"It's kind of fun to do the impossible. " - Walt Disney
Question #81329 posted on 03/02/2015 7:14 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Lets say that the Board is having a Mr./Mrs./Ms./Fräulein 100 Hour Board pageant.

What are the events that will take place in such a pageant to determine the winner? Who are the judges? Will there be an epic showdown between 100 Typing Monkeys and CATS for the title? Etc.

-General (Who would like to sincerely thank TSG for Board Question #81003)

A:

Dear Rose,

Obviously a writing sample will be the sole determination of who the winner is. The judges are the original editors, since they're the most shrouded in mystery. Since I don't think 100 Typing Monkeys or CATS are in the running for the best writing, I don't think there would be a showdown at all between them.

Perhaps we'll have an enactment during reunion week. Stay tuned!

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #81230 posted on 03/02/2015 6:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are the requirements and/or recommendations that Brigham Young University gives its professors to provide to students (either in print or electronically) a syllabus and a grading rubric? I have a professor who won't give me either and when I ask him about it he just blows me off (by not responding to my emails or telling me he is busy and to check back with him later).

If you could not tell I am looking for more than just a course schedule for this class. As I hate playing mind games like "Guess What the Grading Requirements for Professor X Are".

-I Wonder A Wonder

A:

Dear Wonder,

I was positive that it was a university requirement for professors to provide a syllabus or at least a posted grading scale. However, I have searched all over and have not found anything from the university that requires professors to issue a syllabus or rubric. 

There are a few things that you can do. First, check Learning Suite and all of its tabs and links. When I was a TA, it drove me crazy that students would email about test dates and paper deadlines when it was all on Learning Suite. If nothing is on Learning Suite, check the Syllabi Directory. If you're still turning up empty handed, email him politely and explain why you need the syllabus. If he doesn't respond, talk to him at the next class. Don't rush up right before class begins. Mention that you haven't heard back from him and ask if you can have a copy of the syllabus or where you can find one. If he is still hesitant, ask if you could stop by his office hours and pick up one then. If he still isn't working with you, you can always contact your advisor or bring it up with your school's dean. 

Best of luck!

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #81266 posted on 03/02/2015 5:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm in my last semester, enrolled full-time on campus, and taking one independent study class. I know that there's a deadline for the IS class, but I'm worried that I'm not going to finish it on time. Theoretically, what exactly would happen if I didn't finish it on time? Would the only consequence be a delay on receiving my diploma? Would I still be able to walk in April? Obviously I wouldn't be able to technically be graduated in April, but I can't find any specific details anywhere.

-freakin out

A:

Dear Freakin,

Apparently, Independent Study has their own chat feature which allows you to get your questions answered in 10 minutes rather than 100 hours. When I asked them your question, this is what they said:

Independent Study: Once you enroll in one of our courses, you have a year to complete it, although you may finish it faster if you choose. Once you finish the class, you can have a transcript sent to your university to transfer the credit. If you do not finish the class before your schools deadline, you could not request a transcript from us to transfer the credit. if you do not complete the course within a year, it will simply expire and not appear on our transcripts. 

Soulful: Okay, so as BYU student doing independent study, I would need to talk to my department if I did not finish the class before graduation?

Independent Study: So as a BYU Student Basically if you need the credit to graduate, and you don't finish before the end of the semester, then you won't be able to apply the class as credit for that semester. If you don't finish the class at all (within a year of registering), it simply expires and won't show up on your transcript.

So basically, if you don't finish the class on time (as in before the IS deadline) you can't count it towards graduation. If this is going to be a problem, I would suggest talking to your department advisors. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Question #81331 posted on 03/02/2015 5:26 p.m.
Q:

Dearest 100 Hour Board,

In the song Honey by Erykah Badu, she sings that he's honey and if lemon were added he'd be her favorite drink. What drink is she referring to?

G'Day,
Scarlet Flamingo

A:

Dear Flamingo,

My best guess is honey lemon tea, which is wonderful stuff.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Question #81241 posted on 03/02/2015 5:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

In light of the sinister actions of others that have taken innocent lives lately in Europe, I was wondering if you think Anitsemitism or Islampophia is greater in Europe? Obviously, both of these are terrible and I'm not talking about comparing the evils of both since they are both ignorant/evil mindsets -- I'm just wondering do you think that Antisemistic or Islamophobia is more "popular" in Europe? In other words, do you think Jewish communities feel more vulnerable or do you think Muslim communities feel more vulnerable?

**Note, I'm not doubting that "hatred" for both of them are unfortunately present in Europe and that both communities are vulnerable in their own ways -- but which one do you think is a more common, mainstream problem in Europe?

-Inquisitive Imam (who only comes in peace)

A:

Dear Inquisitive,

I can't say for certain what the general sentiment is today (though I doubt much has changed), but in 2008, public opinion looked something like this:

Anti-Islam in Europe-real.gif   Anti-Islam in Europe.gif (source)

At this point in time, anti-semitism was on the rise, but anti-Muslim feelings were higher in every country surveyed, except Russia. From these numbers, and from what I have studied concerning the plight of Muslims throughout Europe, I would say that Muslims are the more "vulnerable" of the two in the region (though I don't think vulnerable is really the right word for it). If you're interested in more statistics concerning the Jewish and Muslim minorities in Europe, these articles should be interesting to you. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Question #81301 posted on 03/02/2015 4:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is a birthmark anyway? Like what causes one? Is it a mass of melatonin/cells? Medical terms?

There's a guy in my ward that has a large one right on his face, and it's hard not to stare at it. I'm doing my best not to. Well, he's also getting some dermatology/laser treatment to make it go away (11 rounds), and it is slowly fading away. How does it work exactly?

-Pills & Pillows

A:

Dear Pill,

This website says, 

Birthmarks are blemishes on the skin that are noticeable at birth, or shortly afterwards. A significant proportion of newborns have a vascular birthmark—a red, pink or purple blemish that is caused by abnormal blood vessels under the skin. Some people are born with pigmented birthmarks; these are usually brown and are caused by the clustering of pigment cells.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Question #81310 posted on 03/02/2015 4:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
Let me preface that I'm asking this question because I'm trying to figure out how to change. I haven't talked about this with any close friends or family members because I don't want them to think I'm a terrible person. I grew up with a wonderful girl that was my best friend all thought Junior High and High School. In High School we dated a little and then wrote while I was on my mission. After my mission we stayed close friends and then she met a great guy and got married. They really are so good for each other and I am happy for them. However, sometimes thoughts come to my mind like "What if we had gotten married instead?" or "What if they got divorced, would we get together again?" etc. Deep down I don't believe this and I really am happy for them. In fact I get mad at myself whenever thoughts like that cross my mind and it makes me feel like such a terrible person. Because I occasionally have thoughts like that, I have greatly distanced myself from her and just about extinguished our friendship. I do see them at weddings, funerals etc., but I never visit long even though she always wants to, because I feel so bad about ever even imagining such a thing when she is in such a happy and healthy relationship. I just don't know what to do. What can I do to change? Should I stop talking to her all together? Have you ever heard of someone that's been through something like this? I just feel like such a terrible person and really want to change. Please help.

-Disappointed in me

A:

Dear Disappointed,

You are not a terrible person. You're a human being; a son of God with divine heritage. Having thoughts we aren't proud of is part the human experience. It's what we do with those thoughts that's important. Consider the following quote from Elder Holland:

Like thieves in the night, unwelcome thoughts can and do seek entrance to our minds. But we don’t have to throw open the door, serve them tea and crumpets, and then tell them where the silverware is kept! (You shouldn’t be serving tea anyway.) Throw the rascals out! ("Place No More for the Enemy of My Soul," Jeffery R. Holland, April 2010)

Please note that there was no qualifier on the first sentence. Elder Holland did not say, "If we are not careful, unwelcome thoughts will enter our minds" he said "Unwelcome thoughts can and do seek entrance to our minds." When you're dealing with unwelcome thoughts, step one is always to throw them out immediately. It sounds like you've got that under control. However, step two is equally important: forgive yourself. The Son of God came down to earth and suffered for the sins of the world. Each time you punish yourself for your feelings, you suffer needlessly. Each time you have one of these thoughts about your friend, throw it out, forgive yourself, and move on.

You should only interact with your friend as much as you feel comfortable. If you find that seeing her is just too painful, you may need to end contact with her for a while. Remember to fill your life with other pursuits. It might be hard to hear now, but there's someone out there for you. It will all work out in the end.

- Haleakalā

A:

Dear you are still okay,

I see two ways forward in your situation. The first is to try spending more time around the two of them. It's possible that avoiding her is letting you focus on memories of something that doesn't exist anymore, while being around her and her husband would give you the chance to reconcile that part of you to reality. The second is to avoid her entirely. If it's not possible for you to feel okay with yourself while you are around them, then time and distance are really the best way to heal.

Speaking from experience, it's much easier to let go of a past relationship or potential relationship when you are in a happy and stable relationship yourself. When that time comes (which it probably will, regardless of how you feel right now), it may be easier to rekindle your old friendship.

I think that the situation you're describing is much more common than you may believe. That doesn't make it any easier, though. I wish you the best of luck.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #81346 posted on 03/02/2015 2:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I was watching the first episode of the most recent version of Cosmos: A spacetime odyssey, and Neil DeGrasse Tyson says that when he was 17, in 1975, Carl Sagan invited him to spend a Saturday with him, showing him his lab at Cornell, and taking him to see other things.

My question: who was 17-year-old Neil Tyson to Carl Sagan that Sagan would give him a day? A family friend? Something else? In general I'm asking how did they cross paths and meet, a 17-year-old from the Bronx and a high-level Cornell professor doing things with NASA?

-Pete

A:

Dear Jim,

When Neil Tyson was applying for colleges, Cornell forwarded his application to Carl Sagan, and Sagan reached out and got in touch with Tyson.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #81285 posted on 03/02/2015 1:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,
I am a big fan of Sherlock and the Mentalist and although I think both of the main characters are fictitious and would never exist in real life, I wanted to know more about memory palaces. I know that unless you had a photographic memory it's very unlikely that you could remember everything that has ever happened like Sherlock and Jane both do. However, I read in an article online that memory palaces are real and that they really can help you improve your memory. What do you think of this? Can someone with an average memory really build a memory palace in order to improve their ability to memorize things, or is it something only for highly intelligent individuals? Also, if it really is something that a normal person like me can benefit from, how can I learn how to do it? I looked on google and all I found was a dumb wiki-how article and an article that described a man that used a memory palace but that never eluded to how he achieved such a feat. So basically my question is, can someone like me have a memory palace (or maybe just a memory cabin for my average brain) and if so how do I do so? Thanks for your help! You are the best!

-Sherlock Jane

P.S. Good luck on midterms!

A:

Dear Jane,

Here is a TED talk about a journalist and his coverage over the USA Memory Championships. He actually answers almost all your questions at some point in his speech. The whole video is quite interesting but he starts talking about memory palaces 11 minutes in. 

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear Sherlock,

Anyone can have a memory palace. A couple of summers ago I spent some time building a very small mind palace. It was simply a hallway with rooms to remember different things. In one room I had a book I had just read, in another I put information about my personal studies, etc. It wasn't that big. After a few weeks of building I came to the conclusion, for me at least, it was a bit of a waste of time. I already remembered things. I did not need a mind palace to help me remember them. Putting time into making a mind palace just wasn't worth it to me. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  

A:

Dear Eleven, 

I ran across this series of posts on tumblr, which I found incredibly fascinating and may be beneficial to you. For a limited time I built my own mind palace based on my childhood home, but I had trouble with maintenance. Perhaps I'll try it again sometime.

-Tally M. 


0 Comments
Question #81289 posted on 03/02/2015 1:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've presented a number of academic papers at academic conferences and so forth, and I've noticed that "academic posters" are becoming more and more a thing. Maybe they were always a thing, but I'm just starting to realize them (from what I can tell from the flyers asking for submissions)... Anyway, how does one present an academic poster? If you're not reading your paper, do you just describe what you have on your poster -- your research? Is it typically 20 minutes also? Do you have your poster in front of the room as you talk? Or is more like a science fair deal... where people walk around and look at other posters?

How does one make an academic poster? Are they usually created on Powerpoint slides and then blown up and pasted on cardboard? (Where does one buy those cardboard stand-ups, how much do they cost)?

How do you "submit" a poster to the conference? Do you just give them an abstract, and once it's accepted, you create the poster? Or should you already have the poster made?

I'm not sure if you can tell, but I'm contemplating presenting a poster... :)

-Liquid Paper

A:

Dear Liquid Paper,

In the future, it would be good to split up these questions—each of your paragraphs would fit well in its own submission. I'll cover what I can here, but I'm sorry I can't go much in-depth.

I recently attended a large academic conference, and I saw a lot of poster sessions. You're exactly right, they're more like a science fair; you're not in front of a captive audience at the front of a room. Instead, there's typically a big room with posters hung up everywhere, and researchers stand next to their posters and wait for the people milling about to approach them. You can get an idea for the setup from the pictures on the Poster Session Wikipedia article and these Google image results for "academic poster session." Yes, you just describe your research, supported by your poster. It takes only as long as the audience member wants to stay; usually a researcher will have a 30-second pitch, and then the person(s) they're speaking with will ask questions, prompting further descriptions of the research or other academic discussion, and then new people will come up, and they'll join the conversation and probably ask for your 30-second spiel again. Rarely will people stay for 20 minutes; more like 1-10 minutes, maybe, and you'll be talking to an audience of 1-4ish people at a time, depending on the size and setup of the conference.

PowerPoint would probably work; there are even a bunch of templates you can try out. Each conference will have its own guidelines, such as these, which may include tips for making posters as well as recommended/required dimensions. You can then use a printing center, like Cougar Creations here at BYU, to print it out on nice big paper. You can paste it onto cardboard if you want, but usually posters are tacked up onto a board provided by the conference. A stand-alone cardboard poster costs around $3-10 and can be found at office supply stores or office/school supply sections of stores like Wal-Mart and Target. For travel purposes, though, it's probably better just to keep the poster in a tube and use the bulletin boards at the conference unless otherwise directed.

The process for submission is similar to a paper: you don't have to have the paper/poster done, or even the research done, before submitting the abstract and being accepted. In some cases, you can indicate whether you'd like your abstract to be considered for a paper presentation, a poster session, or both.

-Owlet


0 Comments
Question #81222 posted on 03/02/2015 1:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What do people mean when they toss around that phrase (and others like it) that "happiness is a choice"? I've always found it to be somewhat judgmental and presumptuous...not to mention untrue. But maybe you can help me understand what people really mean by it. I don't believe happiness is a choice because we can't just automatically turn off emotional pain. Yes, we have control over how we respond to adversity--for example, whether we become bitter toward God or other people--but just because I forgive someone for hurting me or choose to trust that God has a purpose for my suffering doesn't mean that my suffering is any less present. Am I missing some other meaning to this phrase?

-Unhappy

A:

Dear you, 

To me, the phrase means that you're taking all the things life has given you and you choose to see through the negative and be grateful for the good things you have. However, it doesn't mean that you have to be upbeat and a ray of sunshine all the time. Your life will have moments that are downright awful. Is it okay to be sad, angry, or frustrated? Of course! But what really matters is purposely choosing to act proactively and seeking the good that will lead you to happiness, even in those times of trouble. 

Here are some other Board questions about this particular topic. And as yay points out, there are circumstances that make it harder or impossible for some to choose to be happy. 

Best of luck,

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear reader,

My fellow writers have written great answers, but I just think it's important to remember that it is possible for people to experience psychological disorders, including depression, that make it physically impossible to experience certain levels or types of happiness. This is not a matter of choice. It is a matter of biology, and decisions and determination, while helpful, can only go so far to change it.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #81267 posted on 03/02/2015 1:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board music junkies,

Two related questions: First, what singer out there has the best voice that you've ever heard? I'm talkin' one that makes you sit up and listen, that sounds even better live. And second, what is a song you would recommend that showcases that talent?

My vote is for Marc Broussard and his cover of "I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know," but I'm interested in expanding my musical tastes, so I give it over to you fine folks! Te toca!

-carencro

A:

Dear Carencro,

I should preface this by saying that I bet our musical tastes don't overlap much. But you say you're interested in expanding yours, so I'll tell you what I think and let you decide whether you agree. Here are the vocal performers who make me sit up and listen:

  • Andrea Bocelli, singing "Nessun Dorma" from Puccini's Turandot. I know, most people are skeptical about opera. But listen to the whole thing and you won't even be able to pretend you didn't like it.
  • Bryn Terfel does opera as well, but don't worry - I'm gonna recommend Broadway instead. I love his cover of "Stars" from Les Miserables.
  • Audra MacDonald is incredible. My favorite is "Your Daddy's Son" from Ragtime.
  • Brian Stokes Mitchell is possibly my favorite singer ever, and he shows off like a stud when he sings "Some Enchanted Evening" from South Pacific
  • When Nat King Cole sings "L-O-V-E," I practically melt in my chair.
  • Ramin Karimloo plays the title role in the 25th anniversary edition of Phantom of the Opera. His voice has great clarity and precision, and I love listening to him sing "Music of the Night."

If you're interested in more popular stuff, I know, like, three artists:

  • P!nk's voice has a tenor that I really enjoy in contemporary music, and Nate Ruess lacks the raspy quality that turns me off of many modern male vocalists. They both have a good sense of pitch and commanding voices. You can kill two birds with one stone by listening to "Just Give Me a Reason."
  • Adele's voice gets me every time. I love "Rolling in the Deep" and "Hiding My Heart Away."

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Dear Cueca,

Excellent question. Here's a few of my top picks.

  • First off, FREDDIE MERCURY. In my opinion, "Somebody to Love" is one of the most impressive vocal performances in the history of modern music.
  • I somehow left Michael Jackson off of my placeholder. That is a travesty. The man had an incredible voice. I think I have to pick "The Way You Make Me Feel" as the best song to showcase it.
  • For newer music, I'll second Heidi's suggestion of Adele, specifically "Rolling in the Deep."
  • I'm not too familiar with Mika's music, but his vocals on "Grace Kelly" are absolutely spectacular.
  • And finally, everything sung by Justin Vernon on the album Bon Iver is pure gold. I absolutely love the way he uses his voice as just another one of the instruments in the songs.

There you have it,

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #81275 posted on 03/02/2015 1:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What is your favorite thing about The Soulful Ginger?

-THIS IS THE LAST ONE I PROMISE

A:

Dear Me, 

You know, it's kind of awkward because this past week I've been seeing Ginger everywhere and last Saturday I threatened to beat her up. 

Of course, she reminded me that she has a black belt in karate, and I coincidentally remembered that I have a severe aversion to blood and gore and beating her up might upset my delicate composition. So I have not yet beat Ginger up. Not because of the karate thing. Solely because of the blood thing, of course.

Also, Ginger still has my book. 

Also none of these things constitute "my favorite thing." 

-Concorde

A:

Dear Donna,

She's enthusiastic about life.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear you,

She's totally unafraid of being friendly, kind, and inviting. I love that about her. Also she's (a) a polisci major, (b) very smart, (c) my Board Momma, and (d) the only writer I knew in person until last week.

Also, her hair. End of story.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Dear kookaburra,

She's always down to try crazy new things and so is destined for a life of international mystery and intrigue. She's also a great listener.

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Dear Human,

I don't know, she's kind of weird...

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  


0 Comments
Question #81321 posted on 03/02/2015 10:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Watched Zero Dark Thirty last night. The main character said she was recruited into the CIA right after graduating high school. Looked up online to see if the CIA really does this, they do. So a few questions. Why would the CIA recruit such youngin's as recent high school graduates instead of recent college graduates? Also, how do you get selected out of high school? What are they looking for--grades, IQ tests, SAT scores, extracurricular activities, a certain specialized test, etc?

-sci-grrrl

A:

Dear sci,

For your light reading. 

-Concorde

A:

Dear sci,

A retired Director of Counter-Intelligence told me that the CIA prefers to recruit case officers who are in their late 20's to mid 30's.  This is because younger people tend to be more unpredictable.  They want people who have developed a stable worldview, personality, and life patterns.  Also they want people who have hopefully grown out of any teenage need to show off or draw attention to themselves.  They need people who prefer to go unnoticed.

As for what they're looking for, after a stable personality, really good language skills is a top priority.  It's not uncommon to learn four or five (or more) languages as a case officer and you need to be fluent in all of them.  To be effective you also need great interpersonal skills.  Manipulating people is basically the point of your job so you have to be good at it.  One of their biggest challenges is finding strong technical people who have the necessary softer skills.  People who are outstanding with electronics and languages and interpersonal skills are basically unicorns.  From their point of view it's easier to find someone with language and interpersonal skills and train them on some basics of electronics / technology.  Since the language and interpersonal skills keep you alive, you can't just get basic training on them and then hope for the best.

-Curious Physics Minor


0 Comments
Question #81298 posted on 03/02/2015 9:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What do you do when life isn't fair?

-Sad and angry

A:

Dear you,

Find catharsis. Sing out loud in your car with the window rolled down, go play Beethoven's Sonata Pathetique, go on a run until you pass the pain and hit your runner's high, etc.

Also, remember the Atonement. Remember that God cares about you and that God has a divine plan that will resolve all unfairness if we live it.

Love,

~Anne, Certainly

A:

Dear sad,

This quote from Elder Holland made a world of difference during a time on my mission when all I wanted to do was curl up in a ball in my apartment and never come out again. My best friend sent me a handwritten copy and didn't tell me where she'd gotten it from, and when I've searched for it since being home, I can't find it word-for-word the way she wrote it down. The closest available source online is this talk, but I like it better with exactly the wording my friend quoted. So that's the wording I'll give you, but I have to add the disclaimer that it might be a total misquote.

"When they struggle, when they are rejected, when they are spit upon and cast out and made a hiss and a byword, they are standing shoulder to shoulder with the best life this world has ever known, the only pure and perfect missionary who ever lived. They have every reason to stand tall, and to be grateful that the Savior and Redeemer of the world knows all about their sorrows and their afflictions - and that, for a moment or two in their lives, they will understand what He went through for them."

Technically, this quote is about missionaries. But I think it applies to you and me as well. When life isn't fair, I remember that perhaps the least fair thing of all is that Jesus Christ suffered for my sins, and that because he did, the grave has no victory and death has no sting. And I remember that it's a privilege to understand, for a moment or two in my life, what He went through for me.

In the grand scheme of things, unfairness works in our favor. We usually call it mercy.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Dear Sad and Angry,

I have had that sad and angry "life is unfair" feeling twice in the past week.  The first time I felt it happened right before I first read your question. Well, it turned out that the thing I was all mad about wasn't actually unfair at all, and I had mostly just been imagining things.

I think a lot of seemingly unfair things are like that.  With our limited perspective, we are often prone to thinking that some things are more unfair than they actually are because we don't know all the sides of the situation.

But then again, there are also a lot of things in the world that actually are just unfair.

Today, one of those things happened to me. I have been sitting here trying to think about what I should do or how I can get over it and I want to share some of the thoughts I have been having with you.

First, I thought to myself, why do we have such an obsession with what is and what isn't fair?  I think that it comes from comparison.  I mean, usually, when we are complaining about something that isn't fair, that perception of unfairness comes from a comparison that we have made between ourselves and somebody else.  Here are some examples of some thoughts that people might have which demonstrate this idea:

  • I studied three times as much as he did, and he still got a better grade than I did. Unfair.
  • She always gets the boys, and now she gets him, too?  Can't it ever be my turn? Unfair.
  • I have to work 20 hours a week to pay for my rent and they don't even have to worry because their parents pay for everything. Unfair.
  • I go to the gym every week and he just sits around eating ice cream, but he's still more in shape than I am. Unfair.
  • I keep all the commandments and he isn't even worthy, but girls still like him more than they like me. Unfair.

See how, in all of these situations, the person thinking their life is unfair is comparing their life to somebody else's?

I realized that I do the same thing way too often, and honestly it is what I spent way too much of today doing.

Therefore, I think the best thing we can do when we feel like life isn't fair is remember that we should never determine how good our life is by comparing it to somebody else's life. Of course we start to feel like things are "unfair" when we compare because our life will never be the same as anybody else's! Everybody is different and everybody needs different experiences, trials, and blessings in order to learn what they need to learn in life.

For the last couple of years I have been trying to rid myself of jealousy and feel genuine happiness for the successes of others.  I've come a long way, but I of course have a long way to go, and I guess today reminded me of that.  Still, I know that it is a worthy goal because I have noticed that when I succeed at being truly happy for others, rather than being angry when things seem unfair, I also feel much more happy and satisfied with my own life.

My final thought on the matter, is that I bet that God doesn't see things as being "fair" or "unfair."  I bet He just sees things as "this is what this person needs," and "this is what that person needs." He knows what is best, even though that may mean that some of us have to pass through more trials that others. He knows that it will all be fair in the end.

 “All that is unfair about life can be made right through the Atonement of Jesus Christ." -David A. Bednar

Love,

Vienna

A:

Dear you,

I always find someone to serve. It doesn't have to be a full blown project but anything that keeps my mind off of my troubles and focused on helping others will work. 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #81297 posted on 03/02/2015 7:50 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have lots and lots of unsalted peanuts, and I'm thinking of shaking things up a bit. Is it possible for me to make homemade honey roasted peanuts? Any recipes you'd recommend? Is it fairly simple?

What about sugar cinnamon roasted peanuts?

What are other yummy things to do with peanuts?

-The Ironic Chef

A:

Dear Chef,

BOILED PEANUTS. You have not lived until you've tried them. They take a while to cook but it's incredibly easy and totally worth it. Wash your peanuts, making sure to get all the dirt off. Place them in a pot and fill the pot up with enough water to cover all of the peanuts. Add a little less than ¼ cup of salt for each pound of peanuts. Cover and boil for 6 hours. 

Enjoy!

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear Ironic Chef,

A good resource for learning how to cook almost anything is by using the Food Nework's video recipe page. Here's a link to their videos on peanuts. My personal favorites are from Alton Brown. Here are two of his recipes on peanut butter and peanut brittle. As for the honey roasted peanuts you asked for, here's a recipe from the Food Network kitchen. I'd add cinnamon just as the sugar mixture starts to simmer, before you add the peanuts, so clumps of cinnamon don't form. Enjoy!

-Squirrel


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Question #81317 posted on 03/02/2015 7:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What's the difference between popcorn salt and regular salt?

-Chef N

A:

Dear Chef N,

Popcorn salt is essentially pulverized regular salt. Since the granules are smaller, it sticks to the popcorn better. 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Sunday, March 1, 2015
Question #81299 posted on 03/01/2015 10:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

You are not lawyers. Now that we've got that disclaimer out of the way, the background and question:

I have recently started applying for lots of jobs online (I'm trying to find an internship.) At the end of the application, the company will ask for some demographic information like gender, race, veteran status, and disability. I am particularly concerned about asking disability in my situation. (I am aware of the option to opt out of the questions.) Cancer is often listed as an example of a disability. When I was 19, I was diagnosed with cancer and went through surgery, chemo, and radiation. There are currently no adverse affects and I only visit my doctor ever six months. I have a full range of mobility and full mental capacity. I don't consider my case to be a disability and have so far answered that I don't have a disability.

My concern comes from three aspects,
-If a company considers this a disability, and I say I don't have one, they might say that I lied on my application and use this as grounds for termination.
-If I answer that I do have a disability, then I might take an opportunity from someone who really needs it.
-If I refuse to answer the question or say that I do have a disability, they might ask the question to me directly or ask me to clarify and I'd have to explain my expensive medical past which could really discourage smaller companies from hiring me. (Especially since I have a high risk of high future medical costs.)

Now the question: (Note, you are not lawyers and this is not any sort of actual legal advice.)
-On a personal level, what do you think I should put as my answer?
-Do companies actually receive this demographic information with my application?
-Are they legally allowed to use this information in the hiring process?

--Shrinky Dink

A:

Dear Doctor,

According to one source, "the only appropriate time to disclose on an application is if the employer is actively recruiting employees with disabilities." If it seems that you would be uninhibited in performing the essential functions of the job without accommodations, there's no reason to disclose.

What demographic information a hiring manager receives may be dependent on the company, but when it comes down to it, the Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination against an employee because of a disability.

So, as far as I can tell, you would be fine, and perhaps even better off, with not disclosing your medical past.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Question #81342 posted on 03/01/2015 9:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Who else never liked LEGO as a kid, fragile, quick-to-fall apart creations that they made?

-Surveyor

A:

Dear Surveyor,

This picture explains exactly how I feel about LEGOs:

lego_1.jpg

(source)

Honestly, I was never a huge fan of LEGOs, but it seems that we may be in the minority. However, as my googling informed me, there sure are a lot of parents that hate the little blocks, so we are not totally alone.

If you want a fix for the easy-to-fall-apart factor, you could always do what my family does and just glue your LEGO creations together.  That way they can last a lifetime!  

-Vienna

P.S. LEGOLAND is a different story.  I went there when I was 12 and I remember it being the coolest thing ever. Also, The LEGO Movie might be my favorite animated movie from the past year, so I guess I can forgive LEGO for all those moments of excruciating foot pain.


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Question #81340 posted on 03/01/2015 9:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is everyone who has ever written on the Board still alive?

-Still alive

A:

Dear Elvis,

Since we don't really even know exactly when the Board began (our best guess is 20 years ago this year)—much less who the first writers were—it's basically impossible to say.

Suerte,

--Ardilla Feroz 

A:

Dear Alive,

Fact: Even after you die, if your thoughts and ideas remain on the earth, you are still alive, in a sense.

Fact: Writing for the Board is a great way to accomplish this.

Fact: Board writers are immortal.

-Vienna

A:

Dear GLaDOS,

Just so it's completely clear, we don't know for certain of any writers who have since died. However, despite some rather monumental efforts by Genuine Article and others, there are still quite a few writers whose identities we don't know, and more who we really don't have a good way of keeping track of.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #81242 posted on 03/01/2015 8:38 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How much weight can the average toilet hold?

-Uncle Karl

A:

Dear Uncle,

What a fascinating question in the field of materials science! In fact, it's so fascinating, over 200 papers are published on this subject every year. Engineers are constantly seeking to find stronger and stronger toilet materials and designs. This is necessary, of course, to keep up with the growing output of American bowels (which itself is a major public health issue). The most commonly used material for toilets is porcelain. That's right, porcelain! I know what you're thinking - "Porcelain? Like what my collection of 217 dolls are made out of?" Well, that might be true. My personal collection is of American Girl dolls, which are made out of vinyl instead of porcelain. Yours may be porcelain, though. How should I know? I definitely don't keep a living directory of all doll collections with 50 or more pieces in a 100 mile radius. Because that would be weird, especially if the information was obtained without consent.

In order to run my own tests, I had to obtain a porcelain sample so I could test its durability. The idea of testing several toilets is impractical. Fortunately, one of the nearby collectors local doll stores had a large supply of porcelain dolls that I purchased and gained possession of completely legally. Once I acquired the dolls I needed to find something that could accurately simulate the weight that would generally be a stressor for the average toilet. The weight we needed to simulate, of course, is human fecal material but unfortunately ORCA regulations put up a lot of red tape when we want to experiment using human by-products. Knowing that canine fecal matter is the most similar to humans' among local fauna (Ramsey and Clark, 2011), I hoped to obtain a large enough sample for my tests. Unfortunately, after requisitioning samples from a number of dog walkers I realized it was not feasible to obtain all my samples this way.

Instead, I turned to more modern methods. I was able to make use of a force testing machine designed to find the maximum amount of stress material can withstand. I smashed several dolls' faces in and was able to characterize well the strength of porcelain. Using methods that will be published in my next paper, I was able to extrapolate this data and find a theoretical breaking point for a standard toilet. By my calculations, a standard toilet can hold ~400 average bowel movements of weight without flushing (although I should add that most toilets will not hold this much volume).

-Terrible Scientist


0 Comments
Question #81337 posted on 03/01/2015 8:38 p.m.
Q:

Dear Vienna,

You seem like a pretty cool chick. Got anymore fun dating stories?

-Marlsven

A:

Dear Marlsven,

Thanks! As much as I wish I could tell you about some other crazy dating story, the vast majority of my dating history has actually been relatively normal. Go figure. I definitely have not been on any dates even close to as weird as the one with Edgar.

Most of my college dating has been done in typical, cliché BYU settings such as hiking the Y, getting frozen custard, bowling, ice skating, etc. There is nothing wrong with that, as I enjoy all of those activities, but it might be why I have nothing crazy to report.

Then again, I also don't go on quite as many dates as I would like, which could be another thing hindering me from adding another crazy dating story to my collection.

So yeah, let this be an announcement to all the single, temple-worthy men of the world: You should ask Vienna on more dates.

-Vienna


0 Comments
Question #81339 posted on 03/01/2015 7:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Does Tally M. have a dating application?

-No reason, just curious... *cough*

A:

Dear Ten,

Yes, though the efficacy of such a thing is yet to be proven.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Posted on 03/01/2015 3:53 p.m. New Comment on: #81328 In your opinion, who's worse: Provo drivers, or Provo pedestrians? -Freshwerf
Question #81333 posted on 03/01/2015 3:08 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I left flowers on the doorsteop of a girl i hometeach. My goal was anonymity.

The girls wanted to know who did it so they asked on the ward facebook page. Promising him treats and lovin.

Then to my surprise some other guy in the ward claimed he was the flower dropping fool. He's Mr. Popular in the ward.

What would you do in this situation?

Prop M

A:

Dear Wade,

What a tool! Seriously.

I just wanted to say that. If I were you I'd leave an anonymous note saying that he didn't actually leave the flowers and the true florist wished to remain anonymous.

And then egg his windows.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Prop M,

The first idea that came into my head was this:

1. Make a batch of mildly disgusting cookies. (Nothing harmful, just, you know, load them with salt or something.)

2. Place cookies on the doormat of Mr. Popular with a note on top that says, "From the girls in Apt. 100."

3. On the bottom of the plate, write, "Just kidding. From the guy who actually delivered flowers to Apt. 100. Gotchya!"

But as fun as it is to think about pulling that prank, I probably wouldn't actually do it.  If he is lying about silly stuff like that, he is probably just insecure, and heck, we all do stupid things sometimes.  Might as well forgive him.

Still, it sometimes helps to momentarily imagine getting your revenge, right? Just don't dwell on it for too long.  People are people, yo.

Love,

Vienna


0 Comments
Posted on 03/01/2015 8:57 a.m. New Comment on: #81244 Are there any lds hymns in any areas that you know of that are set to ...
Posted on 03/01/2015 8:54 a.m. New Comment on: #81264 I know our eternal salvation does not depend on this, but I'm curious -- do you ...
Posted on 03/01/2015 8:53 a.m. New Comment on: #81311 Do you have any tips for dealing with a family member who is a narcissist? This ...
Question #81328 posted on 03/01/2015 1:50 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

In your opinion, who's worse: Provo drivers, or Provo pedestrians?

-Freshwerf

A:

Dear freshling,

Provo pedestrians haven't almost killed me yet.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Wade,

Easy. They're both the worst.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Freshwerf,

Drivers. By far.

Dear Provo Drivers,

I don't know if you've heard, but pedestrians have the right of way. 

Always.

- Haleakalā


1 Comment
Question #81327 posted on 03/01/2015 1:50 a.m.
Q:

Dear Competitors,

Is said item spelled in 7 letters or less?

i.e. bananas warrants a yes, magic school bus warrants a no.

-11/20

A:

Dear eleven,

Close, but no bananas.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear Great Gatsby,

No, ma'am.

--Ardilla Feroz

A:

Dear almost Thanksgiving,

Yes indeed.

-Inverse Insomniac

A:

Dear Nine,

Nope.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear 0.55,

Is said item spelled in 7 letters or less?

No. 

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #81326 posted on 03/01/2015 12:50 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I am an incoming graduate student and first-time car owner. As I am selecting housing, affordability is one of my priorities. I assume parking is around 30-70 per month(?) But I also heard that BYU offers free parking. So is it better that I park my car at BYU and live in an apartment very close to campus? Or choose an apartment with free parking with a $225 per month rent and 10 minutes walk? I am female and I assume I will walk home from the library at night, so safety might also be a concern? I've never been to Utah before and I am not very familiar with its weather, but I heard it's freezing a lot of the time. Can anyone tell me which is a better option based on the feasibility and affordability?

-Rain

A:

Dear Rain,

Provo is really weird about parking.

BYU is actually going to start charging $60 per semester for on-campus parking this fall. Also, Divya informs me that most campus lots actually don't allow overnight parking precisely so that the lots won't be used for car storage.

However, parking at most apartments is either free or nearly free. Of the two places that I've lived, one charged a one-time fee of around $50 to register the car with the complex, and the other has no parking charges whatsoever. (That said, parking is not in fact free. I expect that the cost of parking is included in rent—meaning you're paying for a parking space whether or not you actually own a car.)

Basically, my advice is to look for the complex with the best deal, without taking parking into account. You'll get more or less free parking wherever you go.

Also, let this serve as a reminder to everyone that Provo's parking situation, for an apartment-oriented community, is really weird.

-yayfulness

A:

Dear you,

I'm going to disagree with yayfulness a little bit: I think it's worth checking what the parking fee is at places you're seriously considering because while many complexes will have some free parking, parking may not be adequate. My complex, for example, has parking you can pay like 25 or 30 dollars a month for and have a numbered, covered spot. They also have free parking (with like a 5 dollar sticker) but it seems that there are one or two more cars than there are spots, which means that you sometimes end up parking on the street.

~Anne, Certainly


0 Comments
Saturday, February 28, 2015
Question #81318 posted on 02/28/2015 10:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I just read Board Question #81240 where Ardilla predicted an upcoming influx of groaning from people who don't think BYUSA is effective, correlated with the upcoming BYUSA elections. Admittedly, I'm one of those people, but I'm willing to expand my perspective and consider the situation from a different angle, so I'm hoping you can help me with that.

My initial impressions of the student gov't come from my own experiences where I was super excited and pumped up my first BYUSA election during freshman year, and then quickly realized that there wasn't a dime of difference between the candidates. (I mean, we DID end up getting vending machines in the library, but it did take freaking forever, let's be honest.) I also have a roommate who used to work at BYUSA and talked a lot about some of the sexism she had to put up with from a certain supervisor (who no longer works there) and also some of the financial corruption in general going on inside. Yes, they do give out a crap ton of free stuff, and especially as a freshman those freebies are REALLY appreciated, but it's also not like the rumors many people hear about BYUSA's corruption are entirely without root.

Although I've had decent experiences working with the Clubs subdivision as a club officer, if I were to make a totally blanket, generalized statement, it would be that BYUSA is a private high school for a certain type of personality (i.e. the "preps") that seemingly only exists to benefit those people's resumes by giving them titles and work experience. Only a relative fraction of that work experience is actually helping the student body they're supposed to be serving, much like high school student gov't. At the end of the day, high school student gov't positions aren't necessarily going to secure you admission into your favorite college, and BYUSA leadership is really not that different when it comes to affecting potential post-grad life.

So my question for the Board is, what exactly is the function of BYUSA, preferably -as interpreted- by the people on the inside who work for them, both students and adult staff? Surely the people on the inside are very aware of their perception among the general BYU body. If that's the case, what's preventing change: the jaded students themselves, or crotchety old men and women at the top of the command chain who are used to doing things a certain way?

Thank you for your time,
Ellie Paige

A:

Dear Ellen,

This is somewhat unrelated, but it took forever to get vending machines in the library because of library administration, not because of BYUSA. 

-A Librarian 

A:

Dear Ellie,

I'll agree with you that BYUSA's benefits to the student body aren't necessarily efficient. However, I don't think that means there's something wrong with an organization; that's just what's going to happen when you have a student-run organization. People have classes to focus on and there's a high rate of turnover, and so it's not going to compare to real-world organizations in some aspects.

However, I think that overall BYUSA does benefit the student body. First of all, it provides a good framework for all of the other clubs to work under, which then benefits every single student who participates in a club or attends a club-sponsored event. It also does give the actual BYUSA students some experience. While you may not feel like this experience is worth much, the fact of the matter is that some people do. The same types of people who participate in BYUSA now will go on to have jobs that may require them to hire someone someday, and they will see BYUSA participation as a positive on a resumé. Their goals may be different than yours, but they're doing something they enjoy to achieve their goals, which is a good thing.

Finally, I'll just add that last night, two of the candidates for BYUSA elections went around my apartment complex introducing themselves and offering to do service for people. Yeah, you could say they're "just doing it to get elected," but it still takes a certain type of person to think of that kind of campaign strategy over something less arduous than going to a run-down apartment complex and taking out the trash. Even little things like this, in my opinion, benefit the student body.

-Zedability


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