"If stupidity got us into this mess, then why can't it get us out?" Will Rogers
Sunday, May 24, 2015
Question #82552 posted on 05/24/2015 6:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is the best place to hang out around campus so that I can get asked out on dates? I've only been set up on dates this last semester and would like someone to sincerely ask me out. Can you help me out?

-A very single lady

A:

Dear Wade,

My apartment. ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Single Lady,

In my experience, you are most likely to be approached by guys when you are sitting outside somewhere. I have no clue why this is, it's just something I have noticed.

Actually this reminds me of something that happened to me my first week back from the mission. I was sitting outside when this really attractive guy came up to me and started making conversation. At this point, I should let you know that I was super awkward and uncomfortable around boys at this point in my life. So, when he asked me for my number I literally started laughing in his face. Then I felt super bad and after a moment of awkward silence I said, sure, you can have it!

He never called me.

Anyway, the other place would probably be the Cougareat, where someone might ask to sit by you or have lunch with you.

Some people swear by the library, but I have never exchanged more than a few words with anybody I didn't know at the library, so I must be missing something.

Honestly, the best way to get more dates is sadly not by hanging around campus, waiting for men to approach you (though I wish it was because that would be a lot easier).

The best way is by being proactive in your social life and showing interest in boys that you meet through your ward, your work, or other groups and activities.

Still, it doesn't hurt to up your chances by trying to get picked up on campus, so best of luck!

Love,

Vienna


0 Corrections
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I don't believe this is how Utah Saints came up with their name. I believe, like one of the commenters, that their name is a play on Utah Mormons. Are you able to dig up any more info on how the band chose their name?

-Famous Fanny

A:

Dear Famous Fanny,

I sent an email to the official Utah Saints email address asking them if the story you linked to was correct. Here's what their representative had to say:

That explanation is fairly close to the truth, the word "Utah" came from the end of the film "Raising Arizona" , the "Saints" part to make it sound like a team.
 
Utah Saints are based and started in, Leeds, England, and at that point had never been to Utah.
 
There is a theory, which isn't true, that they are associated with the Mormon church in some way, or are mormons, as the Mormon church is also known as The Church Of Latter Day Saints, and based in Utah, but that had no influence in the naming of the band.
 
Not the most exciting of explanations, but that's how the name came about - they were also trying to find a name that worked without suggesting a style of music - eg Metallica does suggest a rock band, and Utah Saints didn't want to suggest a style of music in their own name. Names for acts can be really tricky to decide on!
So, there you have it. If you want to ask the Utah Saints any other questions, their contact information is available here.
 
-Frère Rubik

0 Corrections
Question #82550 posted on 05/24/2015 4:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How many houses would a warehouse wear if a warehouse could wear houses?

-facetious musings

A:

Dear El'tha,

7.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Corrections
Question #82419 posted on 05/24/2015 4:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

If werf was majoring in a certain major, and wanted to plan their housing accordingly so that they would have the least distance between (for the sake of simplicity) their apartment and their college/department on campus, where should they live?

I'm looking for a list of a couple majors, or you could also identify which apartments trend toward what majors. For example, Helaman Halls is very close to the RB, so any freshman looking to major in Physical Education, Dance, or Health Science would be well off.

-SMQ

A:

Dear SMQ,

I'm not going to give you list with all majors, because BYU has a lot of them. Also, our question guidelines don't allow us to give recommendations about where to live. However, if you're interested in what apartment complexes are physically closest to most classes for a particular major, this is easy to accomplish. Find out where that major's department is based (that information is usually available on the department website), and then take a look the handy map on page 13 of this guide. It shows you where all off-campus housing complexes are located.

I'm not exactly sure what you're trying to accomplish here, but good luck with whatever it is!

- Haleakalā


0 Corrections
Question #82547 posted on 05/24/2015 2:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is there a way on Facebook to eliminate the chat and only view messages? I never chat on there, only msg. I know that if I prefer to message and view the whole conversation I have to go to messenger>options>see full conversation>and go from there. Is there a way to set this as my preference instead of going through chat all the time?

-Bells out of the sky

A:

Dear Doctor,

You could turn off chat by going to the bottom right corner of the screen where the little gear option is for the chat. 

-Tally M.


0 Corrections
Question #82546 posted on 05/24/2015 2:38 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

In reference to #82433 and #82480, what's with this obsession over having "my own nym" for readers? Isn't this a (somewhat)anonymous forum? I guess I just don't get why someone is so attached to an anonymous identifier that it leads to banning and editing names.

-100 Hour Bard Anne, Certainly Ardilla Feroz Captain Obvious Curious Physics Minor Divya El-ahrairah FAIL Haleakalā Heidi Book Inverse Insomniac Kevin Librarian M.O.D.A.Q. Meta Knight Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of 'Nym. Ms.O'Malley not yayfulness obstreperous Owlet QED Shifty Canadian Squirrel Tally M. Terrible Scientist Tevye The Great Irritator The Marauders The sage advice of Madam Insomniac The Snarky Snicket The Soulful Ginger The Tech Guru The Word of the Board Tootles Vienna Vienna from the future yayfulness Yellow Zedability

A:

Dear one who steals writer nyms instead of reader nyms,

I think that sometimes when people use the same nym consistently, they start to feel like it's part of their identity, or represents them on the Board, just as our real names can definitely help give us a sense of identity and a way to represent ourselves to other. As a result, it really does feel like impersonating someone's identity or using someone's property when another reader uses the "established" nym of another reader.

Now, in real life, people will definitely have the same name, and it doesn't bother them too much. However, real life also has other ways of making the distinction with two people with the same name, like last names or face-to-face interaction. Because the point of the Board is anonymity, these distinctions are almost gone, other than small stylistic details that may not even be noticeable to the casual reader. As a result, people may feel a loss of control over how they represent themselves to the Board community when someone "impersonates" them by stealing their nym. This is especially true when the question with the stolen nym asks a more personal question, which also affects how they are represented to the Board community.

It's important to remember that "how people perceive me" and "a loss of control over ___" are common things that upset almost everyone.

On the other hand, other people use regular nyms and don't care if someone else uses it. It depends on the reader.

Now, obviously, we don't expect the readers to be so well-versed in the archives that they somehow sign each question with an absolutely unique nym that has never been used before. However, if you see that a regular reader is consistently signing themselves as "Sage" or "Sump" or "Razputin's Girl," then as a courtesy, just don't use it, because even if it doesn't seem like a big deal, some people really do care, and I personally don't think that the extra effort it would take to come up with a different nym is worth potentially upsetting someone else.

-Zedability

A:

Dear Wade,

You forgot Wade. Wade is everyone.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Corrections
Question #82544 posted on 05/24/2015 1:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have a problem. I have fallen for a friend of mine pretty hard. Finally one day I told her and found out that she doesn't have the same feelings for me, but she wants to stay friends. The problem is, the two of us work together and see each other almost every day. To make matters worse, there are only about 6 employees where we work so it's impossible to just ignore her.

It's been really hard for me to move on from her even though I know she isn't interested. I love my job but I know it will be easier to let her go if I quit.

What do you guys think? Is it worth quitting a job I love to get over this girl or are there other ways I can get over her? Though I love the job, it is a student job, not a grown-up adult job, so it wouldn't be the end of the world to find a new one.

Thanks,

-It Don't Breakeven

A:

Dear When A Heart Breaks No

Do you honestly think running from the situation will help? I don't know that it will. I mentally and physically run from a lot of things—including girl problems—and baby there ain't no mountain high enough or valley remote enough to drown out the emotions in your head.

Don't make any rash decisions about your job right now. Give yourself a couple weeks to feel out the situation and make your decision from there.

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Corrections
Question #82543 posted on 05/24/2015 9:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have any of you gotten sick or flu-like symptoms like sore throat and stuffy nose after returning to the US from living abroad? I just returned from four years in China, and I've never had these problems until now.


Confused Ex-expat

A:

Dear Ex-expat,

Welcome back! And yes, that happened to me all the time when I'd come back to the States to visit for a month in the summer, and sometimes over Christmastime. Especially if you haven't been back for 4 years, your body is just adjusting to another climate, different pollens in the air, and new microorganisms in the food. I usually give it a week or two and then I feel better (with the help of Vitamin C supplements), but it happens gradually enough that I don't really notice. Good luck!

-Auto Surf


0 Corrections
Question #82542 posted on 05/24/2015 9:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Do BYU wards really feel that different from each other if they're within a certain age group? I stayed at my complex for four years until I graduated, with 75% turnover. But each year the ward didn't feel dramatically different. Mostly 19-25 year olds, with a few stalwarts who've lived there for 3+ years like myself.

Ex-expat

A:

Dear TARDIS,

They definitely do. I've had some conversations with Concorde about this. It's much more about the type of complexes within the ward boundaries.

The more expensive a complex is, the less active and more cliquish the ward tends to be. Cheaper housing tends to attract more down-to-earth people who are willing to sacrifice comfort to save money.

People who choose certain complexes will tend to be of a certain group, which will mean that the type of ward won't change much despite massive turnover. This isn't to say there aren't exceptions, just that there are generalizations.

-Tally M.


0 Corrections
Question #82528 posted on 05/24/2015 8:52 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Who's the kid at 11:43 of this episode of Bill Nye the Science Guy? I've seen that kid in another show, the name of which is on the tip of my tongue. Seems like she might have played a mean older sister, if what I can at all remember is right. And there's no cast credits at the end of that video, obviously.

-Human

A:

Dear Human,

Shout out to Genuine Article for discovering that it is Ivyann Schwan. Shout out to Ms.O'Malley for reminding you that Bill Nye episodes are now on Netflix. 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Corrections
Question #82524 posted on 05/24/2015 8:52 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

In Pharrell Williams' song "Happy," he ends some of the consonant ending words with vowel sounds.

For instance: Clap along if you feel like a room without a roof-ah
Clap along if you feel that happiness is the truth-ah

Is there a linguistic term for this, where the word just gets elongated at the end because of the enthusiasm or the momentum of the speaker?

-Ajisai

A:

Dear Picante,

I think what you're talking about is called prosody. This video describes it as: "The use of intonation and vocal stress to convey information about the structure and meaning of an utterance; the use of pitch, loudness, tempo, and rhythm in speech so the listener can understand what is being said." This is contrasted with monotone, where there is no variation of pitch, loudness, etc., and sometimes the sentiment is hard to understand. The term isn't specific to conveying enthusiasm, but rather emotion in general. 

Also, if you're interested in linguistics, you might like this page that talks about a new trend called "Vocal Fry." It's apparently the new "Valley Girl" way of talking, but can also give off an air of sophistication. Enjoy!

-Auto Surf


0 Corrections
Question #82515 posted on 05/24/2015 8:50 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are some good ways to go on a roommate hunt? I need a roommate who is willing to avoid perfumes and certain cleaners - and I am willing to pay for and provide all the cleaners. I have allergic asthma, so I have trouble almost daily, and the less I have at home the better I"ll be able to live without fear of another reaction.

Ideally it would be someone who has the same allergies or has lived with someone with these allergies. My roommate who has lived with me for two years - she bought dish soap that I am very allergic to a few weeks ago. I bought her soap I could be around, and she said she'd look into returning it. Yesterday I had a severe allergic reaction. Eventually I figured it was most likely from a plant I passed by yesterday, the same plant in the soap I'm allergic to, and told her that two or three times. Not half an hour later, she used that soap. And lied about it. So, I need to find a new roommate, and figure out how to get rid of this one, so I can live in my apartment without fear of a reaction.

-Miss Frazzled, who is going to talk to the conflict resolution center and landlord this afternoon. Unfortunately, most people I meet persecute me because of my allergies.

A:

Dear Ms.Frazzled,

Goodness missy! You definitely drew the short end of the roommate stick. I'm glad that you're taking matters into your own hands by seeing your landlord and trying to find a way to solve your problem. While you're a student, it will be a bit more difficult to go and find a new roommate for a variety of reasons, especially since you're limited to the BYU Housing bubble. However, this doesn't mean that all hope is lost. You need to have a heart-to-heart conversation with all of your roommates. Get everyone together at the same time and let them know how you absolutely cannot have certain things in the apartment. You can discuss it one-on-one with the roommate you're struggling with, but by having everyone else around, you will have the power of your peers.

When you're looking for a new roommate, start with people you know and who are familiar with your needs. Siblings, cousins, friends, coworkers, and classmates will be a great place to start. If that doesn't work, open up to everyone else. You need to be upfront with anyone who you could potentially live with. Let them know that you can't use certain cleaners and soaps because of allergic reactions but that you'll provide more than enough for the apartment. In all honest, I think most people won't mind having to use a different soap because of a medical condition. If they do, they're probably not someone you would want to live with anyway.

Lastly, keep in mind that it may also be a struggle for your roommates to adjust their life to your needs. I'm obviously not blaming you for your own allergies, but you know everything that you can and can't have while your roommates don't. Your roommate may have forgotten and just panicked when she used the soap and lied to protect herself. Be firm, but also try and realize that it may be just as hard on them as it is on you.

Best of luck!

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Corrections
Question #82541 posted on 05/24/2015 6:32 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am in love with my best friend, but I want it to stop. I don't think my friend has same feelings for me. How can I make it stop? Stop hanging out with the individual is not an option.

-High Fructose Corn Syrup

A:

Dear Martha,

Well, talk to the other person. You might be wrong about their feelings towards you. And at this point, what have you got to lose?

Being in love with your best friend is a hard situation. And really, being in love with anyone that doesn't love you back is hard. Love doesn't just dissipate, and it can take a really long time to fade away. To be completely honest, there's still a part of me that has lingering feelings towards my ex, Spencer. It's not that I love him still, but more that I got used to caring about him and how he was doing, and there will always be a part of me that wants to keep caring.

It helps to focus on other people. Flirt with more people. Make an effort to be interested in someone else for a change. Focusing your feelings on someone else can help to push out the feelings you have for your friend.

Finally, realize that you aren't the only one that struggles with this. That was one of the reasons I loved watching How I Met Your Mother. It helped me to realize that my problems weren't unique and that it was possible to still be happy even when I dealt with things I didn't want to deal with.

Feel free to e-mail me. I know what it's like.

-Tally M.


0 Corrections
Question #82530 posted on 05/24/2015 1:20 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Bored,

What's your favorite board game?

-No Joke

A:

Dear Rose,

I've played a lot of games this past semester, mostly because Klaus and Roosevelt often needed a third player and I was usually free. Most of the games we played aren't strictly board games, but I've really enjoyed Munchkin, Dominion, Seven Wonders, and Ticket to Ride. I think only the last two qualify because they have actual boards.

Speaking of Ticket to Ride, Concealocanth and I need to play again sometime...

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Humorless,

Risk.

If I were given the choice of all the board games in the Solar System, to have as the only game I could play for the rest of my life I would choose Risk. If I were given the chance to meet the love of my life, but I would have to miss a game of Risk to do so, I would call ahead and invite them over to play Risk with me, and go ahead and play it, rather than go meet them. If I had to live my life without chocolate or Risk, I would choose chocolate. Given the choice of bring back the Dodo bird, and playing Risk, I would play Risk. 

Life is full of choices. The answer is always Risk.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  

A:

Dear nojoke,

I'm a fan of Eurogames in general over American-style games. Ones that I've been enjoying lately include Seven Wonders, Ticket To Ride, and Carcassonne. I like Risk, but only the Risk 2210 version.

-Inverse Insomniac

A:

Dear No Chiste,

There's a little known Parker Brothers game called Masterpiece that my family and I love. You basically just buy and trade works of art and try to convince other people to buy your forgeries. Good fun.

Sorry is a tradition on my dad's side of the family at family reunions. It gets really competitive, which is pretty ironic because that game is almost entirely dependent on chance.

And, I love a good game of Settlers of Catan and Ticket to Ride as much as the next guy.

-Frère Rubik


0 Corrections
Saturday, May 23, 2015
Question #82538 posted on 05/23/2015 10:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I just want a little advice. I'm thinking about taking a jiu-jitsu class, but I'm basically worried about it being awkward. My husband says that when he took it, the girls usually practiced with each other, but sometimes the numbers were uneven and they ended up practicing with the guys. I think it would be a really fun class to take, but I don't think I would feel very comfortable practicing with the guys, especially with the more contact-intensive moves. I don't want to miss out but I also don't want to put myself in an uncomfortable situation. Any suggestions?

-Ponderous McAwkward

(Oh, and P.S., I already took an all-girl self defense class and really liked it!)

A:

Dear Ponderous,

The easiest solution I see to this is to try and find a friend to take the class with you. That way, even if the numbers aren't even, you can just buddy up with her (or him, if there's a guy that's not your husband that you would still feel comfortable taking the class with) instead of taking the chance of ending up with a guy. Of course, you might end up in the uncomfortable situation anyway if for some reason your friend couldn't make it, but I don't think there's a way to guard against every possible scenario here. 

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear Ponderous,

I've taken that class twice: once as a freshman, once with my sister. In my experience it's only as awkward as you make it, regardless of who or what gender you are battling. 

When I took the class the second time, there were two groups of five girls each that trained together and so they didn't often have to practice with guys. It might work out that way for you, but please consider when you are trying to test how well you know something it might be good to practice against someone bigger and stronger than you so you must rely on technique and leverage to win instead of just overpowering a weaker opponent. Someone bigger and stronger could mean some of your best practice opportunities will be guys in your class. All that up-and-close contact might sound weird to you right now, but trust me, jiu-jitsu is anything but romantic.

Still not diggin' it? Here's a thought: why don't you take the class with your husband? The coach won't care if he retakes it, and you'll have a jiu-jitsu practice buddy out of the deal.

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Corrections
Posted on 05/23/2015 9:15 p.m. New Correction on: #82523 I have a rented textbook and it STINKS! Like, trapped in the fan over a stove ...
Question #82531 posted on 05/23/2015 9:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Bored,

What's your favorite punch line?

-No Joke

A:

Dear No Joke,

"...because there was no punch line."

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear No Joke, 

"A brick."

-Auto Surf

A:

Dear No Joke,

"Beady log."

When my brother was a toddler he would tell nonsense jokes all the time and each time, without fail, the punch line was him screaming "BEADY LOG!!!" and laughing hysterically.

Examples:

Why did the monkey laugh at the giraffe? BEADY LOG!

What did the moon say to the sun? BEADY LOG!

Why do bad things happen to good people? BEADY LOG!

To this day, none of us have a clue what a "beady log" is, but it sure answers a lot of questions.

-Vienna

A:

Dear pas drole,

"Juuuuice."

-Inverse Insomniac

A:

Dear No Joke,

"If one more person goes into the building, it will be empty."

-Zedability


0 Corrections
Question #82532 posted on 05/23/2015 9:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What does it mean to distill upon something as the dews from heaven?

-Exact

A:

Dear Exact,

The more I think about it, the more I really like this metaphor. Thanks for the question!

So, when dew forms, it doesn't fall in one giant mass. (Unfortunately. Just imagine: you're lying awake in bed in the early morning, when all of the sudden you hear a mighty "WHUMP" and suddenly the ground is drenched in dew. I'd actually wake up early just to see that, I think.) Rain is a better approximation, but still not perfect; the water comes from up in the air and splashes down to the ground when enough has collected into a drop.

The forming of dew is a very subtle, gradual process. It happens when the surface of the ground is cool enough to draw heat from the water vapor in the air, causing the water to solidify and condense. It's essentially the same thing that happens to an icy drink on a humid day. 

If you've ever watched either process, you know that it is very, very slow. Most often, you don't even notice until you go to pick up your drink and it's completely wet.

So, when we say that something (like, for instance, the doctrine of the priesthood) distills upon something else (perhaps, our soul) as the dew from heaven, what can we take from that?

-The process is going to be a very gradual one. We may not even notice the distillation until after a longer period of time.

-The thing being distilled (like the water vapor in the air) is already all around us, waiting to be collected. But, we won't get any until we're ready for it and the conditions are right (like how dew won't form until the ground is cool enough).

-Though it's not enough to sustain life itself, a study has shown that dew plays an important role in providing for the daily needs of plant life. We can draw another parallel to D&C 121:45 here. The distillation of dew and doctrine is a passive process, one that we don't have complete control over. The process won't meet our needs completely, but it will supplement them and help us as we actively seek more understanding.

Those are the main thoughts that came to my mind. I'm sure there's lots more to be learned from this metaphor with further thought and study.

-Frére Rubik


0 Corrections
Question #82533 posted on 05/23/2015 9:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What would you recommend that somebody focus on in preparation for a mission? The scriptures and Preach My Gospel are given, but specific things to study or work on would be appreciated.

-General

A:

Dear general,

World religions.

It is my opinion that the single biggest weakness of the Church's missionary force is a lack of understanding and respect for the religions of others. I'm also convinced that the conversion and retention rates would go up noticeably if this changed.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Gen,

I agree with the other writers. Remember not to forget the human side of the people you're teaching. One of my professors put it really simply and said something like, "The best missionary loves the message and loves the people." I think an important part of that is deciding to love, rather than just waiting for it to happen. Decide before you get there, and you'll be able to hit the ground running. Good luck!

-Auto Surf

A:

Dear TARDIS,

I wholeheartedly agree with yayfulness. We talked about this in my American Christianity class, and as I've sat in on some recent Sunday School lessons, I'm shocked at how members treat other religions. They have very little perception of what other religions actually believe, and speaking like that on a mission will alienate investigators. Additionally, we need to be more aware of vocabulary differences. Often times, two groups may use the same word to say two different things, while two different words may actually refer to the same thing. (I actually wrote an article on this for one of my English classes if anyone's interested.)

Mormons may be good at a lot of things, but unfortunately, being understanding of other religions is not one of them.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear General,

In addition to spiritual preparation, I would say the most important preparation for a mission is social preparation. Work on your people skills and work on being willing to leave your comfort zone. Relationships are a huge part of being a missionary, so if you work on developing and bettering the relationships you have now, it will be easier to have happy, healthy relationships in the mission. I read a book called The Anatomy of Peace before my mission that I would highly recommend. It changed the way I think about relationships and I applied many of its principles in each of my companionships. 

As far as spiritual preparation goes, in addition to a focus on PMG and the scriptures, I would focus specifically on prayer. My prayers were seriously lacking before my mission and one of the things that shocked me in the MTC was the amount of time we spent praying. The most important relationship you will develop in the mission is the one you have with Heavenly Father, and He is the one who is going to help you through the toughest of times. So, get to know Him as well as you can before you enter the field. Pray on your knees morning and night and put thought into the words that you say.

Good luck!

Love,

Vienna

A:

Dear General,

In addition to the other writer's thoughts on learning about other religions (which I wholeheartedly agree with), I would suggest learning to listen to people as individuals before you assume things about them. I knew a fairly decent amount about most of the major religions in my mission before I went there, and how they differed from each other and our own, but a textbook knowledge of these religions didn't prepare me for the drastically different ways that each individual interprets or understands them. For example, teaching a Catholic who goes to church on Christmas and Easter and gets the rest of their religious knowledge from new-age Internet websites is drastically different than teaching an active Catholic who teaches catechism in their spare time. Many people I met had strongly held beliefs that were actually in direct opposition to their own religion's teachings; on the other hand, many people cared deeply about aspects of their religion that I didn't know about, and it's impossible to know every detail of every religion.

Knowing about someone's religion can give you a good general idea of how to approach a conversation (for instance, I would often build common ground with Christians about the divinity of Christ, but I would build common ground with Muslims over the role of prophets or Christ's second coming), but learning to ask questions, listen to the Spirit, and listen to what the person is actually saying will allow you to discern their exact personal beliefs, their needs, their interests, and their concerns. It will help you know how to teach the Apostasy to a Catholic who believes they belong to the original Church of Christ vs. a Catholic who believes that all religions are equally true. It will help you know how to explain the Pre-mortal Existence to a Pentecostal in such a way that they understand that the doctrine is actually unique to Mormonism.* Most importantly, it will help people to feel like you respect them and their concerns, and they will be more open to listening to what you have to say.

In other words, study the relevant sections in Chapter 10 (Teaching Skills) of PMG, and try to apply those skills to get to know new people in your ward, your classes, or anywhere else you can interact with people. Try to have meaningful conversations and find out what's important to them. You may feel awkward, but learning to feel awkward and talk to people anyways is probably another really important missionary skill.

-Zedability

*No joke, as a greenie I once taught the whole Plan of Salvation to a Pentecostal, and at the end of the lesson she said, "Well that's the same thing as what my church believes, so I'm just going to stick with that." It definitely made me re-evaluate my teaching skills. Same thing with the first French investigator I had, who took three iterations of the Restoration before she understood that we weren't Catholic.


0 Corrections
Question #82534 posted on 05/23/2015 9:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Bored,

What's your favorite "shaggy dog story"?

-No Joke

A:

Dear Jokester,

There was once a man who was troubled about his son. Said son was bright and intelligent, but failed to apply himself, which led to him getting less-than-stellar grades all throughout junior high. Concerned for his son's future, one day he decided to sit down and have a talk with the boy.

"Son, I know you're smart. You have such incredible potential to be successful and do good in the world. I know you do, but this won't just happen naturally. You'll have to work for it; you'll have to earn it. Maybe you can't see that right now, but I want to help you to. I'll make you a deal, son: if you apply yourself and work hard in this first year of high school, I promise that at the end of the year, I'll buy you whatever you want."

The boy looked up at his father with wonder in his eyes.

"Anything?" he asked, timidly.

The father smiled warmly and nodded.

"Anything, son. But you've got to earn it. You've got to work the hardest you've ever worked and earn it."

"Then I'll do it," said the boy. He embraced his father, and the two joined their family outside on the porch.

The school year came, and the boy made good on his word. He worked incredibly hard, amazing not only his teachers but also his classmates, who had doubted his intelligence before. At the end of the year, this former C-average student had earned A's in all of his classes. His father could not have been more proud. After the last day of school, he took his son out to get some ice cream and to talk once more.

"Congratulations, son," he said. "I knew you had it in you all along. Have you felt any different this year?"

The boy nodded. 

"Yeah, I have. It feels kinda nice when people think I'm smart."

His father smiled.

"Well, that itself can be a great reward. But, I'll keep my promise: you can have anything you want. What'll it be?"

The boy paused for a moment, then said:

"I want one thousand pink ping-pong balls."

The father blinked, not sure he'd heard correctly.

"Sorry, son; what was that?"

The boy repeated,

"I want one thousand pink ping-pong balls."

The father sat back in his seat, confounded. He couldn't fathom what purpose his son could possibly have for one thousand ping-pong balls, and pink ones at that. But, trusting his son, he went out and bought one thousand pink ping-pong balls. He eagerly waited to see what his son would do with them, but they sat untouched for the entire summer. Worrying that his son was slipping back into his earlier ways, before the second year of school started he had another talk with the boy.

"Now son, your mother and I are still incredibly proud of the work you did last year. But, we know you can do more. So, we want to make you the same deal we did before: prove to us that you can work hard and exceed your previous accomplishments, and we'll buy you whatever you want."

The boy consented, and again astounded his parents with his capabilities. He became involved in student leadership and was enamored of his class. He was the darling of his professors and even received a letter of congratulation from his principal. His parents were positively beaming.

"Son, we are thrilled with what you've been doing this year. Every day we're more impressed with the man you are becoming. We love to see your confidence grow and flourish. We know that you're happy with what you've done, but we still want to honor our agreement: what do you want?"

The son smiled, then said,

"I'd like ten thousand pink ping-pong balls, please."

His parents were flabbergasted.

"But, son...don't you already have one thousand of those pink ping-pong balls up in your room? That you haven't even touched?"

The boy nodded.

"Yes, I know. But trust me, this is what I really want. Can I have the ten thousand pink ping-pong balls?"

His parents eyed each other warily, but eventually consented. They stored the new ping-pong balls in the shed behind their house.

As summer reached a close, their vision of what their boy could become grew even more. They made the same challenge to him as they had before, and he continued to exceed their expectations. He instituted new clubs and new programs at the school, creating lasting change and helping others to follow in his footsteps. He drew the attention of the local news, yet was incredibly modest in every interview. With his vision thus increased, his parents eagerly wondered what he'd ask of them this year. They were dismayed, then, when his answer was:

"I want one hundred thousand pink ping-pong balls."

His father protested.

"Son, you have more of those ping-pong balls than you know what to do with. We're willing to give you whatever you want, but we also want to give you things that will help you grow and give you more freedom. Is there anything else you want?"

The boy considered this for a moment, then said

"I see what you mean. In that case, I'd like a new Mustang..."

His parents grinned.

"...filled with pink ping-pong balls."

Their grins faded slightly. They couldn't fathom their son's obsession with these pink ping-pong balls. They wondered if not all was right in his head. But, because of his accomplishments, they were willing to give him the benefit of the doubt. They delivered the car, ping-pong balls and all. He scooped them all out and took them to the shed with the others, then took the car out for a spin.

The last year of high school approached, and the parents decided once more to make their deal with the son. He readily accepted, and continued the work he had started the year before. He was accepted by numerous prestigious universities and received countless scholarships. The mayor gave him the key to the city, and he delivered a rousing and inspiring speech at his graduation as valedictorian. His parents threw him a lavish party to celebrate his accomplishments, attended by all of his professors and friends.

When the party had ended, he sat with his parents on the porch, reflecting over the past four years. Picturing his future, the boy's parents didn't know what he could possibly need; he seemed to have provided himself with everything necessary for his future success. So, more for tradition's sake than anything else, they asked their son what he wanted from them in return for working so hard. He didn't say anything for a long time, then eventually said:

"I want a semi-truck...filled with pink ping-pong balls."

His parents said nothing; they'd given up on trying to understand his strange demands. They arranged to buy the semi truck, and filled it to the brim with pink ping-pong balls. They had the truck symbolically delivered to their son at the house, but planned to store it somewhere else.

The next morning, the boy's father heard his son getting up early. He went to the window and saw his son loading all of the old ping-pong balls into the truck and then drive it away. Convinced that he was about to get the answers to his questions, the father jumped into the Mustang and started following his son. 

They drove out of the city and into a high mountain pass. As the son reached the summit, he finally noticed his father in the car behind him. Panicking, he stepped on the gas, careening over the top of the pass. His father followed suit. As they came down the other side, the truck started going faster and faster, out of control. The son attempted to use the brakes, but they burned out almost instantly. The truck began to swerve.

The vehicles suddenly came to a sharp bend in the road. The son attempted to shift into low gear and slow down, but to no avail. The truck careened into the barrier and then hurtled over the edge. The father managed to bring the Mustang to a stop, then ran to the edge. He got there just in time to see the truck smash into the valley floor, releasing an explosion of pink ping-pong balls.

And that is the end of the story.

-Frère Rubik


0 Corrections
Question #82529 posted on 05/23/2015 9:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Bored,

When is the next Board Lair open house?

-No Joke

A:

Dear Humorless,

It isn't.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Corrections
Question #82519 posted on 05/23/2015 11:58 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

All writers, especially from different parts of the country:

Do you say subdivision or neighborhood? Are they the same thing?

-Kazak Stan

A:

Dear Stan of Kazak,

Whereas neighborhood seems to be a more general term, I tend to associate subdivisions with suburbs. Since there are no suburbs anywhere near where I live, I tend to say neighborhood.

-Frère Rubik

A:

Dear Stanley Kaz,

"Neighborhood" is a fairly general term and can be used in many different ways. "Subdivision," on the other hand, has a fairly specific technical meaning: a subdivision is the result of a single parcel of land, usually a fairly large parcel, being subdivided into at least two but usually numerous smaller lots. If "subdivision" is being used to refer to a discrete neighborhood, it's usually because a developer bought a large parcel and subdivided it to create a planned neighborhood.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Wade,

Subdivision.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Stan,

I use "neighborhood" and "area" interchangeably, and also yay's use of "subdivision".

-Squirrel

A:

Dear Stan,

I use subdivision if it's named but I'll use neighborhood if it isn't. All subdivisions are neighborhoods, but not all neighborhoods are subdivisions. 

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear blue and yellow, 

I think I use both...? I've never thought about it that much. 

Okay, yes. I use subdivision, even if I'm not in the suburbs or the area doesn't have a name. Oops. Sometimes I use neighborhood but I think that's just from being around people who say neighborhood. 

-Auto Surf

A:

Dear Rose,

Always neighborhood.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Stan,

I don't think I've ever said "subdivision." The word feels so sterile and institutional, as opposed to "neighborhood," which feels friendly and inclusive. Although, technically I would say "neighbourhood."

-Shifty Canadian

A:

Dear Stan,

People say subdivision?

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Corrections
Question #82522 posted on 05/23/2015 11:58 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

If you were to do an AMA (ask me anything) that you wouldn't mind writing about on The Board, what would some of your titles be?

-My Name Isn't Here

A:

Dear you,

  • I had a pet banana slug for three years. His name was Herbie. AMA.
  • I write for the 100 Hour Board. AMA.
  • I am a statistical outlier for the use of a -PAP (Positive Airway Pressure) machine-- I'm a girl, started using a CPAP at 19, and am average weight. AMA.
  • I have a relatively rare chronic illness-- a degenerative connective tissue disorder that, among other things, causes extreme flexibility and joint pain. AMA.
  • During the winter months I eat about two-and-a-half pineapples per week. AMA.
I wish I had something a little less odd to add. Now everyone's going to think that I'm a slug-loving pineapple-eater, which I am.... 
 
-Squirrel
A:

Dear Doctor,

The only two interesting things I can come up with are ones that I also have to censor slightly due to privacy reasons:

  • I speak [redacted] without having served a mission there AMA
  • I was the president of a BYU fan club AMA
And there's the normal/boring/ridiculous things:
  • I once had four tweets in the Tweet Beat of the Universe AMA
  • I'm a 100 Hour Board writer AMA
  • I composed a song for my high school choir AMA
  • I can do 17 pushups AMA
  • I've played True American (Mormon-style) twice and lived AMA
  • I used to work in BYU Special Collections AMA
Yep. I'm a really interesting person. #sarcasm

-Tally M.

A:

Querido Batman,

  • I once ate sixty one bananas in a day AMA
  • I enjoy dumpster diving during long airport layovers and as the opportunity presents itself at BYU AMA
  • I was placed in Mexican public school as a twelve year-old although I knew no Spanish AMA
  • I have been on a road trip from Utah to Honduras AMA
  • I work as a figure drawing model at BYU AMA
  • I have been on top of the HFAC, MOA, HBLL, SWKT and inside the campus tunnels AMA
  • I had to take College Algebra (Math 110) at BYU four times almost consecutively before I passed AMA

Apparently I also crave approval (or pity) from internet strangers.

Suerte, 

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Corrections
Question #82523 posted on 05/23/2015 11:58 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have a rented textbook and it STINKS! Like, trapped in the fan over a stove top only used to make rancid ramen noodles for two whole semesters stinky. The smell has bonded to every single one of the 802 pages. I legitimately cannot study because of how distracting the smell of my textbook is.

So what can I do to remove the stink? I have tried spraying it slightly with some Frebreze/Gain spray, but I am afraid of ruining it (and therefore having to pay for it). How can I go about this in the most gentle yet effective way?

-SMQ

A:

Dear SMQ,

I'm sorry about your book. Hopefully I can help. Here's what I'd recommend:

Start by copying the pages you'll need to read for the next two weeks first. Sprinkle baking soda (to absorb the smell) in between each page with a sieve, close the book, and leave it for a week-and-a-half. Open the book outside, shake out the powder, then put dryer sheets in between every few pages. Who can't love a textbook that smells like Bounce? Good luck!

-Squirrel


1 Correction