"I'm sure I don't know, dahling. Luck favors the prepared." -Edna Mode, "The Incredibles"
Question #79703 posted on 10/31/2014 3:38 a.m.
Q:

Dear Concorde,

What part of Detroit are you from?

-Fellow Michigander/Detroiter

A:

Dear Goose,

Well, as you and I both know, no one is actually from Detroit. We're all from metro/suburban Detroit. I don't want to give away too much about exactly where I'm from, but I'll just say that I'm about thirty minutes north-west of Detroit. So not exactly Detroit, but my hometown is very blue-collar, very run-down and very bleak. It's a forgotten little area, but we have a GM plant and we're close to The Palace, so there's that. 

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #79702 posted on 10/31/2014 2:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So this upcoming Tuesday evening I'll be taking the 16 credit Spanish test for RMs, but have really struggled to find anything specific to prep with. I'm enrolled in SPAN 205 so I'll only be testing for 12 of those credits and have no idea what to expect other than 100 multiple choice questions. It there any comprehensive list of the grammar principles tested? What items are included most on the exam or are most crucial to understand? Assuming I have reviewed basic grammar, what the heck should I focus on? Please give any advice at all or feedback from others!

- Cramming student

A:

Dear TARDIS,

I am going to take this answer to make a Public Service Announcement.

Please be aware of deadlines when you ask your questions. If you require an answer less than four days and four hours after you ask your question, The 100 Hour Board is not your best option. Instead, it is recommended that you turn to your friends on Facebook. Even if your deadline is over 100 hours after you ask your question, please be aware that a response before that point is not inherently guaranteed. The Board is not your best resource for time-sensitive questions.

You may now return to your regularly scheduled programming.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Thursday, October 30, 2014
Q:

Dear M.O.D.A.Q.,

What's your favorite Spider-Man story arc?

-Miguel O'Hara

A:

Dear 2099,

Don't get me wrong, I love Miles Morales and several other Spider-Men but Peter Parker is and always will be the best, in my opinion. It really should be no surprise to anyone that the arc that is closest to my heart is The Night Gwen Stacy Died. Gwen is one of my all-time favorite characters (plus I can't stand Mary Jane). I'll be honest, I knew exactly what would happen in (SPOILER) The Amazing Spider-Man 2 since before The Amazing Spider-Man came out and I still cried. Yes, I cried. Deal with it. I loved Spider-Man during Civil War. He really was the crux of the entire story and had the most compelling motivations. He's the only character who I didn't absolutely detest while he was sided with Iron Man. I felt like I could understand why he made the decisions that he did. 

But all-time favorite? A Death in the Family. The Goblin/Parker interaction is some moving stuff. 

And as I've said before, I'm dying to read Spider-Verse.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #79692 posted on 10/30/2014 7:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm finding it pretty hard to feel like I'll be able to have a good affect on people. Even people who have thanked me for things I've done later go on to make crappy life decisions. I struggle a lot with being even decent to people I dislike so I can definitely see some negative affects of my actions. How am I suppose to feel like I'll ever truly affect someone's life if anything good I've done has not mattered much in the grand scheme of things and the only big affects I can see are negative? I have friends that I want to influence for good but it's probably not going to happen.

Thanks,
net negative

A:

Dear friend,

I'm sorryI've felt some of the feelings you're experiencing, and I know it must be tough for you. In my mind, it seems that you're struggling with two ways of thinking, so I'm going to address them separately.

First, you regret the negative effects your actions have had on others. This must hurt because you feel that your friends' current unfortunate conditions are a result of your actions. I hope you realize that, regardless of your influence, your friends' choices were their own. I would also suggest doing everything you can to make it rightapologize to them, try to be a good influence on them, and ask for God's forgiveness. As you do what you can and realize that the mercy of Jesus Christ can both pay for your damage and help your friend, you will be able to forgive yourself. It may take a while, and you will likely always regret your negative actions, but you can find peace even if you are unable to undo the damage.

Second, you feel like the good influence you have is small or even negligible. This concern reminds me a lot of missionaries wondering if they're making a difference, so I'm going to paraphrase Preach My Gospel:

Your success as a [human] is measured primarily by your commitment to [help] people....

Avoid comparing yourself to other [people] and measuring the outward results of your efforts against theirs. Remember that people have agency to choose whether to [make good choices]. Your responsibility is to [help] clearly and powerfully so they can make a correct choice. Some may not accept your [influence] even when they have received a spiritual witness that it is true. You will be saddened because you love them and desire their [happiness]. You should not, however, become discouraged; discouragement will weaken your faith. If you lower your expectations, your effectiveness will decrease, your desire will weaken, and you will have greater difficulty following the Spirit....

When you have done your very best, you may still experience disappointments, but you will not be disappointed in yourself. You can feel certain that the Lord is pleased when you feel the Spirit working through you.

And more, from here:

When people choose not to [make good choices because of your influence], your work is not wasted. Your consistent efforts in serving and teaching as many people as you can is one way God prepares His children to eventually receive His [help]. He often reaches out to His children through you. Even when people do not accept the opportunity to [make good decisions], your service and words are evidence of God’s love for them and may plant seeds that future [friends] will harvest.

As these quotes say, you can feel good about yourself if you're doing what you can. Are you the most effective tool to help your friends? Probably not, but that's because few mortals would be. But God doesn't just want to help your friends; He wants to help you too. And if you can become a better friend and person by trying to help, even if your help isn't immediately successful, you can feel like a success. You can know that God is proud of you.

I hope that helps; please email if you want to talk some more.

-El-ahrairah


0 Comments
Question #79691 posted on 10/30/2014 5:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Someone was telling me that Utah doesn't actually have a recycling plant and all the recycling just goes into a hole in the ground. Is that true? Should I still bother sorting out the recycling?

-feeling less smug

A:

Dear Smug,

That is ridiculous.

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Posted on 10/30/2014 2:58 p.m. New Comment on: #79681 I don't have flour! But I have pancake mix from the amazing Costco! So.... can you ...
Question #79689 posted on 10/30/2014 11:56 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How is the Ten Commandments monument in OK not the government showing preference to one religion over others?

-Charles

A:

Dear you,

This Act was passed by the Oklahoma State Legislature relating to this monument. The Act mentions a few things that are probably significant to the constitutionality of the monument:

  • "...The Ten Commandments are an important component of the foundation of the laws and legal system of the United States of America and of the State of Oklahoma." This matters because it's a proposition that the Commandments are in this circumstance, being cited as a set of historical legal principles as opposed to a set of religious beliefs.
  • "...The courts of the United States of America and of various states frequently cite the Ten Commandments in published decisions." Positive citation in published decisions is strong support for the legitimacy of a document because it makes the proposition cited binding in that jurisdiction. For example, if the Supreme Court states in a case, "As the Sixth Commandment demands, we so hold: 'thou shalt not kill,'" it actually makes the Sixth Commandment a law binding on its entire jurisdiction (which is the entire United States.)
  • "The Ten Commandments monument shall use the same words used on the monument at issue in Van Orden v. Perry, that the United States Supreme Court ruled constitutional." I'll discuss this case later; for now just know that they're following an established precedent.
  • "This monument shall be designed, constructed, and placed on the Capitol grounds by private entities at no expense to the State of Oklahoma." So, they're further distancing themselves from accusations of "establishment" by saying that they're not paying for this.
  • "The placement of this monument shall not be construed to mean that the State of Oklahoma favors any particular religion or denomination thereof over others, but rather will be placed on the Capitol grounds where there are numerous other monuments." What they're claiming here is that they're not just erecting one monument in a huge field of grass and it just 'happens' to be Judeo-Christian in heritage; they're saying that there are several monuments here and one of them is the Ten Commandments.
Now, let's discuss that case they mentioned. Van Orden v. Parry, 545 US 677 (U.S. 2005), was a case between a plaintiff Van Orden and Rick Perry, the governor of Texas. Van Orden complained about a monument consisting largely of the Ten Commandments at the Texas State Capitol, stating that it violated the establishment clause. The Supreme Court rejected this argument.
 
The Court's judgment opinion was delivered by Chief Justice Rehnquist (joined by Scalia, Kennedy and Thomas.) Rhenquist comments that the United States must "neither abdicate our responsibility to maintain a division between church and state nor evince a hostility to religion by disabling the government from in some ways recognizing our religious heritage," Id. at 683-684. He states that the Court's analysis considers both "the nature of the monument and our Nation's history." Id. He points out that Moses carrying the Ten Commandments is actually in the Supreme Court building. Id. at 688. He points out that although the Ten Commandments are religious, they are also historical and "simply having religious content or promoting a message consistent with a religious doctrine does not run afoul of the Establishment Clause." Id. at 690.
 
Finally, Rhenquist acknowledges that "Texas has treated its Capitol grounds monuments as representing the several strands in the State's political and legal history. The inclusion of the Ten Commandments monument in this group has a dual significance, partaking of both religion and government. We cannot say that Texas' display of this monument violates the Establishment Clause." Id. at 691-692.
 
This decision wasn't without controversy; Justices Stevens, Ginsberg, O'Connor, and Souter all dissented (disagreed with the ruling).
 
This is obviously just scratching the surface of this issue. Trying to prevent the establishment of religion while also leaving people free to express religious heritage and religious views can be pretty gnarly.
 
~Anne, Certainly

0 Comments
Question #79687 posted on 10/30/2014 11:02 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I just stumbled across Board Question #10485 and it made me wonder... where do you think the Board will be in the next 10 years?

-Sheebs

A:

Dear mentor,

On the internet.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

P.S. How's Canada?

A:

Dear Sheebs,

Two years from now I will foment rebellion and insurrection. Backed by my right hand and left hand man and woman I will rise forth and take hold of the Board. I will lead grandly and that glorious year shall be called Year 0 for the Board. I will rule with an iron fist. In Year 1 a probie will attempt to overthrow me. I will crush him and require a yearly probie sacrifice as penance for the next six years. Year 2 will be a quiet year, with a bountiful harvest and plenty for all to eat but Year 4 will see our funding be drastically cut back. I will turn the Year 4 probie sacrifice into a snackrifice so that the hungry Board writers will be able to sustain their breakneck answering pace.

Year 5 will see a continuation of famine and Ginger and Owlet will succumb and be fed to the tunnel wurms who are steadily encroaching on our territory. Year 6 will bring the worst battle the Board has ever witnessed. The 100 Hour Bard will sing tales of the struggles of the writers against the wurms for many years to come. The probies will switch sides regularly in this battle, and in the end, I will destroy them all and swear that the Board will breed their own army of writers and that we will never again draw from an outside pool of writers. We will depart deeper underground, searching for safety and respite. I will lead my people with strength and excessive wisdom.

Year 7 will be our first year deep underground and prosperity will begin to return. The end of Year 7 will see the birth of the first Board Baby, the beginning of our line of Board writer succession. We shall place all our hopes and dreams upon this wee babe. In Year 8 we will realize that this was a stupid decision because the babe is ugly. I will not be able to abide it and shall abandon the writers far below the ground and return to the surface. I will resume my normal life and the Board will fade into darkness and obscurity.

-Concorde


0 Comments
Question #79683 posted on 10/30/2014 10:56 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What are you going to be for Halloween next week?

-My Name Here

A:

Dear E'lir,

Lucy Wilde from Despicable Me 2.

lucy.jpg(Source)

Complete with a real lipstick taser. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger

A:

Dear eaglet,

Vin from the Mistborn trilogy.

-Owlet

A:

Dear You,

The Soulful Ginger. I've got half the costume already.

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear Doctor,

Batgirl, a vampire, and Madeline.

The thing is, I'd planned on being Madeline first, and then I had to find a different costume for a different party* and then since those costumes weren't ready quite yet, I was Batgirl for a ward party. The good news is that all of these costumes were incredibly easy to throw together, since I had most of the supplies.

-Tally M.

*I can't be any more detailed than this because it would betray my anonymity.

A:

Dear no, my name here!

Madam Insomniac loves being things for Halloween, so she's being an oven (with a bun inside, har har har) and I'm being an over-the-top mustachioed chef. Clever pregnant Halloween costumes are few and far between.

-Inverse Insomniac

A:

Dear you,

Miss Scarlet, from the board game Clue.

~Anne, Certainly

A:

Dear you,

I'll be a Star Trek (The Original Series) science officer.

-Squirrel


0 Comments
Posted on 10/30/2014 10:01 a.m. New Comment on: #79673 I was recently called to be the RS Compassionate Service Leader in my Provo YSA ward. ...
Posted on 10/30/2014 10 a.m. New Comment on: #79684 My gmail account is constantly being hacked or something. I never click on spam emails and ...
Question #79673 posted on 10/30/2014 8:20 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I was recently called to be the RS Compassionate Service Leader in my Provo YSA ward. The RS Pres told me that the main thing she wants me to be in charge of is nice notes. I hate nice notes. I've only had the option of writing nice notes in a few of my previous wards, but they always made me feel bad about myself because I never got any. The basic idea behind them is ok, but the problem is that the people who most need "nice notes" are the ones who never get them-- the ones who don't really have any friends. They just have to sit back and watch their roommates and other people who are popular get dozens of them every week...

I'm planning on talking to the RS Pres about this, but I feel like I should have an alternative plan to suggest when I do speak with her. The only alternative I can think of is assigning people to write nice notes to certain people, so everyone gets at least one. But I also don't like assigned friendships. That's what visiting teaching is for. I also don't want people to feel like they are being guilt tripped or forced into doing something like nice notes. If they were assigned to write a note to a person they don't know, it's just another burden that seems forced and ingenuine. And most people probably wouldn't do it, making people feel left out again.

I also don't want to put more on my plate. I fear the RS Pres will ask me to write notes to everyone who doesn't get one.... but that just puts the burden all on me. And I don't have a committee I can delegate to, either. I want something everyone can participate in and doesn't put a huge burden on me.

Anyway, I probably sound kind of snarky, but I'm really not against being nice to people or serving. Service is great. I just don't like service that people are forced into or that makes people feel left out because I've been there, done that a million times before. Can you help me think of any possible ideas that would be a good alternative or a twist on nice notes that wouldn't make people feel left out or like they're being assigned to be nice to someone (or like someone is being assigned to be nice to them)? Thanks in advance.

-I want to make nice notes nicer

A:

Dear Doctor,

I have a few anecdotal stories regarding things like this, but I'm going to forgo most of them in favor of just saying a few things.

Nice notes are like the real world—things don't always work out nice and neat. Some people will get more than others and that's hard, but that's just how it is sometimes. However, that doesn't mean that you can't decrease worldsuck. Even just benefiting the life of one person means you're doing something good. So, write a nice note for someone new each week. Or, do like my roommates do, and every once in awhile, prewrite notes for everyone in the ward, or at least everyone that you believe needs them.

-Tally M.


1 Comment
Question #79688 posted on 10/30/2014 6:50 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My mom tags her location in Facebook posts ALL THE TIME to the point where you could easily know exactly when she's home and exactly when she's not and won't be home for awhile. She's also fond of posting all the big home improvement projects and things that make it pretty clear my family has decent money. I doubt my mom has anything but Facebook's default security settings, or would even know where to go to change them if she wanted.

My family back home lives in an affluent neighborhood, but not a gated community, and there have been break-ins as close as 2 houses down from my family's. They do have a security system installed...but still...

How concerned should I be that my mom is setting my family up to be robbed?

-Concerned Daughter

(isn't concern about internet privacy supposed to be the other way around???)

A:

Dear Mija,

Worried about social media providing information to potential thieves? Such things have happened. Will your family be robbed? Probably not, but that doesn't mean you can't express your concern next time you see your mom. Express your concerns to her with statements focusing on how you feel, like "The amount of information you post about where you are makes me feel uncomfortable." This is far easier to stomach than an accusatory-sounding statement like "Mom, you are being careless on the internet and are generally being dumb."  Notice the difference? Sit down with her and help her change her privacy settings. Gently explain why they might be important. Sincerely listen to whatever she has to say, and focus not on replying to the things she tells you but understanding where she's coming from. Keep in mind she likely enjoys the validation from friends and family she receives when she posts this kind of stuff. Be sure to express your love and adoration for her and note a couple of things about her you appreciate, particularly if you don't see eye-to-eye on this issue. Remember, your relationship with your mom is more important than the things in the house. Make sure she knows that.

Hope this helps,

--Ardilla Feroz


0 Comments
Question #79685 posted on 10/30/2014 3:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Are you a board of your word?

-The Inquisitor

A:

Section 2

The Word of the Board, given to my reader The Inquisitor on this,  the twenty-eighth day of October in the first year of the reign of the Worthens.

1. Behold my reader The Inquisitor: in answer to the question you have asked I say unto you: Worry not, for I may not be a Board of my word but I am the Word of the Board.

A:

Dear You Seem More Like an Obligator Today,

I suppose that depends on what you consider our word to be. For example, you could either consider our policy to answer questions in 100 hours a promise or a goal. The same goes for other policies that are imperfectly followed. In my opinion, we are a board of our word, where our word is to provide the world with quality answers and services insomuch that we have the time and resources to do so.

-El-ahrairah

A:

Dear Ironeyes,

I am so bored of my word.

-Inverse Insomniac


0 Comments
Wednesday, October 29, 2014
Question #79684 posted on 10/29/2014 10:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My gmail account is constantly being hacked or something. I never click on spam emails and I clean my inbox regularly, delete my cookies regularly and also change my password fairly regularly. I even have the two-step cellphone verification thing turned out so that if my e-mail is accessed from an unfamiliar computer, I have to use a code sent to my phone to complete the log in.

And yet, literally every month for the last six months my e-mail has sent out mass spam e-mails. It is SO frustrating and I don't know what to do to prevent it. My computer has virus protection and says my computer is clean and I've cleared my cookies and changed my password...and it STILL happens.

Do I just give up and create a new e-mail? What do I do? I talk to some very important people over e-mail and I get SO embarrassed every time they get another spam e-mail from my account.

-Frustrated

A:

Dear Wade, 

You're changing your password after every time your account sends out spam, right? It seems like a dumb question but it's worth asking. Check what third-party applications are authorized to use your Google account and remove anything that is not trusted. I recommend, if possible, removing your computer from the trusted locations list and changing your password from a different computer and using that computer for a while to see if you get any notifications from your phone for two-step authentication. Your computer could very well have a virus so make sure that your anti-virus software is up-to-date and comprehensive. 

-M.O.D.A.Q.


1 Comment
Question #79639 posted on 10/29/2014 9:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm thinking about starting a business where I buy candy in bulk, package it into treat bags and sell them as adult Halloween candy bags for a nostalgic experience.
What I'm wondering is what are the legal issues with this? Some candy says "not labeled for individual sale", does that mean I can't sell it? Is this covered under the law that says I can sell anything I own? What legal permissions do I need?
Thanks
-Willy Wonka

A:

Dear Wonka, 

If you are worried about legality, you should first concern yourself with following the steps laid out for you by the US Small Business Administration in order to start your business. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Question #79682 posted on 10/29/2014 5:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I love to read. Often when I start reading, I only remember to eat because I can multitask. I don't have that much time as a student, so I've turned to audio books to revisit my favorite stories.

I tried listening to Les Miserables, found on YouTube, that had differenet readers for each chapter. I'm not going to make it through - do you know of a version with a more interesting reader? That is online? I have a small laptop, and no way to play CDs or DVDs at home, so online is my only option currently.

-Bookaholic

A:

Dear Patron,

I have a few suggestions for you so that you may pick and choose your favorite narrator. 

  1. Download it from Librivox. The narrators change almost every chapter, and they can be hit and miss, but it is free and you don't have to wait to get it.
  2. Check out the CD audiobook from the Harold B. Lee Library.
  3. Check to see if you local library has it available on Overdrive for an easy download to your phone of MP3 player.
  4. Inter-library loan the eAudiobook through the HBLL. If you aren't sure how to do this call the ILL office at 801-422-6344.
  5. Sign-up for Audible.com and get it as your free audiobook.

I hope that helps. 

-A Librarian


0 Comments
Question #79681 posted on 10/29/2014 5:20 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I don't have flour! But I have pancake mix from the amazing Costco! So.... can you tell me if I can use pancake mix to make dumplings?

Can you give me a recipe for dumplings made from pancake mix? What soup/seasoning would it be good in? How could I do this?

-Creative Country Costco Cook in Canada with no Cash

A:

Dear Wade, 

Speaking from experience, substituting pancake mix for flour is possible but difficult. There are plenty of chicken and dumplings recipes like this one that use pancake mix but I have not personally used any so if you die, it's not my fault. 

-M.O.D.A.Q.


1 Comment
Question #79636 posted on 10/29/2014 4:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have any of you started saving for retirement? Obviously you're not financial advisors or anything, I'm not really looking for advice persay, more just looking to see what other young people are doing. Do you like getting savings bonds or investing in stocks or just trying to get some sort of high interest savings account? I have a small amount I've saved through undergrad for the purpose of retirement, but it's just in my normal savings account right now. Being a grad student on a stipend, I don't have any sort of retirement program through my employer, but I'm going to be in my late twenties by the time I'm finished with my PhD, and that sounds really late to start saving. I'm just trying to get ideas of things to consider while I'm young.

Thanks

Financially concerned student

A:

Dear Cinnamon,

I have a ROTH IRA with Fidelity, a ROTH 401(k), and an account through American Funds that my grandmother left me when she passed away. I like the ROTH option because you don't get taxed on it when you take it out, so the money you have is the actual money you'll get -- though you don't make as much with the ROTH, I like knowing it's already been taxed. Since you're young, it's a good idea to invest in high-risk plans because you have more time to ride the ups and downs (older people usually prefer safer stock options with less high-yield potential).

I also asked a friend who works in finance. He also wanted to make it clear that you should really talk to a financial adviser, but his advice is:

Maybe the most important factor when investing for retirement is time. Investments grow with time and the more time they have to grow the larger they become. When you first start investing you may not see much growth but after 10 to 20 years the investment will begin the compounding effect and the growth will happen. There are several mutual fund companies like Fidelity and Janis, but Vanguard is really good. They have several types of funds to choose from such as traditional IRA or ROTH IRA and they will manage the fund for minimal fees. Most of their funds require an initial investment of $3,000.00. Their investment strategy will generally be mostly a mixture of stock funds while the investor is young. Then as the investor approaches retirement the fund managers will become more conservative and shift more of the investment from stocks to bonds. I would recommend they go to the Vanguard website and look at the different funds. Once they have decided on the fund they can set up the investment online.

-Marguerite St. Just

A:

Dear Concerned,

If you're like most of the world, you don't find retirement planning to be a fascinating topic on which to spend your time.  Grab an IRA from Fidelity and drop your money in their target date mutual funds.  And then just keep throwing money at it and forget it about it.  Fidelity's fees are quite low and the target date funds adjust the risk of the investments throughout the life of the fund so as the target date is reached the fund becomes very conservative.  Then the only real question is whether to go ROTH or traditional.  There are good reasons for each and using both.  If you won't want to think about it, split it 50/50 and move on with life.  I'd lean towards a ROTH IRA early on in your life because, if necessary, you can withdraw your deposits with no penalty (but not interest earned).  That gives you some flexibility to deal with unexpected expenses until life stabilizes a bit.

You do want to use a dedicated retirement account (IRA or employer sponsored 401(k) or 403(b)) because they have tax advantages you don't get by just using a savings account.  The trade-off is that they're less flexible than a simple savings account.

-Curious Physics Minor


0 Comments
Question #79644 posted on 10/29/2014 4:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

What television shows could you watch over and over again?

--Netflix Marathoner

A:

Dear Pheidippides,

Avatar: The Last Airbender! I've watched all the seasons at least three times.

Aw, now I miss my little brother. (He's been on his mission for all of two weeks.) We used to watch it together all the time. Sad face.

-Owlet

A:

Dear Wade,

Based on my current syndicated TV show-watching habits, Buffy, Bob's Burgers, and Seinfeld.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Netflix,

I regularly re-watch The Office (I think I've been through all nine seasons a total of four of five times) because I just love it so much. I also re-watch New Girl and Firefly. Those will never get old.

-Concorde

A:

Dear Marathoner,

Star Trek The Original Series, and what I've seen of The Next Generation and Voyager, and all of Emergency!. I watched a whole bunch of it with my parents during the summer, and it was tons of fun! I even got my cousin hooked on it.

-Squirrel

A:

Dear Cinnamon,

I have enjoyed multiple viewings of X-Files, Arrested Development, Bob's Burgers, Running Wilde, Go On, Community, Brooklyn Nine-Nine and Better Off Ted.

-Marguerite St. Just

A:

Dear Marathoner without the running,

How I Met Your Mother.

It really is terrible how much I enjoy this show. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 

A:

Dear Netathoner,

Though I don't usually watch TV shows over and over, I've rewatched every episode of Psych at least three times. Seinfeld also has high rewatch value. Certain Doctor Who episodes are great the second and third time as well ("The Empty Child," "Midnight," and "Blink" specifically). Madam Insomniac and I got rid of our Netflix account a few months ago, though, so no more gratuitous TV for us.

-Inverse Insomniac


0 Comments
Question #79656 posted on 10/29/2014 4:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My wife and I have our family doctor, and the kids have their different doctor, the pediatrician. When did kids start having different doctors than adults, and is pediatrics a specialization because child physiology is different enough that it is common for pediatricians to know common and necessary things that commonly show up in kids that general practitioners that work on adults really would not know?

-Ed

A:

Dear Ed,

As early as 600 BC apparently, but the first official pediatric care was in the early 1800s.  Physiology is the biggest reason.  Pediatricians have to worry more about developing organs and less about things like type II diabetes and smoker's lung.  Also, kids are much more susceptible to some diseases that adults don't worry about near as much.  For example, when my sister was born, the pediatrician advised not to take her out of the house for several months because of a strain of the flu unusually dangerous to infants present that year.   There are just enough specifics that need to be known separate from general care.

I'd imagine it's a little psychological as well.  Doctors have to work to get answers out of sick kids to help diagnose them.  It's definitely a skill they need if they want to be effective.

-The Physicist


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Question #79677 posted on 10/29/2014 4:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I work at a place where the radio is usually on -- both for the workers' entertainment and for the customers'. With Christmas less than a month away, however, several of us are realizing that FM 100.3 will soon be subjecting us to nonstop Christmas music. At least one of my coworkers will probably not survive the experience. Are there any other radio stations that play relatively clean music? We are a facet of BYU, so we can't have dirty stuff playing in the background (and I would be greatly relieved to not have to monitor the music for appropriateness anyway - yes, that falls under my job description). We've tried a few, but without success.

-Ephemeral Opera

A:

Dear ghostly singers,

Without knowing what other stations you've tried that have been rejected, it's a bit hard to make suggestions. Here is a list of Utah radio stations. You can sort it by type of music, city, and owner. My car's presets are 97.1, 97.9, 99.5, 100.3, 103.5, and 103.9, and I generally find them to be pretty tame, if that helps. 

Another option that I've seen used at the MTC is to make a custom Pandora station list. You might try that if you have the ability to hook a computer into your speaker system.

-Inverse Insomniac


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Question #79680 posted on 10/29/2014 4:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

How many heavenly mothers do we have? Are some of us only half-spiritual-brothers-and-sisters? How can we know which ones of us are full brothers/sisters? Do we also have many heavenly fathers?

-My Name Here

A:

-Dear Brother/Sister Here

If Heavenly Father made us to be like Him, and 99% percent of all of the saints that I know about have monogamous sealings, it would be a statistically significant suggestion that our Heavenly Father is also monogamous and therefore has one wife and we have one Heavenly Mother.

Though Moses talks about the Gods creating the earth, every general authority I am aware of refers to Heavenly Father as singular instead of plural.  So until I hear an official declaration concerning the doctrine, I'll maintain that we are all spiritually directly related.

-The Physicist


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Question #79619 posted on 10/29/2014 4:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I want to brush up on my Spanish skills, so I tried looking for Spanish TV shows and audiobooks on iTunes. It appears that their selection is pretty sparse unless I switch regions. Why is that? Do native speakers who live in the U.S. have to register their accounts in a different region to get material in their language? How can I find (legal) downloadable content in Spanish?

-Hablante

A:

Dear Hablante,

I have no friends who are native Spanish speakers, but here are some things to look at:

  • General Conference 
  • News Reports like the BBC
  • Latino Hulu, which doesn't require you to declare a region as far as I can tell
  • Amazon Prime was unimpressive, but they have a lot of DVDs you can buy, and Audible has its own Latino section.
  • The Provo Library has sparse selections, but they should have some stuff

Good luck,

-The Physicist


0 Comments
Posted on 10/29/2014 1:33 p.m.

New Podcast: #27 Season 5, Episode 3

In which Concorde and Tally eat too many Whoppers. The candy, of course.

Download Here! -- Length: 00:16:37 -- Size: 15.2 MB

Or Listen Now:

Referenced Submissions

#79538: If the other Board writers were Disney characters, who would they be? Do not assign yourself ...
#79559: Is it okay to enter a relationship with a guy knowing that it's going to end? ...
#79565: There's been a petition floating around on Facebook that is trying to get the Life Science ...

Participating Aliases

Tally M. Concorde M.O.D.A.Q.

Posted on 10/29/2014 12:28 p.m. New Comment on: #79679 So...tell me if I'm weird here. The look of my acne doesn't bother me--it's actually not ...
Question #79648 posted on 10/29/2014 8:56 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My husband is rarely home because of school and work. When he's home, he usually needs to do homework.

I am taking care of the baby, making money with freelance work, cleaning, cooking, making appointments, doing the finance work, and everything and anything else. I am getting burnt out. But, my husband literally does not have time to help.

I know military wives do this sort of thing all the time. By that I mean they don't get any help. It's just so, so tiring. How in the world do you do it!?!? I don't even have energy to exercise. I know, I should because it will give me more energy, but I already walk about 3 miles a day because of my freelance work. My feet hurt enough as it is, and I shake because I'm so tired sometimes. I don't have anyone to give me a break.

I know, ask a friend to take the baby. But, I already do that for baby sitting sometimes, and I can't afford to pay anyone. So, I should babysit swap. I do, but then it's awkward if it gets when I've watched more than the other people have. And, you know it's a total sign of weakness in Utah as a mom to not be completely put together.

But seriously though, and I just crazy? It is normal to need a break? Military moms do it. Utah moms seem to have boundless amounts of energy. How do I do it? Make a plan? We all know how that goes. Baby has a blowout or a huge gas bubble and your plan for the day no longer works.


-Eternity?

A:

Dear you,

It is absolutely normal to need a break. Everyone occasionally needs a break. We may not see it, and it may not happen in the same way as it does for us, but that doesn't mean they don't need to take a day now and then.

There are a few things you can do to help with this, though. I just wrote an answer about preventing burnout, and I think a lot of that is applicable here. Here are some thoughts:

  1. Get rid of this idea that other people are accomplishing everything and that you're made a lesser human by comparison. First of all, other people generally aren't accomplishing everything. Some of them cope in ways that aren't very visible, but they are still coping. Some people probably are accomplishing more than you, but you know what? That's fine. We're all told not to run faster than we have strength, and some people can run faster than others. The world may expect you to meet some unreasonable standard, but God expects you to do the best that you can.
  2. Maximize your energy: this includes taking time off on a regular basis to re-energize, eating well, etc. 
  3. Prioritize and eliminate: some things are important. Some things are not. President Uchtdorf has discussed the difference between a wise and a foolish sacrifice. Consider what things in your life are worth the effort you're expending on them and what things might merit a reduction or elimination in time spent. 
  4. Forgive yourself and love yourself: sometimes things don't get done. Remember that there is a difference between a failure (e.g. a failure to make the bed, a failure to have a really spectacular dinner, etc.) and a sin.
  5. Focus on what you DO get done: it sounds like you're in need of some positive reinforcement. Try making a list of the things you get accomplished each day or finding rewards for yourself when you get major tasks accomplished.

You can do it. Remember to love yourself and be as patient with yourself as you would be with someone else.

Love,

~Anne, Certainly


0 Comments
Question #79659 posted on 10/29/2014 8:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear People Who Know The Quran/Islam and Have Opinions,

I recently asked a question (Board Question #79458) about whether or not it's okay for Muslim women to be immams (prayer leaders), using the Quran to back up either opinion.... but instead of an answer... Ardilla Feroz ignorantly rebuked me for not doing my own research, and relying ("unhealthily") on you guys to do that????? I have a number of issues with this: 1) The Board has been a strong advocate of not judging and making assumptions about people, but Ardilla goes ahead and just does this?? 2) why is my question any different than anyone elses? Why am I singled out and rebuked?? Everyone is asking questions because they don't have the answers...

I don't want the above question answered... I'll give Ardilla a benefit of a doubt that she/he was just making a rookie mistake and was just using a "cop out" instead of attempting to answer my question for whatever the reason. (I'm sorry my question was not of particular interest to you or a priority and you were looking for a reason to simply not answer it... but you don't have to go on your high horse and incorrectly scold me.. sheesh).

NOW BACK TO THE REAL QUESTION:

The reason I'm curious about Muslim women and prayer leadership (is not for a research paper -- like Ardilla Feroz ignorantly assumes) it's because I have a few Muslim friends, and we got into this conversation about whether or not the Quran states either way whether or not Muslim women should be prayer leaders. And not having the knowledge, I did not know what to say. I just want to be able to discuss this with my progressive Muslim friends in an educated fashion. And I wanted to get an idea what people in general thought?

For instance, I know that in our church... women can't be bishops because they don't have the priesthood... but this is because only men have the priesthood... but if there isn't the priesthood in Islam or true authority (from our view) -- should we care whether or not a woman is a prayer leader for a congregation of men/women? Why would we think it's inappropriate? Why would we deny a woman the ability/opportunity to do this? Does the Quran specifically advise against women doing this? Are there sections in the Quran that would support women being a prayer leader? How would you ground your opinion and express this to your religious Muslim, but (with a progressive outlook) friends?

Thanks,

Inquisitive Immam (Round Two)

A:

Dear Inquisitive Isis,

As to why I felt you were gathering material for a research paper: 

There's a BYU class on Islam doing a research paper on fatwas that relate to women this semester. True, Sage was the person to directly mention the paper, but when you also ask for scholarly sources, stating "I'm trying to think of a good fatwa question" regarding "ISIS or al-Qaeda and women’s martyrdom' not two weeks after Sage first popped the question, it seems just a tad suspicious. Mere days later, you're interested in topics related to women and Islam again. You are interested in being better educated about it for personal reasonswhich is goodbut you're not really interested in doing that research yourself? Forgive me if I remain skeptical. 

It's OK. We can agree to disagree. No hard feelings, OK? 
Fluffy bunny hug,

--Ardilla Feroz 

A:

Dear Round, 

First of all, I don't think any of us are experts on Islam. I would be surprised if any of us have even read that Qu'ran (if anyone has, kudos). If you are looking to us for expert opinions or knowledge of the Islam, than we may not be the best people to ask. Given that, I think Ardilla does have a good point, though we do appreciate your faith in our all-knowing abilities. 

I don't know if Islamic women should be imams or not based on actual Islamic doctrine. From my research though, some islamic sects, both in and out of the Arab world, consider it okay and others don't. The debate is largely due to a dispute concerning the spirit of the Qu'ran and the letter of a disputed hadith that indicates that women should be able to lead mixed congregations as well as single-sex ones and whether the prohibition of this developed as a result of sexism in the medieval environment and patriarchal interpretations of religious texts that are not part of or reflective of true Islam.

Personally, I don't see anything inherently wrong in women leading prayer meetings or women being imams. However, I am not a Muslim and I do not believe that such tenets are revelation are from God, so I can easily disagree (or agree) with them on this. If I were Muslim, I think I would feel the same about this question as I do about women having the priesthood: while there isn't anything inherently wrong with it God made things the way they are and that is why this is or isn't so. But I guess that is a big difference between Islam and the LDS Church--we believe in modern revelation from a modern prophet to clarify these things or answer our questions, while they do not.  

I hope my humble and uninformed opinion is helpful. If you really are interested in this stuff you really ought to try doing some more personal research. You will probably be able to form the opinions and get the information you want by doing that. Here are some potentially helpful resources for you. Also, you could try talking to Ryan Combs, the research librarian for Islam, or Mauro Proprezi, who teaches "Islam and the Gospel." 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Question #79676 posted on 10/29/2014 8:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

If I I agree to help someone with English in exchange for receiving help with his first language, how do I make this helpful and enjoyable for both of us? What kind of things do people normally do when they help each other out with languages? How technical should I get? How nervous should I be about helping someone with their English? I'm not particularly knowledgable in the technical aspects of it (aka identifying dangling participles or rules and such). How do I remedy that nervousness?

Thanks,
bad at my second language

A:

Dear learner,

In my experience, the best thing you can do is talk to him and have him talk to you. It can be about absolutely anything. When he says something that's grammatically incorrect, point it out and tell him what the correct thing is. When he says something that's technically correct but sounds really weird, point that out too and give him an alternative. If you can explain the exact grammar rules behind it, that's great. If not, that's fine.

When you were a toddler learning to talk, nobody taught you any rules about verb conjugations or dangling participles or how to make plurals. You learned by listening, by trying, and by being corrected when you were wrong. Formal grammar came later. To illustrate it in a slightly different way, when I was fresh off my mission, I could explain the rules of Spanish grammar in intricate detail. My mastery of the rules of English grammar was significantly less impressive. And yet, my grammar when actually speaking English was far, far better than my grammar when speaking Spanish.

My guess is that this friend of yours wants a conversation partner so he can learn conversation, not grammar. Just focus on understanding what he's trying to say and then teaching him how to make his language understandable, and I think you'll do a great job.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #79620 posted on 10/29/2014 8:20 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I've seen a few late night ads on TV showing elderly people who can no longer walk up/down their stairs, purchasing and then using some sort of contraption where they actually sit on a seat and the seat goes up and down stairs. It's the idea of an elevator but takes up a whole lot less space. I'm curious, though, how much weight can this special seat hold?

-Red Skeleton

A:

Dear Red,

They are called stair lifts. Of the few I looked up, they all had different weight limits. One heavy duty chair was able to accommodate up to 500 pounds, while another could only hold 249 pounds. The weight limit just depends on the brand and style of the chair. 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #79660 posted on 10/29/2014 7:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why does the White House's wall/fence keep getting breached by crazy people? Is it really that easy to hop over the fence? Are they being copy-cats by thinking "hey, if it's easy... I'll give it a shot too." What's your opinion? Is our security that bad? Or are these random crazies just that good?

-Inquisitive Imam

A:

Dear Inquisitive,

I think a lot of people miss one rather important point.  If we wanted to make it difficult to get from the sidewalk to the White House we could, very easily.  Razor wire fences, concrete barriers, layers of electrified fencing, guard dogs, and armed guards every 10 feet.  No one would make it over the fence or remotely close to the building.  But that's not what we want the most visible symbol of our government to look like.  That would look like the home of a tin-pot military dictator.  The Secret Service has to strike a careful balance between security and appearance.

The public relations aspect of their job is made more difficult due to the preference for not exposing everything they do (though the high-profile scandals haven't helped).  The recent fence hopper who made it into the building may sound bad, but not if you consider the risk management proposition the guards need to work under.  One person, no baggage, no apparent weapon, and the President is not present.  This presents basically zero risk to the nation.  Keeping the situation cool was a very appropriate response even if it meant the person got further into the building than desirable.  Now, I would be concerned if the situation were a person hopping the fence with a large backpack at the same time the President were exiting the building.  And, in such a situation, I would actually be amazed if the person made it more than 2 steps before something dramatic happened.

It's not that random crazies are "that good," it's that random crazies present almost zero risk and it would be a public relations disaster to start gunning down mentally ill people who decide to hop the fence.

-Curious Physics Minor


0 Comments
Question #79679 posted on 10/29/2014 4:08 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So...tell me if I'm weird here. The look of my acne doesn't bother me--it's actually not that bad, mostly just smaller blackheads. But the FEELING of all that dirt and grime and nastiness PUSHING up and out from underneath/in my skin is DISGUSTING! I feel like I have to pop and pick at my blackheads to get the crap OUT...but of course , you never get all of it that way and I can still FEEL it just festering.

It feels like no amount of washing, no amount of skin care products, no amount of popping, and no amount of facials will actually get my skin CLEAN. Is there really not a magic button I can just push to get my skin clean? I'll even take acne scars--ANYTHING to just feel like my face is clean for once since puberty. Is there anything I can do?? Is this all in my head and just a weird manifestation of OCD?


-Your mom's name here

A:

Dear yo' grandma's name there,

I'm not a skin doctor, but a dermatologist is. She can help you figure out whether your fascination with epidermal cleanliness is more medical or mental. Visit one. I know it's not cheap, but I really think it might be worth the investment for you.

Really, I've had problems with acne for years and visiting made all the difference. Interestingly, my doctor informed me my acne breakout at the time had actually worsened because I'd been scrubbing my face too hard and too long with one of those harsh microbead-containing face washes. After doing what he told me, my skin is doing pretty good. At his recommendation, I now use gentler Cetaphil soap to wash my face. While my skin isn't perfect by any means, it's better than it was.

Paz,

--Ardilla Feroz


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