorporation of other foreign languages, with their loan words and grammar constructions, mean that classical Arabic is an exceedingly complex language. The concept of Arabic itself has three levels; classical (Qur'anic Arabic), Modern Standard Arabic (a simplified version of classical Arabic, used mostly for television and printed news), and the dialect of whatever country, district, or town in which it is spoken.

Dr. Smeed

A:

Dearest Emiliana,

First, I don't think that written language is the best way of measuring language development. For starters, reading and writing has historically been the province of only the highly educated, so it's easier to maintain a "pure" form of a language if only the highly educated are using it. (The language of the Iliad doesn't really tell us anything about the language of the average, illiterate laborer in Ancient Greece.) Additionally, the ancient texts that have survived are often few and far between, making it more difficult to reconstruct the history of a language. And even in the modern era, when literacy is widespread and casual language is widely documented, linguists still agree that there are significant differences between written and spoken language.

I'm also going to push back on your use of the word "entropy." In a non-technical sense, entropy is "a process of degradation or running down or a trend to disorder." I don't think that's the same thing as simplification. For example, the OED lists over 50 historical spellings of the noun "right" (including rict, richȝ, rijt, rythe, reight, etc.). Collapsing all of those spellings down to one standardized spelling is definitely orthographic simplification, but I wouldn't call it entropy. (On the contrary, standardizing spellings seems like creating more order, not less.) Entropy is also a natural physical process, while language is created by the human brain and it changes due to complex interactions between speakers and communities. I do think I understand what you're trying to say; I just don't think that "entropy" is the right word for it.

As an additional wrinkle, there is no universally agreed upon standard for linguistic complexity. At some point in time, the prefix "in-" (meaning "not") split into five different prefixes: "il-" ("illogical," "illicit"), "im-" ("impossible," "immeasurable") "in-" ("innumerable," "inoperable"), /ɪŋ/ (also spelled "in-", but pronounced differently; "incongruous," "ingrate"), and "ir-" ("irreverent," "irrespective"). Did this change make the language more complex, because a single prefix turned into multiple prefixes? Or did it make the language more (phonetically) simple because the prefix consonant now matches the point of articulation of the following letter?

With all of that as a background, my guess is that you're referring to well-documented phenomena such as the loss of (most) grammatical gender and (most) cases in English. Based on a very thorough scientific analysis (i.e., bouncing ideas off of Petra and Mico), our hypothesis is that this type of change may be influenced by population size and language contact. If a language has a small number of speakers who don't regularly have contact with speakers of other languages, it may be easier for those speakers to maintain a certain degree of complexity (however you define it). On the other hand, if a language has a large population of speakers and a great deal of contact with other languages, that may influence the way the language develops, including simplification of certain linguistic features. Possibly. Maybe.

- Katya


0 Corrections
Question #89476 posted on 04/25/2017 2:04 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board writers who have finals,

How you doin'? You okay? Anything we can do to help?

-tomaytoes

A:

Dear el tomate no pudo bautizarse porque toma té,

I'm on the quarter system, so no finals in April, but I think this might turn out to be the busiest week of my quarter. I had one major paper due yesterday (Thursday, that is) and I've got two more due on Monday, plus an important presentation with my studio class in a public meeting next Saturday. And that's not even taking into account my job as a research assistant, my overwhelming desire for distraction in the form of alumni week, and both my birthday and my anniversary. I'm busy, I'm stressed, I'm excited, I'm very hopefully not getting sick... I'm basically everything except relaxed and rested.

So, if you could somehow find a way to vicariously sleep for me, that would be awesome.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Tomatoes,

Butter.jpg (source)

Please send me all the dog memes you can muster.

Keep it real,
Sherpa Dave

A:

Dear Lon,

In the past, oh, two days, I guess, 

  • I helped my brother and his family move (again) while getting ready to move myself at the end of the month. 
  • I've just been going on runs?? I guess it's good for me, but, like, eghh. It's sort of gross.
  • I've had to figure out how to go about writing three papers that I should have written+submitted over the course of the semester but Anxiety so I didn't so I've been being frantic about lately, all while trying to be a Real Person in Real Life. The result is that I am not very successful in either endeavor. But hey, only one more paper to go and then I can study for my actual final exams. 
  • Oh, can I show you what I'm proudest of?
    I established the first private Board Alumni Facebook group.
    I help connect dozens of writers. I get to see them growing up.
    In their eyes I see you Alexander. 
    In their posts I see 
    If you would like to support this private operation you can find us on Kickstarte

Nope. Back to finals. 

-AS

A:

Dear potatoes,

By the time this posts I will have taken the next big test in my medical career, Step 2 CS. The test is basically me paying $1,300 (plus travel/food/lodging to one of 5 places in the country that administers it) to prove that I'm speak the English goods and that I'm not a total buffoon with mock-patients. There are three criteria to meet over 12 patient encounters, and it is pass/fail. But, the way things are actually graded is a tightly kept secret, so the whole test is basically me asking tons of questions hoping that something sticks and you get the answers you need, all while jumping through hoops that don't exist anywhere in the real world of medicine, and being subjectively graded while doing it. Students similar to me (US, MD school) have a 97% pass rate, basically making this a giant money grab by the licensing folks under the guise of "We want to make sure students are really ready to practice medicine!" What's more is that there are many accounts of people doing generally well and failing, and others listing thing after thing they did poorly and passing. And if you fail and have to retake it, you get to carry that red flag with you into residency applications, even if you pass the second time, and most students that fail the first time pass the second time without any additional study.

And I don't get to know the results until potentially the end of July.

So if you could get rid of this test that'd be great.

- Commander Keen

A:

Dear you,

I literally got up before 4 am this morning to study for my final at 7 am (it's the first day of finals, btw). Also, I still have a ton of grading and stuff to do for my job.

~Anathema

A:

Dear Potayto,

Hello, darkness, my old friend...

-Van Goff, who already went on hiatus to study for finals week but a) you asked and b) "study"


0 Corrections
Question #89479 posted on 04/25/2017 2:04 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board (and Alumni, too! Yay!),

So there's this girl I like, and recently she told me that she likes me, too. And that's exciting! Especially because this doesn't seem to happen to me all that often.

I'm excited that we're probably going to spend more time together in the near future, but I'm also a little nervous about something. See, while we haven't had any long conversations about it or anything, it seems like our interests and tastes are pretty different from each other. Part of me thinks this actually isn't going to be a huge deal, but the other part of me can't stop thinking things like "Well, this is nice, but it's going to start going downhill when she finds out I like X."

Have you dealt with this kind of situation before? If so, what did you do? Do you have any advice in general? Like I said, I don't have a ton of experience in dating and this kind of thing.

-Eager, but Anxious

A:

Dear Eager, but Anxious,

Okay, so. Once upon a time, I remember feeling like it was an exceptionally rare event when someone liked me. I felt like I had to take that and run with it because I didn't know if or when it would happen again. So if it was possible to get myself to like the person that liked me, I would. I'd contort myself into little shapes, like what they liked, and hide what I thought they didn't.

Let me tell you, that nonsense is exhausting and it doesn't work. You are going to like and be liked by plenty of people in your dating life, and there are going to be enough of them who will like what you like or at least like you while you like what you like. (That was a lot of likes. Wow.) I was surprised to the extent to which this is true.

My advice is to just be exactly who you are from the beginning, unapologetically. Be a good person, and be a giving person in conversations and activities and whatnot, but just show off who you are right from the get-go. If she still likes you, great. If not, someone else will, and that relationship will be better for you. Don't train yourself out of being who you are. That is a headache to undo.

- The Black Sheep

A:

Hello Kitty,

No. I have not dealt with that kind of situation before. Meaning when I've liked a girl and she told me she also liked me.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Hello anxious one, 

Okay, I have to tell you this funny story. It is completely true and it is not intended as counsel of any sort but is super relevant.

One of my best friends (as in known him since elementary school) is like a "sexy nerd", that is, he likes and plays basketball, he's good-looking, he works out, he doesn't wear glasses, he is totally not a guy you would think plays World of Warcraft (vanilla and the main tank in 40-mans, for those who want to know, and he doesn't play anymore). I'm a nerd and even I didn't play it for at least a year after it came out, so I was surprised to learn he was so into it. But he was. He had a gaming computer and still took care of himself and did varied activities but it was still his big main thing.

He dates this girl very seriously at the same. He doesn't tell her. This is around the time that WoW addiction headlines are getting into the news. She has zero clue. She is one of those women who thinks video games are the worst thing a man can be into, even though hunting or golfing takes up more of his time. I digress.

They move in together. Finally, at that point, with no shame, he busts out the gaming PC. She is shocked and can't believe it. She is also kind of mad.

Anyway, he was still an awesome catch and she married him anyway. Their kids are adorable.

She never converted to WoW though she played it a little bit at first. She now finally realizes that golf is kind of worse, because it takes way more time and is way harder to interrupt, it turns out. And he is very disciplined about his diet and gym habits, so it's not like he's desperate for the exercise.

He is still really good-looking and I say that as a straight guy. He has never been overweight or not had a muscly, lean appearance. People still can't tell he plays video games, and not just sports or Halo or whatever, but PC stuff. He's a huge Jazz fan and Jazz games usually beat out video games. He's still a nerd. All of his friends' wives love this story--it's of course cuter/funnier if you know 'em, as usual.

--Toasteroven

A:

Eager,

Let me stop you right there, champ. It sounds like you need a refresher course on RATHER DASHING'S GUIDE TO MUCHAS SMOOCHES:

  1. Reach up to your head and turn down your brain screams
  2. Put your lips on her lips
  3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 until somebody faints and/or an angel descends to give you high-fives because your technique is on point
  4. Repeat step 3 ad infinitum because kissing is awesome
  5. You're a winner, go get some tacos, unless you're still smooching because technically you're in an endless loop of lip action

There you have it! Go, my child. Be anxious no more.

-Rather Dashing

A:

Dear You,

I think it’s kind of fun to date people with interests different from your own because you get to learn about new things. It would be really boring to date someone who liked all the same stuff I like. (I mean, you can only have so many conversations about Radiohead before it's like, "Man, I wish one of us had something new to bring to the table.")

Also, I’d be willing to bet that this girl likes and admires you for your positive characteristics—for who you are as a person. Chances are she’s not going to change her mind about you just cuz, I don’t know, you listen to podcasts about comic books or something like that. I mean, yes, listening to podcasts about comic books is, like, high-level nerdy and she probably might make fun of you just a bit, but maybe she thinks it’s kind of cute, too. (Just a random example I’m throwing out, of course.)

Love,

Vienna


0 Corrections
Question #89481 posted on 04/25/2017 1:59 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Can you tell us about a difficult or important conversation you had recently (bonus points if you feel like you handled it particularly well or particularly poorly).

-Inverse Insomniac

A:

Dear Inverse, 

I had a pretty significant amount of emotional trauma that happened to me a few years back. I don't really like to talk about it because it's hard and difficult to discuss but it still impacts my life today. I ended up telling a friend most of the story a few weeks ago and even though it was the most painful thing that I've done in awhile, it's comforting to know that there is someone else out there who I can count on to and can help me through my bad days. 

-a writer

A:

Dear Doctor,

What follows is the story of Tally's Adventures with Depression and HR.

Now, my depression seriously started in July last year, but it wasn't until November when I finally went to my boss and asked him if I could work from home when I wasn't feeling particularly well. It helped mitigate some of the things I was dealing with, and I knew I wasn't going to abuse that permission. He let me do so, and for the next couple of months, I only stayed about one day a week at home, but most of the time I just went home at lunch and worked from home in the afternoon.

February rolled around, and with it a new medication. I was having some bad side effects, so I called my doctor in the morning, and they wanted me to come down that day instead of the following Tuesday when my appointment was scheduled. Problem was, they could only fit me in an hour later and I lived about an hour away. So, I hurried down and used PTO hours to cover for the two I'd be gone. When I came back, my manager (between me and my boss in the hierarchy) mentioned he wanted to talk to me. He explained how my boss had been concerned about me working from home too much, even though I didn't feel like it had been too much. He even said that my boss had talked about the idea of going to three quarter time with three quarter salary. At this point, I felt so uncomfortable that I felt like I needed to talk to HR about it. So, I did. It was a very nervewracking conversation. The end result is that HR told my boss and manager to back off.

All was well, I thought.

Fast forward to last Monday. My manager wanted to meet with me due to a mistake on my part that had been realized while I was working from home the previous Friday. His entire point was that working from home lead to communication issues and that, essentially, I needed to stop doing it. And then he mentioned that my boss wanted me to make sure I was getting forty hours in a week. Unsettled, I went to my time tracker app (which I hate with a passion but I was grateful for it anyways), printed out a report for the previous five weeks, and found that I'd worked over forty for three of the five, and forty for the other two. They'd only gone off of their perceptions to give me a warning. So, I scheduled a meeting with HR for that afternoon and explained the situation, providing evidence of my hours worked and adding that after the meeting that morning, I had honestly felt like I couldn't work there anymore (which was true).

The good news is that HR was completely on my side, called my manager out for being a micromanager, gave me an official accommodation to work from home once a week with a letter from my therapist, and explained to them that I wasn't being petulant, but that there was a medical reason this was going on. The bad news is that I don't have the flexibility to pick which day I stay home (which wasn't the point but whatever) and I still don't feel entirely comfortable at work. I don't feel like I have the space I need, and it honestly feels like they've stopped trusting me, but they haven't told me why.

Anyways. Meetings with HR can be hit and miss, but I'm grateful these two went well.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear friend,

1. Your questions are great. I'm glad Alumni Week is a thing so that you can ask a lot of them. 

2. I've been realizing that it's pretty difficult to express what I need from others if I don't actually know myself what I need. (As a side note, I think most people don't really know what they need, and that causes a lot of hardship.)

This has been particularly present in my family relations lately: I'm graduating from depression's hold on me and realizing I actually can do a lot of things I want to do. But this started happening right around the time when we started looking more into bipolar disorder and realizing it might more aptly fit my experience (as opposed to general or even atypical depression). 

And, here's the thing: I probably did have bipolar at some point, and maybe even still do, but if I keep being treated like I'm broken, I'm not going to be able to heal. In other words, I once needed a cast to keep me from falling apart, but now I want to walk again and I can't do that if the casts stay on. 

This maybe isn't true for everybody, and it hasn't always been true for me, but it is now. It feels like my family and the professionals I've been seeing want to help me manage some of the deep-rooted issues I've been dealing with, but I've been doing that all my life, and especially the past two years. It's not a bad approach, but I'm ready for something more profound. 

I want to stop pruning and hacking at branches; I want to heal my roots. But how do you tell someone, a mom especially, to let go when you've already scared them into clinging to you?

For now, I think it means I keep a low profile, and do things carefully and gently. Perhaps the hardest part is convincing others to do the same. 

3. Sorry this didn't exactly answer the question. There have been a lot of conversations, and most have been annoyingly hard. But I'm working on it. And it certainly helps that I'll have my own place in a week. 

Thanks for this question. 

-Auto Surf

A:

Dear I2,

I'm the officer in charge of all the civilian-related issues in a sizeable area. I reported directly to a two-star general about the future of this area, and I have a follow-up meeting with him soon. The reports I have been creating and sending are going directly to generals of every quantity of star. I handled it really well, because they accepted my plan of managing an area of nearly a quarter-million people. You could say it went well.

Sorry I have to be so vague. I shouldn't have even gotten involved this year because I want to talk so much about it. Some day there will be a movie about it, I promise.

Dr. Smeed

A:

Dear Inverse, 

This year I have two kids who are reallllllly far behind in reading and/or math. One should probably be referred to special ed and the other has pretty bad ADD. Since I'm a teacher and not a doctor and therefore legally unable to diagnose that a child has a learning disability or other medical condition, I have to drop as many hints as possible in discussions with parents. Both sets of parents were receptive and are beginning referral processes/doctors appointments for their children. Woot woot!

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Corrections
Question #89478 posted on 04/25/2017 1:58 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board Married Writers and Alums,

When you asked your future father-in-law to marry his daughter, what did he say? We just got a "no" and we're devastated. Should we move on with getting engaged? We are both temple-worthy, hard working people and my dad is completely opposed to us getting married and engaged. We've been dating for a year and a half. We aren't rushing into things (even though he keeps telling us we are). Those of you who got a "no," what did you do? What would you have done differently?

-Frustrated and Sad

A:

Dear reader,

I didn't ask my wife's father, because it's none of his [redacted] business.

-The Man with a Mustache

A:

Dear Susan,

We asked for my father's blessing, but not for permission. It was more "Hey, look. We're going to get married, but we're hoping to do so with your blessing. Will you give it to us?" My dad requested my now husband make some very specific promises, and then gave his blessing. Honestly I think my dad would have given his permission had we asked because he's seen how happy I am since being with Husband, but at the same time I can also see my dad saying no because of Circumstances and also no one is good enough for his daughters. Had this been the case, I still would have married my husband; my dad would have come around eventually. I'm not saying you should just blow off your dad, but maybe ask him what it is that he specifically is objecting to, then take it from there. Assuming you're no longer a minor, you don't actually need your parents' permission to wed. Do what will make you happiest in the long run!

-Az

A:

Dear Frustrated,

Like a lot of the writers, I specifically told my fiance to only ask for my father's blessing before getting engaged, not his permission, because I'm an adult and nobody else has the right to give me permission to do anything with my life. However, I did want to get my father's blessing before getting engaged, because that at least keeps him involved in the process and shows respect for him, with a nod at tradition, which my family is big into.

Now that your father has refused to give you his permission, I would suggest sitting down and talking with him (maybe with your almost fiance there, too). You can explain to him why you want to get married, and why you both feel it's the right decision, and hopefully hearing that from you will help him realize that you're not just a dumb kid rushing into something that you don't understand. You could explain that you do respect him and his opinion is very important to you, and you want him to feel involved in the process. That said, you can also tell him that as adults, whether or not he gives you permission doesn't actually affect whether or not you're going to get married, because he legally has absolutely no sway over what you can do and you have the legal right to make any decision you want regardless of whether he agrees with it. With all that out there (you love and respect him, but you're going to do what's best for you, which is getting married), you could ask for his blessing and tell him how much it would mean to you to have it. He might not be able to give it to you right away, but hopefully with time he'll realize that if this is going to happen anyways, he might as well not ruin your day by withholding his blessing. If he doesn't come to that conclusion, I would say you've still done all you can do, and to go ahead with the wedding anyways.

One of my friends (I'll call her Becky) and her now husband (I'll call him Zach) were in a similar situation to yours. They were de facto engaged (booked the temple, had a dress, making wedding plans) long before they were officially engaged (with a ring and an official proposal). Becky's father is very traditional, and Becky and all her sisters knew that before getting engaged, their suitors would need to ask their dad for his permission. During the de facto engagement Zach hadn't talked with Becky's dad, but he was planning on doing it before the official proposal. Unfortunately, Becky's sister knew what was going on with her and Zach, and accidentally let it slip in a conversation with their dad, before Zach had talked with him. The dad called Becky in a rage, demanding to know why Zach hadn't talked with him and implying that he would have said no if he had, because the dad felt everything was going too fast and they didn't know each other well enough to make this sort of commitment. Understandably, Becky was pretty devastated, because her dad's opinion meant a lot to her, but she had also had several strong spiritual confirmations that she should marry Zach, and she was determined to go forward with it. Zach actually called up her dad to explain what had happened, and while I don't know what exactly they talked about, just the fact that Zach was willing to talk with him about everything meant a lot to her dad, and helped soften his opinion of their marriage. Zach and Becky also sat down with him and explained why they were getting married and why they were sure that this was the right thing to do. Up to the day before their wedding the dad continued to tell Becky, "Now remember, you don't have to do this," which was hard for her to hear, but he didn't do anything to oppose the wedding, and in fact spent weeks of hard labor preparing their gorgeous backyard for the most beautiful reception. When they actually got married, the dad was proud as could be, and happy to see his daughter so happy, and he's been very supportive of their marriage ever since. One thing that was helpful for Becky during this time was the support that she got from her friends and other family members, because it was really nice for her to have other people to fall back on when things with her dad weren't great. She and Zach prayed together a lot, and went to the temple together a lot, and continued to build their relationship with each other and with God, and things ended up working out, despite the rocky start with her dad. So press on, friend, things will work out. And even if your dad continues to oppose your decision, remember that ultimately it's your marriage, not his.

I'm sorry you're in such an awful situation, but just know that things will get better eventually.

-Alta

P.S. Professor Kirke makes a really important point about also finding out why specifically your dad said no. Make sure that when you talk with him it's a real conversation, and you listen to his side of the story, too, and pay attention if he has actual legitimate concerns about you marrying this guy. Also pray a lot through this whole situation--that you can know the right thing to do, that you can have additional confirmation to marry your almost fiance if that's right for you, that your dad's heart can be softened, that you can all understand each other better and have productive communication, that everything works out in the way the Lord wants it to, etc.

A:

Dear sad,

You're both adults, and the marriage contract is no longer de facto chattel slavery where the man is purchasing a bride from her father. (You know, traditional marriage.) It's certainly in his power to object, but if you want to get married he's powerless to stop you.

Your beloved should wait until you're at home with your family, perhaps on a cold windy night when you're all gathered around the fire. He'll kick down the front door and storm in with a sharp gust of wind at his back. You and your family turn to him all at once, your eyes alight with happiness, your father's with simmering hostility. He holds out his hand to you.

"My darling, take my hand, and I shall share every day I have with you, from now until our last."

You spring to your feet in a single, graceful leap and dive into his arms. You reach up and embrace him, and he kisses you passionately, yet tenderly.

"NO," booms your father, nostrils flaring, veins twitching. "I FORBID THIS!"

You spin back on your heels, cool fire in your eyes. "You cannot stop us, Father!" Your voice cracks with emotion. "Our love is too beautiful, too real! I shall always love you, but if you will not accept our marriage, neither do you accept me in your life!"

Your newly betrothed suddenly puts finger and thumb to lips and lets out a piercing whistle; a whinney responds from the courtyard. It's his trusted steed, Ajax, whom he cared for from a foal. You and your love dash outside, where he effortlessly hoists you onto Ajax's back and leaps up behind you. Your parents follow you outside, Father bellowing, Mother clutching his arm and crying. The steed rears up on his powerful haunches, whinnying loudly, the wind in his mane and your dress and hair, and you hear your love cry, "Away, Ajax! Away to freedom and eternal love! Suck it, old man!" And you gallop away, middle fingers raised on both hands, on to your happily ever after.

Boom. Easy.

-Cognoscente

A:

Dear Doctor,

Spectre talked to my dad. Who not only asked me if the missed call he got was Spectre, but also proceeded to tell me all the details of their conversation the next day.

-Tally M.

A:

Hello frad (frustrated and sad),

My spouse and I didn't do that because it's antiquated and unnecessary, but whatever, you do you. Anyway, if the two of you are good kids and like each other and think you're a good pair, tell that crusty old guy to respectfully suck it, because you're getting married anyway. 

My spouse's dad actually didn't approve of our marriage either. He warned my then-fiancé that he had had a "vision" in the temple that I was the wrong person to marry, and that we should break up. We ignored that old fart's advice and got married, and we've been together since. We even adopted a beautiful... dog together. Awww.

Anyway, don't worry about that old bump on a log. Do what's right for you.

Marzipan

A:

Dear Frustrated and Sad-

I (and several others) weighed in on this question way back when. As I said then: I asked my wife-to-be if she would prefer I talk to her parents. She said yes. I then called both of them (why leave the mom out?), and informed them that I would be proposing. They were okay with that, which meant I didn't have to tell them to cram it because it wasn't their decision anyway. You're still smart to take his reasons under consideration, and you're also welcome to dismiss them if you think he's wrong.

Most everyone else has conveyed this basic sentiment already, so I'm really just piling on at this point. Do what you want, and he can get over himself.

-Foreman

A:

Dear Frustrated,

Yours is obviously a tough situation; I'll jump in because it seems I have a somewhat different perspective than the majority.

I asked my father-in-law's permission, and he gave it happily. (I did ask specifically permission, not just blessing. By asking to marry his daughter, I'm basically asking to be sealed into a relationship with his family, where he holds eternal patriarchal authority. I think out of respect for that role asking permission is appropriate, even if you might be willing to proceed without permission. For similar reasons, I asked him specifically, not my mother-in-law, and to let us speak freely my wife was not present for the conversation.)

In the case of a "no," I'd second Alta's recommendation to make sure there's clear communication about why. Ignoring your father's wishes might be justifiable (unrighteous dominion is a thing) and it might work out fine. You might also do lasting damage your relationship with your dad, particularly if there isn't good communication. You do want to keep your eye on the eternal perspective, i.e. you need to live with both your dad and your husband for forever.

Your dad saying no does create a red flag. I don't know whether he is seeing something you don't? Are there any other issues in the relationship? Do other experienced people you trust, e.g. the other parents, church leaders who know both of you, family friends, etc., think this is a good idea? Obviously I have no idea what the particulars of your particular case are, but that's the type of thing I would think about. Obviously after answering these questions, you would want to pray about whatever you tentatively decide.

I know of a case where in my understanding the guy asked the girl's father for permission, and father said it was too soon but, when given the "we're getting married anyways" ultimatum, ended up going with it. Anyways, they got married in the temple, and it worked out great (cute kids, good jobs, etc.), until there was an affair and an apostasy and they got divorced. Don't know all the backstory here, but just making the point that not all forbidden romances work out as well as those in them imagine they will and sometimes parents are right to raise a red flag.  

Best of luck as you work through a challenging situation.

~Professor Kirke

A:

Dear Frustrated,

When Andy asked my dad, Dad just said, "Well, it's not like I can stop you, can I?"

Thanks, Dad.

-April Ludgate

A:

Dear Frustrated,

Remember the inexplicably popular pop-reggae song "Rude" from 2014? The only love song that is entirely a man singing a pouty song to his girlfriend's father when said father says no to such a request? If it's a terrible song (and it is) I can only imagine the actual situation being worse.

Not much different from what other writers are posting, but I hadn't met my now father-in-law, so before proposing I called more to, shall we say, inform him that I was going to be proposing. I might have an unreliably false memory of how confident I sounded over the phone but it was something along the lines of "I wanted to introduce myself because I'm going to propose and do you have anything you'd like to ask me about?" His response was, and this is almost verbatim, "Huh, are people still calling the father before proposing these days? I trust [his daughter]." 

Seconding the advice about trying to nail down a specific "why" from your father. Is it only that he feels like you're rushing things? What does "no" even mean to him? He won't attend? He won't offer any financial support for the ceremony/reception? You aren't welcome home anymore? Without knowing, I'd bet the most common aftermath of a "no" is a reluctant acceptance. I think the difficult but mature thing would be to come to a decision as a couple first and then do a sit down with your dad. Then have a family movie night, the three of you, and depending on how the conversation goes, either put in The Little Mermaid or Romeo + Juliet.

- Rating Pending (whose mother-in-law has one of those names that could be male or female and, during that call, he couldn't remember his now father-in-law's name. "Is this [now wife's] dad?" he said on the phone.)


0 Corrections
Question #89475 posted on 04/25/2017 1:57 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

In Silk Parachute, John McPhee wrote an essay about his "list" which is essentially a list of things he's proud to have eaten. What's your list?

-The Man with a Mustache

A:

Dear me,

  • Cow tongue
  • Chicken heart
  • Guinea pig*
  • Squid
  • Octopus*
  • Caterpillar
  • Chicken leg bones
  • Eel
  • Moose
  • Rattlesnake
  • Buffalo
  • Alpaca*

*In the last week!

Best,

The Man with a Mustache

A:

Dear MwaM,

  • Once my dad caught a shark on a fishing trip. Instead of throwing it back like a normal person would do, he cooked it and we ate it. It was kind of weird.
  • Once my cousin killed a rattlesnake on a camping trip. Instead of throwing it away like a normal person would do, he cooked it and we ate it. It was also kind of weird.
  • On my mission, we were often served this these things called mollejas. When I asked the other gringo missionaries what "mollejas" meant, they told me they were chicken bladders. I was really proud of having eaten them until I got home, typed "mollejas" into Google Translate, and discovered that they were actually chicken gizzards, which is basically the poultry equivalent of tripe. So still proud. But not as proud.
  • I also once ate all the cartilage off a cow vertebrate to make my host happy. It was the grossest thing. But yessiree, I'm proud of having eaten it.
Yours, &c.
 
Heidi Book
A:

Dear Mustachio-ed Man,

Frog legs, horse, squid, octopus, and chicken hearts all make the list. Also blood sausage, because although it might not be as "exotic" as some of the other things I listed, it was truly absolutely horrifyingly gross, and I'm incredibly proud of myself for finishing not just one giant blood sausage, but two (someone gave it to me on the mission for lunch so I had to eat it). Also one time I had deep-fried hot dogs (also on the mission), and I guess that could make the list.

-Alta

A:

Dear friend,

Squid, octopus, chicken feet, and deep-fried cheesecake.

The deep-fried cheesecake was by far the nastiest.

Peace,

-Stego Lily

A:

Dear The ~

1. Fish eyes. Twice. Because the designated videographer accidentally took a picture instead of a video the first time.

2. Frog legs. Which I grilled myself.

3. A whole fish. 3 times! (Like, a fish that is cooked whole, skin and all. Not like, I ate the bones. Ew.)

4. Escargot

~ Dragon Lady

A:

Dear I mustache you a question,

  • Fish head
  • Chicken heart
  • Unidentifiable parts of a goat
  • Head cheese
  • The entirety of an enormous meal made by a Latinx family who (no joke) tortured missionaries on purpose by forcing them to eat enormous meals. (Someone should ask me to tell that story sometime.)
  • Kidney pie (The guy at the British restaurant pointedly made sure I knew what I was ordering—"You realize it's not, like, kidney beans. It's actual cow kidney," he said. I assured him that it was entirely my intention to eat a cow's kidney.)
  • Fries quatro quesos dos fritos
  • Fufu

-Inverse Insomniac

A:

Dear MwaM,

One time I was trying make a good impression at a fancy dinner, so I didn't pick the pile of raw tomatoes off the bruschetta, despite my intense hatred of tomatoes.

I'm still proud of myself for that.

-Ace


0 Corrections
Question #89471 posted on 04/25/2017 1:57 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Alumni,

What was your biggest regret while writing for the Board? How do you think your answers would be different now?

-Hiccough

A:

Dear friend,

I started my Board career hoping to make all of these new friends and become part of the community. I was doing pretty well at it my first couple months writing. I wrote some collaborative answers (Tally, remember Tally Lily?), organized a few Board social outings, and got to know the other writers. And then I got a boyfriend and abruptly stopped hanging out with anyone from the Board. Like, the last Board activity I remember going to was the Jello Jubilee, and it happened literally the day after I had my first kiss with the dude who is now my husband. Now, I totally don't regret dating and marrying my husband, but I do kind of regret the way a lot of my friendships, especially Board friendships, fell by the wayside as a result. Sorry guys...

Peace,

-Stego Lily

A:

Dear Hic,

I'm probably exaggerating this in retrospect, but I think that I thought way too highly of my own opinion as a writer. I wish I could have written with a bit more humility. I gave a lot of advice on topics that I didn't understand, a lot of advice that today seems particularly unhelpful as I find myself facing those same issues. Especially relationship advice. Especially relationship advice that I gave without ever having been in a relationship. The real world has humbled me immensely.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Hiccup,

Two regrets. The first echoes yayfulness's answer above: I wish I had been more cautious about doling out my opinion on topics I have no experience with. I was pretty naive in a lot of my answers, which is something I only realize in retrospect.

My second, unrelated, regret is that I wish I had gotten to know the other writers better. I'm bad at bonding with people and I feel super awkward at social events, so I often avoided Board parties and such. Now I realize how many really cool experiences I probably missed out on.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Hello Kitty,

I wish I had done more Word of the Board answers. Mostly though? I wish I had chosen a different 'nym.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Doctor,

I think there's a part of me that wishes I'd overshared a bit less.

And then this morning I ran across this quote on Tumblr from Carrie Fisher: "I think I do overshare. It’s my way of trying to understand myself. "

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Hiccough,

I wish I could have been as cool as El-ahrairah.

-everybody

A:

Dear Hiccough, 

I wish I would have gone to more Board events. I was so busy with school while I was in Provo that I think I missed out just a little bit on the Board bond that we have going.

Also, in my old answers, I frequently left out articles and simple verbs that your mind just fills in and skips over. It makes me cringe a little every time I feel nostalgic and reread all my answers.

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear Hiccough,

I would have come out. I wrote about my mental illness and my faith crisis back in 2008-2010, but I didn't come out. I identified as queer/bisexual back then, but I wish I would have just done it. I wrote about LGBTQ issues but didn't admit they pertained to me. I therefore contributed to the idea that being gay is more shameful than just about anything else you can be. When I think of Board-related regrets, I think of that.

As for answers that myself and other writers would have changed as of 2014, check out Board Question #77024.

- The Black Sheep

A:

Dear hiccough,

I wish I had been more involved with readers. Some of the writers became my very close friends, and I think my time at BYU would have only been improved if I had found more ways to meet people with similarly nerdy, silly interests. Of course the appeal of the Board is the Mystery™, but more friendships would have been more satisfying.

-Mico, full of love for all y'all

A:

Dear Hiccough

I started writing as an out-of-stater and so got to know very few of the Board writers in real life. I wish I'd taken advantage of the burgeoning social media scene to at least connect more virtually. Since I stopped writing I actually have connected with several writers from my day, mostly because Facebook suggested we be friends. There are a few writers I know in real life and have seen in the last year (Dragon Lady, Katya, Hobbes, and Yellow...I think that's it...sorry if I left someone out I met) and they're all delightful people. I need more game nights with them.

As for how my answers would be different: Concision.

-Humble Master

A:

Dear Calvin, 

It led to gimpgomnermo moving in with us eventually so that was a bummer I guess. 

- Commander Keen 

A:

Dear you,

I wish I never would have dated that other writer. 

-me

A:

Dear you,

I wish I never would have dated so many other writers.

-someone else

A:

Dear hiccup, 

I just noticed that in one of my answers from the reunion last year, I used the word "reappropriated" when I clearly meant "appropriated."

The shame.

-Hamilton

A:

Dear Hiccough,

I wish I would have dated more of the other writers. 

-a third

A:

Dear Hic,

The short answer is yes. Throughout my tenure as a writer I was really struggling with my beliefs and my sexuality. I think that there is a lot of overall ignorance and even self-loathing in a lot of my opinion answers (many of which involved sexuality/homosexuality as topics). I was pretty depressed at the time and I think that took its toll on my writing (not to mention other parts of my life *cough* dating *cough* school *cough*)

I have since left the LDS Church, and for me that decision had positive effects. I don't hold other people's memberships against them because I understand that for many people the LDS Church has helped them find the happiness that eluded me for a long time. It just wasn't a happy place for me. I am a very different person than I was when writing for the Board, and my answers would definitely be different as a result.  

At the same time, I don't regret being a writer, or even the answers I gave. I think that the Board was very helpful to me with regards to working through some of my own problems, as well as building some support systems with a couple fellow writers and some readers as well. 

-Watts

A:

Dear You,

While I was a Board writer, I was still figuring out my writing voice, my interests, and my beliefs.  This led to my answers often being written in a very silly tone or a very technical tone and nothing in between.  My biggest regret is the silliness! I feel like it hindered my ability to share my thoughts and advice on some of the questions I answered.

-Yog

A:

Dear British Hiccup,

I almost feel like I've been waiting for this question to be asked.  I loved writing for the Board, but really wish that I would have let myself get into it more.  I was excited to become part of the Board community when I first joined, but found that my then-unaddressed social anxiety issues were getting in the way, causing me to feel like my Board identity was "the weirdly reclusive writer."  I also hate how flaky I became about the actual writing part - my slacking started out when I had some legitimate issues with my computer (limiting the time I could spend writing at home), but I let that problem derail my previously conscientious writing habits.  Like just about everything else in my college experience, part of me wishes I could redo my Board days with the confidence I have now.

~Hermia


0 Corrections
Question #89436 posted on 04/25/2017 1:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board Alumni,

So, what have you all been up to? Any life updates worth sharing?

-Curious

A:

Dear Curious,

A few highlights:

Family: There's a new Littlest Master (for those counting, there's now Lil' Master, Littler Master, Even Littler Master, and Littlest Master).

Hobby: I co-host The Protagonist Podcast* where each week we discuss a great character in a great story. We have had Board writers on as guests, and will do so in the future, I'm sure. There are well over 100 episodes now, but if you're interested in trying an episode, some of our 5 most downloaded episodes* are:

#101 The Town of Cicely, Alaska in Northern Exposure
#99 Holden Caulfield in The Catcher in the Rye
#86 Anne Shirley in Anne of Green Gables
#88 The Joker in The Dark Knight
#83 Calvin and Hobbes in Calvin and Hobbes

Some other episodes that might interest readers:

#64 Niles Crane in Frasier
#70 Peter Pan/Banning in Hook
#84 Lizzie Bennet in The Lizzie Bennet Diaries
#105 Christmas Special 2016 #115 Corner Gas
#110 Earl Sinclair in Dinosaurs
#112 Becca Mitchell in Pitch Perfect
#114 Vin in Mistborn
#117 Sam Gerard and Richard Kimball in The Fugitive
#120 Leslie Knope and Ron Swanson in Parks and Recreation

Books: I edit a series of essay collections about superheroes. You can find lovely volumes on Superman, Wonder Woman, the X-Men, the Avengers, Iron Man, the Incredible Hulk, and the Justice League. And there are more coming next year. I also wrote a book about the X-Men and co-authored a soon-to-be released book about Frasier.

Mystery Project: I was flown out to LA to be interviewed as a talking head for a documentary. I don't know how much of this project has been announced, so I'm leaving it vague for now.

-Humble Master

*Please feel free to subscribe to the podcast in iTunes or any other podcast listening app and leave us a review :)

*We have absolutely no idea why these five are our most popular episodes. If you can discern a pattern, please tell us.

A:

Dear C:

I got married and jet-setted off to a whirlwind honeymoon tour of Edinburgh, went to grad school and cocooned in a love bubble, got published, and Hillary's election ensured low anxiety levels and good backup insurance options.

Jinx, I got dumped, panicked and deferred grad school, dated a dude for a month in the summer and then got dumped again, sort of got back together with my boyfriend, and in the most meta thing that has ever happened to me, ran after The One That Got Away when I won a ticket to see the Crazy Ex-Girlfriend herself, realized that I can't see myself living in Los Angeles right now, and the Scott Michael Foster lookalike (Yog can confirm) came to Utah to at long last say that he loved me/he didn't like hurting me/I should just go to grad school? so we should move on. (INTJs for the win this round.) 

In the meantime, I have been working at my unfulfilling but respectable tech writing gig for over two years now. #emotionallyunstablepeoplecanbegoodattheirjobs #feminism  

I was recruited to even more unfulfilling and dull gigs, poured a ton of womanhours into my resume and networking, and have really shifted my perspective of what I think will fulfill me and my place in my industry. It seems that I'm a person who has to learn lessons the hard way. America, I feel ya right now. 

My search for the happiness MacGuffin has convinced me of one thing: the narrative we sell single Millennial women is broken. Art that explores that is my jam. I'm going to a YA book festival in Santa Monica solo because why not, and looked at this answer and think I should take the advice of Matt Kirby who told my class to "finish the d*** book" two years ago. 

Huh. 

When was the last time you were truly happy, eh? 

---Portia

A:

Hello Kitty,

Is nothing a good enough answer? It's pretty accurate. After graduating I went home for a bit and then started graduate school. First semester was OK and second semester I got super depressed! So very much a whole lot of nothing.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Kvothe,

Well, first and most importantly, the universe gave me to best birthday present ever when Patrick Rothfuss and Lin-Manuel Miranda announced that they would be working together on the "Name of the Wind" movie/TV show

Okay, now that I've gotten that out my system... I currently work at Goldman Sachs as their in-house NSA, which means I get to read all the emails. Work sometimes takes over my life so that's...great... I recently took up rock climbing, which is great. I also run a lot now. Since retiring I've run two half-marathons, and I am doing Ragnar in June. I spent a month in New York for work, I went to Spain and Mexico. I am heading to Italy and Switzerland next week (woohoo). I got Tinder. Then deleted it. Then downloaded it again. Then deleted it... the cycle continues. Oh, I also kissed someone for the first time in like six years (not due to Tinder surprisingly). I lost 12 pounds. Hiked a lot of things, biked less things, and had lots of adventures when I wasn't working... yeah... I work a lot. But hey there are some potentially exciting changes coming down that pipeline in the next year. Or grad school. So that's cool.

Yep that's my life. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 

A:

Dear Doctor,

I got married. To Spectre. Which, if you read the Board, you already know.

I've been dealing with severe depression and anxiety since the beginning of July last year. There's a lot I could say about this, but I won't.

My car got stolen two weeks before our wedding, which meant we had to buy a new one a week before...and after we signed the paperwork, the stolen car turned up that night. We ended up getting rid of that car and keeping our newly purchased one.

My parents are moving for two years to London for my dad's job, which means we get some of their furniture and we get to babysit their piano for two years.

I just got cleared to have an emotional support dog, which is great because our new townhome wouldn't allow pets otherwise and I definitely need a dog. 

And yes, we just signed a three year lease (which is really weird to think about) on a townhome that basically has everything we wanted.

-Tally M.

A:

Curious,

It seems that uh...let's see...a guy named ah...Donald John Dump? Ah, I mean...Trump. Yes, Donald J. Trump has become president of the United States. How curious!

-Adequate Adam 

A:

Dear Paprika,

I'm still working in Human Resources. I had a chance to change jobs to a job I wanted much more, but, for various reasons decided to stay. Now the reasons I stayed are gone and I'm in a weird place of having no clue what to do career-wise. It's not the best.

Quilting is still my main non-travel hobby. I picked up English Paper Piecing, which is the best, and not like regular paper piecing, which is what Dragon Lady does and I have no idea how she has the patience for it! I had plans to steal her Harry Potter quilt once it got finished, but then I totally forgot to do that and she donated it to her kids' school. Missed opportunity. The quilt I'm working on right now looks like this and I will never finish it.

I traveled an acceptable-ish amount (turns out quilting is way more expensive than I thought it would be, and that's kind of eating into my travel budget!). I went to Cancun with my parents for their 50th wedding anniversary. My sister and her family didn't go because she was afraid her children might get kidnapped at the resort -- which she assures me is a totally valid, rational fear, and if I were a mother I would know. Then the entire family went on a Disney cruise in the Eastern Caribbean as a make up trip for my sister's family since they were sad they missed Cancun. Also I visited my birth dad's family in Michigan. Then in December I took sort of an impulse trip to Spain and Morocco, which was a lovely time of year to visit.

Oh, and I recently went to NYC which is one of my favorite things. I saw Anastasia, Dear Evan Hansen, Amelie, and The Great Comet of 1812.

In order, I didn't love Anastasia. They took out Rasputin (and he was the BEST PART, right?) and tried to make some weird love triangle between Anastasia, Dimitri, and the KGB agent who replaced Rasputin's role. This is on my list of least-favorite things I've seen in NYC. The love triangle was stupid, the acting was overly-cheesy, the new songs weren't memorable, and the plot had SO much holes. Like, instead of saving Anastasia's life, Dimitri waves to her in a crowd and we're supposed to believe she remembers that event, but when she talks to her grandmother it's all, "I'm not sure I'm really Anastasia, but you don't have a family, and I don't have a family, so we might as well just be family."

But the little girl who played Young Anastasia may have been the cutest thing I've ever seen, and the staging was really cool given it's such a small theater. In any case, I still regret using a show time on that one. Though, in fairness, I saw it in previews. Maybe they managed to change the entire show to be less awful these last few weeks?

Dear Evan Hansen might be the most fantastic thing I've ever seen on Broadway. It's funny, sad, poignant, touching, and all of the other emotions. Thanks Ace for INSISTING I see that one even though I knew absolutely nothing about it. It's now very high on my list of favorite Broadway shows. It addresses issues of suicide, loneliness, and isolation so well. I wish everyone could see it.

Amelie was super cute! Phillipa Soo is amazing. It was light and funny and the music was memorable. I've never seen the movie it's based on, so I have no idea how it compares. I loved the stage, so I immediately came home and made a quilt based off the stage floor. I was only bothered by the fact that Amelie wouldn't be able to get away with any of her hi-jinx if she weren't super attractive. Everyone would realize she was insane and would write her off. Oh, and the girl who played Young Amelie was also SO dang cute!

And Great Comet was interesting. I didn't think I'd like it. I only went for Josh Groban, who was, of course, amazing, but I ended up loving the music. The staging is SO cool. It's a very interactive setup. It's a show I haven't been able to stop thinking about. I absolutely want to go back and see it again -- which is true of most any show I see... Except Anastasia... And Young Frankenstein. That show was also terrible.

And that's pretty much it. No major life changes, just random little things.

-Marguerite St. Just

A:

Dear George,

I'm deployed, fighting a violent extremist organization that people in college in 2007 and/or 2012 may be familiar with. I might only have one day worth of answers this year, we'll see, the internet here is not too reliable.

We're finally making the big move to North Carolina, a move I have been talking about for three years. This means I got my dream job and I finally get to jump out of airplanes for a living! We have a house lined up and we're working on selling our home in Utah. Does anyone want to buy a house in the geographic center of the Salt Lake Valley?

Dr. Smeed

A:

Dear Mort,

I got married again last June (to the same husband without ever divorcing him).

IMG_0044.JPG

I then spent an additional 5 weeks in China starving and throwing up in KFC's squatty potty because... 

I was pregnant! Baby boy was born in December about two weeks early, but healthy as can be. He's basically the cutest. 

IMG_4777.JPG

I also got a job teaching fifth grade dual immersion. It's been a real challenge, but most days it's awesome!

That pretty much sums up my life.

 

-Azriel

A:

Dear Curious ~

Since last April:

  • I said goodbye to my family's bestie family who moved to Nicaragua. It was really sad for us, but also happy, because it's what they've been wanting to do.
  • Got called as the YW president (to replace my bestie that moved to Nica.)
  • Yellow 2.0 learned to take pictures on my phone without it being unlocked. 
  • I got a personal trainer and worked out consistently for several months. And then stopped almost completely.
  • We spent a week at a cabin in Island Park. Church included sitting on the grass outside for the sacrament for 45 minutes because there wasn't any room inside either of the two chapels!
  • Yellow 2.0 turned 2!
  • Dragon Baby turned 7!
  • My bestie sent me a large bowl of succulents for my birthday, 90% of which are still alive and thriving to this day!
  • Dragon Baby got brave enough to do a zip line BY HERSELF.
  • I got brave enough to repel down a cliff, attempt waterskiing, slid off the slide on a houseboat, and successfully body boarded. (BIG DEAL, FOLKS!)
  • Brother got married!
  • I dejunked a significant amount of stuff in my house, and can't really tell at all.
  • Bought a hammock for my back yard!
  • Went to Girls' Camp for the first time in 10+ years.
  • I lost my Apple Watch at Girls Camp and wanted to weep.
  • Yellow found it a month later in the bottom of my sleeping bag which I had held upside down and shook and found nothing!
  • Spent a week in Lake Powell, then spent the next week and a half feeling like I was still rocking on a boat. I don't recommend that.
  • Left Yellow 2.0 with babysitters TWICE for a week or more each time so that the rest of our family could do family vacations he just isn't old enough for yet.
  • Went through the worst period of depression/anxiety I have ever dealt with in my entire life, and I wouldn't recommend it to anyone. And although this is only one bullet point of many, covered a large chunk of my year.
  • Got an Instant Pot and learned to make cheesecake. Yummy, yummy cheesecake.
  • Started a date night rotation in my babysitting co-op and have dated Yellow more than any other time since probably we were dating.
  • Niffler Baby started preschool with the same teacher Dragon Baby had. Her name is Mrs. Smart and I just love that.
  • Dragon Baby started 2nd grade. [sniff]
  • Both girls participated in a gymnastics recital.
  • I started playing Pokemon.
  • Once again participated in an indoor/outdoor mini golf tournament where all the holes are made by family members, and we all dress in Halloween costumes to play it. On Labor Day.
  • I made and canned grape juice for the first time ever by myself.
  • We dressed up as Pokemon and Pokemon trainers for Halloween.
  • We actually got family pictures taken.
  • Yellow broke into my parents' house.
  • We did Christmas at our house for the first time ever. Just our little family.
  • Spent the rest of Christmas in Idaho at a condo and at my parent's house.
  • I went back to work one day a week.
  • Niffler Baby turned 5!
  • My white fluffy cat discovered it's fun to roll around in pink sidewalk chalk and looked like a Lisa Frank drawing in real life.
  • We got really good at bathing said fluffy white cat.
  • My kids all got small snow shovels and learned to shovel snow.
  • Discovered Harry Potter: Hogwarts Battle, and kind of love it.
  • I finished a Harry Potter quilt (that I've been working on for 2.5 years) and donated it to Dragon Baby's school library, because I am awesome. (Picture in this question.)
  • At Dragon Baby's request, I cut out pictures of myself with letters on each one to spell out Happy Birthday, glued them to toothpicks (like cupcake toppers), and put them in German Pancakes for Yellow's birthday, because I am his favorite thing. It is the most vain crafty thing I have ever done, and I laughed hysterically the whole way through.
  • We discovered Paint Notes on You Tube and kind of love them.
  • Yellow's sister got back from her mission!
  • We got all of us passports!
  • We took our girls on their first airplane rides and went to Nicaragua for over a week!
  • I have peered into the mouth of an active, erupting volcano.
  • I have hiked around a non-active volcano in both a cloud forest and a rain forest.
  • I have visited an ocean beach for the first time IN MY LIFE.

Overall, I would say there have been several fantastic updates to my life, and despite having a really terrible portion of my year, it's good to see that I also had a really fantastic portion of my year, too. 

~ Dragon Lady

A:

Dear Curious,

I went to a few Asian countries last summer. I cannot recommend Thailand and Cambodia enough if you ever find yourself over there. Went to China to teach English, got a new job teaching 2nd grade at a different school in Utah, lost that job within a week because of "low student numbers," and consequently was left searching for a job 3 weeks before school started on the other side of the world. Had a little bit of a breakdown in China because I was jobless and panicking. Anyway, came back to the States, got a new teaching gig in Provo LITERALLY 3 DAYS AFTER LANDING and 1.5 weeks before school started because I'm boss. AND I'M STILL LIVING IN STUDENT HOUSING BECAUSE I CAN'T ESCAPE. 

Even though the beginning of this year was super stressful (so many tears y'all,) I cannot describe the difference between my last school and my new school, more specifically with my principal. My last principal was less than stellar and really did a number on my self-confidence. My new principal is amazing and truly believes in me. I actually feel like I'm teaching this year and it's amazing. 

Uhhh let's see. I'm going to Japan and South Korea this summer since I'll be teaching in China again. I will finally have my car paid off in August so that's like an adulty thing I'm proud of. 

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear Curious,

Since last Alumni week:

  • Took engagement and wedding pictures for a friend. The wedding pictures were stressful and I doubt I'd do it again, because I am not a professional wedding photographer.
  • Mavengirl learned how to walk. It's weird to think that a year ago she wasn't doing that.
  • Survived a 6-month funding crisis where we weren't sure whether or not Mr. Maven would have a job. Do not recommend.
  • Participated in a Mr. Holland's Opus-style surprise orchestra concert for my high school orchestra teacher.
  • Helped make cakes, cookies, and cupcakes in my friend's bakery.
  • Went to Tally M. and Spectre's wedding reception and reunited with/met a bunch of Board writers. They're cool people.
  • Mavenboy started pre-school. He loves it and I love the two day, two hour breaks from two kids.
  • Went to Jackson, Wyoming, Yellowstone, and Grand Teton National Park with Mr. Maven. Kid-free vacations = the best.
  • Bought a minivan. This goes against everything I ever said about cars I'd own, but Mr. Maven approves because he can fit his homemade pinewood derby track in the back. However, it is nice to have two cars.
  • Sewed my kids' Halloween costumes. Reaffirmed that I am not a seamstress.
  • Tried, unsuccessfully, to get my hands on an NES Classic for Mr. Maven. (Nintendo, sometimes you're the worst.)
  • Went against everything I'd ever said about cars I'd own and bought a minivan... Mr. Maven approves because he can fit his homemade pinewood derby track in the back.
  • Our ward split for the 3rd time since we've lived here. Hopefully we're done with that for a long time!
  • Mavenboy started Primary. Thankfully it's going better than I thought it would.
  • Through pure luck, got a Nintendo Switch. Beat Zelda: Breath of the Wild. Loved it. Now to find all the shrines...
  • Found out we're having Mavenbaby #3 in the fall. Excited, but frustrated with how much health care costs. [Insert rant about how universal health care is probably the best option and the GOP needs to stop being babies about it.]

Other than that, mom life remains mostly the same. I'm constantly cleaning up messes but feel like I'll never catch up on housework, we go to lots of play dates with other moms and kids, and I do my best to smile instead of scream when things get frustrating. I do get a lot more invitations to product "parties" (I'm looking at you, LipSense and Lularoe), but I still don't know how to say "MLMs are the worst" politely. But looking back on everything I've done, even though life as a stay-at-home-mom is hard, it's clear that there's been a lot of good to balance out the difficult, and maybe one day I'll appreciate the hard days too.

--Maven

A:

Dear Curious,

Keeping it brief and to the point, after a considerable amount of stress and anxiety in getting it done I am happy to report that I have a *climbs up a ladder, holds up the megaphone to mouth* PhD!

Always a challenge, some things that contributed to the aforementioned stress were: Having a journal request additional experiments (involving a trip to Brazil to look at patient samples) before my major manuscript could be published. Having my generally terrific mentor go out of the country unexpectedly the week before my dissertation was due to my committee ("I'll look over your chapters on the plane ride home!" is not a reassuring thing to hear) (Note: she somehow ended up doing this to the very next person in our lab to graduate. Troubling habit.) Having a committee member with a lot of clout and opinions very publicly disagree with the rationale and interpretation of a series of experiments (and argue against the inclusion of an entire chapter). I said I was keeping it brief and, believe me gentle reader, I absolutely am. 

Things are doing well family-wise. In terms of hobbies, I've recently started learning to play the ukulele and my baking skills are, if I may say so, definitely something to write home about. 

- Dr. Rating Pending Ph.D. (who shouldn't complain too much about people with clout and opinions because, in this community, I think that describes me pretty much to a T. If it turns out I don't have clout, NOBODY DISABUSE ME OF THIS SELF-DELUSION)

A:

Dear Curious,

I bought my second house last year, and am still a pretty darned successful realtor. No children yet, alas, so I'm mostly hanging out with my awesome wife and dog and living in Provo pretending that I'm still a child. I game more now than I think I ever have before, you see.

I went to Japan last year, which was my wife's first overseas trip and was a ton of fun. I'm still writing books and enjoying doing so, and generally I'm quite satisfied with everything. My wife works on campus so I still visit all the time and get overwhelmed with nostalgia, as well as being struck by how quickly it's becoming unrecognizable to me.

Everything is happening, and nothing is happening. I want to sell all my possessions and hop across the globe with my wife, but so far I haven't sold her on that plan.

  ~Hobbes

A:

Dear friend,

A lot of things are the same. I'm still a music teacher, still married to my rad husband, still live in Provo. But I've had some pretty good adventures in the last year. I went snorkeling in the Dominican Republic and saw Les Mis and Matilda in London. I went on the most impulsive vacation of my life to Harry Potter World. I grew a vegetable garden and only about half of it died. I went on a weeklong road trip with my in-laws, without my husband, and it was terrifying and I got really homesick but I also got to see Mount Rushmore and the Badlands and golf-ball sized hail, so that was pretty good. I went to 4 different family reunions. I got snowshoes and a camping hammock and have made good use of both (not at the same time though. Snow hammocking sounds terrible). I convinced my husband that we needed to move, so now instead of living in a teensy, gross apartment that constantly smells like pot and cigarette smoke and probably has mold in the walls, we live two blocks away in a medium-sized, pleasant apartment that smells like new carpet. So yeah, life is pretty great, I'd say.

Peace,

-Stego Lily

A:

Dear reader,

Yayfulgirl and I moved from Utah to San Luis Obispo, California last September for my master's degree at Cal Poly. It's been a good change for us, even though we spent the first month here living out of hotels. It's also been a very good academic experience so far, but I'll leave that part for other answers. My mental health has been a mixed bag and I've spent the past four months putting off a trip to a psychologist to find out if I have some additional undiagnosed issues, so that's been fun, but for the most part I've been coping pretty well.

Oh, and in a completely spur-of-the-moment decision last month, we got a cat!

my name is kat.jpg

He is approximately 50% sleep and 50% psychotic meowing ball of fur. I'm convinced he has some sort of daily destruction quota which he has to meet in order to avoid a severe cursing by the Cat Gods. We leave out old newspaper ads for him to shred, because the alternative is watching him rip up our carpet. Our living room is basically a permanent war zone.

adorable monster.jpg

He's also the loudest, most vocal cat I have ever met. Does he want food? MEOW! Does he want attention? MRROW! Did I just get home from class? MYOWWW! Is it four in the morning? MMMOW! Has it been too long since he made any noise? MROWR!

It's okay, though, because he literally squeaks when he's tired. So far, he seems to like us and we love him despite his destructive tendencies.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Cat,

I officially passed my 3rd year tenure review!

It was a bit anticlimactic because I forgot that the decision was due until I got the phone call and most people at my institution pass their 3rd year review, anyway, but it's good to have that officially in the bag. On to 6th year (i.e., the one that really matters)!

- Katya

A:

Dear Curious,

In what apparently is becoming a tradition in my family, I decided to go back to school. I'm currently at Portland State University for a Computer Engineering undergrad. For perspective my BYU undergrad was in Psychology.

I am dreading losing my parent's insurance when I turn 26 in September - thank goodness my university has fairly decent coverage available.

I have spent an unholy amount of hours playing Mass Effect: Andromeda in the last month.

Still un-married, still no girlfriend, still super duper gay.

That pretty much sums it up.

-Watts

A:

Dear Curious,

Sauron's still grinding away at that dissertation, and I'm grinding away at my Master's research thesis project. I'll be graduating in less than a month with my MA in Marriage and Family Therapy with a specialization in Clinical Art Therapy, after which it's looking like I may launch into private practice (under supervision, until I accrue enough clinical hours to get licensed). My research was accepted to be presented at the American Art Therapy Association conference in November. I also went skinny-dipping for the first time ever in the Pacific Ocean at night (it was painfully cold). Sauron, on top of finishing his PhD, is also working on several creative projects, including a science fiction comic and a screenplay that's being actively developed with a couple of producers at a small independent film company.

Our two shorties are not so short anymore, as they're both now at a convenient elbow-resting height. They're losing lots of baby teeth, reading novels late into the night, making stop-action movies with their toys, and handling Blu-Ray discs responsibly—meeting all those milestones of a well-developed child.

We still live in Los Angeles, and we're still not sure where we'll end up, but it's a good life.

Thanks for asking,

Waldorf (and Sauron) 

A:

Dear Curious,

I wonder if anyone will read this far down?  Well, since I last participated in alumni week I have:

  • Graduated with my master's degree
  • Adjuncted at BYU for 3 years
  • Started a new full time job working as a research and development specialist in the molecular pathology department of a clinical laboratory.  I was 7 months pregnant when I interviewed.
  • Had baby boy #3, who will be two years old by the time this question posts
  • Left the church (a decision that was not made quickly or taken lightly)
  • Bought our first house...in the heart of Utah County
  • Disgruntled has been to Afghanistan 3 times and separated from the army after an 8 year run (and is doing basically the same thing, just as a civilian now).
  • As of last week, I was selected by the Navy!  I'll be in the reserves as a medical officer.  Kind of crazy for a 31 year old female with kids, but I'm crazy excited.
  • And I'm finally leaving the country, I'll be in the Netherlands celebrating 10 years of being married when this posts.  Yay!

- steen

A:

Dearest,

In the last year, I have:

  • Graduated from medical school
  • Visited Japan
  • Explored the Philippines
  • Moved to the American South
  • Begun to rock climb outdoors much more
  • Gotten back into triathlon shape
  • Started wearing bolo ties

And so on and so on.

--Dr. Pilgrim, MD

A:

Dear Curious,

Hey, I'm back!  This is weird.

I'm still working my same boring job, still hanging out with Andy and our dog Chevy.  We bought a piano, which I'm super psyched about because I haven't played in a year and I'm super rusty.

Biggest thing: Andy was accepted to medical school and will be starting in July.  He didn't get into his first choice school, but hey, he got in somewhere, and it's still a really good school!  We're staying in the same general area, so we don't have to move across state lines again, but we will have to move closer to the campus this summer, and I'm not looking forward to that.  

So we're really just getting ready for that sweet, sweet feeling of crushing debt, aw yiss.

-April Ludgate

A:

Dear Reader,

My wife had our second child and first son. At precisely this moment, our firstborn daughter became a monster of limitless proportions. If our son weren't the easiest baby in the entire world, we'd only have one child and I'm not sure which one it would be.

In consequence of this, we decided to take a pay cut, leave my job (which I love), and move across the country to be closer to my family. This is a move that I never anticipated (imagining that I'd be staying at my job for years to come) and it strikes fear into my heart every time I think about it. Stay tuned for results.

-The Man with a Mustache

A:

Dear Curious,

My firstborn son has recently turned two, and his brother's on the way in July. My wife is still the best. I bought a house last May and enrolled in the Indiana University online MBA program in March. When I changed wards, I was released as ward clerk and now, drum roll, I am again ward clerk. 

At my job as an oil refinery engineer I have been through all sorts of excitement, with a mix of losses (guesstimating a few bags of concrete might be needed for a critical path job when the right answer turned out to be over 50 tons; oops), draws (we bought the entire U.S. stock of a certain stainless steel bolting material and were still 60 bolts short on a very urgent need, but turned out we could buy something even better for $2,400 a bolt, so we did...day saved-ish), and wins (successfully got approval from all three required engineering managers for my request to delete our bathroom sign standard drawing, with which we had approximately zero compliance despite it being an official engineering standard since about 1999--noncompliance resolved!). With that record I guess it's no surprise that I got promoted to a supervisory position at the start of this year, managing and mentoring other (mostly new) engineers. That's fun, and if I keep it up I may rise further up the ranks as they continue to search for something that I can do successfully.

I have also been to 8 national parks/monuments in the last six months, which has been pretty cool. Chaco Culture National Historical Park is awesome--you heard it here first.

~Professor Kirke

A:

Dear Cat,

I'm done with BYU! I'm done with BYU! I'm done with BYU! I'm done with BYU!  I graduated last year around the time of the last Board Reunion, excitedly skipped my graduation ceremony to work overtime at my new job (which I love more than a person should love a job), and during every finals week since I've done little shimmy-dances of happiness when I remember I don't have to take any tests in the testing center.  Oh, and BYU delivered my diploma to me in the mail covered in dirt and damaged by rain, which I feel like is an accurate metaphor for how I felt post-graduation.

Other than that, I've gotten 4 ear piercings that I dutifully waited until finishing BYU to get, bought a car, started practicing yoga, paid someone to decorate my first non-BYU living room, bought my own non-tiny TV, and made buckets and buckets of like-minded friends.  On top of all this, I have officially broken free of my financial dependency on my parents and therefore our relationship is much calmer and happier than it has ever been.

Life is beautiful in Neverland,

-Yog

A:

Dear George,

I feel totally vain because I've mentioned this in like three answers already, but I'm just so excited about it: I'm graduating this summer with my master's and will be starting a PhD program in California in the fall. The decision to go on for a PhD has come with a lot of doubt and anxiety, but I'm hurtling headlong toward it nonetheless. 

I've loved BYU, but I am so ready to move on. Campus is too full of old ghosts for me—of people I used to know, of ways I used to think, of things I used to do, of who I used to be. It'll be good to get away. But maybe I'm just running from my troubles?

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Dear,

I still teach high school English: same school, same classroom, same two courses. I still mostly like it. I'm hired again for next year, and 4th year means I'm no longer a probational teacher, I think. It also means I won't have to go to new-teacher meetings anymore. Yesssss.

I still live in the same little house with my only friend from high school. We watch Star Trek projected on the wall while we eat our Blue Apron dinners. We speak the language of quotes gleaned from 15 years of near-identical movie tastes. Sometimes we go to the park to try to catch Pokemon, but that's getting more and more infrequent. It is perhaps too comfortable a setup. 

I aged out of the singles ward and now go to a family ward. It's a little off-kilter there, and I like it pretty well.

Despite the fact that I have done no work at establishing a garden for this year, my pepper plants from last year are trying to go again. I guess I should water them or something.

I got a Roomba. My floor is much cleaner than it usually is.

What a whirlwind of a year, eh?

-Uffish Thought

A:

Dear Curious, 

Everything is different. Mostly in a good way. I left a great job in journalism for marketing nearly a year ago because, long story short, the outlet I was working at became corrupt and journalism jobs don't grow on trees in Las Vegas. But I'm happy! I have a fantastic job that I'm good at, was promoted to a director-level position a couple months ago and get to work with wonderful people every day. And in a city I love! 

Once I left journalism, I got involved in activism, campaigned for Hillary and then somewhat unwittingly found myself leading a chapter of a major national activism organization. So most of my time outside of work is spent planning marches, organizing rallies, scheduling phone banks and the like. I just got back from lobbying in Carson City a couple weeks ago. 

Other than that, I go to a lot of shows and a few festivals a year. I just saw Bon Iver last week, and I'm super excited for Brian Ferry, Tears for Fears and Depeche Mode throughout the summer, on top of the couple of shows a week I usually hit. I still haven't finalized my festival schedule. I'm also working on an essay collection and I'm a little stuck, but that's life. How do I get any sleep?

Oh, I guess the thing that's not different is my severe commitment issues and crippling relationship anxiety hasn't improved at all, so I'll probably die alone. 

Cheers! 

Anomalous 

A:

Reader's Digest Version:

Got married (did that before leaving Board)

Graduated with Ph. D. in Chemistry from UC Berkeley

Adopted two kids, then had two more with my wife. (One of those stories where the couple couldn't get pregnant for years, gave up, adopted a baby or two, then inexplicably (okay, not inexplicably inexplicably) got pregnant while not trying anymore.)

Decided that college professor wasn't career for me, now teach high school science in rural Central Washington State.

Now finishing 7th year of high school teaching. Planning on doing it for many years to come.

Wife started selling Harry Potter themed crafts on Etsy. Business is booming.

Der Berliner

A:

Dear Curious,

I'm still doing the whole medical resident thing in the Midwest, although now that I have graduated from intern to senior resident, life is a whole lot more chill. Now instead of being the one answering a million pages and running all over the hospital trying to take care of patients, I'm the one sitting down calmly in the resident lounge telling the intern exactly how they need to be answering their million pages and running all over the hospital trying to take care of patients. It is the sweet life. In my spare time, I've been trying to finish reading the same book since Christmas, and I also broke my foot on vacation earlier this month!

Mah husband Laser Jock is not sure if he will be joining the Board reunion but he is enjoying some very interesting and fulfilling work at a company that he likes and in his spare time takes care of his broken-footed wife.

- Eirene

A:

Dear cat-killer,

Here's the shortish list of stuff I've done since last year:

  • Had another baby boy!
  • Graduated with a master's degree in Geographic Information Technology
  • Gotten my first full-time job
  • Moved to the Salt Lake Valley
  • Spent a lot more time working on creative pursuits
  • Got a short comic published
  • Been a scoutmaster
  • More or less consolidated a transformation of my political views

Kinda boring now that I look at it, but I've had a pretty good year. It feels good to be done with school and have a little bit of stability.

-Inverse Insomniac


0 Corrections
Question #89480 posted on 04/25/2017 11:08 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I hate hate hate watching most TV shoes because the plot is designed to carry on forever and ever. What I love is a good mini series that can tell a good story with good characters and knows when to end things. Do you have any good recommendations of mini series that I should check out? Also, where can I watch your recommendations (Netflix, Hulu, old library DVDs perhaps)? Any category or genre is fine!

-Impatient Watcher

A:

Dear Doctor,

Broadchurch. Season 1 is the best. Season 2 was a bit more graphic.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Impatient ~

A&E Pride and Prejudice. It was a mini series made for TV and knows where to end. And is wonderful. I think that covered all of your requirements. 

 

Where to find it? Probably half of the girls' apartments in Provo. Or if not, I'm up for a movie night(s). I can provide the DVDs. 

 

~ Dragon Lady

A:

Dear Uatu,

A Series of Unfortunate Events is an excellently self-contained miniseries on Netflix right now! It's a lot of fun and doesn't run away with itself.

-Inverse Insomniac

A:

Dear Snickerdoodle, 

KOREAN DRAMAS. I've seen My Love from the Star and parts of Fated to Love You and they are simultaneously terrible and amazing. The cheese factor is real, but they're still really good. Katya commented that TV shows that continue on and on with no end in sight is typically an American thing. Shows from other countries or Netflix/Hulu originals can be more contained.

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear Impatient,

I present for your consideration Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell, available on Netflix and Amazon Prime (and possibly other places; I haven't checked). It is a seven-episode miniseries about proper Victorian English gentlemen who use magic and debate about the proper use of magic as only proper Victorian English gentlemen can. 

-Frère Rubik

A:

Impatient, I hear Luther is awesome.

-Extravagant Awesomeness

A:

Dear impatient or just patient enough,

There are a lot of t.v. shoes I like. If a show has good production value, they spend money making even footwear flawless, and it really pulls a scene together.

Hehehe.

Good Girls Revolt on Amazon Prime was cancelled after the first season (despite being awesome and well-rated; such a bad decision), and in my opinion has a fairly good ending. It is the story of women working for a magazine in the early 70s and realizing that they want more responsibilities and opportunities. It shows how they go about doing that, dealing with relationships along the way, seeing the world from different angles, etc. 

-Mico

A:

Dear Perdita X,

Korean dramas do often have potential for some pretty good shoes to watch, but there's this Chinese comedy my husband was watching the other night that had the most fascinating shoes I've ever seen. Like, these shoes were really Out There, you know? (I wonder if it's an Asian thing to have interesting shoes? From my personal experience in Asia, this is probably true). Anyway, if you're more into sneakers, there's actually a documentary series called It's the Shoes. I don't actually know if it's interesting or not, but it might be worth looking into when you've got a while to just loaf around. 

-Az

A:

Dear Impatient,

For what it's worth, it appears that most Mexicans feel as you do, because their telenovelas are specifically designed to run their course over a season or two (maybe three?). I don't know if they get translated into English, but there's something for you to look into.

Der Berliner

A:

Dear Sunflower,

I'm rather enjoying Tin Man right now (like, I'm watching it as I'm writing this response). It's only four episodes, albeit very long episodes, and you can find it on Netflix.

~Anathema


0 Corrections
Posted on 04/25/2017 10:14 a.m. New Correction on: #89275 How does the economy work in Scandinavian countries? I always hear such high praises about all ...