"Women can tell you how many degrees (Fahrenheit and Celsius, to say nothing of Kelvin) it was outside." -Optimistic. on first kisses
Thursday, September 3, 2015
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am a recently returned missionary who served in Russia. Could Soviet forces have defeated the Nazi forces in Europe without the US and her support? By the time the US entered the European Theater, was Russia already marching to Berlin? I'd like the facts!

-A more dedicated Patriot

A:

Dear more,

I don't think you can limit the question to when the U.S. entered the European Theater.  I think you have to take U.S. participation as a whole.  If Japan had not attacked Pearl Harbor, bringing the United States into the war, then there is a good chance Japan would have made a move against Russia in Siberia.  Had they done so, Russia would not have been able to take the risk (which they did) of pulling out 30 divisions of well trained and equipped Siberian troops to defend Moscow and lead the counter-offensive in November/December 1941.  Had Japan made a strong offensive move in Siberia in 1941 I think there is a good chance that the German army could have taken, or at least laid siege to, Moscow in the spring of 1942.  The deciding point, really, would probably have been how much of the German army was left standing after the brutal Russian winter.  If Moscow had fallen and the German advance resumed in spring 1942 with a Japanese offensive in the East then it seems unlikely that Russia would have survived.

But let's suppose Hitler hadn't declared war on the U.S. after Pearl Harbor (no one can seem to figure out why he did it) and that the U.S. entered the war only in the Pacific Theater and had no participation in the European Theater (except the mass quantities of munitions we were selling Great Britain).  The aforementioned counter-offensive that ended the Battle of Moscow was successful, though costly, and gave Russia the time it needed to fully mobilize its economy.  In Summer 1942 Germany ran another offensive against Russia but was halted at the Battle of Stalingrad.  These two battles combined are generally considered the turning point of the Eastern Front.  After this time the German army generally only lost ground to advancing Soviet forces.

When we talk about the U.S. entering the European Theater I'm sure most people think of D-Day and the Normandy landings.  D-Day wasn't until June 1944.  From summer 1942 until summer 1944 Soviet forces were successfully advancing against Germany and making good progress.  This would suggest that the answer to your question is "yes".  But, while the U.S. hadn't entered France at this point we were still involved in North Africa drawing away German troops, supplies, and focus.  And Italy was invaded in 1943.  Even before the U.S. joined, Great Britain had been running a North Africa campaign, but the needed commitment of German forces surely increased when the U.S. arrived.  Could Germany have repositioned troops from North Africa to the Eastern Front to successfully subdue Russia if the U.S. hadn't joined?  There's no way to know for sure, but it would probably have been a toss up.  The evidence suggests that Russia barely survived the winter of 1941-1942 and had German troops been better equipped for winter with more troops and fewer distractions in North Africa then Moscow probably would have fallen.  And had Moscow fallen it would have been difficult for Russia to organize a coherent response with the remainder of their forces.

In summary, had the U.S. not entered World War II at all it seems likely that Russia would have fallen from a two-front war with Germany and Japan.  Had the U.S. only entered the Pacific Theater against Japan, Russia would have faced a much stronger and more focused German army that would have been very difficult to overcome.

-Curious Physics Minor

*More accurate terms in many places would be the Axis, Soviet Union, and Allies but I used country names for convenience.


0 Corrections
Posted on 09/03/2015 10:05 p.m. New Correction on: #83718 On one of my walking tours through New Orleans we were taken to the Delphine Lalaurie ...
Posted on 09/03/2015 10:05 p.m. New Correction on: #83718 On one of my walking tours through New Orleans we were taken to the Delphine Lalaurie ...
Question #83738 posted on 09/03/2015 9:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Right. So I'm sitting with my two friends who just both happen to know sign language when I don't. They're always talking to each other in that way in front of me - at ward activities, during board games, etc. It's pretty annoying. How do I know if they're cheating at Clue? If they're talking about ME? - ewww, did you see the shirt she's wearing today, it makes her look fat!, etc. Actually, I see it as rude but I don't say anything because I don't like confrontation and one of the "friends" puts up a fight if you try to say something she doesn't agree with. Do you think it's rude to talk to another person in a different language in front of you if you don't understand it? What can I do next time this happens, without causing a scene (I know I won't cause the scene but the one girl will get aggressive, most likely).

-BoJ

A:

Dear Doctor,

My dad and his parents all speak [redacted], and when my mom was dating my dad, and during the early years of their marriage, she hated it. She was always worried that they were laughing about her and felt excluded from the family.

I think it can be rude and should generally be avoided, but I wouldn't do it right while they're signing to each other. Mention to both of them outside of the situation your feelings regarding the matter, and hopefully they'll be understanding about it.

My dad actually complains to me in [redacted] when he's sitting next to someone on a plane that could read his texts. It's kind of great.

-Tally M.


0 Corrections
Question #83739 posted on 09/03/2015 7:23 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've been seriously considering transferring to BYU for a few months now. I have the application all filled out and ready to go but I'm afraid to hit submit. I know that I am a strong applicant and would most likely be accepted, but I'm really worried that I won't be able to adjust as my current school is much smaller. What are some of your favorite things about the school and what are the things that you think make this such an amazing school?

-Woefully Unable to Make a Decision

A:

Dear Decision,

BYU is huge, but it's also small at the same time. 

You'll have your freshman "weeder" classes, like Physical Science and American Heritage, that have 200-300 kids in each. But, you'll also have a small section of 20-30 students that meets once a week with the TA. Once you declare your major, your class sizes will probably be smaller. My classes in the Education program were between 20-30 students. It was a good size for me. They were small enough to get direct feedback from professors but large enough to blend in with everyone. 

What I loved the most about BYU was the environment. I loved being around people that have similar standards to mine. I loved the air of general positivity and friendliness. I loved that I felt safe in a college town, a feeling I know I wouldn't have felt elsewhere. 

Best of luck in your future college career!

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear Reader,

I LOVE BYU. I really do.

It certainly may be an adjustment to come here from a smaller school, but there are some great things about attending a larger university. Personally, I love the feeling on large campuses that there is an endless amount of people to meet. What's more, there is a seemingly endless amount of things to do and activities to get involved in.

But I would say that my favorite part of BYU is the people. Of course, no BYU student is perfect, and not every student is living the standards of the church. However, I honestly believe that you will find more young people striving to live the Gospel here than in any other place in the world. And that is not something to be overlooked.

I have met some of the kindest, most diligent, fun people I have ever known right here at BYU.

Just like O'Malley said, I feel safe here and I feel that I am able to generally trust most everybody that surrounds me. I also feel like I can make friends with just about anybody at BYU, because when it comes down to it, the majority of us have some pretty important things in common.

Come to BYU!

Love,

Vienna

A:

Dear Doctor,

  • Connections with professors. I feel like I can really get to know professors if I want to. Granted, most of my classes are no more than 40 people or so, but I've gotten to know a lot of professors.
  • A ton of opportunities for research.
  • Chances to get on-campus jobs you'd want. It really is possible.
  • The fact that I don't feel uncomfortable crowding into the shuttles (which are a bit of a mess right now). Like, I have literally no fear that I'm going to be harassed.
  • Regular service activities 
  • Religion classes that can be a breath of fresh air in a busy day
  • There's a decent amount of flexibility to study what I want

-Tally M.


0 Corrections
Question #83718 posted on 09/03/2015 2:13 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

On one of my walking tours through New Orleans we were taken to the Delphine Lalaurie house. This lady was nuts, okay? She tortured her slaves and did lots of awful things to them. One of the slaves set fire to the house and upon help arriving, a bunch of dead and alive slaves were discovered in the attic. The Wikipedia article has this to say:

The tortured slaves were taken to a local jail, where they were available for public viewing. The New Orleans Bee reported that by April 12 up to 4,000 people had attended to view the tortured slaves "to convince themselves of their sufferings."


#1. Were the slaves the dead or alive ones that were on public display?
#2. If the alive ones, how long were they on display?
#3. What happened to these tortured people once no longer a viewing piece?
#4. Were their wounds ever treated?
#5. Were they still slaves after all this?

-Gentrification Thing

A:

Dear GTA,

It doesn't look like any of us knows. Sorry about that.

Lo siento,

--Ardilla Feroz

P.S. Readers, if you for some reason do know... fire away.


2 Corrections
Question #83743 posted on 09/03/2015 12:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have a seven-hour layover coming up. I have friends in my layover city and would like to see them for a while instead of sitting in the terminal for hours and hours. I'm allowed to leave the airport provided I get myself back in time for my connecting flight, right? I can just walk out of the airport and use the boarding pass I'll get when I board my first flight to get back through security? (Other relevant information: all my flights are within the U.S. and I'm not checking any luggage.)

-Never done this before

A:

Dear friend,

You're allowed to, yes. You'll have separate boarding passes for each flight, so you'll just use your second pass to get back through security. Be careful, though - I know more than one person who's miscalculated the utility of a seven-hour layover and missed the second flight because they tried to do too much. 

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book


0 Corrections
Question #83652 posted on 09/03/2015 11:46 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Sometimes I like to try and imagine what it would be like to experience time the way God does. It's crazy to think that I still very much have my agency, but God already knew or knows maybe the choices I would make before I make them. Since He knows the end from the beginning how do you think our agency and the way God experience time can co-exist together?

-Wondering

A:

Dear Reader,

Sorry for the late response on this question. As you can probably imagine, I've had a lot going on what with school starting up again. Also, as a side note, the internet connection in the library is terrible right now. I just lost my whole answer and am now having to retype it.

Anyway, moving past my excuses and on to your question, this is something I have actually thought a lot about!

The way I see it, if God can see everything from one end of eternity to the other, then He already planned and laid out the history of the world long before any of us ever inhabited it. He knows everything that has ever happened and everything that ever will happen, and He helped to orchestrate it.

Of course, you may say in response to this idea, "Well, if that's true, then why has the history of the world been so bleak and destructive? Don't you think if God planned it all out, it would be a bit happier?"

To this I would respond with two thoughts.

First, I think that is where our agency comes into play. When God was planning the history of the world—when He was deciding when each of us would be born and into what circumstance—when He was planning out how He would interact with us in each of our lives—He took our characters and all the choices He knew we would make into account. Because we have our agency, He couldn't plan the history of the world to be perfect. I imagine at times that must have been rather frustrating. All He could do was take each one of us, and everything that we are, and try to give us the best chance He could of becoming the best people we could become so that we would return to live with Him.

Secondly, I think that even if God could have planned things to turn out a bit brighter, I don't think that He would. Sure, He probably could have planned for Hitler to die in his youth long before he could start a terrifying world war. However, God knows that a pivotal part of the Plan of Salvation is that we live in a fallen world. He has to allow for people to use their agency in horrible ways, at times, because we need to be subject to pain, heartache, and trial. What's more, we need to be exposed to the difference between God's ability to inspire and better men and Satan's ability to corrupt and destroy man. We need to see and discern the difference between light and darkness.

Finally, I think the fact that God knows every decision we are going to make can be kind of a hopeful thought. It means that no matter how many mistakes we make, God knew that we would make those mistakes, and He still has a way for us to repent and come back to Him if we so desire. Barring sins of perdition, we can never fall completely off the path with no way to return.

But those are just my thoughts on the matter. My other theory is that all of this is way too complicated for any of us to ever understand. And honestly, that theory is probably closer to the truth.

I guess we'll just have to continue forward, living our lives the best that we can. The rest, well, we'll understand it all someday.

Love,

Vienna


0 Corrections
Wednesday, September 2, 2015
Question #83619 posted on 09/02/2015 11:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How do you un-learn a learned behavior like expecting the worst out of Priesthood holders, e.g. expecting that they will never take you seriously, that they will mock you, deride you, think you're too serious and not "fun" enough to befriend, label you as unattractive, undesirable, and undatable, and in all ways consider you beneath them?

I understand I can only fix myself, and I can't expect too much from others. But I can't ignore that 90% of all Priesthood holders in my life follow this pattern--and that 100% of single, marriageable-age Priesthood holders in my life follow this pattern. Maybe I really am those things...but other people don't treat me like I am. I'm really tired of being on the defensive against this treatment...but I am more tired of getting burned every time I try to go outside my comfort zone and trust people and give them a chance and try to genuinely look for someone who doesn't treat me that way.

-Exhausted

A:

Dear you,

I have a feeling this is going to come off as harsh, though that is not my intent. A lot of guys are jerks. I realize this. And I'm sorry. They were wrong to treat you how they did, and their actions are in no way a reflection of your infinite worth and potential. Note I said infinite worth and potential. This is referring to you.

I'm sorry you've been hurt, and that many men in your life have treated you poorly. But the only way to meet the sort of people you want to meet is to meet people, to try again. Did you expect me to to say anything different? Perhaps a trusted friend or relative can help you strain these tools out before you meet them but eventually it's up to you. You've met decent people before, albeit one in ten—figure out what these 10% men have in common and seek it out. I congratulate you for trying to open up to people as often as you have. It's very brave of you.

"But Ardilla, you're a man so you don't understand what I've been through! Also you are dumb." Yes, I am a man; no, I don't  understand really. And generally yes to the last one. All the same, if you are still reading I would just implore you to remember not all men are jerks. In fact, I'd say most aren't. Whether you decide to believe that or not is ultimately up to you.

Apparently from the Patriarchy,

--Ardilla Feroz (#yesallwomen #notallmen)


0 Corrections
Posted on 09/02/2015 10:28 p.m. New Correction on: #83700 I've heard people say that the parties are getting more and more extreme and that the ...
Question #83742 posted on 09/02/2015 10:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is your opinion on cosmetic surgery? What are your thoughts on the inherent morality of doing so purely for aesthetic purposes?

Let's also take the often exorbitant price of doing so out of the equation. Assuming that the price of a nose job or new teeth or breast implants were more reasonable and accessible to the average person, would you be tempted to do it, or not?

-geel

A:

Dear geel,

I'm pretty laissez-faire when it comes to things like this, with me just judging silently but not condemning them—maybe thinking "that's silly" but not "that's wrong." I personally would only want plastic surgery to normalize my life. For instance, I have a scar. I forget about it, but it tends to be one of the first things people notice about me. I don't super mind that, but I don't think it would be a bad idea to get rid of it. But surgeries that go beyond returning me to a previous state to trying to improve that original state—I can kind of see why people would want those, but I also kind of think those are silly. I don't think I would do it.

-El-ahrairah, who is a guy and thus probably not the best person to ask

A:

Dear you,

I'm totally open to improving your teeth for aesthetic reasons, but I probably wouldn't get a nose job or breast implants. Of course, this is influenced by the fact that my mom is a dental hygienist and I'm pretty happy with other aspects of my body.

-Zedability


0 Corrections
Question #83741 posted on 09/02/2015 10:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What happened with the pigeons that a neighbor was concerned about? I'm glad the horses were taken away, but I care about the pigeons (and any other animals, too!)?

Merry-go-Lamb

A:

Dear and a side of fries,

Presumably they were imprisoned and punished for having kept horses and humans in such squalor. 

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz (who has serious doubts about The Dodo's journalistic integrity)


0 Corrections
Posted on 09/02/2015 8:15 p.m. New Correction on: #83717 I work part-time for BYU. My boss was talking about the ACA, and how BYU's insurance ...
Question #83700 posted on 09/02/2015 7:10 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've heard people say that the parties are getting more and more extreme and that the Blue Dog Democrats are a dying breed. I've tried to find how big they were in each Congress since the caucus was founded but I just can't find anything. I appeal to your superior research skills!

-Curious political junkie

A:

Dear Doctor,

I'm not really great with political science, but I do have two graphics that may help you. One's from XKCD, the other found by yayfulness.

-Tally M.


1 Correction
Question #83717 posted on 09/02/2015 6:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I work part-time for BYU. My boss was talking about the ACA, and how BYU's insurance is "Cadillac" insurance, and that somehow, BYU was being penalized because of the ACA for being generous with their benefits. Can you explain this to me? I know BYU's benefits are great but I don't understand how the ACA could be penalizing BYU for offering great benefits to their employees.

--Inga

A:

Dear you,

Board Question #83737 talks about how BYU's health insurance no longer qualifies under the ACA, but the reasons aren't fully explained. One of the reasons is almost certainly the fact that BYU health insurance doesn't cover birth control, which is required by the ACA, but that's a case of BYU's benefits being less generous, not more. Unfortunately, BYU hasn't put out a lot of information on the subject. My guess is that either your boss misunderstood the issue, or you misunderstood your boss; insurance is disqualified under the ACA for not offering certain benefits, not for being too generous.

-Zedability


1 Correction
Question #83665 posted on 09/02/2015 4:22 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are all the situations in which a That Was Easy button would be inappropriate?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3YmMNpbFjp0

-EZ-BRZY

A:

Dear you,

  • The first day of class
  • The second day of class
  • The third day of class
  • etc...

-Zedability


0 Corrections
Question #83737 posted on 09/02/2015 3:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I heard that the BYU student insurance isn't going to be good enough to meet the requirements for Obamacare starting fall semester. Is that true? how could that happen? Did the BYU insurance change or did Obamacare change?

-I don't even use health insurance

A:

Dear Doctor,

You will use health insurance at some point. Guaranteed. It's worth it to have.

A former Board writer actually posted a link on Facebook to a blog post that pretty well sums up how BYU losing ACA status may affect your situation.

Unfortunately, even the post writer couldn't find much on why BYU insurance no longer meets the requirements. Zed mentioned that it's possible that BYU insurance never qualified, but there was a bit of a grace period that recently ended.

-Tally M.


0 Corrections
Question #83728 posted on 09/02/2015 3:19 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What do you think of the Dunning-Kruger effect? Do you think it's happened to you? What side were you on, the unskilled or skilled side?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunning%E2%80%93Kruger_effect

-Sapiosexual

A:

Dear Attractive/ed Person,

Two stories:

-When I was younger, I used to be into magic a lot. I had a few tricks I could do which I thought were pretty neat. When I went to my second year of EFY, I figured I could get into the talent show pretty easily. I was so confident that I didn't practice one bit. When I found out the audition time was a lot earlier than I'd anticipated, I rushed to the place and, very flustered, tried to do my routine. Basically nothing worked. The experience was so embarrassing that I largely stopped performing after that (but there are still a couple of card tricks I like to keep handy for parties and stuff).

-When I was a freshman at BYU, I went to HumorU shows a lot. It was basically my go-to date, actually. At one of the shows, they mentioned you could try out to join the club at one of their open-mic nights. So, I started developing some bids in my head. I spent a long time thinking about how funny it all was and how I was basically going to kill it at my audition. Before I actually did, though, I figured that I should at least practice it once (that magic incident really scarred me, I think). So, one day when I was alone in my Helaman Halls dorm room, I closed the door, grabbed a flashlight, stood in front of the mirror and started going through my jokes.

I didn't finish the routine. Everything sounded far less funny outside of my head. I didn't end up auditioning, and I don't think I ever will. Better to leave that stuff to the professionals.

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear Sapio,

I think there is some truth to it, but I feel like a person's personality has the most influence over their self-perception, not necessarily their intelligence level. 

However, this happens to me all the time with tech stuff, especially at work. I'm the youngest person on my team by at least 15 years which means that I know how to use iPads and AppleTV. I'm so good at solving computer issues (read: Googling our issues and emailing I.T.) that my teammates have literally nicknamed me "The Wizard." Sometimes it goes to my head, thinking that I can fix all our phone and Internet issues, but in reality all the troubleshooting I know how to do consists of restarting something. 

Also, if I binge on Grey's Anatomy, I sometimes think that I am a super cool surgeon or medical prodigy. But it's just me...in my pajamas...going on my third hour of Netflix. 

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear Jo,

“The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are full of doubts, while the stupid ones are full of confidence.”

-El-ahrairah, who often feels much wiser than he actually is

A:

Dear Yosef,

I have an unfortunate amount of self-recorded VHS and cassette tapes of me "performing" that can prove this happened to me a lot as a kid. (And if you can't tell from that sentence, I was on the unskilled side.) Thankfully, no one uses those things any more so the embarrassing evidence is all but gone. At least, I hope it is. 

-Auto Surf


0 Corrections
Question #83732 posted on 09/02/2015 2:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Therapist Recommendation Experts,

What do you do when seeing a therapist was a bad experience? Like, things just got worse instead of better? And you really don't want to see another therapist because it's really hard (emotionally) for you to explain your problem and you don't fully believe they'll do better than the last guy?

-I don't want to talk about it

A:

Dear Don't Want,

I am truly sorry that you had a bad experience with therapy. I think it's really quite commendable that you went, and that even though it was not a positive experience, you haven't completely written off therapy as an avenue for healing and improvement. As a therapist, one of my soapboxes is, of course, how therapy is a worthwhile endeavor. The other soapbox, though, is making sure that people know what they're getting into as far as therapy goes. Especially if you're new to therapy, you may have some misconceptions about what therapy will be like as well as how to know if it's going well. That being said, I have a few thoughts for you that may help answer your questions.

First, therapists are all human. Just like the humans you find in any other profession, not all therapist humans will be a good fit for you. This makes sense, given the likelihood that not every professor or teacher you have ever had has taught in a way that works the best for you; not every hairstylist you've ever been to has given you a stellar haircut; and not every person you met in your kindergarten class turned out to be your BFF. This doesn't necessarily mean that any of these people are bad or incompetent. It really could just be a matter of fit. Something about the two of you just didn't click, or they don't have much expertise in that particular area. I've experienced this before from the therapist's perspective. Sometimes you can work through it together, but sometimes the best option truly is for the client to move to another therapist. Other times, the fit may be okay, and the professional in question may be competent, but they make a mistake (or several) that are really difficult for the client to move past. Unfortunately, though hopefully rarely, you may run into a therapist who is truly incompetent. If this is the case, know that the odds of your next therapist being a competent one is decent. The training process for therapists is grueling enough that by and large, most of them know what they're doing (though they may have very different opinions on how to do it). You have the right to try as many therapists as you need to in order to find one that fits for you, and you also have the right to report any therapist who you feel is being unethical. 

Secondly, know that good therapy can be painful. It is astonishing to me the number of clients who come into therapy wanting to overcome a past trauma, process a painful experience, decrease their anxiety, get rid of a phobia, address their depression--you name it--but somehow expect that we can do this without things getting raw and real. This simply isn't the case. Therapy can be really tough and emotionally exhausting. The cliche "things will get worse before they get better" applies to therapy often. For many clients, it seems like therapy is a mixed bag, especially in the beginning stages. They leave the session feeling both better and worse at the same time, because the discomfort and the healing are wound tightly together. An increase in distress after starting therapy does not mean that it isn't working. It's because therapy often involves digging up stuff that you've tried really hard to wall off for a long time, and it involves facing a lot of painful emotions. That being said, a good therapist will not force you to go deeper or faster than you can handle. Discomfort is okay, but everyone has limits, and if yours are being exceeded then either therapy needs to slow down, make a course correction, or it may be time for you to look for a new therapist. 

Lastly, try as many therapists as you need to, keeping the above in mind. Finding "the right therapist" does not mean therapy will be sunshine and daisies and you'll leave every session feeling like the king of the world. What it does mean is that you feel a good connection with the therapist and hope for things to improve. Good therapists and effective therapy is out there, I promise. Don't give up because of one bad experience, even though it was truly painful. Your mental health and well-being are worth more than that.

-Divya


0 Corrections
Question #83731 posted on 09/02/2015 1:38 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have another canning question. Let's say I'm canning peaches at Provo's altitude of 4,550 feet and transporting them to California at sea level. Because I'm going from a higher to a lower altitude, there is more pressure on the jars at sea level thus creating a greater vacuum seal on the jars. Conversely, when going to a higher elevation I'm more likely to get jars that could leak because of less pressure. Am I correct in this assumption? Does this have anything to do with Boyle's law and pressure equilibrium? It has been a while since I took chemistry and physics but hopefully my memory is correct. Thanks as usual.

-Salty Dog

A:

Dear you,

Yeah, I think you're totally correct on all counts. It's kind of like how shampoo bottles can leak all over your clothes when you fly - the pressure is so much lower. Similarly, if you've ever opened a carton of yogurt in Utah and had it squirt all over you, that's why; the pressure is lower. And Boyle's law definitely illustrates this.

Man, I feel like this is a boring answer, but I can't really think of anything to say other than "you're right!"

-Zedability


0 Corrections
Question #83705 posted on 09/02/2015 1:04 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

After 5 years, I finally became brave enough to leave a relationship where I felt belittled and often put down. He wasn't happy about it, but oh well. Thanks to all of you for sharing what you are looking for and what you see as normal or important in a relationship. You all helped a ton.

I don't have access to a counselor right now, but have spent the past 6 months focusing on me. The problem is - scary dating possibilities are here. And I have a really hard time accepting attention or thinking I'm worth it. If a guy asks me on a date, I think he must be broken, because why on earth would he be interested in me?

Any of you have any suggestions of ways I can approach this normally? Is it normal to expect or be comfortable with someone liking you? Or thinking you are cool? Does that ever stop being extremely weird?

I am pretty comfortable with myself normally and my esteem isn't too bad when I'm on my own, but it seems to dip really fast when it gets attention, which I don't think is normal.

-Trying really hard

A:

Dear you,

I think most of us sometimes undervalue ourselves, and the amount and frequency to which that happens probably changes for different individuals and at different times in our lives.

For example, I struggled more than I might normally during my period of engagement. My husband is a great guy, and I was dealing with some difficult personal issues during our engagement that at times made me feel so mismatched - like he was not going to end up with the person he deserved if he married me.

I agree with the idea that sometimes we are our own worst critics. You're not unusual for being that way, but that doesn't mean it isn't something it would be good for you to change. We all deserve to be loved, and that includes to love ourselves. Being prideful and being like "Yeah, I'm super cool, everybody thinks I'm great" isn't the goal, but being comfortable with the knowledge that we deserve love and happiness matters.

To this end, I suggest that you undertake specific behaviors geared towards improving your self-love. Pick some of the following and focus on them:

  1. This one is mandatory. When we would go on vacations and one of the kids would complain about something, sometimes my mom would require us to then say two nice things about it. We were snarky and pretty useless about this, but the idea is sound. Next time you catch yourself having a thought that is negative about your self worth, you are REQUIRED to come up with two positive thoughts about yourself. Example: "Wow, why would he want to date me? I am totally breaking out right now." "Oh, wait..." "Well, I am a hard worker - I did all of my homework tonight and made time for this date! Also, I'm a good cook - I made my own dinner and it even had vegetables in it!"
  2. Make a journal in which you require at least one positive thing about yourself daily. It can be something good that you accomplished or just something good about who you are.
  3. Request validation. I had a time in the fairly recent past where I actually sent out an email to some people and told them I needed validation. It can be hard to ask for this, but if you're really getting down on yourself, consider talking to a few close family and friends, telling them you're trying to improve on this, and then asking them what they appreciate about you.
  4. Make and succeed at a little goal every day. Something tiny that you know will make your day a little bit better: today I will eat at least 3 serviings of vegetables. Today I will remember to say my morning prayers. Today I will smile at at least 5 people. Make ONE goal, and then at the end of the day, congratulate yourself for achieving it - you are making progress a bit at a time to becoming who you want to be.
  5. Review gospel resources. The Young Women's theme beings "We are daughters of our Heavenly Father, who loves us and we love Him..." There are countless talks and scriptures that echo this proclamation of our divine loveableness. Find them. Challenge yourself to find something every day, or even every week - a quote, a scripture, a whole talk, a bible dictionary entry, etc.
  6. Be patient. Sometimes when we struggle with something we put ourselves down for the struggle itself. It is okay that you are struggling. It is okay that it is going to take you time to get better. God is not mad at you because you aren't getting better fast enough when you are really trying to keep getting better.

Feel free to email me if you'd like to have a personal conversation about this. Self-love is really hard sometimes, especially when we're struggling with other things, and I'd be happy to chat at anne.certainly (at) theboard.byu.edu.

Love,

~Anne, Certainly


0 Corrections
Question #83714 posted on 09/02/2015 1 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'll be working 20 or so hours a week to support my husband going through school (he'll be working Friday and Saturday nights). We have a 15 month old daughter. I feel absolutely terrible for having to work. Can you tell me I'm not a bad mother? Can you tell me other moms work? Will my daughter miss me? Will it feel like ages to her while I'm gone? Our wonderful neighbor will be watching her. Can you tell me I'm not a failure for not being a 100% stay at home mom? Will my daughter turn out ok? Will she know I still love her? Please help a troubled heart.

-Mother

A:

Dear you,

Step 1: Breathe. It sounds like you're dealing with a lot of anxiety and guilt about this. That is totally understandable, but doesn't make it helpful. Pause RIGHT NOW and sit for like a minute and just breathe in and out.

Step 2: Remember and recognize. There are a ton of mothers who love and take care of their kids but have to (or choose to) spend some of their time working. My mother worked ~15 hours a week when I was quite young. Do I even remember it? No. Do I feel traumatized by it? No. Did she still teach me to read and help me grow up? Yes. Do I still know she loves me? Yes, definitely. 

Step 3: Talk. It may help you to talk through your anxieties and fears with your husband, your own mother, a friend in a similar situation, a bishop, or another appropriate source. You are far from alone in this situation, although it may not feel like it. There are lots of people out there who love you and can reassure you.

Step 4: Pray. And this step you really ought to take as soon as possible even though I've listed it as Step 4. Pray to Heavenly Father to know if what you've decided to do is going to be okay. Ask for the specific blessings you're concerned about (that your child will not be lonely, that you will know how to best spend your time with your child while at home, etc.) 

Step 5: Plan. The future is often the scariest when we don't know how we're going to deal with it. Sit down at your computer and make a calendar. Look at your schedule and realize that 20 hours a week of work plus an extra 5 hours for commuting and picking up your child from the neighbor still leaves you 143 hours a week where you will be the primary caregiver for your child. Granted, your child and you will both sleep a substantial portion of this, but the point is that you are not going to be absent from your child's life with this work schedule. Take time now to look at when you'll be home when baby is likely to be awake. Plan some activities you can do together (e.g. having daily "story time" or weekly "bake with mommy" day.) Think of ways you can make the most of this time, while recognizing that that also includes just relaxing together and spending some unstructured time.

You can be a great mom while still helping take care of your family financially. Be patient with yourself. Do what you can. Trust God and trust in the Atonement to give you grace in a world where our situations are not always perfect.

Love,

~Anne, Certainly


0 Corrections
Question #83622 posted on 09/02/2015 11:50 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

A woman's menstrual cycle occurs, on average, every 28 days. How did the uterus end up aligning almost perfectly with the calendar month? It's convenient, and I love it, but there's no way that the length of a calendar month was measured and determined according to the menstrual cycle. From what I understand, the Gregorian calendar month was created according to the moon. Did women just magically sync up with the moon? Is the moon a woman? The moon is made of cheese, so are women cheese-people? Is this just the greatest coincidence of the universe?

-Cheese Person

A:

Dear Human,

I don't know how well this answers your question, but there is a study called "The regulation of menstrual cycle and its relationship to the moon". The abstract says the following: 

A synchronous relationship between the menstrual cycle and lunar rhythm was confirmed by: Investigative data: Among the 826 female volunteers with a normal menstrual cycle, aged between 16 and 25 years, a large proportion of menstruations occurred around the new moon (28.3%), while at other times during the lunar month the proportion of menstruations occurring ranged between 8.5-12.6%; the difference was significant (p less than 0.01).

Super-interesting! 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Corrections
Question #83730 posted on 09/02/2015 8:56 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I like a girl, and I want to ask her out. We're friends, but I feel like I still don't know her very well. For that reason, I think, I'm really shy about asking her out. For some reason, I feel like I really have to impress her, but all of my date ideas seem decidedly...unimpressive.

100 Hour Board ladies, what do you think? Do you like to be impressed? I mean, obviously you want to have a good time with a guy, but do you think I need to absolutely wow her to have a shot?

(And any date ideas you might have to offer would be appreciated.)

-Nice Guy

A:

Dear Nice Guy,

I think the best dates are the simplest dates! For me, the most important aspect of a date is simply being able to talk to and get to know the other person better. The activity itself doesn't much matter, as long as it's something that allows for conversation. In other words, going on a hike or going out to eat are great ideas! (I especially like hiking on first dates.) Going to see a movie, on the other hand... not the best.

Don't worry about trying to "wow" her. If you really are a nice guy, she is probably already wowed by that alone! The more you worry about impressing her, the harder it will be for you to be yourself. 

In conclusion, I just want to leave you with the following advice:

ASK HER OUT!

ASK HER OUT!

ASK HER OUT!

DO IT!

THIS WEEK!

I may not know who you are, but in my mind you are a lot of guys that I know, and I would tell them all the same thing.

Men of BYU, do you realize that you really can ask out any single girl that you want to ask out!? The vast majority of BYU girls I know will (for the most part) always say yes to a first date, and honestly a first date is such a casual thing that you really don't have to overthink it! So even if you just think you might be interested in getting to know a girl better, ASK HER OUT!

Seriously, us girls want the nice guys to ask us out, because often they have already impressed us. With their niceness. 

Okay, I think I'm done now.

ASK HER OUT.

Love,

Vienna

A:

Dear Nine,

Most of the time, I genuinely don't care where you take me on a date.* The biggest thing that matters is the quality of the conversation. If I didn't like the date, it's usually because the conversation was boring or one-sided.

-Tally M.

*Unless it's a haunted forest/house, especially if I don't know you very well.

A:

Dear Larco,

I was going to say that I don't like it when a guy tries to impress me, but I don't think that's quite accurate. I guess I am just impressed with different things. For instance, if a guy takes me on a hot-air balloon ride that ends in a secluded field with a perfect picnic and a live band playing just for us (or in other words, every Bachelor/Bachelorette date ever), that would be pretty cool. But if the conversation doesn't flow well, or if he doesn't treat the hot-air balloon guide kindly, I won't be very impressed. Regardless of the activity, I think you can impress with sincerity, honesty, and kindness. At least for me, those qualities (and other Christlike attributes) are way more likely to get me interested than an extravagant activity. 

Take care,

-Auto Surf

A:

Dear you,

I'll just throw out there that my first date with my husband was walking to a place for dinner and then walking to a different place for dessert/candy (that part being my idea) and then going home. 

You matter more than the activity. That being said, shake it up and do different things with different levels of craze factor over time, but it's fine to be chill sometimes - even at the beginning.

~Anne, Certainly

A:

Dear Human,

Yeah Yeah, But How Many Pull Ups Can You Do.

-Jaden


0 Corrections
Question #83733 posted on 09/02/2015 8:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

There's this girl I'm interested in. We met three nights ago and have really good chemistry, and have since gone on a group date with friends and hung out with a couple times. I really want to ask her on a one on one date but don't want to seem too forward. When's the best time to ask?

-AHHHHHHHH

PS: Bonus question: Good date ideas?

A:

Dear AHHHHHH,

THE BEST TIME TO ASK IS RIGHT NOW.

Do you have her number?

CALL HER NOW AND ASK HER OUT.

I understand where you are coming from. Asking someone on a date can be a very stressful and nerve-wracking thing to do. I've done it and it was terrifying! Also, I seem to remember Ardilla saying one time that asking a girl on a date can be scarier that giving a speech in front of an entire graduating high school class. Oh yeah, here it is. So you are not alone!

Part of your stress may come from the idea, too prevalent in our culture, that asking someone on a first date means something, like that you want to seriously date this girl or that you think she may be "the one." When we are immersed in that kind of thinking, guys like you end up worrying that asking a girl on a date may seem "too forward."

It doesn't have to be that way at all! If you just want it to be a casual date, act casual about it and it will be.

To better answer your question about when to ask (though I also stick by my previous answer), I would honestly say any time you two are alone together is a good time to ask. Start with a simple, "Hey do you have plans this weekend?" and go from there.

I do however think it's totally acceptable to call her up, as well, if you feel more comfortable asking her that way. In fact, I'd say that's the most common way that I get asked to go on dates.

Good luck, and seriously, don't overthink it too much! You totally got this!

-Vienna


0 Corrections
Question #83527 posted on 09/02/2015 7:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What state or area has the LEAST amount of bugs?

-packing my bags

A:

Dear phobia,

According to this Business Wire article, A BASF Pest Control Solutions telephone survey determined the states with the fewest number of pest complaints per capita were (in order of more bugs to fewer): New Mexico, Utah, Illinois, North Dakota, Delaware, New Hampshire, Idaho, Connecticut, South Dakota and... Washington D.C. 

As you'll see below, yayfulness's response notes this survey is probably worthless. Perhaps the only state where bugs can be said to not exist is the state of Denial. Maybe you should just learn to eat them instead

Unsympathetically,

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Dear reader,

As a South Dakota native, let me assure you that my home state has MANY bugs. As the Board's resident cartographer, I hoped that I could find enough data to make some sort of population density map. However, the data I needed was impossible for me to find, and it looks like insects are so thoroughly present in every ecosystem that a map would be pointless anyway.

If you want to get away from insects, you really only have two choices. The first is Antarctica, with only one native species and a handful of invasive hitchhikers courtesy of humans. Unfortunately, Antarctica is pretty inhospitable, and your only real option that doesn't end in death is working there as a researcher. The second choice is the subtidal zone of the oceans, which as far as anyone knows has no insects. Unfortunately, it also has no air, which could be problematic.

Arguably, insects are some of evolution's most impressive creatures. If you define success as generating an untold number of species that have lasted for millions upon millions of years, then insects are pretty hard to beat.

That said, I totally understand where you're coming from with your question. My wife and I are living in a basement that is overrun with spiders (even more frustrating than insects) and I'd do just about anything to get them to stay outside so that I didn't have to keep killing them. Best of luck in your quest.

-yayfulness

A:

Hey there,

Yay's right. Insects live almost everywhere and are extremely important to the earth's ecosystems. There's just no getting around bugs. You can, however, choose to avoid habitats where insects tend to be larger than average size, such as tropical and/or humid regions, and choose to visit places that are in the middle of their cold seasons because insects often have a period of dormancy or hibernation or death (as their eggs overwinter) during that time.  My advice for what's left of the summer break would be to avoid the equator and vacation in a tundra in the northern hemisphere, or desert in the southern hemisphere since it's winter there now. i.e. anywhere both cold and dry. Also, you should also try to avoid places where there are warmth and/or moisture within those climates (such as houses and other buildings) because bugs tend to congregate in locations that ensure their survival during harsh conditions.

Alternately, you could just douse yourself in peppermint oil as direct contact kills wasps in five seconds flat (as well as a number of other hard-bodied insects). If you carried around a portable mister, you could even take your vacation to the rainforests of South America, home to the terrifying Goliath Bird-Eating Spider (I don't actually know if peppermint oil works on tarantulas or not, I'm just assuming it does. Experiment at your own risk) Come to think of it, better results could be achieved with a flame thrower. 

Wherever you choose to go, I hope you have a good time.

Please note that The 100 Hour Board is not responsible for any fees, imprisonment, capital punishment, or other legal action taken against persons for destroying native wildlife and habitats.

-Squirrel


0 Corrections
Question #83736 posted on 09/02/2015 5:14 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

If the US had a British-style parliament rather than our presidential system, do you think that would increase or decrease Donald Trump's chances at becoming head of state?

-blah

A:

Dear yaddah yaddah,

I may very well be wrong, but I think it would decrease his chances. American parties are weak enough that anyone with sufficient money and popular support can run for president, but British parties are strong - strong enough, in fact, that in order to become an MP representing a mainstream party, a candidate must first be approved by party officers.[1] And no mainstream British party would give Trump a seat as an MP, let alone appoint him party leader.

He would have a hard time partly because the UK has a winner-take-all, single-member-district system for its legislature like we do; therefore, it ends up being a (mostly) two-party democracy in which he wouldn't get enough votes in any single constituency to win a seat. (We can talk about the Lib-Dems if you want, but maybe in another question.) If, however, our system were like many continental European democracies that use forms of proportional representation, his chances might actually increase. Such legislatures lend themselves to the development of fringe parties, and Trump, with the following he has, could definitely build one. Parties in proportional legislatures have to form coalitions in order to get a majority of votes, so it often happens that a fringe party will be part of government - and sometimes (if rarely), it will actually be the largest party in the governing coalition and get to put up the prime minister. (Ahem, Greece.)

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book


0 Corrections
Question #83735 posted on 09/02/2015 5:14 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How do they make more seedless grapes? What do they plant?

-Sour

A:

Dear herbivore,

According to this article from How Stuff Works,

It turns out that most fruits today do not come from seeds. They come from cuttings instead. This is true of grapes, blueberries, apples, cherries, etc. (pretty much all fruits except citrus, although scientists are working on that, too). A piece of a vine or branch is cut off, dipped in rooting hormone and then placed in moist dirt so that roots and leaves form. Because they come from cuttings, new grapevines are essentially clones of the vine they were cut from.

Seedless grapes actually do contain seeds at some point. But a genetic error prevents the seeds from forming hard outer coats like normal seeds do.

Before we go any further, I'd like to clarify something. New grapevines are not "essentially" clones of the vine they were cut from, they are clones. Cuttings are a from of asexual reproduction, which doesn't mix up genetics at all. When you've got a plant with good traits (i.e. your grape or watermelon has no seeds, your piranha plant suddenly can shoot fireballs), your only way to preserve that trait in the next generation is by propagating that plant vegetatively. Many crops with seeds are generally grown this way, because seeds are the result of sexual reproduction. Sexual reproduction tends to mix up genetics. A seed from an excellent apple tree may yield decent apples, but they might be awful instead. Each seed is genetically different from the parent plant and may exhibit different characteristics. If you're a fruit farmer, it's a much safer bet to go with something you know will be financially sustainable four or five years down the road when it begins to produce fruit.

Of course, growing plants from propagation has its drawbacks. Genetically identical plants are susceptible to disease. Take bananas. For whatever reason, bananas ditched the whole seed thing a long time ago, and usually grow by sprouting off the base of the parent plant. These sprouts can be and are removed and planted in other places. Almost all bananas in international trait are of the Cavendish variety. As these are all genetically identical, they are very susceptible to disease, including a nasty number called Panama disease that ravages entire plantations. Says Wikipedia about the whole deal,

Because cultivated bananas are propagated by conventional vegetative reproduction rather than through sexual reproduction, each of the Cavendish clones are genetically identical and cannot evolve disease resistance. As there is currently no effective fungicide against Panama disease, some have speculated about a future where Cavendish cultivars are not usable for farming. In such a scenario, a separate cultivar may be developed as a replacement (as happened with [a previous banana cultivar]). 

The bananas you eat basically everywhere today could be gone in five years. Let's hope things hold, eh?

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Corrections
Question #83734 posted on 09/02/2015 5:08 a.m.
Q:

Dear 百時間のボード,

Is there a Kendo or Samurai club at BYU or in Provo? I have absolutely no experience with it, so I couldn't possibly start one myself.

If there are none of those, are there any martial art clubs that focus on swordplay at BYU or in Provo?

--サムライの男

A:

Dear way of the sword,

It looks like there historically have been few people who do kendo around BYU, and there's nowhere in Utah Valley that teaches it. As far as I'm aware, Salt Lake City is your closest option. If you'd like to study iaido instead you can begin your education with Jake Sorensen at the Iyawama dojo, a member of the Toyama Ryu Iaido Kai USA organization. You can email him at jsorensen@toyamaryu-usa.com or read more about his work at iwayamadojo.blogspot.com.

If you ever decide you want to learn Western martial arts swordplay at some point, BYU has a club named True Edge that teaches historically accurate broadsword fighting on the lawn north of the Wilkinson Center.

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Corrections