"Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened." -Dr. Seuss
Posted on 09/01/2014 10:14 p.m. New Comment on: #78946 I need to get a key from BYU for a room on campus. I was told ...
Question #78961 posted on 09/01/2014 10:12 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Bored,

A penguin flies into the Writer's Lair wearing a sombrero. Why is he there, and what does he say?

-The Greatest Auk

A:

Dear Auk,

Why does he come? What does he say?
Why did he fly to the front of the fray?
"Amigos, yo vine de Argentina
GATOSpingüinosél desayuna!"

I can't understandishI sprechen no Spanish
But tunnels, they mumble and grumble and rumble.
As soon as they start, the tremors all vanish
I realize the goings-on's something outlandish.

The penguin is calling the worms to assist.
So southward they tunnel. They turn and they twist
And hurriedly, violently carve through the crust.
They dig like torpedos—they're very robust.

In an hour of fury, they finally appear
"Worms is coming! It cannot no eating!"
CATS complains as it scampers in fear
While now-flightless penguins all raise a good cheer.

-100 Hour Bard


0 Comments
Question #78908 posted on 09/01/2014 6:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why is it that just about EVERYTHING at Costco comes in a massive size? I mean the strawberries we brought home the other day looked like small apples, the avocados resembled dinosaur eggs, and I've seen potatoes there that could pass for watermelons other than the fact they are not the same color and texture. It wasn't just this one trip, but over a period of years I have seen this trend. Do they stimulate their stuff with crazy growth drugs or something?

-Curiously concerned Costco consumer

A:

Dear Availability Heuristic,

Costco is actually colluding with all the food growers the world over, in order to get for itself, and its super exclusive customers the very biggest produce. It is quite elitist of them.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I remember the main plot of Saving Private Ryan to be that since Damon's character's brothers had all died and he was the last one to continue the family name, they were looking for him to let him go home.
Does that mean that only child males with no male cousins with the same last name weren't drafted?

-Frank

A:

Dear Frank,

During WWII, every man in the country between the ages of 18 to 64 had to register for the draft. Your status of being the only son in the family did not change your eligibility to join the ranks of the US military. What you are referring to is known as the surviving brother provision, which exempted the sole surviving son of a family where one or more sons/daughters died as a result of military service. However, this provision wasn't put into place until 1948, and while it retrograded to protect families who had lost a member in WWII, it didn't do anything during the actual war. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Question #78899 posted on 09/01/2014 6:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I need your help to find a quote I read once. It's a 1-2 paragraph passage, and I believe it's written in the first person. The passage mentions a bunch of different roles one might take on, saying something like "It's not that I don't wish to be a scholar, a holy man, an adventurer, a poet, a politician" etc. (I think it includes a few words of detail for each role, not just the name as I've put here.)

The passage goes on to talk about how there are many worthwhile pursuits in life, but some pursuits are mutually exclusive, and it is better to become as good as we can be in a particular area.

This may be hard to find, but I'm hoping if you guys can't find it, another reader will be able to point me in the right direction.

Thanks,

-Jack

A:

Dear Union,

I haven't had any luck finding a quote that matches your description very well. I originally thought of this quote from Emerson:

"The difference between men is in their principle of association. Some men classify objects by color and size and other accidents of appearance; others by intrinsic likeness, or by the relation of cause and effect. The progress of the intellect is to the clearer vision of causes, which neglects surface differences. To the poet, to the philosopher, to the saint, all things are friendly and sacred, all events profitable, all days holy, all men divine. For the eye is fastened on the life, and slights the circumstance. Every chemical substance, every plant, every animal in its growth, teaches the unity of cause, the variety of appearance."

But that clearly is not it.

This question, then, is left as an exercise for the readers.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #78956 posted on 09/01/2014 2:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Recently my wife and I watched the Jimmy Stewart classic "The Spirit of St. Louis" about Charles Lindbergh making the first successful flight across the Atlantic. This is probably not the most important knowledge, but we kept asking ourselves, where did he relieve himself during that 40 hour trip?! Obviously movies don't often depict small (but important) details like this unless it is some horror film where a teen goes to the bathroom alone and is then attacked by monsters etc.

-Bathroom in the sky

A:

Dear Sky,

You're not alone in asking that question. Lindberg: A Biography tells us that when Lindbergh gained an audience with King George V of England, the King first said, "Now tell me, Captain Lindberg...There is one thing I long to know. How did you pee?"

The pilot replied, "Now, you see, sir,...I had a sort of aluminum container. I dropped the thing when I was over France. I was not going to be caught with the thing on me at Le Bourget." This website further explained that the container received waste from a funnel hooked up to his wicker seat.

-El-ahrairah


0 Comments
Posted on 09/01/2014 1:50 p.m. New Comment on: #78941 (Forgive me if this has been asked before; I wasn't quite sure how to search for ...
Question #78950 posted on 09/01/2014 12:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Bored,

What's you magic number?.

-Diophantus

A:

Dear Algebra,

721. I like the way the digits interact.

7*(2+1)=21
(2+1)*2+1=7

Plus 7+2+1=10 and that makes me feel happy. If you think about it a lot you'll start to notice every time it's 7:21.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Diophantus,

100. 

-The 100 Hour Board

A:

Dear Diophantus,

Three. The single digit number is the best, but I'll take any number with a three in it.

--Maven

A:

Dear Diophantus,

That's like a favorite number, right? I like two-digit numbers that end in 9, particularly 39.

-Owlet

A:

Dear diaphanous, 

Numbers have colors. Longer numbers have a mixture of colors corresponding to their digits. 

256 is my magic number because it is the best color

–Concealocanth

A:

Dear Diophantus,

27. 27 was my sister's first bus number. She started seeing it everywhere, and now I see it everywhere. Volume of a Rubik's Cube: 27 lengths. The sum of the digits of my birth month and birth year equal 27. 2+3+4+5+6+7=27. There are 27 bones in the human hand. 3^3 = 27. That last one makes it as special as 1^1=1 and 2^2=4, which are big names in numbers. And guess what time it is as I write this? That's right. 9:27.

-El-ahrairah


0 Comments
Question #78954 posted on 09/01/2014 10:18 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm looking into buying a new car here, since not having one here is getting difficult. My mom suggests getting one that has about 75 thousand miles on it, and that I apparently can it for about $6000. Doesn't seem like this is possible from my searching on various used car sites--including craigslist. Is it possible to find a car for that price and that mileage? If not, what's the most typical price I can expect for a car with that mileage? Any more car purchasing tips?

-Lady Hermione

A:

Dear Hermione,

Yes, it's possible, but it does take a lot of work and a lot of networking along with some compromise. Buying a used car is like a triangle. In one corner is price, in another is mileage and in the third is age/repair work. Sometimes you can get lucky and luck out on three corners, but most of the time you only get two corners that you really like. 75 thousand miles is a little tricky for that price, unless you compromise on the age, make or model of the car and potential repairs.

Besides hitting up Craigslist and various online car sites, I highly recommend just calling used car dealerships. They might sound more expensive, but used-car dealerships are really good at moving cars quickly, and they're great for negotiating. As a bonus, you get a much better indicator of any secret past the car might have had versus getting false information from a private seller who has more incentive to not tell the truth. You're more likely to end up accidentally buying the car of a crack dealer and discovering a hidden panel with a gun buying from private sellers than dealerships (although of course, most private sellers are upstanding citizens and will not be equipping their cars with gun compartments). 

Beyond that, it helps to read the classifieds religiously and to pick up a wide variety of newspapers from the store every week or so. Dealerships and private sellers will highlight cars there that can give you a better idea of what you want, and what kinds of prices are being asked. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #78941 posted on 09/01/2014 9:18 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

(Forgive me if this has been asked before; I wasn't quite sure how to search for it. I tried a few different things, found no results, and assumed it was an original questions. Feed me to the tunnel worms if I'm wrong)

So, I was talking to my mom recently, and she pointed out that most of my friends are majoring in some form of Engineering. Being a Physics major, this may not seem too surprising (the two share a lot of classes), but here's the catch: I didn't make friends with any of these people through classes. Most (if not all) of them were in my ward Freshman year when I lived in Helaman Halls. I always just assumed it was because Engineering was a popular major these days, but she thinks that we were all sorted into the same hall (Merrill) because we had similar majors.

Now, at first I didn't give this any thought; I picked my room out, after all. It's not like anyone forced me. But, then she pointed out that there were only two or three buildings for me to choose from. I assumed that this was because the others were full, but she argues that those were the only options because of my major.

So, cutting to the chase: did all of my friends and I end up in the same ward because of fate/destiny/divine will, or were we subtly herded toward the same place?

-Classified

A:

Dear Wade,

I have never heard anything about students being grouped in dorm buildings based on their majors. I'm not saying it's not possible; I just don't think it happens that way. As a physics major with several engineering majors as my friends I would guess that the reason so many of your friends are engineering majors is because there are just so many engineering majors.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


1 Comment
Question #78946 posted on 09/01/2014 9:18 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I need to get a key from BYU for a room on campus. I was told to go to the Brewster building to get a key and to call ahead. The problem is that I don't know what room to go to, and I can't even find what number to call. Can one of you lovely people help me?

-Keyless

A:

Dear Keyless,

You're looking for 285 Brewster building. You can see where the building is on this map. The phone number for the Key Office is 801-422-5521. Make sure you take your key request form, BYU ID, and money for a key deposit.

--Maven


1 Comment
Question #78955 posted on 09/01/2014 2:30 a.m.
Q:

I am Groot,

I am Groot?

-I am Groot

A:

I am Groot,

We are Groot.

-I am Groot


0 Comments
Posted on 09/01/2014 12:55 a.m. New Comment on: #78883 I am trying to get stronger and bigger. I figured I'd start out with a simple ...
Posted on 09/01/2014 12:55 a.m. New Comment on: #78766 I'm going to Scotland for a business meeting next month. I've never been there and most ...
Posted on 09/01/2014 12:54 a.m. New Comment on: #78883 I am trying to get stronger and bigger. I figured I'd start out with a simple ...
Posted on 09/01/2014 12:53 a.m. New Comment on: #78936 My husband and I will be trying for a baby soon, and as a result I ...
Posted on 09/01/2014 12:53 a.m. New Comment on: #78936 My husband and I will be trying for a baby soon, and as a result I ...
Posted on 09/01/2014 12:52 a.m. New Comment on: #78936 My husband and I will be trying for a baby soon, and as a result I ...
Posted on 09/01/2014 12:51 a.m. New Comment on: #78746 In Board Question #78587 , The Soulful Ginger kindly clarified for me that it's not the ...
Sunday, August 31, 2014
Question #78952 posted on 08/31/2014 10:30 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Bored,

Are we done here?

-Anxiously Disengaged

A:

Dear pointedly pointless,

We'll be doin' this, if you have a doubt
'til the love runs out, 'til the love runs out

 -OneHundredRepublic


0 Comments
Question #78926 posted on 08/31/2014 10:18 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Last Monday my FHE group went to the Bean Museum and we saw a live animal show. The girl who gave the show was really awesome and cool and did a really good job. It was seriously professional. She told us that she was a student at BYU studying economics but she still worked as a reptile handler. How do you get a job at the Bean Museum giving live animal shows?

Also, I know this is super creepy but is there like a list of employees somewhere or something? I'd like to look her up and get her name.

-Promise I'm not a serial killer.

A:

Dear Promise, 

The job title for someone who gives reptile shows at the museum is "Educator" and to get a job as an educator is fairly simple. Apply when the job shows up on the jobs board (usually around April and again in August) and then interview. They prefer science majors or something applicable, but do consider and hire many other majors and types of people. Necessary skills include a lack of fear of creepy crawlies, public speaking, people skills and a drivers license. According to my sources, the bulk of the training for the job happens after you get hired, but the job is extremely competitive, with over a hundred applicants for any given spot. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #78947 posted on 08/31/2014 8:24 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'd really like to learn to use R. I'm interested in finding an individual who is willing to teach me the program one on one. Any suggestions?

-Banana Bread Lover

A:

Dear gross,

Your best bet for finding a personal tutor would be trying to contact someone in the statistics department to find a stat major to tutor you in R. BYU offers two classes on R, STAT 123 and 223 (these are block classes meant to be taken the same semester), and the only prerequisite is an introductory stat class. Also there are a few good online resources for self-tutoring. Code School has a very good interactive introductory course.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #78944 posted on 08/31/2014 5:06 p.m.
Q:

Dear Concord,

RE: Question #78891,
What?!
Why are you seeing men in boxers peacefully asleep at 3 AM? a) creepy!! b) honor code? c) ewww~~~

-you've got some 'splainin to do

A:

Dear yes, 

You were pretty restless in your sleep last night. 

Cute pajamas, though. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #78938 posted on 08/31/2014 9:18 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I enjoy listening to the hymn "Mansions of the Lord" from the movie "We Were Soldiers." This hymn oddly enough was also the recessional at president Reagan's funeral. I was a bit surprised to find out that there is no rendition by the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. Have they ever performed this amazing hymn? Thanks again,

-Salty Dog

A:

Dear Cosmo,

Yes, they have performed it! Unfortunately, it's not very easy to find the recording because it contains copyrighted material. However, the Mormon Tabernacle Choir website provides the video in its video archive. In order to receive a password for the video archive you must first sign up for the choir newsletter.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #78939 posted on 08/31/2014 1:24 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

This. Innovative business practice or gaming the system?

-But CEOs like a safe country with roads 'n stuff

A:

Dear Wade,

I'm pretty opinionated on this subject but I find it hard to believe anyone could justify this business practice and not see it as merely a way of exploiting loopholes to put more money in the pockets of the already wealthy.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #78937 posted on 08/31/2014 12:30 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What were your favorite ALS Ice Bucket Challenge videos?

-Still Warm and Dry

A:

Dear Dry, 

I laughed really hard at the girl who tried to do it after getting her wisdom teeth out. There's just something so funny about her drugged efforts to drench herself. 

-Concorde

A:

Dear Warm,

I have found that writers have the best videos for this. For example: Patrick Rothfuss sitting in a tub with dry ice and Brandon Sanderson being dunked whilst editing something.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger (who doesn't always read writers' blogs, but when she does, she doesn't regret it) 


0 Comments
Question #78936 posted on 08/31/2014 12:30 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My husband and I will be trying for a baby soon, and as a result I have started keeping a mental list of all the children's books we want to buy. I was thinking of how great it would be to read a children's book on the Plan of Salvation to our child as their first book, but I can't seem to find one! I have scoured Deseret Books and Google, but none have come up!
So, 100 Hour Board, can you find any illustrated young children's books on the Plan of Salvation, or at least on the Premortal Existence to how we got on Earth?
Thank you!

-Hopefully Soon-To-Be Mommy

A:

Dear Soon-to-be Mommy,

After searching Deseret Books, I have to agree that children's Plan of Salvation books do not exist in abundance. However, The Parable of the Princesses teaches about premortal life, the purpose of this life, and eternal destiny. I also found What Happens When People Die? If those aren't enough, you could always write your own book for your children.

-El-ahrairah


3 Comments
Saturday, August 30, 2014
Question #78910 posted on 08/30/2014 11:24 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Which writer do you think you know the least?

-The Inquisitor

A:

Dear Wade,

M.O.D.A.Q. Who even is that guy?

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear you,

I don't know Anne. No idea what she's like. I mean, I've been here a decent amount of time... and she's pretty active here on the Board and stuff so I read her answers... and sometimes she'll even say things to me on the Board. But like, I think she's the one I know the least, especially considering how everybody else seems to know her. Go figure.

-Ozymandias

A:

Dear inquisitor,

The writers I know the least are the oldest and the newest ones. I've never met Yellow, CPM, The Soulful Ginger, or M.O.D.A.Q., and while I've met The Entropy Ninja and El-ahrairah, I don't really know them all that well. I've had some sort of connection to all of the other writers at one point or another. And I'm sure our newest arrivals will get their turn sooner or later.

-yayfulness


0 Comments