"Women can tell you how many degrees (Fahrenheit and Celsius, to say nothing of Kelvin) it was outside." -Optimistic. on first kisses
Question #79613 posted on 10/24/2014 1:02 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

1) What you were most passionate about a year ago?
2) What are you most passionate about now?
3) Why is it different or why is it still the same?

Lone Ranger

A:

Dear TARDIS,

  1. I was the most passionate about getting over a break-up. It was an experience that I'm still learning from.
  2. My chosen career path, as well as finding what my passions are in life.
  3. It's different because it's been a year. I've moved on with my life, and I found things that I can really enjoy about life, even without a significant other.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear kemosabe,

1) Halloween or my then-fiancée (it's a toss-up).

2) Have I mentioned that I made a tiny person and he's coming next month? I think maybe I've mentioned it.

3) Just look at that face.

IMG_2768.JPG

-Inverse Insomniac

A:

Dear Wade,

1) Comic books
2) Comic books
3) Because I never really grew up

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Ranger,

1) Taking over the world.

2) Taking over the world and renaming it Concordia.

3) Why limit myself? 

-Concorde

A:

Dear Lone Ranger,

A year ago I was passionate about frantically trying to cut myself loose from the many things I'd committed myself to doing in order to hopefully be able to catch up on school and pull out of my academic nosedive. Alas, the plan was enacted too late and life for the rest of the semester does not elicit positive memories.

I'm still over-committed to things a year later, but this time I'm passionate about trying to keep my mental health good enough to hopefully avoid a repeat of last year. Bleargh. 

Why's it so similar? While I'd like to think I've changed radically upon the discovery of my little personal epiphanies, I think lasting character change is probably more gradual than I think it is. And that's OK.

--Ardilla Feroz 


0 Comments
Thursday, October 23, 2014
Question #79611 posted on 10/23/2014 10:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I was reading a book in old english and at the end of a letter the person signed it as &c. What is this an abbreviation for? What does it mean?
Thanks!

-reader

A:

Dear Reader,

It used to be widely used as an abbreviation for signing one's name on a letter, particularly when the identity of the writer was already well established between the correspondents. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 

A:

Dear reader,

It literally means "and the rest," from the Latin et cetera. "Et" means "and", so it is sometimes replaced with the ampersand symbol for "and," while "cetera" is abbreviated to a c.

Although I'm sure Heidi Book can tell us more.

-Owlet

A:

Dear reader,

As Owlet explained, &c. is an abbreviation for "et cetera," and as The Soulful Ginger indicated, it was once widely used when signing one's name. European monarchs were especially prolific users of such a signature; their titles were so long that writing them out would take all morning, For example, Tzar Nicolas II's full title was

"We, Nicholas the Second, by the grace of God, Emperor and Autocrat of all the Russias, of Moscow, Kiev, Vladimir, Novgorod, Tsar of Kazan, Tsar of Astrakhan, King of Poland, Tsar of Siberia, Tsar of Tauric Chersonesos, Tsar of Georgia, Lord of Pskov, and Grand Duke of Smolensk, Lithuania, Volhynia, Podolia, and Finland, Prince of Estonia, Livonia, Courland and Semigalia, Samogitia, Białystok, Karelia, Tver, Yugra, Perm, Vyatka, Bulgaria, and other territories; Lord and Grand Duke of Nizhny Novgorod, Chernigov; Ruler of Ryazan, Polotsk, Rostov, Yaroslavl, Beloozero, Udoria, Obdoria, Kondia, Vitebsk, Mstislav, and all northern territories; Ruler of Iveria, Kartalinia, and the Kabardinian lands and Armenian territories; hereditary Ruler and Lord of the Cherkess and Mountain Princes and others; Lord of Turkestan, Heir of Norway, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein, Stormarn, Dithmarschen, Oldenburg." [1]

The poor guy would've been lucky to remember half of the provinces over which he was lord, duke, or heir, let alone how to spell them or what order they came in. Plus, signing his name like that would have used up an extra roll of parchment each time. So instead, he often simply wrote, "We, Nicholas II, By the Grace of God, Emperor and Autocrat of All the Russias, King of Poland, Grand Duke of Finland, &c., &c., &c." [2]

Sometimes, although less commonly, the entire signature was replaced by &c. It wasn't used just in the Old English period, however - I first encountered it in high school when I began reading Romantic and Victorian novels like A Tale of Two Cities and Jane Eyre, where it is often used to extend lists or end letters.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

P.S. My signature comes from Pride and Prejudice, in which Jane often concludes her letters to Elizabeth with "Yours, &c." I assume that here the "&c." cuts down a phrase like "Sincerely yours, with much affection, and wishing you the best."  I don't have any evidence for that theory, though. 


0 Comments
Question #79609 posted on 10/23/2014 7:14 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is "Never Nude" a real psychological disorder?

-SEAN (everyone's friend, including Megan's, Scott's, etc.....)

A:

Dear Wade,

Kind of. Gymnophobia is really the fear of nudity but it's not exactly like the condition portrayed in Arrested Development.

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #79607 posted on 10/23/2014 7:02 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have you've ever blamed losing an item on "accidentally dropping it between the crack of an elevator door"? OR have you've ever actually dropped something important down it? Good stories?!

--Kool-Aid Man Smashing through a Brick Wall

P.S. Oh-yeaaaaah

A:

Dear Kool-Aid,

One time I had to deliver sandwiches to Beyoncé before a concert and I had to take an elevator to her dressing room. I had to sprint across the freeway to get to the place she was performing and as I got in the elevator I was gasping for breath and freaking out that I was about to meet Beyoncé so I dropped the receipt for her order on the floor, and then I tried to nudge it with my foot and ended up pushing it right through the crack between the floor and the elevator and that's the story of the time Beyoncé gave me a fifty for a twenty dollar order because I couldn't remember what the cost was and my hands were sweaty and I think I threw up a little. 

-Concorde

A:

Dear Wall,

I have a friend that dropped his phone down the crack of an elevator. That's the same friend that borrowed my Kindle and then lost it. Also the same friend that would wear a kilt to school every Friday and play the bagpipes during lunch. Also the friend that baked cream puffs with me for seminary.

Ah, high school. Good times.

-Owlet


0 Comments
Question #79606 posted on 10/23/2014 6:56 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Is there a LDS church policy on men donating sperm to a sperm bank?

-Sage

A:

Dear Wade,

Yes. Marguerite St. Just addressed this in a previous question. From Official Handbook 2, "The Church strongly discourages the donation of sperm."

-M.O.D.A.Q.


0 Comments
Question #79605 posted on 10/23/2014 6:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So we believe in equality..... but.... where do the women who drive garbage trucks go to the bathroom during their work shifts? They can't just pull of their route and use a gas station's? Are they? Is there a procedure?

--Kool-Aid Man Smashing through a Brick Wall

P.S. Oh-yeaaaaah

A:

Dear Wall Smasher,

Gas stations have girl's bathrooms...

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger 


0 Comments
Question #79604 posted on 10/23/2014 6:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Have you or anyone you know actually, truly spot a worm in your apple? I've never seen this, but it seems well known and depicted in images all over.

How does the worm get in the apple without leaving a hole? Or do they....

--Kool-Aid Man Smashing through a Brick Wall

P.S. Oh-yeaaaaah

A:

Dear man,

It used to be much more common than it is now. Worms will typically enter through the bottom of the apple, at the place where the bud used to be, so it might not be terribly noticeable. You never see this happen because you buy pesticide-treated apples at the grocery store. However, if you were to grow your own apples without treating the tree with pesticide, you'll get very familiar with the sight of worm-ridden apples.

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #79602 posted on 10/23/2014 6:38 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Why can't I save Word Documents with colons :::::::::: in them? I mean, when I'm writing a paper on Judges 1:1-6 or Nephi 2:4, how do I indicate the colons? What is the reason for excluding the use of colons in naming a file in Word in the first place?! Shed any light?

-Fossilized Typewriter

A:

Dear Great Intelligence,

One of the main reasons you can't use some of the characters for naming files is because colons are used as part of the file path, and if there were colons where there weren't supposed to be, it'd mess the computer up.

I'd suggest using words, naming it something like "Judges 1 Verses 1 to 6" or something like that.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Ft.,

Tally's explanation is correct. I'm going to give you a slightly incorrect analogy that will hopefully help you understand the problem better. Have you ever heard Abbott and Costello's "Who's On First" routine? Putting a colon in a file name messes with your computer's internal navigation system in exactly the same way that naming a baseball player "Who" or "What" messes with a fan's understanding. Rather than coming up with some convoluted way to get around that, your computer just bans players from being named "Who."

-yayfulness


0 Comments
Question #79550 posted on 10/23/2014 3:44 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

So this is my whiny background/sob story:
I started byu as pre animation and got a 4.0 in all of my required pre-requisites. I had almost a 4.0 in my other classes and my portfolio was good enough to get me accepted to Cal Arts, RISD, and SCAD...but I still didn't get accepted as a full blown BYU animation student. Thankfully, I applied to some "backup" schools even though a good amount of them may be considered better than byu's program. I just really liked byu's tuition price and it's a respectable program. Also, Mormons are nice to be around. My sob story turns less "sobby" because I'm now studying at Cal Arts. Although I'm greatful, it still is kind of lame because it is WAY more expensive AND I feel like I wasted my money/time at byu since not all of the pre-requisites transferred. Also, it's kind of a blow to my trust in people to get rejected by the same people who were giving me A's. I guess the best grade you can get it still not good enough.

And these are my questions:
Why is the animation program at byu so difficult to get in to? Why are animation teachers giving out A's to students they don't want in the program? If so many get rejected, why doesn't byu expand the program? Is the admissions decision political? Do you have to be related to Brigham Young himself? Or sacrifice your firstborn to the head of the department?

-Rejected(ish)

A:

Dear you,

Some of my thoughts:

I sent your question to a friend in the animation major to get her thoughts. 

Regarding getting in, she made the following comments:

It's highly competitive, I had A's too when I was rejected [she has since been admitted.] It doesn't matter if you're good, you need to be in the top 25. that's really hard to do. A's don't mean you'll make it in.... In general, grade don't matter in the animation program. Some teachers have said getting bad grades in your other classes is worth it for your portfolio. So yeah, they don't care at all if he had a 4.0.

She also commented that very few people actually get in on their first application (she didn't.) She also commented on a holistic aspect of the application. She mentioned that after she actually spoke to faculty after her second rejection and late acceptance, and said that "They take more than your portfolio, they take into account you as a person, do you pull your own weight, will you keep on going when the senior film is almost done and everyone has given up, do you work well in a team..."

Political decisionmaking?

My friend rejected the idea that decisions are political. I certainly don't have the inside line on admissions in the animation department. However, I'm guessing that it's a combination of yes and no. There are probably certain situations where having the right connections helps you. To a certain extent, many things in life are about who you know; it can be an important or even crucial part of the holistic decision-making process. That being said, I do think it's only a part of the process. Holistic doesn't mean ignoring everything except the political. I'm guessing that the goal of the department is not to further internal politics, but to admit the students that they believe are best matched to succeed in the program.

Why not expand?

My friend commented that there's money to expand. I'll point out that although BYU may have a substantial budget, individual departments are going to be limited in what they can do. Furthermore, while it may sometimes be in the school's best interest to encourage expansion, there are other factors at work here than a large number of competitive or qualified applicants. For example, a larger program requires a larger number of professors. Apart from being expensive, this also presents recruiting difficulties. Getting high-quality professors for niche programs may not always be easy, and settling for lower-quality instructors may bring the whole program down. 

My thoughts:

It stinks to get rejected from things. However, it's important to remember that a) things like this are holistic. It's not just about whether you're good enough to do animation anywhere, it's about whether you have the particular qualities that any given institution is looking for. This may vary between institutions and lead to some people getting rejected at A and accepted at B and others getting accepted at B and rejected at A. This process can be somewhat subjective and can involve "matching" to an institutions particular desires and not just skill or qualifications measured more objectively.

Congratulations getting into your other programs and on finding ways to pursue your dream. Remember that rejections like this are not a reflection on your character or a judgment of your worth.

Good luck,

~Anne, Certainly


0 Comments
Question #79600 posted on 10/23/2014 2:38 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

In doing Family History, I see the names of different places that my ancestors have lived in. Is there anywhere online I can go to see on a map of that time period where that spot is? And also what that spot is called now? What about a mapping tool so I can get a map that shows where that ancestor went?

-Family History adventurer

A:

Dear Cinnamon,

I'm not sure if this is exactly what you're looking for, but rootsmapper.com has at least some of the capabilities you mentioned. Definitely check it out.

I hope this helps.

-Marguerite St. Just


0 Comments
Posted on 10/23/2014 1:13 p.m. New Comment on: #79596 I'm looking for some cooking classes in Salt Lake County...but all I can find are one-off ...
Posted on 10/23/2014 1 p.m. New Comment on: #79599 During the Utah State game, one of the refs got caught up in a tackle and ...
Question #79597 posted on 10/23/2014 10:56 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My dad just said, "You have to have mental issues to think Studio C is funny." I pretty much agree. I saw them perform at the Stadium of Fire this year. I told my mom that it seemed as if 5th graders wrote the scripts. She replied with, "No, more like 2nd graders." So...why do people like them? WHO likes them? Is it pretty much just "provolones"?...hopefully...

-Brenton, FBI wannabe

A:

Dear Brenton, 

I take serious issue with your dad's casual usage of mental issues as a method of measurement here, so just as an FYI, that kind of talk isn't cool. 

That being said, I do not like Studio C and I've worked on the set several times and know Matt Meese fairly well. I simply do not find them funny and I think that their humor is very basic and relies on childish elements, which is why I get a bit confused when college aged students find them funny. I understand children being big fans, considering the fact that Studio C is targeted towards children, but that's about it. I did watch a few episodes with Tally once, trying to see if I would like it, but I just didn't like it. I love Divine Comedy because it's unpolished and rough and I'm not distracted by fancy sets, props and costumes. Studio C is Divine Comedy stripped of those aspects. 

One of my current places of work is fairly involved with Meese and is often utilized by Studio C. When kids come to my place of work, I find that a large amount of children are familiar with the show and absolutely delighted by it and anything to do with it. I think it's good that children have access to clean comedy, but I think the fact that the actors are Mormon makes them seem more real and approachable to Mormon kids, which feeds the obsession. There's also the fact that Mormon culture is an echo chamber. We get ridiculous and weird about well known people within our religion and I have no idea why, but when I'm being my usual cranky self, I get irritated over it. 

-Concorde

A:

Dear Wade,

Setting aside my personal opinions on sketch comedy, Studio C's "clean comedy" reaches a niche demographic of young children as well as older members of society.

This really reminds me of the discussion between Jerry and George about Bania on Seinfeld.

George: So what, he's got a couple of good jokes.

Jerry: Like what, Ovaltine? Why do dogs drink out of the toilet? Shopping carts with one bad wheel?

George: That's true, that always happens to me.

Jerry: You think that's funny?

George: I don't know, I like stuff you don't have to think about too much.

Jerry: You like Bania's act. You're a closet Bania fan!

George: Maybe I am.

Jerry: Oh, I'm gonna puke.

George: Puke! That's a funny word. Puke. Puke! Don't have to think about that.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Brenton,

Personally, I think Studio C is funny for what it is. It's just supposed to be goofy sketch comedy. In my opinion, we're exposed to too much media and as a result, we're desensitized. People can't just enjoy simple humor anymore—it has to be Colbert or Saturday Night Live or else it's just garbage. I will grant that I like probably only 50% of Studio C's sketches, but some of them are really funny.

-Inverse Insomniac, who lives in the echo chamber

A:

Dear Eleven,

I like Studio C. Mostly for the satire and parodies of current events.

I'm sorry you think I'm stupid.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear FBI,

I like Studio C because it's simple humor. I don't have to put thought into the jokes or sketches, they're just silly. 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #79570 posted on 10/23/2014 10:02 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I have always thought that following the teachings of the church were sufficient to make me a good person. Recently I have been reading a book about communication. This book seems to have a lot of ideas that would make me a better spouse that have never been taught to me in church. On my mission we were also taught how to better understand and overcome concerns that investigators had. This was not doctrine related, but more like something I think you would find in a sales seminar.

My question is what non LDS book, class, organization, group, etc. have you read, taken, joined, or belonged to that has helped you become a better person?

I am looking for suggestions that are in line with Our Very survival by Kevin R. Duncan. From his talk:

"This world is full of so many self-help books, so many self-proclaimed experts, so many theorists, educators, and philosophers who have advice and counsel to give on any and all subjects. With technology today, information on a myriad of subjects is available with the click of a keystroke. It is easy to get caught in the trap of looking to the “arm of flesh” for advice on everything from how to raise children to how to find happiness. While some information has merit, as members of the Church we have access to the source of pure truth, even God Himself. We would do well to search out answers to our problems and questions by investigating what the Lord has revealed through His prophets. With that same technology today, we have at our fingertips access to the words of the prophets on nearly any subject."

-Seeker of Wisdom

A:

Dear Doctor,

I've found that The People Code by Taylor Hartman has been beneficial in my life. It's not a panacea, certainly, but it's helped me to understand those around me better and to better interact with them. It's also helped me to better understand myself and figure out specific areas to improve on.

-Tally M.

A:

Dear Wade,

Read 10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found Self-Help That Actually Works - A True Story.

-M.O.D.A.Q.

A:

Dear Wisdom,

If you have the chance, you might like to skim The Five Languages of Love. There are obviously all kind of exceptions and considerations you need to take into account, but the realization that different people appreciate different things is super important. I also liked Malcolm Gladwell's book Blink because it helped me analyze the way I make choices.

-Owlet

A:

Dear congratulations, you found it,

I love love love Difficult Conversations and How to Win Friends and Influence People. Also, I use the Worst-Case Survival Handbook almost daily.

-Provider of Wisdom


0 Comments
Question #79599 posted on 10/23/2014 6:32 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

During the Utah State game, one of the refs got caught up in a tackle and left the field injured. Did they continue the game being one ref down? Or do they, as a matter of practice and precaution, have substitute officials standing by in case someone gets hurt? Also, does anyone know how he is doing? I never heard any follow up on how badly he was injured.

Sad fan that just got home from the Nevada game

A:

Dear there are no happy pandas,

It's a matter of standard procedure to have a backup referee or two in a game to officiate in the uncommon but eventual cases when a referee is injured. While this is unfortunate, it does give backup referees a chance to do what they've trained to do for years and officiate a game.  

As for the ref from the Nevada game, I also don't know how he's doing. Considering the gobs of cash made in football, I would hope he receives adequate medical care. Ladies and gentleman, let's have a moment of silence for the man in the monochrome and pay it forward by not cussing out the ref at the next event we attend when he does his job and referees, particularly if we don't agree. 

Cheers!

 --Ardilla Feroz


1 Comment
Question #79598 posted on 10/23/2014 2:26 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm feeling really down right now because I just went on an awesome date last night with a girl from my ward, but then tonight at a movie night I saw her holding hands with another guy. I think I've seen her do something like this before; I am shy and Super Prude so holding hands and other signs of physical affection are serious to me and imply a strong level of commitment, but apparently not for her. I think she's a great person but I'm not sure if I can get over this or pursue dating her any more.

We aren't seriously dating yet but I feel kind of "betrayed" because I am saving those gestures so that they'll actually MEAN something when I kiss my gf, hold her hand, etc. I understand that if I really want to date this girl I might have to meet her halfway by speaking her lingo, so to speak, but I'm not sure I'm willing to do that.

Advice?

-Cyrano

A:

Dear Nine,

Just because you feel the date went really well does not mean that she felt it went really well; I've been on both sides of the story. Additionally, the guy could've held her hand without her necessarily wanting it, she could have been interested primarily in him to begin with, or there's a number of other reasons for them holding hands.

Don't assume that she's not "saving" her gestures. Don't assume anything. If you're really interested in her, ask her out again, and then figure out if she's interested from there.

-Tally M.


0 Comments
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
Posted on 10/22/2014 10:32 p.m. New Comment on: #79588 It really bothers me that a man can find a woman really attractive because I am ...
Posted on 10/22/2014 10:32 p.m. New Comment on: #79568 Dear All-Knowing Magic Board, As I was looking through some old questions, I always felt that ...
Question #79596 posted on 10/22/2014 8:50 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I'm looking for some cooking classes in Salt Lake County...but all I can find are one-off classes (as in, you pay once to go to a sugar cookie class at Harmons one night, and have to pay again to take another class on fish fillets). I'm hoping I can find something that lasts for six weeks or something.

Back home our city sponsors a ton of classes for everything from ballroom dance to pottery and cooking weeks at a time. Do any of the cities in the area have something like that...? Or are there some culinary schools that do community classes?

-Here, My Name Is

A:

Dear Is My Name Here,

I haven't been able to find anything that sounds like the community-sponsored classes you mentioned. There's a plethora of places offering one-off classes and a number of places offering one-year culinary programs, but nothing on a six-week basis. The University of Utah does have a three-week course in outdoor cooking and camping, though. 

My suggestion would be to watch the continuing education course catalogs at the Salt Lake City School District for updated offerings at the beginning of each new academic semester. They seem the likeliest to organize the sort of experience you're seeking. Provo does some interesting recurring classes on a regular basis. You also might find cooking kindred spirits through a Meetup group in your area. Additionally, consider approaching your church leaders (Relief Society President/Elder's Quorum President if you are LDS) to see if someone would be willing to teach a few classes in their home. Chances are you're not the only one in the neighborhood who wants to pick up a few new tricks.

Good luck in your culinary quest,

--Ardilla Feroz


1 Comment
Question #79595 posted on 10/22/2014 7:14 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

My birthday is coming up, yay! Unforunately, my car needs presents more than I do. My in-laws live very far away from my husband and me, so they usually buy me an Amazon gift card for my birthday or Christmas. However, I'd rather have that money go towards my "fix my car so it'll pass emissions" fund. Is there a tactful way to ask for a check instead of a gift card? Should I just be blunt and tell them I need the money?

-Birthday lady

A:

Dear Lady,

First, happy birthday! Second, I don't think there's anything wrong with being direct. Whenever I have to pluck up the courage to ask for a favor, my formula is more or less as follows:

  1. Gratitude (I appreciate so much that...)
  2. Background (You see, I've been having this problem...)
  3. Gratitude (Thanks for the last time...)
  4. Request (Do you think you could...?)
  5. Gratitude (You've been so kind to me...)
  6. Apology (I'm really sorry to inconvenience you...)
  7. Gratitude (But thank you so much, you've really made my day...)

This approach is probably a little over the top. I need to get over myself and be better at letting people serve me, but I feel so bad whenever I have to ask a favor that I get a little too effusive. I over-thank and over-apologize. You don't have to do that. Gratitude is always a good way to start, but you can simply explain your dilemma, thank your in-laws for their kindness, and ask if they can send you money as cash instead of a gift card. Most people are less sensitive than we think they are; if your in-laws are reasonable people, they won't feel remotely offended by a request like that.

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book

A:

Dear Birthday,

While I'm sure you're in-laws will be happy to help you out with your car, if they insist on sending you an Amazon gift card, you can sell it online at Gift Card Granny for some cash.

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #79301 posted on 10/22/2014 6:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Are any of you guys able to find the floor plans of the St. Mark's Chapel, St. Andrew's Chapel, or Chapel of Epiphany on the UBC campus in Vancouver, Canada? If it's not online -- would you mind emailing the churchs' staff for the floor plans? I tried to email the various staffs, but I don't have outlook so it just disappears... Anyway, can you find and direct me to these floor plans? All or any of their floor plans would be great! But remember, the chapel building (not the student residences/halls).

An odd request, I know. But there is some architectural skills being put to practice for an architect class of mine!

-Art

A:

Dear Art,

Unfortunately, I've run into the same problems you have. My emails were not returned and my online research has been less than successful. I even combed through all the public files in their digital collections with no results.  Since the Internet failed me, I recruited Sheebs to actually call UBC but they have yet to return her phone call. 

If Sheebs or I ever hear back from them, we will post it in a comment! 

-Ms.O'Malley


0 Comments
Question #79579 posted on 10/22/2014 3:33 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

I recently read Angry Conversations with God: A Snarky but Authentic Spiritual Memoir by Susan Isaacs. A few times throughout the book she mentions that there are more women Christians than men. If so, what's the percentage of Christian women to Christian men (in America...or worldwide)? Why are men less likely to consider themselves Christian?

-Christmas Cactus

A:

Dear Christmas Cactus,

So I found this fascinating website that you should all check out. Numbers, facts, and trends shaping your world.

The page on Religious Affiliation and Demographic Groups says the following: 

The Landscape Survey finds that men are significantly more likely to claim no religious affiliation than are women. Nearly one-in-five (19.6%) men have no formal religious affiliation, almost seven points more than women, 12.8% of whom say they are unaffiliated. Moreover, men are twice as likely to say they are atheist or agnostic as compared with women (5.5% vs. 2.6%).

The graph below that tells us that 74.2% of American men identify as Christian, compared to 82.4% of American woman. Unfortunately, there's no simple explanation for why more women are religious than men. Most sources suggest that it doesn't have to do with biology but rather with traditional gender roles[1][2], but there is at least some evidence that it is due to men's inherent predisposition to take risks[3].

Yours, &c.

Heidi Book


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Question #79590 posted on 10/22/2014 3:32 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

It's my birthday! Any birthday advice/presents/quotes/songs you want to give me?

Thanks!
-Elly

A:

Happy Birthday, Elly!

Sorry we missed the special occasion. To make it up to you, here's a purple sweet potato.

purple-potato.jpg (source)

Take it to the world's largest Bunny Museum in Pasadena and give our furry friends a tasty treat.

Felicitaciones,

--Ardilla Feroz 

A:

Dear L.E.

Bonne fête à toi! Bonne fête à toi! Bonne fête chère Elly... Bonne fête à toi! (sung to the tune of "Happy Birthday")

Not to be outdone by l'écureuil feroce, here is a picture of a chicken nugget shaped like Abe Lincoln:

Abe Chicken.jpg(Source)

Although it's not your birthday any more,

-Inverse Insomniac


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Question #79561 posted on 10/22/2014 3:26 p.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,

Can any of you tell me about the Ryde? Is it reliable? Is it worth the money? I'm away from BYU this semester and will need a way to get to and from campus when I get back, and hadn't even heard about the Ryde until this year. I've looked at the website and read all the information provided there. I've also liked their Facebook page. I guess I'm just looking for opinions. I'm a little concerned by the fact that people have posted questions on their Facebook page and received no answers. It seems that nobody has kept up their page since 2012. Is the Ryde even still operating? Any reviews or recent information would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

-Purple Crayon

A:

Dear Crayon,

I loved using the Ryde my freshman and sophomore years. It was super convenient to be picked up right at my apartment and be dropped off on campus. The busses where consistently on time and they were never too crowded for me. Even after I had a car, it was worth the $100 so that I didn't have to fight for a parking spot on campus or walk up 900 E during a snowstorm. The only downside for me is that I had to walk pretty quickly to get from the MOA to my classes in the MCKB. 

Also, apologies for holding this over and thanks Ardilla for picking up my slack!

-Ms.O'Malley

A:

Dear Rhymes with Orange,

I called the Ryde today and they informed me they're still up and running. They told me their Wyview, Wymount and King Henry routes are running as usual, and as their Glenwood stop is on the Wyview route I'm almost positive it's also being serviced. You mentioned you're away from campus this semester; for the benefit of other readers I'll also mention as of November 1, 2014, the Ryde will be selling a handful of discounted passes on the Wyview route at $60 apiece that are good for the remainder of fall semester. You know, if black ice and slushy sidewalks aren't really your thing.

As an alternative to the Ryde, you can consider a student UTA bus pass. Check your emails from the university as Winter semester approachesthey sometimes offer better student deals for semester-long passes. It's significantly more expensive but could be useful if you need public transit to get you places besides BYU.

Biking is another option, but don't forgetwinter. WINTER. WINTER. 

Paz,

--Ardilla Frozen


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Posted on 10/22/2014 1:24 p.m. New Comment on: #79587 I am a worrywart about everything. I see things in black and white. The stress of ...
Question #79568 posted on 10/22/2014 11:44 a.m.
Q:

Dear All-Knowing Magic Board,

As I was looking through some old questions, I always felt that posts asking questions that were already asked were a big waste of your time, but now as I search for a answer for my question, I hope I wasn't just searching with the wrong keywords. If I'm wasting your time, sorry!!!! :(((

I went to a dentist at Center and 400 West in Orem and, lo and behold!, across the street is a smaller Stonehenge! This founded a great idea of a fun date of "Around the World in 80 Minutes." That is, we will be going around the valley to different spots. So far I only have Stonehenge and Mt. Rushmore in Trafalga in mind. I know of a cheap little pirate ship in a park, but I was hoping for something more grand than a cheap little pirate ship in a park.

Can you list all model world monuments within a half hour radius to make my date possible? I'd prefer something specific, like Eastern Island heads or Eiffel Tower or the Great Wall or the Sydney Opera house and the like, not so much pirate ships or Chinese themed architecture, though if nothing else is available, I'd accept those too. :)

-Concerned Romantic

A:

Dear Concerned Romantic,

I am sorry, but several of these are not within half an hour distance from Provo, and they aren't really model world monuments, but they are very similar to places around the world. I hope this list is still useful to you.

Readers, feel free to comment if you have anything to add. 

Sincerely,
The Soulful Ginger  

A:

Dear concerned,

As a side note that is totally irrelevant to your main question, we really don't mind too much if you ask questions we've already answered. There are nearly 80,000 questions in the archives, many of them as much as a decade old. While we love it when you check the archives and save yourselves 100 hours, at the end of the day, we write for the Board because we love to hear ourselves talk. So, don't worry!

-yayfulness


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Question #79587 posted on 10/22/2014 10:08 a.m.
Q:

Dear 100 Hour Board,


I am a worrywart about everything. I see things in black and white. The stress of these two things is constant. How do I get better?


-worrier

A:

Dear you,

I wonder if you might be a perfectionist. I was told by someone that I was a perfectionist, and they explained to me that people who are perfectionists often don't self-identify because they think "Well, if I were a perfectionist, I would do things perfectly. I never do anything perfectly, so I must not be a perfectionist." This, of course, is bad logic: perfectionists hold themselves to unreasonable standards and then endure stress and anxiety when they cannot yet meet those standards.

I recommend reading Russell M Nelson's talk Perfection Pending, Cecil O Samuelson's What Does it Mean to Be Perfect, Gerrit W Gong's Becoming Perfect in Christ, and Stephen G Robinson's Believing Christ. They address what perfectionism is and may be helpful in dealing with the anxiety it causes.

Perfectionism distorts our perspective by creating a binary system of adequacy reliant solely upon us. Either we did something right or we sinned. Either we achieved something or we are failures. And each and every failure is taken as evidence that we are fundamentally not good enough and that we never will be because there is just too far to go. The Gospel becomes something that is sound in principle for other people, but won't work for us because we just can't seem to get it right. We worry because we perhaps unconsciously place our own perceptions onto the way we think about God and expect Him to be as harsh on us as we are on ourselves. This leads to worrying about every little thing that falls within our circle of control (and maybe some beyond as well).

How can we get better at not worrying and at not simply seeing things as sufficient or insufficient, black or white? I recommend the following:

  • Pray for help: This is a first step in overcoming any challenge; God wants to help us.
  • Study the scriptures, conference talks, and your patriarchal blessing: Ponder what it is God expects of you. What has he commanded? What has he left up to our choice? A story I've found meaningful tells of a man who prays and prays for an answer to a question. He prays for a long time, resolved to hold off on either path until he knows God's will. Eventually he hears a voice: it doesn't matter what color, just paint the fence! I think sometimes we worry so much about what color God wants the fence that we maybe don't realize that if he provided both of the available paint colors, he might be okay with either.
  • Consciously consider the difference between failure and sin: Remember that it is possible to mess up without having done something bad. Success does not make something morally praiseworthy, and failure after sincere preparation and effort is not a vice. Catch yourself in your evaluations and acknowledge when you're not being fair.
  • Remember your sphere of control: There are some things you can take care of and others you cannot. Do what you can for that which is in your control, and try to consciously trust God on the rest. Tell Him in prayer that it is hard for you, but that you are trying. Ask for help and peace.
  • Use the Atonement to overcome both failure and sin: Christ suffered not only for our sins but also so that he would understand our weaknesses.
  • Relax: This requires conscious effort. Take time daily to do something that relaxes you. Meditating, listening to classical music, stargazing, writing in a journal, playing music, writing poetry, going on a walk, washing dishes: there are a ton of ways to chill out. Think about what helps you and make time for it EVERY DAY. 
  • Remember the source of fear: It is not of God. God seeks for us to learn and grow and progress, not to be paralyzed by fear and guilt.

Good luck. You are a child of God, and He cares about you. Holding to that knowledge helps us move past difficulties and rest in confidence.

Love,

~Anne, Certainly


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