Kissing is just cuddling with your lips. -Krishna

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Friday, September 30, 2016
Question #88107 posted on 09/30/2016 3:25 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What part of General Conference weekend do you expect to enjoy most? Why?

— Larry Wayne

A:

Dear Reverend,

I mean, I'm sure I'll enjoy/be spiritually uplifted by the talks, and it's always nice to take a brief escape to Rubikland during the semester. However, if I'm going to be completely honest, I'm think I'm mostly looking forward to the part where I get to sleep in and attend ten hours of church meetings with plenty of breaks and food in between, rather than waking up early to attend ten hours of church meetings all in a row on one day with no breaks for snacks in between. 

-Frère Rubik asks that you would kindly tell your executive secretary how much you appreciate him the next time you get a chance. 

A:

Dear reader,

Priesthood session and any time Elder Holland opens his mouth.

-Sunday Night Banter


0 Corrections
Question #88106 posted on 09/30/2016 1:18 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

For most students (freshmen) with BYU Dining meal plans, do you think the total amount of food consumed actually ends up being worth the total price of the plan?

(Question inspired by perennial discussion of left-over meal plan money at the end of semesters)

Thanks for the time and effort of responding!
— Larry Wayne

A:

Dear Larry the Cucumber, 

When I was a freshman, I finished my meal plan with $0.10 left on the card and was so proud of myself.  I also easily fed myself, both of my sisters, Commander Keen, CK's wife, and an upperclassman boyfriend with that card for a long time.  Some of my friends used their extra money to stock up on canned food and other non-food materials at the Creamery in preparation for our sophomore year.

So yes, the amount of money on the card is ridiculous.  But if you have other people you can feed or there are goods you need at the Creamery (even if that means buying 10 gallons of Graham Canyon), then go for it.

-April Ludgate

A:

Dear Larry,

I lived in Helaman as a freshman and had the plan that allowed me to eat in the Cannon Center as often as I wanted to 7 days a week, plus gave me $250 a semester to spend elsewhere.

It was luxurious and I ate really well, but if we're talking quantity of food, then it certainly wasn't worth it. Even though I could go to the Cannon every ten minutes if I wanted to, I only ate the regular 3 meals a day.

The quality of food was of course significant higher than I have eaten since, but even with that consideration I would never willingly pay such a high price for food again. I fed my sister fairly often on that $250 (plus food I smuggled out of the Cannon), but I certainly don't think I ate food worth $400+ a month.

Love,

Luciana


0 Corrections
Thursday, September 29, 2016
Question #88105 posted on 09/29/2016 11:42 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Gingers have no souls.

Dementors steal souls.

Is Ron immune to the Dementor's Kiss??

--Hurry Purtur

A:

Dear Hairy,

In addition to your conclusion, it also means that being ginger is a fate worse than death.

-The Entomophagist

A:

Dear you,

I just wanted to step in and complain that I have vast stores of untapped Harry Potter knowledge, and this is the only question I get.

Bitterly,

Luciana

A:

Dear reader,

The Soulful Ginger would be mortified. How dare you?

-Sunday Night Banter


0 Corrections
Question #88104 posted on 09/29/2016 11:27 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are your favorite tactics to get conference tickets? Include strategies a while before, shortly before, and during conference. The standby line doesn't count, because the standby line is for suckers. Hardly anyone gets in that way.

-My Name Here

A:

Dear squawk-a-mole,

Salt Lake City native here, meaning our ward was rarely up for tickets or anything.  Get tickets through legitimate means? Hardly. Nay, we often resorted to subterfuge to listen to the voice of the prophets. Well, maybe that was just our family being lazy, or the fact that the one time I did try watching conference using the standby method they stopped giving out tickets like fifteen minutes before conference even started and I wound up in the Joseph Smith Memorial Building, which was 'aight but not what I had in mind that particular picturesque smiling child-hopping-over-rain-puddle-for-Conference-Ensign-photos day.

ANYWAYS. The following method is not Board, Church or BYU endorsed, but the fastest way to get tickets I know of is to walk in front of the conference center shortly before a session begins and stick up your fingers indicating the number of tickets you want, maybe plead feebly and mumble something about "tickets... conference..." and sure enough someone with extra tickets will just hand you theirs out of either pity, convenience or disgust and you just stroll on in easy-peasy like, making sure to cackle disparagingly at the hopeless saps in the standby line, because that's what conference is about, yo'. Right? Right. 

I haven't tried this for a while (besides cackling disparagingly, I do this with most anything on a daily basis: "Hah! Eggplant! Ridiculous! Hah! Pigeons! Ridiculous! Person with stable relationships and job?!? Bah! Ridiculous!") so I don't know if it's discouraged or not. For a while it seemed like my suggested method was an uncommon behavior, but then people figured out this actually worked so now there's more competition for free tickets, and so it all may be ruined. Another disadvantage of this method is it is difficult to all get tickets together. One ticket is easy, two is tricky, three is pushing your luck—but hey, if you don't mind going in all by your lonesome and waving resentfully at your relative or friendgirl who ended up way down on the floor from your seat in the upper nosebleeds, this method may work for you.

Secrets,

 --Ardilla Feroz


0 Corrections
Posted on 09/29/2016 11:07 p.m. New Correction on: #88084 On the subject of vaccinating children, I often hear the argument that not vaccinating your children ...
Question #88099 posted on 09/29/2016 6:35 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Since I got back from my mission, I have been focusing on my studies. I put a lot of time and effort, of course. However, I find that while I am outgoing and very positive at the beginning of my day, I am less energized, less happy, and just focused on finishing up the day. If anything comes up without me planning, I get super frustrated and stressed, as, mentally, it seems like my bank of energy has already distributed all my energy to different sources, whether being stored up for hometeaching or doing a math test. This affects everything in my life, whether it be dating ("while she is super cute and she is a wonderful person from what I can tell, it would be too much effort to ask at this moment. Perhaps next time I see her.") to family ("my brother wants to do something, but I am way too tired to do this. Maybe tomorrow"). I have been seeking solutions for this and I felt continual preparation is necessary.

So my question, most superb board is this:
"How do you plan for the unexpected?" For example, if I am super tired from studying Physics and I have the opportunity to ask some amazing girl out, how do I muster the power to do so without giving a weak effort?
To rephrase my question, I guess I am asking, "How do I make the most of my opportunities?"

-feeling like sans here

A:

Dear you,

I have much this same problem. After a long day of school and work, I don't have the energy to do much else. However, I've slowly learned to socialize in ways that don't totally exhaust me.

Sometimes when something unexpected comes up, you don't have any control over the situation. But if you do, and if you have the power to shape the situation, then here are some of my basic tips.

  1. Whenever possible, plan social activities for early in the day. This may not always be possible, depending on your schedule, but if you can, try to do most of your socializing before the day is over and you're exhausted. Grab a quick breakfast with your brother. Ask that pretty girl if she'll have lunch with you instead of planning anything big or elaborate. 
  2. Arrange for social activities that don't drain your energy. Figure out some activities that aren't totally draining for you. It could be something like watching a movie or going out for comfort food. It could be as simple as going for a drive up the canyon. If you're mentally drained but still want to be productive, schedule a phone call with a family member or anyone else you want to talk to.
  3. If you have advance notice about something, then plan your day to preserve energy for that event. If I know of something major that I have to do or really want to do, then I'll arrange my schedule so I'm not totally exhausted. For example, a few weeks ago I went to go see my favorite band in Salt Lake, so I knew I would be out late on a Monday night. Therefore, I made sure I didn't have any urgent homework to do that day and I ditched my worst class because I know it exhausts me.
  4. Don't be afraid to tell people how you feel. If you're tired, and if you really can't summon the energy to do things, then tell people. Most people will understand how exhausting college is, and they'll be happy to reschedule.
  5. Sometimes caffeine is a life-saver. Don't become an addict or anything, but if you really need a quick energy boost, then pick up a soda. It's harder if you're stuck studying on campus, but if something comes up unexpectedly, then caffeine can give you the energy and motivation to seize the opportunities that come.
  6. Prioritize what's really important to you. Take five minutes to consider the situation. If you look back in week or a month or a year, would you be happy you made the decision to stay in? Would you be glad that you didn't expend more energy, or would you regret that you passed up opportunities? Then, depending on your answer, make a decision.
  7. Have something small and simple you can do to relax you. If you're feeling overwhelmed by stress, find an activity that relaxes you. It could be exercise or meditation or eating your favorite food, but find something that can help you calm down and feel less stressed.

These ideas might be totally unhelpful, and if so I'm sorry. Sometimes you just don't have the energy to do more things, and that's okay. But if you really do want to be more productive after long and exhausting days, I have noticed that these things help me.

Love,

Luciana


0 Corrections
Question #88101 posted on 09/29/2016 6:34 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is Tinder really as bad as I hear it is? For context, I've had plenty of women tell me it's terrible, but is that just because the men on there are lame, because that's really the only thing I hear, or is there some kind of similar stereotype to the women on tinder?

-would have used that mormon/byu one that I heard about, but I guess it's only for iphones.

A:

Dear person,

My only experience with Tinder is the "Provoguysamiright" Instagram page.  Which is both horrifyingly amazing and amazingly horrifying (and only associated with Tinder or other similar dating apps about 70% of the time). 

I think Tinder is a very different beast in BYU/Provo area.  It is used as a one-night stand or hook-up app basically everywhere else in the country, and is used more for steady dating in Provo.  Though (as seen on the above Instagram page), there are many people who just use it for NCMOs and free dinners.

-April Ludgate

A:

Dear ShouldaCouldaWoulda,

You might also be interested in Bumble, an app that (from what I've heard) is exactly like Tinder except that only the girl is allowed to start a chat after you match. In theory, it seems like it would weed out a lot of the "lame" men that you associate with Tinder, but I'm not sure what it's like in practice (I just bring it up because one of my home teachees told me yesterday that he got it but he described his experience with it in very broad, vague terms).

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear you,

Upon reading this question, I thought to myself, "Hmm. My dating life is pretty close to a blank slate, and I know extremely little about Tinder, so perhaps I'm qualified to evaluate this situation objectively." Thus convinced, I downloaded Tinder. Here is the process I followed.

  1. Download Tinder.
  2. Search for a way to sign up without using my Facebook profile.
  3. Debate the merits of creating a fake profile so I can do this anonymously and not have to talk to any strangers.
  4. Give in and sign up with Facebook.
  5. Make sure the pictures of me are decent, even if this is just for experimental purposes.
  6. Notice that the info on my FB profile is out of date and wonder whether it's worthwhile to fix.
  7. Update age preferences because 30 is a bit old for me. Settle on 26 as the upper limit.
  8. Look at pictures of men and realize I don't know the difference between swiping left and swiping right.
  9. Google "How to use Tinder"
  10. Learn from WikiHow that I should be the only one in my Tinder pictures.
  11. Go back to Tinder and change my pictures.
  12. Look at more men and realize I forgot to learn what swiping means.
  13. Google "How to use Tinder" again.
  14. Panic about the idea of talking to strangers and even potentially dating them. Wish I had created a fake profile after all.
  15. 3:04 p.m.: Begin swiping.
  16. Wonder why all the men are Tinder are so hot and muscular.
  17. 3:05 p.m.: Get my first match. Success!
  18. Panic and realize I am definitely not brave enough to message anyone I've matched with. Hope that some of them message me so this experiment is worthwhile.
  19. Realize I left the minimum age at 18 and acknowledge that I have no interest in cradle robbing.
  20. Change minimum age to 21.

After those brief 20 steps, I continued swiping, alternately hoping that men would match and message me so I could do this experiment properly and hoping no one would message me because I'm a horrible coward.

A few disclaimers: I only had two days in which to conduct Tinder research, because I started my experiment when this question had already hit 50 hours. I also swiped enough to use all my "likes" each day, in order to give myself the broadest pool of men possible.

In the two days that I Tindered, I matched with around 100 men and had conversations with 11 of them. I was asked on an actual date by two of them. Since that asking-out only happened this morning, thus far I haven't responded. I'm not sure I will respond because I'm not sure I trust internet strangers whose only qualification is that they find me attractive.

Here are my conclusions: Tinder isn't the worst, per se, but I can imagine it would be very frustrating if you were actually hoping to get dates out of this. Even though I only spoke with a few men, I grew to really hate the question "How are you?" There's no way to answer that question that sounds interesting, especially when you're just starting to talk to someone. Or maybe I'm just bad at internet flirting. That is also a distinct possibility. But most of the conversations I had were rather bland, and unlikely to lead anywhere.

In terms of the pool in general, I have 2 complaints that are perhaps unique to the Utah area: too many men had missionary pictures, and too many men had children in their pictures. Neither of those things make me want to date you.

Tinder could be beneficial for people. I got asked on two dates in two days, which I suppose messes up my six-month dry spell. It also helped me define what I'm attracted to in a man. But would I recommend it for those hoping to meet their soul mate? No. Definitely not.

Love,

Luciana


0 Corrections
Question #88061 posted on 09/29/2016 6:33 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have suffered from migraines since my childhood, but I never grew out of it. For all my life, I've taken all sorts of blockers, but a new doctor recently suggested that I should take Topiramate at 25mg a day, and see if this improves how I feel. He even suggested upping the dosage (because he gave me a low dose to start out with).

He also mentioned that it might help me lose weight, which is something I've struggled with because I have hypothyroidism, PCOS, and have had over 15 surgeries on my ankles/feet (so despite earnest efforts, nothing really budges).

1. How effective is Topiramate for treating migraines?
2. How effective is Topiramate for helping to lose weight? Although, just to be clear, this isn't the purpose for why I'm taking it! (It's just an added benefit).

How soon will I notice a difference, if any?

-Pills & Pillows

P.S Thanks, Ardilla Feroz, for some much needed laughs in Board Question #87977.

A:

Dear person,

Medications are not something to amateur-ly research and conjecture about, and I'm not capable of anything more than that. This really is a question for a doctor/other qualified health professional, especially because of all of the medical issues you have mentioned. Best of luck.

-Sheebs


0 Corrections
Question #88027 posted on 09/29/2016 6:33 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've been through some difficult family situations and I grew up watching my parents argue frequently (I'm a child of three divorces). Now as an adult, I'm finding it really difficult to trust people and relationships because I'm so used to being hurt by anyone i dare to love deeply, even family. I view families as fake and I panic when people get too close (physically or emotionally). It's lonely. Do you have any suggestions for a person who wants to trust others, but is petrified of it?

-Almost drew a knife on a boy who hugged me

A:

Dear person,

That's super hard, wanting to be emotionally intimate with other people and not being able to and having a distorted sense about relationships. Therapy can be really helpful for people facing interpersonal difficulties. At the BYU Counseling Center (CAPS) there are a lot of fantastic therapists who are good at helping with these kinds of problems. CAPS offers individual therapy as well as group therapy, which can also be really effective. You may be interested in the general processing group or the family of origin group they offer. (Please click on that link and scroll down to see the options.)

By the way, I apologize for giving you such a brief and terse sounding answer so late. I am really busy and disorganized right now. But I really care a lot about this question and about what you've had to go through. I think interpersonal wounds can be some of the toughest challenges of this life to overcome. It makes me sad that you have such a hard time trusting others and I hope you can find the help you need and that you come out on the other end of all of this with an increased capacity for love and trust. It's worth it.

-Sheebs


0 Corrections
Question #88100 posted on 09/29/2016 6 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

After years of thinking I was an introvert, I've discovered that I am a really shy extrovert. Social situations give me energy, but I often don't have the courage to go to them and often feel really self-conscious. Do you have any tips to overcoming shyness and embracing a more extroverted nature?

--Briggs

A:

Dear Briggs,

I'm not a shy extrovert, but an outgoing introvert. Either way, I feel it's a fairly similar situation.

The hardest part about social situations is going to them. Once you're there, it usually gets better and better, even if it starts off awkward. Don't try and force yourself into going. Rather, go because you love either the people there or the activity. If you get bored, you don't have to feel trapped—it's okay to leave.

Also, don't feel like you have to be comfortable in all social situations. As for me, I do much better one-on-one than in group settings. I've learned to put up with group events so I can get to those fun one-on-one conversations. Find what works for you, and do what you enjoy most rather than forcing something you don't enjoy.

Good luck!

-Kirito


0 Corrections
Question #88084 posted on 09/29/2016 11:12 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

On the subject of vaccinating children, I often hear the argument that not vaccinating your children will allow diseases that were almost eradicated to come back and many people will get sick, to which the anti-vaxxers reply "See, you're afraid of these diseases, your vaccines aren't really helping you! All the more reason not to get them."

Are people who are vaccinated at risk from people who don't vaccinate, or is it just the ones who are unable to be vaccinated who are at risk from these anti-vaxxers?

Flu shot

A:

Dear Flu,

The simple answer to your question is that vaccines aren't perfect, and even if you get vaccinated there's a chance, however slight, that you can still get the disease. One thing about viruses that a lot of people don't seem to realize is that they can mutate within a host's cells. Because of this, if an unvaccinated person gets a disease that you and I have been vaccinated against, it is possible that the virus mutates within them before transmitting to us. Because we were vaccinated against the old form of the virus, we don't have immunity against this new mutated form so we are still able to get sick. This is part of why, for example, the Flu shot doesn't always work, because the Flu virus mutates very quickly. Other more dangerous diseases like say polio or measles require more time and available hosts to mutate around vaccines. This is part of why people are afraid that the anti-vax movement will bring these diseases back. Because Anti-vaxxers are essentially turning themselves into walking Petri dishes for these diseases to grow and mutate in.

So no, those who are unable to vaccinate are not the only ones at risk from anti-vaxxers, but even if they were, I'm pretty sure "little kids with leukemia might get whooping cough and die because of your actions" is a good enough reason to not do whatever the thing was. Like really? "Oh it's no big deal because the only people it puts at risk are babies, old people, and people with like cancer or something." What the actual heck?!? In what world is that even remotely okay??? Sorry brief rant over.

One last thing I'd add is that we're not afraid of these diseases because of vaccines, we're afraid of them because they KILL people. We're afraid of them coming back because when they were around, 2 out of every 5 children wouldn't survive to the age of 5. We're afraid of them coming back because we've heard how awful dying of smallpox, or losing your child to polio is. We don't want to go back to that.

Dr. Occam


1 Correction